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MONTHLY MARKETS

1st SAT Bruns Heads 1st SAT Murwillumbah

1st SUN Byron Bay 1st SUN Lismore Car Boot

6628 4495 0417 759 777 6685 6807 6628 7333

2nd SAT Flea, Byron YAC 0431 524 044 2nd SUN 2nd SUN 2nd SUN 2nd SUN

The Channon Lennox Head Alstonville Coolangatta

3rd SAT Mullumbimby 3rd SAT Murwillumbah

6688 6433 0419 369 609 6628 1568 6684 3370 0417 759 777

3rd SUN Uki 0487 329 150 3rd SUN Lismore Car Boot 6628 7333 3rd SUN Ballina 6687 4328 4th SUN Bangalow

6687 1911

4th SUN Nimbin 0458 506 000 4th SUN (in a 5 Sunday month) Coolangatta 5th SUN Lennox Head 0419 369 609 5th SUN Nimbin 0458 506 000 SATURDAYS Byron Artisan Market 4-9pm 6685 6807

FARMERS MARKETS Each TUE New Brighton Each TUE Organic Lismore Each WED 7-11am M’bah Each THU 8-11am Byron Each FRI 7-11am Mullum Each SAT 8-11am Bangalow Each SAT 8am-1pm Uki Each SAT 8.30-11am Lismore 2nd SUN 9am–2pm Tabulam

6677 1345 6628 1084 6684 7834 6687 1137 6677 1345 6687 1137 6679 5530 0466 415 172 6688 6433

JANUARY 2017

First quarter January 6 06:46 Full moon January 12 22:33 Third quarter January 20 09:13 New moon January 28 11:07 Day of Sun Sun Moon Moon High tide, month rise set rise set height (m) 1 S 0551 1947 0817 2150 1120,1.71; 2329,1.21 2 M 0552 1947 0914 2231 1159,1.68 3 T 0552 1947 1011 2311 0014,1.21; 1239,1.63 4 W 0553 1947 1109 2349 0105,1.21; 1323,1.56 5 T 0554 1948 1208 0205,1.23; 1414,1.48 6 F 0555 1948 1309 0029 0313,1.28; 1513,1.40 7 S 0555 1948 1411 0109 0425,1.37; 1620,1.34 8 S 0556 1948 1515 0152 0534,1.49; 1730,1.30 9 M 0557 1948 1620 0239 0636,1.63; 1840,1.28 10 T 0558 1948 1725 0330 0733,1.75; 1942,1.29 11 W 0559 1948 1828 0427 0826,1.85; 2037,1.30 12 T 0559 1948 1927 0527 0915,1.91; 2127,1.31 13 F 0600 1948 2020 0629 1001,1.92; 2215,1.31 14 S 0601 1948 2108 0732 1046,1.89; 2300,1.30 15 S 0602 1948 2151 0834 1128,1.82; 2344,1.28 1207,1.71 16 M 0603 1947 2231 0933 17 T 0604 1947 2307 1030 0029,1.25; 1245,1.59 18 W 0604 1947 2342 1124 0115,1.22; 1322,1.46 19 T 0605 1947 1218 0210,1.20; 1401,1.34 20 F 0606 1947 0017 1310 0315,1.21; 1452,1.23 21 S 0607 1946 0052 1401 0425,1.25; 1555,1.16 22 S 0608 1946 0129 1453 0530,1.32; 1704,1.12 23 M 0609 1946 0207 1544 0623,1.41; 1810,1.12 24 T 0609 1945 0249 1635 0710,1.50; 1904,1.15 25 W 0610 1945 0334 1726 0751,1.58; 1950,1.18 26 T 0611 1945 0422 1815 0831,1.66; 2031,1.23 27 F 0612 1944 0514 1902 0909,1.71; 2112,1.27 28 S 0613 1944 0609 1947 0946,1.75; 2151,1.30 29 S 0614 1943 0706 2030 1024,1.77; 2231,1.33 30 M 0615 1943 0804 2111 1100,1.77; 2313,1.36 31 T 0615 1942 0903 2151 1139,1.73; 2357,1.37

Astronomical data and tides

Low tide, height (m) 0422,0.26; 1745,0.33 0503,0.30; 1826,0.33 0548,0.36; 1909,0.34 0640,0.43; 1957,0.35 0741,0.50; 2050,0.34 0854,0.55; 2147,0.32 1015,0.57; 2246,0.29 1137,0.53; 2344,0.24 1251,0.45 0038,0.18; 1355,0.36 0130,0.14; 1450,0.28 0219,0.11; 1540,0.23 0307,0.10; 1626,0.21 0353,0.13; 1710,0.22 0439,0.20; 1751,0.26 0523,0.29; 1831,0.31 0608,0.40; 1910,0.37 0657,0.51; 1949,0.41 0752,0.61; 2032,0.45 0900,0.69; 2124,0.47 1022,0.71; 2221,0.47 1142,0.68; 2319,0.45 1245.0.62 0011,0.42; 1336,0.55 0055,0.37; 1418,0.47 0135,0.32; 1456,0.41 0213,0.27; 1530,0.36 0251,0.23; 1606,0.32 0330,0.21; 1641,0.29 0410,0.22; 1718,0.27 0452,0.25; 1756,0.27

Times are Eastern Daylight Saving. Time lags: Ballina Boat Dock: 15 min; Byron Bay: nil; Brunswick River Hwy Bridge: high 30 min, low 1 hr; Mullumbimby: 1 hr 10 min; Billinudgel: 3 hr 55 min; Chinderah: high 1 hr 15 min, low 2 hr; Terranora Inlet: high 2 hr 10 min, low 2 hr 25 min; Murwillumbah: high 2 hr 30 min, low 2 hr 50 min. Tides in bold indicate high tide of 1.7m or more and low tide of 0.3m or less. Data courtesy of the National Tidal Centre.

EMERGENCY NUMBERS Please stick this by your phone AMBULANCE, FIRE, POLICE .............................................................. 000 AMBULANCE Mullumbimby & Byron Bay .................................131 233 BRUNSWICK VALLEY RESCUE Primary rescue........................6685 1999 BRUNSWICK MARINE RADIO TOWER ...................................6685 0148 BYRON CENTRAL HOSPITAL ..................................................6639 9400 POLICE Brunswick Heads .......................................................6685 1277 Mullumbimby ..............................................................6684 2144 Byron Bay ...................................................................6685 9499 Bangalow ....................................................................6687 1404 STATE EMERGENCY SERVICE Storm & tempest damage, flooding.....132 500 AIDS Confidential testing & information (ACON) ................................6622 1555 AL-ANON Help for family & friends of alcoholics ...................... 1300 ALANON ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 24 hours...............................1800 423 431 ANIMAL RESCUE (DOGS & CATS) .........................................6622 1881 LIFELINE .........................................................................................131 114 MENSLINE 7pm–11pm nightly (phone counselling & referral for men)..6622 2240 NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS Meets daily ....................................6680 7280 NEIGHBOURHOOD CENTRE ..................................................6684 1286 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 24 hour crisis line ...............................1800 656 463 NORTHERN RIVERS GAMBLING SERVICE ...........................6687 2520 NORTHERN RIVERS WILDLIFE CARERS...............................6628 1866 KOALA HOTLINE........................................................6622 1233 WIRES – NSW Wildlife Information & Rescue Service .........6628 1898 SNAKE & REPTILE REMOVAL – call WIRES .........................6628 1898

North Coast news daily: www.echonetdaily.net.au

Relying on hope as retirement strategy The majority of Australians have no idea how long they will be retired, despite retirement being a regular thought for one in five Australians. According to the BT Australian Financial Health Index, 29 per cent of Australians cannot give an estimate of how long they will be retired, while 26 per cent of Australians expect to be in retirement for 20–29 years. Just eight per cent of Australians expect to be retired for less than ten years. Melinda Howes, general manager of superannuation, BT Financial Group, said many of us don’t have a clear idea of how long we will be in retirement because we have not planned for this phase of our life. ‘Clearly none of us knows how long we will live in retirement, but health and lifestyle are good indicators. Importantly, making a plan and sticking to it will give more control over how and when we retire,’ Ms Howes said. The index shows that 41 per cent of pre-retirees (aged 55– 64) think about the prospect of retirement either ‘often’ or ‘daily’. ‘It’s not surprising that those closest to retirement are thinking about it the most, but the big difference is between worrying and thinking about it to taking action, getting advice and feeling confident about retirement,’ said Ms Howes. A further 58 per cent of Australians reported ‘sometimes’ or ‘rarely’ thinking about retirement, with only 21 per cent saying they never thought about retirement at all. Seven per cent of Australians expected to retire before age 55 years in 2012; however, by 2015 this number had grown to ten per cent. This trend is further supported by other data which shows a decline over the past two years in the level of worry and concern about retirement finances and an increase in the number of Australians who are now excited about the prospect of retirement planning. Drawing on three years of data, the number of Australians who say they worry about their finances in retirement has fallen from 44 per cent in 2013 to 40 per cent in 2015. At the same time those who feel excited and energised when planning for their retirement has grown from 14 per cent to 21 per cent of Australians.

Sport

With hope in the heart of the universal footy crowd

FC Tokyo supporters sang till they were red and blue. Photo supplied John Campbell

Traipsing around the grounds of the Northern Rivers Regional Rugby League, following the Byron Bay Red Devils as The Echo’s sideline eye, was hardly the most rewarding experience of 2016. Not to put too fine a point on, the boys had a season to forget, but at least the hike out to Kyogle was made bearable by a thumping victory over the Turkeys. So after witnessing every minute of the Devils’ inglorious, often luckless campaign, it was with a ton of relief that I flew to Japan, where nobody has ever heard of ‘the greatest game of all’. But old habits die hard for the footy hack and after a while I found myself longing for the smell of liniment and the roar of the crowd (or is it the smell of the crowd… ?). Checking out the sports pages of the English-language Japan Times one day, wondering if a break from the temples and castles might do me the world of good, I noticed that F C Tokyo would be playing at home on the weekend. Boom boom! Take me out to the ball game, Fuji! Notwithstanding the Cherry Blossoms’ historic defeat of the Springboks at the last Rugby World Cup, soccer is the mob’s preferred code of football in Japan. The J League was established in 1993 and, now with 18 teams involved in Division One, it is generally regarded as Asia’s elite competition. Being the mega-city that it is, I expected FC Tokyo to be a powerhouse, in the way that Man U, Real Madrid and AC Milan are in their domestic leagues. Founded in 1998, however, Tokyo (it has no nickname) is yet to win its first title and was placed mid-ladder leading into the clash with Vegalta Sendai (the

zil. Supporters of both sides were going the rat well before kick-off, with the crew who’d made the trip down from Sendai, though vastly outnumbered and corralled into the area behind the southern goal, giving their hosts a bath in the chanting stakes. Nonstop they went at it, roaring their battle cry to the tune of Twisted Sister’s We’re Not Gonna Take It. It was bloody magnificent! I’m with them, I decided (you can’t be impartial at the footy – you might as well not go if you are.) I wouldn’t know one end of a soccer ball from the other, so I daren’t comment on the quality of the match. But the punters were clearly into it and when Kota Mizinuma – a nippy little midfielder who took a lot of punishment from his markers – slotted one into the back of the net at the 14th minute, the redand-blue faction went berko. What happened next was surreal, even by the standards of a country where weirdness is everyday. You could have knocked me down with a feather. That great anthem popuI purchased my ticket for 2,700 yen (a bit over thirty larised by Liverpool supportbucks), and took my seat ers standing on Anfield’s Kop, among the great unwashed You’ll never walk alone, was (except that nobody in Ja- sung. Not many people in Japan is unwashed) near one pan speak English, so to hear of the corner flags and about their rendition of the clastwenty rows back. The sta- sic that most of us associate dium, which has a capacity with Gerry and the Pacemakof 50,000 (another surprise ers was fabulously cute – or – I expected twice that many) ‘kawai’, as they would have it. Even more bizarre, the lyrwas half-full, meaning that I had no trouble getting a beer ics were shown on the giant and something to eat – and to scoreboard, as though it were my astonishment (and joy), an outdoor karaoke session, they sold chips! Hundreds of in English! It was a brilliant and uncheer-girls kept everybody happy for half an hour before forgettable afternoon, but to the two sides emerged from tell you the truth, I can’t wait to see the boys rack up their the tunnel. FC Tokyo wore the red first win at Red Devil Park in and blue strip of Barcelona, the 2017 comp. Maybe Gerry Marsden while their opponents were decked out in the yellow over the PA will give them shirts and blue shorts of Bra- a leg up. The Byron Shire Echo January 11, 2017 53

Kashima Antlers, 2016’s gun side, who were on their way to winning an eighth crown). Getting to Ajinomoto Stadium was dead easy – after half an hour’s study of the city’s intricate rail network, that is. Public transport in Japan is simply phenomenal. If you miss your train, another one will be along in five minutes, with carriage doors pulling up at exactly the spot marked for them on the platform. Passengers are requested not to speak on their mobiles, so they don’t, and the quiet is lovely. Anybody who has ever been to a game of footy is familiar with the buzz that you feel when you get off the bus or train to make the last leg of your journey to the ground on foot. Suddenly you are surrounded by fellow travellers, their step quickening, their thoughts consumed by excitement and anxiety, hope and dread and all of the primeval vapours that swirl around a game-day football experience.

Game on


Byron Shire Echo – Issue 31.31 – 11/01/2017