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90 Ballina St Lennox Head 6687 7388

Weekend Breakfasts from 8am Tapas all day Lunch from 12pm Dinner from 6pm Open 7 days

mullumbimby

AN UNFLAPPABLE COOK Victoria Cosford

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Winner Best Restaurant Ballina Shire 50 PaciďŹ c Parade, Lennox Head For reservations call 6687 4333 www.blackboard.net.au

Cafe 6684 2220 Resto 6684 2227

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Bookings recommended CHEF’S TABLE WEDNESDAY DINNER $35 – 2 COURSE MEAL Available for functions & special occasions 72 Burringbar Street, Mullumbimby

OCEAN SHORES

OPEN 7 DAYS 4–8.30PM

Tintenbar French country dining "9/s#ATERING Open Wednesday to Saturday from 6pm and Sunday Lunch

4HE/LD#HURCH 4INTENBAR 02 6687 8221

suppliers

CATERERS 1UALITYCREATIVECATERING #ELEBRATIONCAKES 'OURMETDELECTABLES 7OOD&IRED0IZZA 4ASMAN7AY "YRON!RTS)NDUSTRY%STATE



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Homewares Asian Groceries Fine Teas TM

www.echo.net.au

Ian Evans was browsing in his regular way on the internet when the advertisement caught his eye; he printed it out and propped it up in front of his wife. It took Annie probably less than a minute to decide she should apply for it. Her website is entitled The Dig Cook, and that is exactly what Annie Evans is. We meet in a cafe and I love her immediately: how could anyone not? Least of all a team of hardworking archaeologists thousands of miles away from home, engaged on a six-week project with only a small and distant village as a reminder of relatively modern civilisation. For over ten years Annie – devoid of formal training but with a strong background in catering and cafe work and, perhaps most importantly, a passion for cooking – has been travelling to far-flung places in the UK and Greece to join archaelogical survey projects and excavations as the camp cook. That initial advertisement was desperately seeking a cook to travel to Cyprus in three weeks’ time; miraculously Annie pulled everything together, researching the area comprehensively so that she knew what ingredients might be available to her upon arrival, dragging out all her old recipe books and composing menus. She tells me that ‘it sounded like an adventure’; she and Ian had been enjoying a semi-retired lifestyle based in Myocum and suddenly here was an opportunity to travel and to meet people, to stretch and extend herself at a stage in life when so many other people are content with a narrowing-down.

she absolutely loved it, loved meeting the archaelogists and academics; assuming the mother figure; confronting the challenges of different cultures, ingredients, customs and language; the local oil and olives and haloumi and tray of ‘warm, perfect peaches’ brought to her by villagers. She loves the fact that towards the end of each dig – and six weeks is generally the length of a project – Ian arrives in order that they may then pile into an old van and explore countries like Croatia and Turkey and France together. She is about to head off to Lake Mungo in far south west New South Wales – site where the remains of the oldest human being in Australia was found - where a group from La Trobe university has signed her up. She tells me about the vast expanse of paper she has spread out on the floor at home on to which she is setting out every ingredient she will need (‘I know this sort of thing can be done on a computer’, she says cheerfully, ‘but I’m such a Luddite...’) Luddite she may be, but Annie Evans is, to me, a most wonderful inspiration.

Annie, riffling through the stained home-made recipe book she takes to all her jobs, showing me old-fashioned photos of herself grinning cheerfully out of some rough-as-guts kitchen, is the best company. She describes arriving, that first time, with visions of a villa in Cyprus with a central courtyard, a sort of kasbah with tiled floors, only to discover an improbably small kitchen, scruffy buildings providing the most basic facilities: she is infectiously jolly about it all. Because, as it turned out,

CHOCOLATE MASSAGE With Easter impending, thoughts turn naturally to chocolate – and what more indulgent a concept could there be than a chocolate massage? Mobile day spa Ripple, which provides their unique service through the Gold Coast, Mt. Tambourine, Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast, have introduced a massage using warmed chocolate oil from head to toe, guaranteed to melt away stress and relax the muscles. Managing director Alison Shaw discovered the technique in a small day spa in Barcelona, Spain, and was inspired to recreate it here. The two-hour chocolate package includes a full body aromatherapy massage with warmed chocolate, chocolate lotion and gift of chocolates, and costs $185. For more information contact Alison Shaw on 0438 567 906.

snippets

LENNOX

HUNTER UNCORKED

The Hunter Valley Wine Industry Association has teamed up with Warners Bay Chamber of Commerce to present an exciting event called Hunter Uncorked at Warners Bay on Sunday 26 April. The beautiful Lake Macquarie foreshore will be the venue for this food and wine fair, showcasing premium Hunter Valley wines (Pepper Tree, de Bortoli, Bimbadgen Estate, Brokenwood to name a few) and produce from the region spanning Hunter Valley Cheese Company, Port Stephens Oysters, Pukara Estate and Morpeth Sourdough. The free event will feature winetastings, live music, market stalls and mouth-watering dishes served up by famous Hunter restaurants The Verandah and The Cellar. It will be held from 10.30 a.m to 4.30 p.m and more information can be obtained by going to www.uncorked.hvva.com.au

The Byron Shire Echo April 7, 2009 47

Byron Shire Echo – Issue 23.43 – 07/04/2009  

Free, independent weekly newspaper from the Byron Shire in northern NSW, Australia.

Byron Shire Echo – Issue 23.43 – 07/04/2009  

Free, independent weekly newspaper from the Byron Shire in northern NSW, Australia.