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LEE KARL ECKERT PORTFOLIO OF WORK


Lee Karl Eckert

P: 847.530.6153 E: eckert90@gmail.com W: linkedin.com/in/lkeckert

Biography

Lee Eckert is a young designer who is interested in working in a collaborative and innovative work environment. He has focused his career in three main areas: high performance buildings, user informed design, and collaborative work processes. Lee earned a Master of Architecture degree at the University of Oregon with a focus in ecological design and a Master of Integrated Design and Construction from Auburn University. He also earned a B.S. in Architecture from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He has worked for VITAL Environments, a user informed design firm in San Francisco. He also has earned a Second Place in the ASC National Open Graduate Competition, a Honorable Mention in the ASCA Fabric in Architecture Competition, Eagle Scout, and speedskated in the 2009 US Olympic Long Track Speedskating Trials.

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BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA EAGLE SCOUT AWARD

2009 US OLYMPIC TRIALS

LONG TRACK SPEEDSKATING

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A J

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UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN_MILWAUKEE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, ARCHITECTURE

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TALIESIN HISTORIC PRESERVATION DRAWING INITIATIVE HAB’S SURVEYOR/DRAFTER A J AUBURN UNIVERSITY

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VITAL ENVIRONMENTS DESIGNER J

GRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANT

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AUBURN UNIVERSITY

MASTER OF INTEGRATED DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

PASSIVE HOUSE RESEARCHER + CERTIFIED PASSIVE HOUSE CONSULTANT

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

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E


Taliesin East Historic Preservation Drawing(Spring Green, WI)


Table of Contents Collaborative Design

Cordova Market User Informed Design

Wikimedia Sync Spaces Community Theatre

Gillett Theatre Co.Lab Tensile Structure Project

[Re]Active Resort

Research + Fabrication

Habitat Radiant Wall Panel Fabrication

Fabricated Skin Collaborative Design

Industrial Heritage Center Historic Preservation

Taliesin HABS Drawings


Cordova Market

Cordova Market

Rebuilding a Community [Lee Eckert, Brandon Clarke + Cherilyn McCabe] Constructed in June 2013. Cordova is a small town in northwestern Alabama. Located in Walker County, Cordova is a truly multi-modal town with access to the Black Warrior River, active railroads, and interstate highways. During April of 2011, tornadoes tore apart the town and almost completely destroyed the city center of Cordova. For this project we developed a proposal for a market in Cordova, AL that included a building design, business plan, and conceptual cost estimate.

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Cordova Market

The Project Goals Access to Healthy Food

Problem: There is limited access to food in Cordova

Jasper, AL

Solution: Provide convenient access to healthy local food 1. Provide an accessible food supply

2. Bring local food to Cordova(CSA, farmers market) 3. Ensure that there are affordable and healthy food options

Cordova, AL

Dora, AL

Sumiton, AL

Improve Tax Base

Problem: Limited tax base after tornado Solution: Create a design that builds value for Cordova 1. Provide a design that is within budget

Legend Grocery Store Restaurants City Limits

2 mi 5 km

Streets

Before the Tornado

2. Create a building with low operating costs 3. Support local business Jasper, AL

Create a Community Focused Design Problem: Lack of community center

Solution: Focus on creating a community centric design 1. Create spaces for community events

Cordova, AL

2. Support fundraising in the city

Dora, AL

Sumiton, AL

3. Work with WIC, SNAP, and other food programs

Legend Grocery Store Restaurants 2 mi 5 km

City Limits Streets

After the Tornado

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Cordova Market

User Interviews + Studies

These characters represent the residents interviewed during a visit to Cordova, Alabama. They were created to help understand what is important to Cordova. This will impact the design of the new grocery store that will be constructed. The personas present different user types within Cordova that will shop at Cordova Market. This approach helped to inform the design about the goals, desires, and any limitations that the users may have had in regards to rebuilding. To help complete the personas we utilized techniques presented to us by Vital Environments, an architecture firm in San Francisco. This workshop helped us refine our interviewing skills and become active listeners in order to tell the residents stories in a concise manner. “I can’t stand it when the labels are in the wrong place.” Alan

User Circulation Paths Fruits, dairy and prepackaged items were common products in each cart.

Basic items such as toothpaste and toilet paper, helped make stores one stop shops for the community.

Each group used their discount card at the grocery store to save on their grocery bill.

Produce Was Visited First

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Nutritional value was more important to each group opposed to the price.

“I like to know the price of what I am buying.”

Alicia


Cordova Market

User Profiles Mother

Maggie

40-50 Year Old Female Married with Kids

Description: Maggie works for the city of Cordova as a County Clerk. She grew up in Cordova, and enjoys raising her kids in a small town atmosphere. Rather than driving a few blocks to go shopping, she has to plan ahead and travel the longer distance to Jasper. This has caused her to cook less and eat out more.

Owner

Elderly Person

Jim

75-85 Year Old Male Living in Elderly Home

Description: Jim is a high school graduate who has lived his whole life in Cordova. He used to live close to town and work within the city, but now lives in the elderly home that is close in proximity to the city. Jim enjoys spending time sitting on the bench in the store and being able to walk to the store on his own.

Dan

45-55 Year Old Male Married with Kids

Description: Dan is the owner of the Cordova Market. He is new to Cordova, being from Eufaula, Alabama, but has decided to move to Cordova and own/operate the Cordova Market. He wants his business to support the local economy and future growth in the area. He also is interested in healthy food options.

Shopping Habits Before the Storm: Visits/Week: 6 times, husband went twice Time Spent/Visit: 30-45 minutes How they got there: drove Where they live: 4 Blocks away Money Spent: $125/week What they bought? -Meat -Fresh produce -Everyday things(Milk, cereal, eggs)

Shopping Habits Before the Storm: Visits/Week: 6 times Time Spent/Visit: 60-120 minutes How they got there: drove Where they live: 4 Blocks away Money Spent: $45/week What they bought? -Fresh produce -Everyday things(Milk, cereal, eggs)

Shopping Habits Before the Storm: Visits/Week: 7 times Time Spent/Visit: 15-30 minutes How they got there: drove Where they live: 8 Blocks away What they bought? -Meat -Fresh produce -Everyday things -Health foods

Likes of Old Store/Needs of New Store: Likes: Familiarity of store and people, supported the community,

Likes of Old Store/Needs of New Store: Likes: Familiarity of store and people, supported the community,

Likes of Old Store/Needs of New Store: Likes: Familiarity of local residents, supported the community

Needs: Wants more selection including fresh fruit and seafood and the inclusion of a deli and bakery.

“The place was like family, the owners made the place”

Needs: Wants more selection including fresh fruit and seafood and the inclusion of a deli and bakery.

“The old men would sit on their bench on their little old pews”

Needs: Wants to give back, be profitable, and be closely connected to the community.

“We like businesses that support our community”

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Cordova Market

The Site

The goal of our project was to produce a locally sited and appropriately sized grocery store that will provide fresh groceries and produce to the residents and surrounding areas of Cordova. The store will distinguish itself through its close proximity to the downtown areas and the quality service that is focused on meeting community needs. It will also focus on supporting the local economy by raising tax revenue, and through the purchase of local food and the support of local groups such as the Cordova Blue Devils. The design of the Cordova Market is meant to transform what could otherwise be a ubiquitous store building into a transformative symbol of the future of Cordova. The Cordova Market is meant to efficiently use available funds in order to deliver a project that the city can afford and support, while also providing a valuable asset for the future of Cordova.

Typical Mid-Sized Grocery Store

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The Ideal Cordova Market


Cordova Market

Innovative Site/Building Features

To reduce the utility costs, a series of skylights have been added to light the sales floor of the grocery store. By paying a small price of approximately $7,000, the owner will save up to $108,342 over a 30 year period. The 20 ton HVAC system that we have selected will have a startup cost of $76,596 and the combined HVAC/Geothermal system’s startup cost will be $99,146. That is an additional $22,550 to the cost of the building, but the owner will save up to $312,486 over a 30 year period. Geothermal vs Typical HVAC Comparison

Geothermal vs Typical HVAC 30 Year Price Comparison $700,000

30 Year Price: $662,491

$600,000

$312,486 Saved

$500,000

$400,000

$300,000

ft 135

90f t

30 Year Price: $350,005

Payback: 3 years

$200,000

Geothermal System

30 Year Price: $99,146

$22,550

HVAC System

$100,000

30 Year Price: $76,596 $1

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9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Years

Skylights vs Typical Lighting Comparison

Lighting: 30 Year Price Comparison $300,000

$250,000

30 Year Price: $241,950

Sk y

$200,000

lig

Saved: $108,342 30 Year Price: $133,608

$150,000

ht s

Payback: 3 years Lights and Skylights

$100,000

Lights with No Skylights

Initial Price: $24,984

$50,000

$6,704 Initial Price: $18,280

$0 1

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9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Years

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Cordova Market

The Building

The design of the Cordova Market is meant to transform what could otherwise be a ubiquitous store building into a transformative symbol of the future of Cordova. It does this through the use of modern materials such as green screen and rain screen. The green screen allows for growth to occur up a side of the building without damaging the building. The rain screen is an inexpensive material that can help protect the building from the elements, while at the same time being very decorative in nature.

View of the South-West Corner

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View of the Southern Elevation


Cordova Market Produce Me at

Dai ry

Pro du

ce

Service Space Ser

vic e

S pa

ce

rm ac y

Other Critical Elements

Ph a

Market Interior Spaces

Che c

kou t Ent

ry

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Wikimedia Foundation

Wikimedia Foundation

User Informed Office Design

Completed as the lead designer with VITAL Environments On this project, I studied the Wikimedia Foundation’s use of different types of office spaces. I studied how they functioned as an organization, how individuals used their own personal spaces, and what was still needed to make their office a successful work environment. I specifically developed spaces that differed from their typical work spaces, by developing collaborative work spaces, quiet spaces, and reading nooks.

Is a dynamic workspace important to you?

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Wikimedia Foundation

Specialized Office Spaces The Nook

The (Bat)Cave

-Google hangouts -One-on-one chat -Phone calls

Privacy

Characteristics

Comfort

Privacy

Activities

Comfort

-Permanent walls -Isolated location -Higher level of visual/auditory privacy -Comfortable seating -24 SF

Number of People

Number of People

Activities

-Reading -Quiet, focused work -Listening to training -Idea paint reflection

Characteristics

-Self contained/semi-portable -Cozy -Limited sound control -Limited privacy -21 sf(2)

The Booth

Activities

Privacy

-Small meeting -Collaborative task -One on one work

Characteristics

Comfort

-One movable wall -Multiple seats -Central location -Limited sound control & privacy -42 SF

Number of People

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Wikimedia Foundation

Sync Space Questionnaire

In order to better understand how Wikimedia worked as an organization, and in turn what individuals thought of different interventions, I produced a series of questionnaires that asked people to rate changes that had been made.

Adjustable Lights:

Multiple Seats:

Size Of Desk:

Quieter Space:

Comfort Of Seat:

sync space

sync space

sync space

sync space

sync space

PLACE STICKERS HERE 12


Wikimedia Foundation

Sync Space Responses

Below is a summary of responses from the Wikimedia employees. These responses helped me realize that while many factors were important, the ability to control the quietness of the space, include multiple seats, and incorporate some type of fun element in the space were key to the success of any prototype that was produced.

Adjustable Lights

Not at All Important

Size Of Desk

Slightly Important

Multiple Seats

Important

Fairly Important

Quietness

Very Important

Comfort

No Opinion

Slightly Comfortable

Less Comfortable

Fairly Comfortable

Very Comfortable

Fun Element

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Wikimedia Foundation

Sync Space Prototype

Evaluating Wikimedia’s Use of Different Spaces The Sync Space was designed around the idea that the Wikimedia Foundation needed a different type of space that would fit a variety of different uses. Below are examples of parts of surveys that were given out to Wikimedia employees.

12 Minutes

5 Minutes

Google Hangout Length

Conversation Length

1 Person: (Google Hangout)

2 Person: (Talk)

4’-3”

6’-4”

2 Minutes Phone Call Length

10’-2”

1 Person: (Cell) Quiet Room

Paper Lanterns

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Herman Miller Desk

Acoustic Foam

Ikea Hampen Rug


Wikimedia Foundation

Sync Space Flyer

TRY OUT THE NEW SYNC SPACE WOULD YOU USE THE SPACE...

FOR A PHONE CALL

TO USE GOOGLE HANGOUT

TO TALK TO A COWORKER

I really want your feedback about how it’s working. Email: lee@vital-inc.com or Lynette’s email thread

Quiet Room

NEXT TO THE THIRD FLOOR SERVER ROOM [Photos from E-Trade]

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Gillett Theatre Co.lab

Gillett Theatre Co.lab A Community’s Story University of Oregon Thesis Project Advisor: Howard Davis The Gillett Theatre Co.Lab’s aim is to provide the community of Dalston with the opportunity to share, elaborate, and experience its story.

“The Local”

“The Visitor”

This project argues that a collective community narrative, made up of a variety of differing and often divergent stories, is the essential element that binds a community together.

Degree of Divergence

The theatre will focus on connecting with individuals in the community, having an unwavering public presence, and creating space where the community can get involved. The Community’s Story

“The Student”

“The Theater Guy”

“Can a community survive without its own story? --Clive Thompson--

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Gillett Theatre Co.lab

The Individual Connection Freddie 30’

ODUCTION

“This space allows for people to feel part of the square. As someone who runs the business here you don’t want to have a single monotonous atmosphere.”

John

5’

INDIVIDUAL London Resident “Gillett Square is like a TV. You could come here for lunch and just laugh. You see all types of people from the soul cord high class to the soul cord lowest class.”

Laborer

Tourist

Local

Student

Actor

CREATION

Pippa

Local Resident

“I come here to Gillett Square to socialize and meet my friends. And to see the larger community. You meet different people from different backgrounds.”

10 PEOPLE Maggie Student

0 PEOPLE

5’

30 ’

Local Businessman

1 PERSON

“I’ve been hanging out in this square since I was 14. Gillett Square is a social meeting place for me. It is a place I can relax.”

Nigel

Local Vendor

“It would be nice if people would use it more. It is a bit of a lung in Dalston. There is a distinct lack of those public lungs.”

1 - 10 PEOPLE 17


The Site

Gillett Theatre Co.lab

GILLETT SQUARE

The neighborhood around Gillett Square is positioned to easily connect into the greater London area. It accomplishes this through its proximity to a series of bus and train lines, as well Expanding the Square as bike paths that surround the is one of the ways represents site. Gillettmain Square in which the Gillett Co.lab a unique space where Dalston attempts to connect with can come together and the neighborhood celebrate who and what they are as a community.

GILLETT SQUARE

Expanding the Square is one of the main ways in which the Gillett Co.lab attempts to connect with the neighborhood

Expanding the Square is one of the main ways in which the Gillett Co.lab attempts to connect with the neighborhood

Access to the Site is provided to Main AccessMain to the Site is provided to the rest of London via Kingsland High Street the rest of London via Kingsland High Street

Building Diagrams

Main Access to the rest of Lond

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Program

Performance Spaces

Circulation


an

Gillett Theatre Co.lab

First Floorplan

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1. Cafe 2. Open Theatre 3. Lobby 4. 2nd Story Cafe 5. Public Assembly 10’

6. Workshop 01 7. Large Theatre 8. Archive 9. Office Space 10. Practice Room 30’

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6. Workshop 7. Large Theatre

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Gillett Theatre Co.lab

The Theatre

While the typical theatre does not connect with the community, the Gillett Co.lab is designed to allow the community to invest and become an integral part of it. The Gillett Co.lab accomplishes this by incorporating a series of different theatre experiences. Specifically it uses the large public square as a performance venue, including smaller always open theatres, and includes a large configurable theatre that can be used for a variety of events.

The Problem

The TYPICAL ProblemTHEATRE: 01 THE he Problem The Typical Theatre

The Solution

Solution THE COMMUNITY THEATRE: 02 The The Solution

The So

02 THE COMM

The Theatre 10 10 Community -Blocks views into the interior ior -Creates an always available public space -Create The Problem The Solution THE TYPICAL THEATRE: COMMUNITY THEATRE: 02 THE -Blocks views into the interior -Creates an always available public space show how theatre is made -Allows tre-Blocks is made -Allows anyone to their work THE -Doesn’t TYPICAL THEATRE: 01into 02 THE COMMUNITY 10 THEATRE: views the interior -Creates an always available space -Doesn’t reveal the a theatre process -Allows anyone to present present public their work 10 -Blocks views into the interior -Creates an always available public space -Doesn’t a theatre iscreate made -Allows anyone to present -Doesn’t spaces -Breaks paces forshow the how community -Breaks the separation from the outside -Doesn’t create community space for the community -Creates a connection totheir the work outdoors -Doesn’t show how a theatre ispersonal made -Allows anyone todown present their work -Doesn’t create personal spaces for spaces the community -Doesn’t create personal for the community

-Breaks down the -Breaks down the separation fromseparation the outside

from the outside

The Theatre

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Gillett Theatre Co.lab

The Different Theatre Experiences

Gillett Square_Night Performance

Open Air Theatre

Large Theatre Performances

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key resources

Gillett Theatre Co.lab

Open-Air/Open Source Theatres

The three Open-Air Theatres of the Gillett Co.lab provide small publicly accessible theatres directly off of the public square. The community drives the content, raises funding, and performs shows allowing the theatre to quickly adapt to our constantly changing society. key key value customer customer revenue key key value customer customer key key value customer customer cost partners

activities

partners proposition

Key Partners -Public Institutions -Local Businesses -Community Members

activities

Theatre/Square Section key resources

cost structure

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key resources

cost structure

revenue stream

partners activities proposition relationships proposition segments relationships segments

Key Activities -Producing Shows -Managing the Facility -Education Programs

channels

cost structure

segments

Value Proposition -Ease of Access to Theatre -Discuss Community Issues -Lower risk in shows

key resources channels

revenue stream

relationships

channels

revenue stream

structure

stream

Revenue Streams -Crowd Sourced Funding -Conferences -Educational Programs -Ticket Sales


Gillett Theatre Co.lab

Open Air Theatre 23


Gillett Theatre Co.lab

The Large Theatre The large theatre is designed to be a customizable space that can shift for the performance at hand. Lighting elements can rotate and seating areas can be removed. Large facade panels can shift to allow the square to blend into the large theatre itself. Transverse Theatre

RGE THEATRE

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01 Open to the Square

The lobby space of the building is deďŹ ned by the rake of the theatre above it and its location on the square. This allows the ďŹ rst part of the ramp to be used by the public throughout the day, while also providing a space for vendors to sell their wares.


Gillett Theatre Co.lab

End Stage

Open Theatre

02 Shifting Acoustic Panels & Lights

The acoustic panels and lights in the main theatre are meant to shift based on the performance in the space. This allows the theatre to be used by a variety of different groups and for a number of different performance types.

03 Large Rehearsal Space The large large rehearsal space in the back of this theatre provides a private, yet large practice space. It is positioned next to the main theatre for easy access.

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Gillett Theatre Co.lab

Movement Through the Space THE RAMP

The ramp is a defining aspect of the Gillett Theatre Co.lab. For the average patron of the large theatre, it provides a vantage point to see and experience the back of house spaces that are typically hidden from the general public, the Open Air 03 Circulation Theatres, and activityRamp on Gillett Square. For the local community, the Open-Air Theatres and the Cafe/Co.Lab Space are The ramp functions as places a filter between the square focused on providing to use and inhabit.

THE RAMP

and the theatre selectively allowing certian views to Circulation Ramp 03also the outside. It pathway Thefunctions ramp functions asas a filterabetween the squarefor theatre and the theatre selectively allowing certian views to patrons to pass through and seeasdifferent areas of the outside. It also functions a pathway for theatre see different areas of the theatre wherepatrons theyto pass canthrough getandinvolved. the theatre where they can get involved.

01 Workshop

01 Workshop

This space provides the theatre with a workshop to build elements of their performance. This space is meant to be easily seen by the people on the ramp in order to show people where they can get involved.

This space provides the theatre with a workshop to build elements of their performance. This space is meant to be easily seen by the people on the ramp 02 Cafe/Co.Lab Space in order to show people where they can get On the west edge of the Gillett Theatre Co.lab, the involved.

THE RAMP

double height space serves as a mixing bowl for the surrounding community. There is also a double height cafe that provides a place for the community to eat and for theatre patrons to wait for a show.

01

Space 02 Circulation Ramp 03 Cafe/Co.Lab On the west edge of the Gillett Theatre Co.lab, the

The ramp functions as a filter between the square double servesallowing as a mixing bowl for the and theheight theatrespace selectively certian views to surrounding There a double height the outside. Itcommunity. also functions as is a also pathway for theatre cafe thattoprovides a placeand for see the different community to eat patrons pass through areas of and for theatre patrons to wait a show. the theatre where they can get for involved.

01 Workshop

01

03

02

THE RAMP

This space provides the theatre with a workshop to build elements of their performance. This space is meant to be easily seen by the people on the ramp in order to show people where they can get involved.

03 Circulation Ramp 02 Cafe/Co.Lab Space

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On the west edge of the Gillett Theatre Co.lab, the double height space serves as a mixing bowl for the surrounding community. There is also a double height cafe that provides a place for the community to eat and for theatre patrons to wait for a show.

The ramp functions as a filter between the square and the theatre selectively allowing certian views to the outside. It also functions as a pathway for theatre patrons to pass through and see different areas of the theatre where they can get involved.

03 01

01 Workshop

This space provides the theatre with a workshop to build elements of their performance. This space is meant to be easily seen by the people on the ramp in order to show people where they can get involved.


Gillett Theatre Co.lab

Lobby Perspective

Circulation

Back of Theatre

On Stage 27


Gillett Theatre Co.lab

Diving into the Details 01 Zinc Panel/Curtain Walls

1/4” Perforated zinc panels are used to filter light entering the main southern exposure of the building. A steel structural system is used to connect the metal panels to the curtain wall weather enclosure.

Wood Rainscreen

Zinc Facade Panel

Precast Concrete

02 Wood Rainscreen Panels

03

In this Walls system, glass curtain walls are 01 Zinc Panel/Curtain

used as the main enclosure from the elements. A wood screen is used to filter light that enters the space and to provide an opportunity for operable Panels 02 Wood Rainscreen elements. In this system, glass curtain walls are used 1/4” Perforated Zinc panels are used to filter light entering the main southern exposure of the building. A steel structural system is used to connect the metal panels to the curtain wall weather enclosure.

as the main enclosure from the elements. A wood screen is used to filter light that enters the space and to provide an opportunity for operable elements.

03 Zinc Panel/18” Concrete

03 Zinc Panel/18” TheConcrete large theatre walls are the most The large large theatre walls are the most

solid of the wall enclosure systems used on this project. In this case, the metal panel system used on the rest of the project are backed by a 18” prefabricated concrete Wall. A steel structural system is used to connect these two elements.

solid of the wall enclosure systems used on this project. In this case, the metal panel system used on the rest of the project is backed by a 18” Prefabricated Concrete Wall. A steel structural system is used to connect these two elements.

02

28

01


Gillett Theatre Co.lab

Zinc Panel/Curtain Wall Detail 01 18” Precast Concrete Wall

18” Precast concrete elements are used as a backup condition for the rainscreen. They provide the main structure, as well as concrete embeds to allow the wood rainscreen to attach 01 toCurtain it. Wall w/Viracon Glazing

02

A curtain wall with steel mullions is used as the main method of weather proofing this section of the facade. Viracon VNE1-63 is specified as a high performance glazing element.

02

Detail/EPDM Roof 02 Parapet Wood Rainscreen Panels

The Zahner Zinc Panels are placed over the concrete parapet ensuring that the roof is not visible from the building exterior. The panel is attached into the concrete parapet via metal bolts placed in the concrete.

Wood rainscreen panels provide a protective layer from the concrete backup wall. They also allow03anZahner operable element Zinc Rainscreen Panel to be added. Zahner Zinc Panels filter light entering the Co.Lab. The panels are around 4 feet tall and are attached with custom clips to the main structure

04 Zinc Panel Door w/ Glass Backing

03 Steel Structural Elements

The main level of the small theatres are made operable through the use of Zinc Panel Doors that are attached to the bottom of the curtain wall. Glass is attached to the back of the zinc panel door in order to provide a watertight enclosure when lowered for the night.

Steel columns will provide support for the rainscreen in areas where openness is desired.

04 EPDM Roof w/ Structural

Trusses

03 01 04

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Fabric Architecture

Columbia River Gorge [Re]Active Resort

[Lee Eckert, Amy Fisher, Erik Herman+ Anna Kindt] 2013 ASCA Fabric in Architecture Competition: Honorable Mention This proposal seeks to solve issues in the hotel industry such as fluctuating occupancy levels, seasonal guest needs, and the need for more sustainable spaces. These goals are accomplished through the innovative use of fabric architecture. The design creates a unique image for the hotel as the buildings themselves will serve as destinations for the guests. The kinetic aspects of the buildings also bring sustainability to the forefront of guest experience and intrigue them to return to the hotel to be part of that experience throughout the year.

Activity + Climate Cloud Cover

Human Activity

Temperature

JAN

FEB

MAR

Wild Wintersteel Season

30

Bird Watching

APR

MAY

JUN

Sailing Columbia River Salmon

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

End Of Tourist Season Ski Season

DEC


Fabric Architecture

The Site

The resort activates and deactivates based on the climate and activity on the site. Facilities that need to be utilized year round, like the permanent restrooms and the restaurant shift size and scale on a daily basis. More seasonal spaces, such as the boat house and market pavilion, completely disappear when not in use. This creates a resort that has a limited impact on the environment and is also always at full capacity.

RESTAURANT

LOBBY WINTER

SUMMER

WINTER

SPRING

N SUMMER

FALL

PERMANENT GUESTROOMS WINTER

SPRING

SUMMER

FALL

BOATHOUSE SPRING

SUMMER

MARKET PAVILION SPRING

SUMMER

TEMPORARY HOUSING SPRING

SUMMER

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Fabric Architecture

The Resort Lobby

As the entrance to the resort, the lobby takes advantage of one of the main characteristics of fabric: its ability to transform. The lobby shifts open and closed based on the time of day, season of the year, and the climate.

Summer Detail Hot air exits the opening in the top of the building during the summer months

In the winter when less people go to the resort and when it tends to rain more, the peaks in the fabric will be brought down to allow water to be collected. In the summer when more room is needed, the peaks in the surface are lifted allowing small heat towers to cool the space.

b Lob

Sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge are unobstructed

y

rd

a y t r ou

Winter Detail

C

Secondary water proof membrane collects rainwater

in

Din

a

re A g

Hub responsible for transitioning fabric between raised and lowered positions

N N

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Water Storage N


Fabric Architecture

Shifting Form Summer Condition

Winter Condition

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Fabric Architecture

Permanent Guest Rooms

Boathouse

The fabric covering the exterior portion is adjustable at the human scale to react to changing climate and personal preference.

The building expands radially to respond to increases in activity and storage needs while fabric spans the open elements of this ever changing structure.

Fabric Closed

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Framing The Night Sky

Fabric Open

Open For Rental

Closing For The Night

Closed and Stored for the Winter


Fabric Architecture Market Pavilion The rigid structure emerges from the landscape to support a vegetative roof while the fabric drapes below that structure and adapts to the needs of the market.

Overlapping Fabric

Fabric Closed

Fabric Transition

Fabric Open

35


Radiant Wall Panels

Habitat for Humanity Radiant Wall Panel Research

[group project] Completed with the support of: Habitat for Humanity and the Auburn Departments of Architecture, Kinesiology, and Biosystems Engineering. Recent technological advancements have undoubtedly helped to reduce the strain that we are putting on the environment. Despite these advancements, the high costs and an unbalanced flow of information have prevented much of this technology from being applied to one area that truly needs it: low income housing.

“It is our responsibility to build energy efficient houses that can make it possible for families to live at less expense with less energy cost and more comfort� Millard Fuller, Habitat’s founder.

In our study, we attempted to develop an affordable and efficient radiant wall system that could be used by Habitat for Humanity to reduce occupants energy costs, estimated at 30% of an average owners income. We focused our research on investigating recent advancements in the tubing of radiant panels, as this provide the opportunity to drastically reduce the cost and increase the effectiveness of radiant panel assemblies.

Pex Tubing Solar Collector

36

Shallow Heat Exchange

Reservoir

Radiant Panel

Heat Pump

Radiant Panel


Radiant Wall Panels Copper

37


Radiant Wall Panels

The Wall Assembly

As part of the research, we studied the typical construction methods utilized by Habitat for Humanity to build their homes. We utilized this knowledge to develop a panel that would fit within the current wall assembly allowing it to be incorporated in both new and existing Habitat construction projects.

½” Hardieboard

Housewrap

½” Rigid Insulation

½” Gypsum Board

¾” OSB 2”x 4” Framing Radiant Panel Denim Insulation 1”x 2” Furring

½” Gypsum Board

38


Radiant Wall Panels

The Testing Process

Another part of the research involved developing a simple, systematic way of testing the performance of the radiant panel systems. Below are diagrams of the process that was utilized. Stop Test

Air Temperature of Thermal Lab

Start Test

GPM

Cooling

Turn On

Heating

Varies

Turn Off

10

10

Elapsed Time (Minutes)

Pump

Reservoir

Valve

Outlet Probe

Heater

Radiant Panel

Flowmeter

Inlet Probe

The Results

Despite the fact that the copper piping costs significantly more than PEX, we found that in our tests it performed much worse. The copper tubing lowered the temperature of the room by -1.4°C (2.16°F), while the PEX tubing lowered the temperature by -2.4°C (4.32°F). 35

Copper Piping

Degrees (°C)

30

PEX Tubing

25 20

Water: Output

15 10

Water: Input :00

:10

:20

:30 Minutes

:40

:50

:60

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Fabricated Skin Surface Tessellation

[Lee Eckert, Colin Brown + Robert Zdanowski] This project was developed as part of a fabrication studio, focusing on both hand and digital fabrication methods and techniques. As part of this studio, a series of prototypes were developed to experiment with new and innovative building enclosure prototypes. This prototype is composed of overlapping layers of acrylic and steel. It attempts to create literal as well as phenomenal transparency by selectively projecting its image on the spaces beyond. In this way the prototype contrasts actual physical separation with its mere appearance.

40

Surface Tessellation


Surface Tessellation

41


Surface Tessellation

Process Diagram: Metal Louvered Panel Aluminum 60601 .032� Thickness

Aluminum Too Malleable Edges Tear When Pressed Not Interested in Surface Quality

Steel

Cold Rolled 20 & 22 Gage

Final Product

Rusted Steel Louver Panel

42


Surface Tessellation

Process Diagram: Acrylic Panel Final Image

The Pattern by Marius Watz

Distortion

+

=

The Final Acrylic Panel

43


Surface Tessellation

The Final Product

44


Surface Tessellation

“the object of art is to give life a shape� William Shakespeare

45


Industrial Heritage Center

Industrial Heritage Center

Transforming Chattanooga’s Past and Present [Lee Eckert, Wilson Diaz, Justin Mendoza, Kyle Mead] Placed on the Chattanooga City Plan Our project focuses on providing a setting where Chattanooga’s industrial past and diverse future can come together. We propose to do this by adaptively re-using a unique and storied part of the existing urban fabric. It will transform a historic industrial building into a center for exploring, celebrating, and fostering the roots of Chattanooga. It will be split up into a series of spaces that focus on industrial artifacts, and their transformation from traditional methods, such as woodworking and metalworking, to more digital techniques such as CNC milling, robotics, and 3D printing technology. This project is focused on connecting our project with its three main user groups: Craftsman, Manufacturers, and Visitors. By highlighting the industrial arts, we are providing users with the opportunity to play a role in the development of the space, and in turn further development of the community.

01

02

Add

Push

Existing Building Enclosure Building Enclosure

03

Walls pushed replaced Walls areare pushed in and SFinis and replaced by an additional upper level second level

04

Pull Lift

46

New skin is broken down New shell is broken down in an attempt to blend the interior exterior blending interior andand exterior

Transformation the skin of A transformation of theofskin of the building the building

on


Industrial Heritage Center

South Elevation

47


11 11

Industrial Heritage Center

Floor Plans

down

Legend 1. Restroom 2. Cafe 3. Back of House 4. Prep Area 5. Storage 6. Mechanical Room

18 18

01 01

07 07

01 01

07 07

08 08

12

12

up

12

12

12

12

8. Kitchen 9. Book Store

down

11 11

12

12

10. Gift Shop 11. Lounge Area 12. Studio/ Workshop 13. Gallery 14. Exhibition 15. Information Area 16. Theater 17. Installation 18. Manufacturing Company

11 11

07

06 06

07

11 11

down

03 03

10’

up

30’

60’

09 09

16 16

15 15

04 04

up

down

01 01

up up

down

02 02

down

01

01

01

down

05

10 10

17 17

17 07

05 05

up up

12 05

12 12

12 12

06 06

11 11

down

down

11 11

11 11

down up

up

13 13

02

14 14

13 13

11

1. Restroom 11 2. Cafe 3. Back of House 4. Prep Area 5. Storage 6. Mechanical Room 7. Installation 10’

First Floor

48

Existing

1. Restroom 2. Cafe 3. Back of House 4. Prep Area 5. Storage 6. Mechanical Room

8. Kitchen 9. Book Store 10. Gift Shop 11. Lounge Area 12. Studio/ Workshop 13. Gallery 14. Exhibition

30’

12 12

12 12

12 12

12 12

12 12

12 12

12 12

12 12

12 12

8. Kitchen 9. Book Store

60’

10’

Second Floor

existing

Pedestrian Access pedestrian access

Removal

removal

Sidewalk Addition sidewalk addition

Light Towers light towers

10. Gift Shop 11. Lounge Area 12. Studio/ Workshop 13. Gallery 14. Exhibition 15. Information Area 16. Theater 17. Installation 18. Manufacturing Company

30’

60’


Industrial Heritage Center 01 Studios/Workshops

Pinching pinching

02 Gallery Space

Combined combined

03 Catwalk

Division of Program division of program

04 Lobby

Primary Structure primary structure

05 Outdoor Patio

49

Building Systemsbuilding systems


Industrial Heritage Center

50

South-East Perspective

2nd Floor Circulation

1st Floor Gallery

2nd Floor Catwalk

West Elevation


Industrial Heritage Center

Bird’s-Eye View

East Elevation

51


Taliesin Historic Preservation

Taliesin East

Preserving the Past Through Drawing Historic preservation drawings of Taliesin: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home and Studio in Spring Green, WI. How do we as a culture define our built environment? Are buildings permanent fixtures of our surrounding environment or shifting entities that change over time? Taliesin, Frank Lloyd Wright’s home and studio, is a place that has intentionally and unintentionally changed over time, developing spaces that focus on the process and the ephemeral nature of the world around us. As part of a historic preservation drawing team, I was tasked with capturing Taliesin, not how it originally was or what it could be in the future, but as it currently exists. The historic preservation drawings that were produced are part of the Library of Congress’s Historic American Buildings Survey Collection

52


Taliesin Historic Preservation

53


Goals and Aspirations

As I look back at where I have come from, what I have accomplished, and where I am going various themes integral to the way I design have become apparent. These themes help guide my design process and provide me with a consistent way to approach every project. Refining this process is a life long endeavor that never will be fully complete, but will provide refreshingly new experiences along the way. Redefinition of Disciplinary Barriers Architecture is in a state of flux, constantly changing its definition, its influences and disciplines that are involved. It acknowledges hidden potentials of the site, while also developing its own identity. Spaces of Repose Due to the stressful nature of the world around us, it is necessary to create places where people can relax and develop their own identities. These places have the potential to not only improve the lives of their inhabitants, but also to become catalysts for the greater community. Appreciation of Material Qualities and Workmanship Materials directly influence the quality and feel of the space that they surround. They have the ability to convert banal spaces into spaces that inspire and simple spaces into refuges Architecture as a Process Architecture is more than a static moment in time. It is a series of moments which allow materials, site conditions, and inhabitants to transform throughout time.

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Cedar Lake, WI (Summer 2008)


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Lee Eckert-Architectural Portfolio  

Architectural design work by Lee Eckert from his studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Auburn University, the University of Oreg...

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