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A F D E C statistics

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EVENTS

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C ontacts

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A monthly newsletter for members of the Electronic Components Industry Association J anua r y 2 0 1 3

E C I A We l c o m e s I n d u s t r y Ve t e r a n John Denslinger As CEO To all my colleagues who thought I retired last year, yes I am back… rested and ready to go! It’s interesting in a way to trade 35 plus years at Murata and 15 years on the “member” side of the Association aisle for a position on ECIA staff. May I say I am honored by the opportunity to serve as your new CEO. My commitment to you is more than just executing our mission statement. It includes putting emphasis on increasing member value as well as expanding ECIA’s local & global reach. First, I want to acknowledge the incoming Executive Committee as they are the key architects of change. Chair Michael Knight, TTI, and Chair Elect Blair Haas, Bud Industries, continue from the original team. Incoming freshman Paul Buckley, Newark Element 14; Perry Fox, Tonar; Jim Bruorton, KEMET; and Dave Norris, Norris & Assoc. will join Michael & Blair. The combination is a perfect blend of new perspective and industry experience. I look forward to working with each in the coming year. Next is to offer special recognition to the outgoing Executive Committee. They were exceptional contributors. They were the pioneers as ECIA’s first Executive leadership team. It was their vision that helped meld ECA & NEDA and paved the way for Rep participation. A big thank you goes to Brian McNally, Arrow; Lee Davidson, Allied; Rick Dwyer, Intel; Mark Conley, O’Donnell Associates; as well as to Michael and Blair. John Denslinger

Now we start Year 3 and setting priorities tops the immediate agenda. Having said that, my goals coming into the job are set: 1. Improve our organizational effectiveness and capability to better serve our members (i.e. processes, communications, website, staff, promotional tools, etc.) 2. Share best-in-class practices/communications among our Councils raising both productivity and participant satisfaction. continued on page 4

Inside Slow Growth for 2013

3

Sales Growth South of the Border Monthly Order Index

5 7

New 2-D Barcode Labeling Guideline

7

Advertise on Inventory Search Site

8

Top Risk Exposures for 2013

9

Spring Engineering Summit

9

FIRST® Ultimate Ascent

10

Avoid Affordable Care Act Penalty 10 ECIA Chapter Meetings

11

CARTS International 2013

11


To T h e P o i n t :

2013 Association Initiatives

The electronic components industry begins 2013 with new challenges and opportunities. The uncertain economic outlook, both globally and domestic, hangs over an industry that has enjoyed robust growth during the past several years. No clear trend has emerged as to what sales might be in 2013. Is the industry heading for another good year or is it looking at flat or negative sales growth?

Robin Gray ECIA Chief Operating Officer

In a global economy, an event in one part of the world can have a significant impact on other regions. The Japanese earthquake/tsunami and the floods in Thailand are examples of unforeseen events that have a dramatic effect on the industry. While no one can forecast natural disasters, the industry can be better prepared to respond through disaster planning. One area that the industry can anticipate an impact is government regulation, both in the U.S. and overseas. Regulations such as RoHS and REACH have brought about widespread changes in the manufacturer and selling of the electronic components. More recently, conflict minerals and specialty metals legislation in the U.S. has altered the way companies do business. And, coming soon, is Defense Department regulations on reducing the risk of counterfeit electronic components in the defense supply chain. Other legislation not specifically targeting electronics, such as health care and taxes, will have big impacts on the industry. As ECIA moves into its third year, government relations will command more of the association’s attention. The association will be monitoring and reporting any legislative and regulatory developments to keep members informed. Other projects that the association will be working on in 2013: • Continued expansion of the features and functionality of the hugely successful inventory search site (www.ECIAauthorized.com). Among the new features will be a BOM import/export function for buyers; the launching of regional versions of the site; and a distributor inventory stock service for manufacturer members. • New industry standards in areas such as end-of-life, 2D bar coding, connector tray packaging, and numerous other technical standards. • A comprehensive examination of the design registration/design win process to identify best practices and better ways to introduce new products. • Development of a standard on counterfeit risk mitigation policies and procedures for the authorized channel. • More activities and events at the local level. • Expansion of the association’s partnership with FIRST to increase the industry’s exposure to STEM students as a career path.

John Denslinger and I and the ECIA staff look forward to bringing these benefits and more to ECIA members and the electronic component industry in 2013.

The Source Page 


Distributors See Slow Growth for 2013 By James Carbone

The outlook for electronics distribution in 2013 is mixed with some distributors cautiously optimistic that there will be growth, while others say 2013 will be a repeat of 2012 when sales were flat to down depending on the distributor. Many distributors expect some revenue growth, but it may be due to market share gains rather than overall growth for the industry. Some distributors say the industry underperformed in 2012 and that trend may last through the first half of 2013. However, there should be some bright spots such as the automotive industry and solid-state lighting. Some distributors say the continued growth in manufacturing in Mexico will help bolster sales in 2013. (See story page 5.) Most distributors are concerned that a lackluster economy, the continued debt crisis in Europe and slower growth in China will continue to be a drag on business. “I think 2013 will be a duplicate of 2012 and there won’t be meaningful movement with growth,” said Michael Knight, senior vice president, Americas for TTI, based in Fort Worth, Texas. “It’s going to be a tough year for distribution because all of our business is constantly being put out for bid,” he said. Knight said customers still value their distribution partners, but they are under a lot of pressure to reduce costs. “They are seeing what someone else has to offer. The business may move around a little bit among distributors, but in terms of total distribution, I don’t think it will change that much in 2013 in North America,” he said. Distribution business will be flat to slightly up in 2013 and the second half would be stronger than the Michael Knight, TTI, Inc. first, he said. However, Knight noted that many in the industry said the same thing would happen in 2012, but second half growth did not materialize. Knight added it is just a matter of time before business picks up. The longer the industry underperforms, the greater the correction will be when business picks up. “It may be in the second half of 2013 or in 2014 but at some point in the not-so-distant future I believe we will see a correction to the lackluster underperformance of last year.” Stabilizing Business Chuck Delph, senior vice president, Avnet Electronics Marketing Americas, based in Phoenix, Arizona, said there are signs that business is stabilizing in the new year if not growing just yet.

“One indication of stabilization is that we have seen a return to positive book-to-bill ratios,” he said. “I don’t know if positive book-to-bill ratios are a great indication of growth, but I do think it gives us an eye into the future that stabilization is on the horizon if not here.” While the industry is not “off to a gold rush,” there should be slow to moderate growth in 2013. “We may not know until the September quarter,” if there will be decent growth, Delph added. Delph predicts the Americas will play a big part in whatever growth occurs. “In the past, the Americas region led the globe out of economic downturns and we will do that again. There will be growth in our traditional industrial markets which Chuck Delph, Avnet include military/aerospace, automotive Electronics Marketing and telecommunications.” Lindsley Ruth, corporate vice president at Future Electronics in Montreal, indicated that while there is too much uncertainty to forecast a strong year for Future and for distribution in general, 2013 may be a better year than most people think. He noted that 2012 was a tough year for Future with relatively flat year-overyear sales. ”But having said that, we invested in infrastructure and will have more accelerated growth in 2013,” said Ruth. Ruth believes there are positive signs that the economy and the electronics industry will grow in 2013. On the macroeconomic level, he noted the fiscal cliff was averted in January and the housing crisis in the U.S. appears to be coming to an end with more investment in housing occurring. The automotive segment will be strong even if car sales don’t rise dramatically because of increasing electronics content in vehicles. In addition demand Lindsley Ruth, continues to grow for solid-state lighting Future Electronics on a worldwide basis. The drive to improve power efficiency will help drive the semiconductor market, especially for power management integrated circuits. “There are very few semiconductor companies out there today that are not focused on power management and improving overall efficiency in circuits,” said Ruth. The electronics industry will grow because of the proliferation of electronics in consumer electronics equipment, vehicles, medical and industrial equipment in addition to the continued growth in demand for media tablets and smart phones. “That trend is not going to be reversed,” said Ruth. “Consumer electronics will continue to grow.” continued on page 4

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Distributors See Slow Growth for 2013 continued from page 3 North American Business is solid North American business I think is still very solid,” said Ruth. He noted that equipment is still designed in the Americas even if it is manufactured overseas. “We are still very optimistic about the future of business in the Americas.” Another distributor that is optimistic about 2013 is Mouser Electronics, based in Mansfield, Texas. Mouser expects a double-digit increase in revenue in 2013, said Pete Shopp, senior vice president of operations. “We did not grow as much as we wanted to in 2012 and are expecting better things in 2013. We think we will be in the 10-15% range,” said Shopp. Design activity was strong in 2012 and is expected to remain robust in 2013 as well. Shopp said one reason for the stronger growth will be an improving economy in the second half of the year. He added that solid-state lighting and automotive will be strong for Mouser in 2012 and the company’s global business is growing, Pete Shopp, he said, “Europe and Asia together will be Mouser Electronics close to 40% of our revenue,” said Shopp. Mouser started focusing on Europe and Asia about five years ago. “We’re expecting the U.S. and Canada to grow about 10%, but we think Europe and Asia will be more in the 20% range,” he said. Allied Electronics is confident that business will improve, but it probably won’t be in 2013 because the broad economic indicators in 2013 are the same as in 2012, said Scott McLendon, President Allied, headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. “GDP is forecast to be only about 2%, the industrial production index is forecast to grow 2.3% and corporate profits are forecast to grow 4.7%, which would be the smallest increase in several years. That will have an impact on capital spending,” said McLendon. But the longer-term outlook for distribution is more promising. “I am bullish about the long-term future of the North American market,” he said. “I believe there are doubledigit growth years ahead of us.” McLendon Scott McLendon, Allied Electronics noted that the world’s population continues to grow and is becoming more affluent. As a result, demand for electronics equipment and components will rise. At the same time, distribution is becoming more efficient and suppliers are selling more products through distributors, he said.

I n d u s t r y Ve t e r a n J o h n Denslinger Selected to Lead ECIA continued from page 1

3. As CEO, be visible to the industry throughout the year. Conduct face-to-face out-reaches with current ECIA members and their company Executives for industry vision and insight. Similarly, seek out opportunities to cultivate new members who will actively contribute to our growth and more importantly, our success. 4. Continue to build our “value portfolio” as a means to attract new members. (ECIA’s Inventory Website is a great example that just keeps delivering more & more member value!) 5. Explore global expansion via alliances especially in the Asian region. 6. Manage aggressively but operate with fiscal conservatism.

So there you have it: 2013 in a nut-shell. I look forward to your support and working with each and every Board member in the coming year.

John Denslinger ECIA President & CEO

New Members - Welcome to ECIA DB LECTRO Inc. - Distributor Dependable Component Supply Company - Distributor East Coast Microwave Distributors, Inc. - Distributor Harwin - Manufacturer The Phoenix Company of Chicago, Inc. - Manufacturer RCD Components, Inc. - Manufacturer Richardson RFPD - Distributor Yageo America - Manufacturer

“The value proposition that distribution provides the market is still very viable and robust,” said McLendon. “I think long-term we have a bright future. Ultimately the trend is up and to the right.” The Source Page 


Look For Sales Growth South of the Border By James Carbone

Some distributors expect there will be greater opportunities for sales growth in Mexico as OEMs and electronics manufacturing services (EMS) providers bring back manufacturing to Mexico from China.

They want stuff in proximity to them. In the rest of North America, very few customers really insist on having the inventory in the same ZIP code,” he said.

Labor rates are increasing in China and are projected to increase for the next several years. As a result, the labor cost advantages of manufacturing in China have been lessened. Some manufacturers, especially makers of industrial equipment, are opting to build in Mexico for the North American market.

Catalog distributors also expect to benefit from increased manufacturing in Mexico. Pete Shopp, senior vice president of operations for Mouser Electronics, based in Mansfield, Texas, said that Mouser Electronics’ business in Mexico grew by about 20% in 2012 although “most of the activity there is large production or MRO type business.”

“We continue to see customers re-shore manufacturing back into Mexico,” said Chuck Delph, senior vice president, Avnet Electronics Marketing Americas, based in Phoenix, Ariz. “Cus-

“For the most part we are starting to see more design activity from some of the university funded projects,” he said.” Mouser’s business in Mexico could increase 35-40% in 2013.

tomers are bringing production back to a skilled low-cost region within the Americas which is Mexico. We don’t see it coming back into the United States.” He said most of what is coming back is industrial equipment manufacturing, which tends to be low-volume, high-mix business. Logistics costs for such products are high, so any labor cost savings that manufacturers realized in China were offset by shipping costs. With labor costs rising, some equipment manufacturers decided that it doesn’t make sense to manufacture in China if the products are to be exported. As a result, Mexico is looking more appealing to many distributors, including TTI, based in Fort Worth, Texas. “Mexico is a growing region for us,” said Michael Knight, senior vice president, Americas for TTI. “We have a great local footprint there and we are seeing plenty of examples of re-shoring.” North America represents about 60% of TTI’s business and Mexico is the fastest-growing portion of TTI’s North American business although it is still a relatively small percentage of TTI’s overall sales. While business is growing in Mexico there are serious issues in the country. One is security. Violence fueled by the drug trade has plagued Mexico in recent years. “Our people in Mexico have had a couple of situations with car jackings, but fortunately no one has been hurt,” said Knight. One unique requirement in doing business in Mexico is manufacturers there prefer to have local inventory. They prefer to have components that can be driven to their facilities rather than having the parts flown in, said Knight. “It’s a hot button for them.

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Catalog distributor Allied Electronics is taking a cautious approach to Mexico. “Mexico is an opportunity for Allied, but we are not doing a whole lot there today,” said Scott McLendon, President Allied, headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. He said doing business in Mexico has “a lot of complexities.” There are credit, payment and security issues. “How do you keep employees safe and what kind of brick and mortar do you put in the country?” he said. Some distributors believe South America represents a great opportunity for sales growth. “We do expect to see growth at a faster rate in the Latin America than we see in the more traditional U.S. and Canada market, said Delph. “For us the growth region in the Americas is Brazil. “The country is building infrastructure to get ready for the Olympics and for the World Cup,” he said. Delph said the electronics manufacturing services provider base and “Brazil’s indigenous customer base is growing at a very good clip. It’s not just about European or Asian or American-based companies going into Brazil and building, it is also Brazilianbased communications companies and industrial companies.” Those companies are building infrastructure in the country resulting in growth opportunities for distribution.


Afdec Monthly Statistics

Average Daily Sales by Month Sales in £k per day; ----- shows 3 month average

Semiconductors to Industrial Market

Passives

140

30

120

25

100 20 80 15 60 10 40

5

20

0

0 Nov Dec Jan

Feb Mar

Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan

Feb Mar

Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep Oct

Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Interconnect

Jul

Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep Oct

Electromechanicals

25

50 45

20

40 35

15

30 25

10

20 15

5

10 5

0

Nov Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug Sep

Oct

Nov Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug Sep

Oct

0

Nov Dec Jan

Feb Mar

Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep

Oct

Nov Dec Jan

Feb Mar

Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep

Oct

All Industrial Components (ie net of Semis to PC mkt)

250

200

150

100

50

0

Nov Dec Jan

Feb Mar

Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep

Oct Nov Dec Jan

Feb Mar

Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep

Oct

Each month AFDEC gathers statistics from its distributor members and summarizes bookings, billings, inventory, stock turn/earn ratio, debtors, © copyright ecsn (The Electronic Components Supply Network Ltd). components and, where appropriate, into more detailed subgross margin, etc., split down by semiconductors, passives and electromechanical A Company These Registered in England 977242 to check their own trends against those of the industry. categories. monthly statisticsNumber: enable members Registered Office: The Manor House, High Street, Buntingford, Herts, SG9 9AB, UK North American statistics are available through ECIA’s Distribution Business Index.

The Source Page 


Index Ends 2012 On Positive Note Will Optimism Continue Into 2013? Orders for 2013 could portend a move toward a confident and growth environment for this sector of the electronics industry. Pent up demand from the cautious approaches in the 4th quarter of 2012 could spark significant upward trends in 1Q2013 if government and industry can rise above the pessimism that has plagued investors with indecision. The 12-month moving average remained steady-as-she-goes reflecting this indecision to move in either direction. ECIA’s monthly report consolidates order information collected in confidence from leading IPE component manufacturers.

New Guideline on 2-D Barcode Labeling Released By ECIA Electronic Components Council Provides Specification for Product Package and Shipments in the Electronics Industry The ECIA Electronic Components Council (ECC) provides a forum to discuss industry business issues and develop best practices in operations, quality, management, marketing and communications strategies. The Council recently completed a new guideline - EIGP 114.00 – that provides current technical information to assist the electronics components industry in choosing appropriate 2D symbology(s), materials, and equipment for their current and future application needs. Two-dimensional (2-D) bar coding is not yet used much in the electronics industry, but over the next five years, distributors, component manufacturers and OEMs will transition to the technology in the labeling and shipment of parts. Benefits include single barcode scans, improved data accuracy, and increased efficiency. Because of the design of the 2D symbology, more information can be included on the labels. With the increasing requirements to add attributes (RoHS, REACH, etc.) to labels, the ability to add more information will become ever more important. Joann Fox, global logistics project manager for Arrow Electronics, was Chair for the committee tasked with developing the guideline. “Right now 2-D bar coding in the electronics industry is in its infancy,” said Fox. Implementation of 2-D bar coding has to be done jointly with component manufacturers because “suppliers have to provide the information that we can use. We have come up with the information fields that would be most useful to us and to the end customer and we have asked suppliers to give us that information in a 2-D barcode,” she said. Such information includes date codes, lot codes, country of origin among other data. The complete guideline is available from ECIA and offers comprehensive information on specifications and applications. The following companies contributed to the development of this latest guideline: Arrow Electronics, Avnet, Digi-Key Corp., Freescale, Future Electronics, KEMET, Murata, Newark element 14, Phoenix Contact, Sager Electronics, TE Connectivity, Texas Instruments, TTI, Inc., and Vishay.

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Smart Advertising

Put Your Company’s Message on the Industry’s Fastest Growing Search Site

www.ECIAauthorized.com

Initial offering • Advertise on the fastest growing industry inventory search site • Open to ECIA member manufacturer and rep firms only, plus distributor sponsors • Six 300 x 250 pixel ome-page blocks available • Random ad rotation • Annual commitment Sign up today ~ • Click here to complete the annual advertising agreement

Support the association site that promotes the authorized sale of electronic components.

The Source Page 


To p R i s k E x p o s u r e s f o r 2 0 1 3 With the start of the New Year comes the annual tendency to create lists – goals, resolutions, bucket lists, you name it. Those of us who specialize in risk management, however, tend to focus on emerging perils. So, this month, we’re offering you our view of the “hot” risk exposures that technology businesses need to watch in order to protect their bottom line in 2013. • Medical devices: the evolution of active, implantable medical devices has enabled doctors to monitor and treat their patients wirelessly. However, such advancements also raise questions about information security and potential threats associated with the software supporting such devices. • Mobile: as consumers continue to forgo cash and credit cards in favor of mobile payment apps, securely facilitating such transactions will become expected – and raises yet another opportunity for hackers and malware. • Network access management: as more employees work remotely – or are recruited from other parts of the world – accessing networks securely is a paramount concern. You may think this is nothing new, but remember that more employees are using wireless devices, putting increased pressure on network security. • Smartphones: we think smartphones are poised to become geniuses. It appears that many household items will become mobile-enabled (think apps for TV remote controls or to raise the heat or turn on the dryer). With this convenience comes increased product complexity and potentially broader consumer warranties, with little appetite for increased pricing. • Vendors and cyber security: as companies push more IT services to third-parties, these specialty vendors are increasingly assuming cyber liability vulnerabilities related to their clients’ data. Not only is their clients’ data at risk, but so are the vendor’s services and reputation. As with any year, good planning and risk awareness will mitigate your exposure to potential loss. For further advice on minimizing the impact of emerging technology liability on your business, contact your insurance agent or broker. In the meantime, on behalf of everyone at OneBeacon Technology Insurance, Happy New Year!

Spring Standards Engineering Summit

April 15-18, Courtyard Orlando Lake Buena Vista in the Marriott Village The Spring Standards Engineering Summit will be held April 15-18, 2013 in Orlando, FL. This semi-annual event features a complete slate of EIA engineering meetings plus a series of general sessions and participation activities that will allow attendees to meet and exchange information with colleagues and peers. A special seminar has been added to Monday, geared to first-time attendees. The Summit chairmen in conjunction with the S-1 General Session have provided a schedule that will both meet the objectives of each attendee and still allow enough time to assure a productive and efficient venue for all technical activities. Who Should Attend: Component Manufacturers, Material and Equipment Suppliers, OEMs. Market managers, engineering, product managers, manufacturing, and test/conformity assessment engineers and managers. Meetings focus: Meetings developing Standards for Passive Components—Resistors, Capacitors, Inductive Components, Overcurrent Protection Devices, IPDs, Decoupling Devices, Electronic Connectors and Sockets. Discuss and create Industry Standards, Test Methods, Performance Criteria, Soldering Technology, Automated Component Handling, Product & Process Quality and Reliability. Hotel Location: Courtyard Orlando Lake Buena Vista in the Marriott Village 8623 Vineland Avenue, Orlando, FL 32821-6499, (407) 938-9001 Click here to register. The registration fee for ECIA Members is $45; Non-ECIA Members is $75. For more details, contact Ed Mikoski at emikoski@eciaonline.org. Page




FIRST® Ultimate Ascent 2013 Robotics Game Revealed

to 51,000 Students World-Wide

FIRST ® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) inventor Dean Kamen launched the 2013 FIRST® Robotics Competition (FRC®) season with the Kickoff of a new robotics game called ULTIMATE ASCENTSM before a crowd of 600 people at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester, N.H., hometown of FIRST Headquarters. Nearly 51,000 high-school students in 81 cities around the world joined the 2013 Kickoff via live NASA-TV broadcast and webcast. “FIRST isn’t about competing, it’s about cooperating, and recognizing that if you have the right tools, you’ll be able to make this world a better place for yourself and for the country,” said Dean Kamen, president of DEKA Research and Development and FIRST Founder, adding, “There is no stimulus package that will have as much return as stimulating a bunch of kids to become the workforce of the future, the problem solvers, the creators of the future.” “For our country to succeed, we must prepare our young people and our workforce for the jobs of the 21st century, and events like this competition are crucial for those efforts,” noted the new governor of New Hampshire, Maggie Hassan. “It is going to be incredibly important as we move forward in this state and in this country that more and more of our young people are prepared.” Sponsored by NASA and Needham, Mass.-based PTC, the 2013 Kickoff event was an opportunity for teams from all over the world to come together as a community to share in the excitement of seeing the new game unveiled. Teams from 83 Kickoffs in 81 cities across the nation, and in Canada, Israel, and Mexico, among many other locations, watched the proceedings via NASA-TV and were offered workshops and a chance to meet other teams. At the Kickoff, FRC teams were shown the ULTIMATE ASCENT playing field and received a Kit of Parts made up of motors, batteries, a control system, a PC, and a mix of automation components – with no instructions. Working with adult Mentors, students have six weeks to design, build, program, and test their robots to meet the season’s engineering challenge. Once these young inventors create a robot, their teams will participate in 77 Regional and District competitions that measure the effectiveness of each robot, the power of collaboration, and the determination of students. To find information about regional events in your area, click here. Editors Note: ECIA members contributed over 1 million parts to the 2013 competition’s Kits of Parts and are gearing up to increase that participation for the 2014 challenge. The information on the ECIA website will be updated as it is finalized over the next few months.

How to Avoid Affordable Care Act Penalty with ECIA Benefit Solutions The Affordable Care Act (ACA) – which is more commonly known as “ObamaCare” – aims to reduce the nation’s uninsured population by 30 million people, partly through the expansion of Medicaid programs, the individual mandate, federal government health insurance subsidies and the creation of state-run health insurance exchanges scheduled to come online next year. By 2014, every person in the United States must be covered by a health insurance policy or pay a penalty equal to a maximum of their 2% gross income. To help you and your employees avoid this penalty, the Electronic Components Industry Association (ECIA) and Assurance Benefit Solutions have partnered together with eHealth. As a private health insurance exchange, eHealth provides a proven, cost-effective channel through which consumers can access the quality health insurance coverage they need. You have the ability to search hundreds of health insurance plan options from over 180 carriers nationwide. This highly sophisticated technology platform, hosted by eHealth, enrolls tens of thousands of consumers every month in individual and family health insurance policies, as well as small group, Medicare, dental, vision and other complementary insurance

products. You have access to side-by-side health plan comparison tools and the ability to sort health plan results by preferred doctor, price, plan benefit, insurance company and other filters. Late last year, eHealth enrolled its 3,000,000th member. This milestone marks the cumulative number of consumers that have enrolled in a health insurance plan purchased through eHealth’s online partners such as ECIA. If you need further reason as to why eHealth was chosen as a new benefits provider, they operate the leading national marketplace for people to find, compare and buy health insurance online. This was before policymakers were even talking about health insurance exchanges and requiring consumers to buy insurance or pay a penalty. Your employees need to be prepared for the new rules, regulations, as well as fees, taxes and penalties that will be assessed starting next year. Talk to your employees about the ECIA Benefits platform and how to investigate and compare what benefit plan works best for them. A full list of insurance products, benefits and programs designed to fit your personal or business needs can be found at www. eciaonlinebenefits.com. Password: benefits2012 The Source Page 10


Chapter Meetings Bring ECIA Closer to Home M e e t i n g s S c h e d u l e d i n D a l l a s a r e a & To r o n t o

ECIA is pleased to announce the organization of it’s third chapter! The popularity of the chapter concept has been evident at meetings in the Dallas area and Southern California. Meetings are designed to facilitate local networking. Texas Chapter Meeting - January 22, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. La Cima Club in Las Calinas 5215 North O’Connor Road, The Tower at Williams Square, Suite 2600 Irving, TX 75039 214.600.8869 Speaker: John Shellene, FIRST – “For Inspiration & Recognition of Science & Technology”

www.firstintexas.org

Registration: ECIA Members $15 ** ECIA members will need to log in to the registration site to receive the discounted member rate. Non-members $25. Click here to RSVP by January 16th. Toronto Chapter Meeting - February 4th, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Holiday Inn - Toronto International Airport 970 Dixon Road, Toronto, Canada 416-675-7611 Speaker: Glenn Smith, Mouser Electronics “Selling Online” - Learn about selling online from guest speaker, Glenn Smith, Mouser Electronics. Click here to register online by January 28th or call 678-393-9990.

Hybrid Capacitor Pioneer to Keynote CARTS International 2013 David Evans to Discuss Unique Solutions for High Performance Applications

March 25 - 28, Omni Houston Hotel,TX CARTS International 2013 brings its expertise in electronic component technologies for high temperature, high reliability to the center for oil and gas exploration applications - Houston. Priority consideration has been given to papers addressing alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar and geothermal. David Evans is President and founder of Evans Capacitor, and inventor of the hybrid electrolytic-electrochemical capacitor technology. He has more than 25 years experience in the field of electrochemcial capacitors and has been awarded 15 U.S. patents in the areas of high energy density capacitors. He is the author of numerous technical papers, speaking at conferences around the world. An innovator in the use of high energy density capacitors applications, Evans has been a solutions pioneer in the use of his technologies for advanced medical, military, transportation, and communications applications CARTS International 2013 will focus on leading passive electronic component technologies for energy exploration and development including fossil fuel alternatives such as wind, solar and geothermal. Page 11

CARTS also features Technical Introduction of Products (TIPs) where leading manufacturers provide insight into products being developed for the challenges facing today’s world energy requirements. The symposium consists of both invited and submitted technical papers, technical seminars of topical interest, and a market seminar that is unique to CARTS International. The technical seminar Monday morning, March 25th, is designed to train new engineers and update more experienced personnel. The afternoon market seminar provides a worldwide survey of the passive component and associated materials markets by analyzing current and future trends. The two-day symposium & exhibition, Tuesday through Thursday, give manufacturers and suppliers the opportunity to meet one-on-one with current and potential customers. Click here for CARTS International 2013 information, program details, exhibit and sponsorship opportunities.


ECIA Staff

Upcoming Events: 2013 January February March April

22 4 19-20 10-13 25-28 9 9-10

Texas Chapter Meeting Irving, TX Canadian Chapter Meeting Toronto, Ontario Statistics and Industry Data Council Washington D.C. UID Indianapolis, IN CARTS International 2013 Houston, TX Texas Chapter Meeting Irving, TX ECIA Components Council (ECC) Chicago, IL

15-18

Spring Engineering Summit Orlando, FL

May July

25-26 6-9 9

ECIA & Foundation Board Meeting St. Louis, MO EDS Las Vegas, NV Texas Chapter Meeting Irving, TX

October

8 27-29

Texas Chapter Meeting Irving, TX ECIA Executive Conference Chicago, IL

John Denslinger 678.393.9990

President & CEO jdenslinger@eciaonline.org

Robin B. Gray, Jr. 678.393.9990

Chief Operating Officer rgray@eciaonline.org

Robert Willis 571.323.0255

Executive VP/CTO rwillis@eciaonline.org

Debbie Conyers 678.393.9990

Director of Marketing & Communications dconyers@eciaonline.org

Donna Dilbeck 678.393.9990

Member Services Coordinator ddilbeck@eciaonline.org

Laura Donohoe 571.323.0294

Standards Administrator ldonohoe@eciaonline.org

Barney Martin 678.393.9990

VP of Industry Practices bmartin@eciaonline.org

Michelle Meyer 703-583-2970

Director of Member Relations mmeyer@eciaonline.org

Edward Mikoski 571.323.0253

Director, ECIA Standards and Technology; VP, EIA Standards and Technology emikoski@eciaonline.org

Raymond Tekin 571.323.0251

Director, Website Services/IT rtekin@eciaonline.org

Janet Wood 678.393.9990

VP of Administration jwood@eciaonline.org

Electronic Components Industry Association 1111 Alderman Drive, Suite 400 p 678.393.9990 Alpharetta, GA 30005 f 678.393.9998 D.C. Office 2214 Rock Hill Road, Suite 170 www.eciaonline.org Herndon, VA 20170

ECIA Board Members 2013-2014 Chairperson + Michael Knight TTI, Inc.

Distributor Director Lee Davidson Allied Electronics, Inc.

Manufacturer Director Greg Jerrehian Phoenix Contact

Distributor Director Eric Max Genie Group Inc.

Sales Representative Mike Swensen Mel Foster Company

Chairperson-elect + Blair Haas Bud Industries, Inc.

Manufacturer Director Richard Dwyer Intel Corp.

Manufacturer Director Sid Kalantar Bourns

Manufacturer Director Jeff Thomson ON Semiconductor

Sales Representative Craig Anderson Sumer

Distributor Director Francis J. Flynn Sager Electronics

Manufacturer Director James R. Kaplan Cornell Dubilier Electronics

Sales Representative Paul Nielsen Brainard-Nielsen Marketing

Distributor Director Alan Bird Arrow Electronics

Distributor Director+ Perry Fox Tonar Industries, Inc.

Distributor Director Chuck Kostalnick Avnet

Manufacturer Director+ James A. Bruorton KEMET Electronics Corp.

Manufacturer Director Phillip Gerrard TE Connectivity

Distributor Director Mark Larson Digi-Key Corp.

Distributor Director+ Paul Buckley Newark

Sales Representative Jim Harper Harper & Two

Sales Representative Robert Logan Kruvand Associates

Sales Representative Mark Conley O’Donnell Associates North

Manufacturer Director Brian Hauge Molex

Manufacturer Director James Matthews Corning, Inc.

Sales Representative+ Dave Norris Norris & Associates Distributor Director Kip Poncher Hawk Electronics Distributor Director Lindsley Ruth Future Electronics Manufacturer Director Joel Smejkal Vishay Distributor Director Glenn Smith Mouser Electronics

Sales Representative Bob Walsh Coakley, Boyd & Abbett, Inc.

+Executive Committee

ECIA January 2013  

member newsletter

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