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PLUS:

Meet Echo’s 2017 Hall of Fame inductees

Growing from the Center one•n•ten settles into new location to continue serving today’s youth and tomorrow’s future LGBTQ NEWS, VIEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT | VOL. 29, #2 | ISSUE 698 | NOVEMBER 2017 | COMPLIMENTARY


Eddie Palmieri Latin Jazz Orchestra: Eddie at 80

Thu, November 9, 7:30 p.m. A night of red-hot salsa and Latin jazz with the legendary pianist and bandleader

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Attorney Lindsay Benjamin Lindsay@allenlawaz.com

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We’ve got you covered. Family Law

Employment Law

Criminal Defense

Divorce, Child Custody, Prenuptial Agreements

Wrongful Termination, Sexual Harassment, Discrimination

Felony, Misdemeanor, DUI & Traffic


inside this issue Issue 698 | Vol. 29 , #2 | November 2017

features NEWS 8 Letter From The Editor 12 News Briefs 14 Datebook PREVIEWS AND REVIEWS 56 Without Reservations 58 At The Box Office 60 Opening Nights 62 Recordings 64 Between The Covers

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COMMUNITY 66 Talking Bodies 68 All Over The Map

Hall of Fame Team Echo is proud to introduce you to the Class of 2017 and we invite you to get to know these community heroes.

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Growing From the Center New location expands one•n•ten’s ability to serve today’s youth and tomorrow’s future.

70 Guest Columnist ON THE COVER one•n•ten staff members strike a pose in the new Youth Center, located inside the Parsons Center for Health and Wellness at 1101 N. Central Ave., in Phoenix. Cover photo by Fernando Hernández.

PLUS:

Meet Echo’s 2017 Hall of Fame inductees

Photo by Stephanie Anne Donoghue.

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Growing from the Center one•n•ten settles into new location to continue serving today’s youth and tomorrow’s future LGBTQ NEWS, VIEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT | VOL. 29, #2 | ISSUE 698 | NOVEMBER 2017 | COMPLIMENTARY

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A Royal Return Former state titleholders Diva and Kriis Dikay earn Miss and Mr. Tucson Pride crowns.

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An Unexpected Tale Phoenix designer-turned-author Michael Scott Garvin looks to repeat debut success with second novel.


echomag.com web exclusives PHOTO GALLERIES Did the Echo cameras catch you out and about at this month’s events? Find out at echomag.com/ gallery/2017-photos. COMMUNITY CALENDAR From pageants to advocacy, this is where the community goes to find out what’s going

Photo by Ken Schles.

It Wasn’t Judy! In honor of LGBT History Month, guest columnist Perry Brass debunks myths surrounding the Stonewall Riots. echomag.com/it-wasn’t-judy

on in the gayborhood. echomag.com/

A Conversation with David France Director shares more about the doc that explores mysterious death of a mother of the trans community. echomag.com/david-france

community-calendar COMMUNITY DIRECTORY Looking for a local group to join? Have a group that’s seeking new members? Either way, this is the place to connect. echomag.com/ community-directory MARKETING SOLUTIONS Find out why Echo is the publication your future clients are already reading. echomag.com/ marketing-solutions

Courtesy photo.

Alphabet Soup Take a closer look at the history behind the words and phrases used to identify LGBT people. echomag.com/alphabet-soup

Congressman John Lewis In honor of LGBT History Month, civilrights icon shares his insight on equality and social justice. echomag.com/john-lewis

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LETTER FROM THE editor By KJ Philp facebook.com/EchoMagazine

Instagram: @echomagazineaz

twitter.com/EchoMagAZ

Linkedin: Echo Magazine

S

ince there is a good chance you could be reading this before October has come to an end, I’d like to kick this issue off by wishing you all a happy belated National Coming Out Day, no matter where you’re at in your journey, as well as a happy LGBTQ History Month! For more than a decade now, Echo Magazine has observed this month by honoring LGBTQ community heroes who have helped raise awareness and spark change on the local and national levels by nominating them for induction into our Hall of Fame. In this issue, we’re proud to present the Class of 2017: • Dawn Bowman • Jeremy Bright • Josef Burwell • Edward Castro • Geoffrey Dorsey • Silvana Salcido Esparza • Jeffery Perales • Stevie Tran This group has made tremendous contributions in government and politics, nonprofit service, activism, academia and entertainment, both in the local community and beyond. It was a pleasure getting to know them all a little better and I’m proud to introduce you to them beginning on page 27. And we can’t conclude the conversation about accomplishments that took place in our community this year without celebrating what one•n•ten has been able to overcome. Since its youth center was set on fire in July, the community came together to raise funds and donate supplies the organization needed to continue offering its services to LGBTQ youth. As you might have guessed from the cover, we’ve got more

about one•n•ten’s new location at the Parsons Center for Health and Wellness in “Growing From The Center” on page 38. Also embarking on a new endeavor in the year ahead is Miss and Mr. Tucson Pride 2017. Join us in congratulating Diva and Kriis DiKay as they kick off their reign as Southern Arizona’s royalty and find out more about each of them in “A Royal Return” on page 44. The Phoenix Storm Rugby Football Club is also gearing up for its 2017-2018 season, which will bring exciting changes for the team. We’re excited to share what our writer found out as well as the images our photographer captured at the team’s most recent boot camp Sept. 30 in “Storm Season” on page 18. While this is technically Echo’s November issue, we’re still not quite done observing National LGBT History Month. So, as part of the National LGBT History Project, we have stories that retrace our efforts and celebrate our community’s champions from across the country at echomag.com. For more information, see the “Web Exclusives” on page 7. Mark your calendars for Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) and be sure to check out our next issue for details on the annual observances scheduled throughout the state. Team Echo invites you to join us as we honor the lives of our brothers and sisters we’ve lost this year in acts of anti-transgender violence. We’ll have up-to-date information on times and locations of the 2017 TDOR vigils at echomag.com/tdor-2017 as those details become available to us.

LGBTQ NEWS, VIEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT PUBLISHER: Bill Orovan ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER: Bill Gemmill EDITORIAL MANAGING EDITOR: KJ Philp CONTRIBUTORS: James Fanizza Tamara Juarez Laura Latzko Art Martori Liz Massey Devin Millington

Tia Norris Seth Reines Julio C. Reyna Terri Schlichenmeyer Rachel Verbits Megan Wadding

ART DEPARTMENT PHOTOGRAPHY: Fernando Hernandez, nightfuse.com, Scotty Kirby Photo and Stephanie Anne Donoghue. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR OF SALES AND MARKETING: Ashlee James ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES: Gregg Edelman Rosanna Portugal-Miles NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE: Rivendell Media, 212-242-6863

ECHO READERSHIP: 50,000 SUBSCRIPTIONS: $29/year ACE PUBLISHING, INC. MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 16630

Phoenix, AZ 85011-6630 PHONE: 602-266-0550 EMAIL: manager@echomag.com Copyright © 2016 • ISSN #1045-2346

MEMBER:

KJ Philp is the managing editor of Echo Magazine. He can be reached at editor@echomag.com.

MARK OUR CALENDARS To have your event considered for Echo’s print and online calendars, submit your event details to echomag.com/community-calendar.

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Echo Magazine is published by ACE Publishing, Inc. Echo is a registered trademark of ACE Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Written permission must be obtained in advance for partial or complete reproduction of any advertising material contained therein. Opinions expressed therein are not necessarily those of the publisher or staff. ACE Publishing, Inc. does not assume responsibility for claims by its advertisers or advice columnists. Publication of a name, photograph of an individual or organization in articles, advertisements or listings is not to be construed as an indication of the sexual orientation, unless such orientation is specifically stated. Manuscripts or other materials submitted remain the property of ACE Publishing, Inc.


news briefs

Courtesy photo.

Imagine Equality Arizona recognized local leaders and honored it’s 2017 award winners at “Imagine,” the organization’s 2017 Community Celebration which took place Oct. 7 at Events on Jackson. Members of the Equality Arizona board pictured left to right: C. Murphy Hebert, Richie Taylor, JP Martin, Zachary Stinger, Kevin Patterson, Larry Sandigo and Janey Starks. Not pictured: Mary Page, Gaby Mendez, Michael Soto, Caitlin Breedlove, Sentari Minor and Thomas Barr.

Globally Recognized Leader in Public Health Appointed as New Executive Director at Southwest Center For HIV/AIDS Southwest Center for HIV/ AIDS announced that public health leader Kristin Kalla (pictured) had been named the center’s new executive director Oct. 10. Kalla’s appointment follows a national search conducted by a committee comprised of the center’s board of directors and key representatives from the Phoenix business, philanthropic and public health communities.

Kalla holds Master’s degrees in public health and medical anthropology from University of California Los Angeles, in addition to a Bachelor’s degree from the University of California, San Diego. In 2014, she was inducted into the Alumni Hall of Fame at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. She is also an ordained minister, certified in Ayurvedic nutrition and a Reiki Master practitioner.

“We are very excited about having Kalla at the helm of the Southwest Center,” said Mike Sparaco, Southwest Center for HIV/ AIDS board chair. “Kristin is a mindful, mission-driven nonprofit executive who has diverse experience steering strategic change, scaling-up, and mobilizing funding for community-based initiatives focused on public and women’s health, HIV/AIDS, gender equality and diversity both in the U.S. and abroad.” Throughout her 25-plusyear career, Kalla has been a senior manager and technical advisor on public health and gender justice issues to the U.S. Government, United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Center for Disease Control, foreign government ministries, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), CARE International, among others.

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She has led the development of protocols and standards in the fields of public health and social justice, including an international protocol for HIV/AIDS voluntary counseling and testing; youth programming and advocacy; prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission; and guidelines for ensuring the meaningful involvement of people living with HIV and AIDS.

“Arizona is now ranked 15th in the United States for the number of newly diagnosed HIV cases,” Kalla said. “I’m so inspired by the local survivors, LGBTQ community, advocates, city officials, donors, partners and center staff who have committed their efforts to work on behalf of communities in the Phoenix area affected by HIV/AIDS. The City of Phoenix recently became the 11th U.S. Fast Track City to be part of the United Nations initiative to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2020 and I’m looking forward to leveraging my international experience and networks to lead Southwest Center in support of this important goal. It is a great honor and privilege to work with such a committed community to place those affected and living positively at the center of everything that we do in order to address their unique needs.” The announcement comes just three months after Southwest Center announced it was one of 30 grantees nationwide to receive a 5-year, 1.7 million dollar grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to enhance HIV prevention and outreach services in Arizona. For more information, visit swhiv.org or email Kristin Kalla directly at kkalla@ swhiv.org. news


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datebook Oct. 26-28 | Nov. 2-4

Scorpius Dance Theatre presents of A Vampire Tale, in which a young woman is drawn to the dark side and finds herself infatuated with the King vampire. All eight performances (including two matinées) will take place at Hardes Theatre, a more intimate venue that allows greater interaction between the performers at the audience, at Phoenix Theatre, 100 E. McDowell Road.

Oct. 31

Join Scorpius Dance Theatre for Battle of the Two Queens, A Vampire Tale spoof night performance and reception fundraiser, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at Phoenix Theatre, 100 E. McDowell Road, in Phoenix. scorpiusdance.com

scorpiusdance.com

Terry Goddard, One Arizona and Anabel Maldonado for their extensive work in support of Arizona voters, beginning at 7:30 a.m. at Ability 360, 5025 E. Washington St., in Phoenix.

Oct. 20

azadvocacy.org/awards

featuring a live DJ, raffles, costume contest, food and door prizes, from 6 to 11 p.m. at First Church UCC Phoenix, 1407 N. Second Ave., in Phoenix. transspectrum.org/tsaz-2017-masquerade Nov. 1

Oct. 26

One Community presents its seventh annual Spotlight on Success awards luncheon (11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.) and networking cocktail reception (1:30-3 p.m.) at the Sheraton Grand Phoenix, 340 N. Third St., in Phoenix. onecommunity.co Oct. 20 & 27 | Nov. 3, 10, 17

The Lesbian Social Network, an alcoholfree alternative to meeting women at bars that features games, discussions, special guests, movies and more, takes place every Friday from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at Faith Alive Church, 801 E. Camelback Road, in Phoenix. meetup.com/ lesbian-social-network-phoenix Oct. 21-22

Phoenix Pride presents the 15th annual Rainbows Festival, a free street fair featuring vendors and entertainment, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Heritage Square Park, 113 N. Sixth St., in Phoenix. rainbowsfestival.org Oct. 22

Phoenix’s 10th annual AIDS Walk Arizona & 5K Run, benefiting Aunt Rita’s Foundation, will take place at Third Avenue and Washington Street in Downtown Phoenix.

Ballet Arizona invites you to LGBT Night Out at the Ballet: Swan Lake, including a private reception at Hard Rock Café at 5:30 p.m. and a 7 p.m. performance Symphony Hall, 75 N. Second St., in Phoenix. (Promo code: NIGHT OUT.) Balletaz.org Oct. 26

For Positive Men weekly meetings take place every Thursday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Casa De Cristo, 1029 E. Turney Ave., in Phoenix. forpm.org Oct. 27

bit.ly/2xFoOXI Nov. 2

One Community invites you to Pride Night at the Arizona State Fair, which includes complimentary admission to anyone who signs the UNITY Pledge, raffle prizes and giveaways, a Q&A with Phoenix Mercury players (Central Community Stage) and a conversation with LGBTQ leaders about equality, from 5 to 10 p.m. at the Arizona State Fairgrounds, 1826 W. McDowell Road, in Phoenix. bit.ly/2gh0sMK Oct. 28

Joshua Tree’s fifth annual Masquerade Gala, a cocktail reception, dinner and a program hosted by Olivia Gardens and benefiting Joshua Tree Feeding Program, will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. at The Parsons Center for Health and Wellness, 1101 N. Central Ave. in Phoenix. jtfp.org

auntritasevents.org Oct. 28

Oct. 25

Arizona Advocacy Network will host its 2017 Awards Breakfast, honoring 14

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BestCompaniesAZ and Career Connectors present the third annual Diversity and Inclusion Career Fair, an opportunity to connect with award-winning companies that value a diverse & inclusive workforce, from 9 a.m. to noon at North Phoenix Baptist Church (Building B), 5757 N. Central Ave., in Phoenix.

Trans*Spectrum of Arizona’s second annual Halloween Masquerade Gala,

Arizona Drag Stars, downtown Phoenix’s premier drag show, will feature some of the Valley’s hottest performers beginning at 8 p.m. at Crescent Ballroom, 308 N. Second St., in Phoenix. ticketf.ly/2wT1FNf Nov. 4

The Pride Guides presents the Not Your Mama’s Wedding & Event Expo, which will include LGBTQ-friendly event vendors, live music and chances to win a variety of prizes in the wedding costume and karaoke contests, from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn-Phoenix Midtown, 4000 N. Central Ave., in Phoenix. gogayweddings.com mark our calendars

To have your event considered for Echo’s print and online calendars, submit your event details to echomag.com/ community-calendar. All submissions are subject to Echo’s discretion. events


OUT & ABOUT Opening Act: Arts Season Kick-off Reception Sept. 23 at Phoenix Theatre. Photos by nightfuse.com.

For more Echo photos visit echomag.com/gallery.

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photo feature

Storm Season Phoenix’s LGBTQ rugby team changes direction for 2017-2018 Story by Tamara Juarez & photos by nightfuse.com

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fter sharing a field for three years, Arizona’s only LGBTQ rugby team, the Phoenix Storm Rugby Football Club, will be ending its partnership with the Camelback Rugby Club in an effort to reestablish itself as its own inclusive and diverse sport team. The change comes before the start of the 2017-2018 season and will not impact the team’s ability to compete in tournaments. In fact, the team is confident that the new changes will boost morale and increase its presence within the LGBTQ community. “The changes that we’re making will have a great impact on the team,” said Marcel Chisum, Phoenix Storm captain. “Previously, when we were combined with our sister team, Camelback, most of our games were played under the Camelback name. Now, with our separation, Phoenix Storm games will be played by the Phoenix Storm. We’ll have bigger representation out in the community and be recognized as an allinclusive male team.” Becoming independent and playing games under its own name, Chisum hopes, will help the Storm build a stronger connection between the team and the LGBTQ community, which makes up a majority of their member and fan demographic. “Over the past few seasons, we sort of lost our identity, he said, “but we want to change that and let people know that Phoenix Storm is here, and we welcome all to come play with us, whether straight or gay.” The team’s partnership with the Camelback Rugby Club was originally formed to help the Storm compete in more games. As an associate-level team, the Storm would be matched against other fledgling teams, which are prone to many cancellations. “We would have players come to practice seven out of the eight months out of the year and only get to play a few games,” said Phoenix Storm coach Steve Enteman, “It just defeated the purpose of coming to play the sport. When we joined Camelback, that

For more photos of the Phoenix Storm Rugby Football Club’s Sept. 30 bootcamp, visit echomag.com/storm-season. 18

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number jumped to 10 to 12 opportunities out of the year to play matches.” With amateur sports, Enteman explained, there is a competitive side and developmental side. Under the partnership, the Storm would serve as the developmental side and Camelback would be the more challenging side. The teams would often exchange players to fill each side. With the new changes, Storm players will still have the liberty of choosing to play with the Camelback Rugby Club if they wish to improve their skill by playing against more experienced players. Those who remain with the Storm will also get the opportunity to improve during practice and a guaranteed number of games. During the summer, Enteman and Phoenix Storm president Stephen Potter, met with the president of Arizona Rugby Union, and requested to have guaranteed play throughout the season. The union accepted their request and has committed to prioritizing and scheduling matches for the Storm. Enteman, who is entering his third year as coach and has been a Storm member for almost 10 years, said that one of the most rewarding aspects about being part of a LGBTQ team is feeling a sense of belonging, especially now that the team is independent. “Rugby is the most inclusive sport I have ever seen,” he said. “... I have played with straight teams for the majority of my life and have never felt comfortable coming out, so having that separate identity again kind of gives courage to individuals who are still playing these sports closeted. It lets them think ‘Hey, if these guys can do it, so can I.’ We represent that within Arizona.” Since its inception back in 2004, the Phoenix Storm has strived to provide LGBTQ members a safe and inclusive environment where they can play rugby and meet other people who share the a passion for the sport. And, moving forward, the team hopes to increase its community outreach efforts by participating in more LGBTQ events and partnering with local charities and nonprofits. Engaging with their main demographics will not only help the Storm increase their team’s visibility

within the LGBTQ community, Enteman said, but also allow their players to create life-long friendships and expand their support network. The Phoenix Storm Rugby Football Club is looking kick off this new chapter by competing in its first tournament at the beginning of December, and is on track to starting the new season with between 18 and 20 members, but aims to increase that number to about 30. For more information about upcoming matches, fundraisers or application instructions, visit phoenixstorm.org. Tamara Juarez s a student at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. During her spare time she loves to read, hike and make bad puns.


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OUT & ABOUT Phoenix Fashion Week Community Night Oct. 5 at Talking Stick Resort. Photos by Bill Gemmill.

For more Echo photos visit echomag.com/gallery.

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OVER 50 DESIGNERS, 1 STAGE

December 2nd, 2017 Fashion Show Starts: 5pm GET YOUR TICKETS AT

labelhorde.com


OUT & ABOUT Imagine: Equality Arizona’s 2017 Community Celebration Oct. 7 at Events on Jackson, Phoenix. Photos by nightfuse.com.

For more Echo photos visit echomag.com/gallery.

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HEALTH

AND

SEX BELONG TOGETHER

Healthysexuals

PROTECT THEMSELVES Know your prevention options. Tag in. VISIT AND TALK TO A HEALTHCARE PROVIDER

HEALTHYSEXUAL, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc. © 2017 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. UNBC3908 01/17


OUT & ABOUT Tucson’s 40th Annual Pride In The Park Sept. 30 at Reid Park, Tucson. Photos by Bill Gemmill.

For more Echo photos visit echomag.com/gallery.

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Community Heroes Inducted into the Class of 2017

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ach year, as part of LGBTQ History Month, Echo Magazine honors community heroes who have helped raise awareness and spark change on the local and national levels by nominating them for induction into our Hall of Fame. Echo’s annual Hall of Fame tradition was established in 2006, and each year LGBTQ and allied community members have been recognized for their contributions in government and politics, nonprofit service, activism and entertainment. The individuals profiled on the following pages mark the 12th class to be inducted, and they join more than 100 others who have left a lasting legacy throughout the years. Echo would like to thank those who took the time to submit nominations for this year’s candidates and we invite you to join us in congratulating the Class of 2017.

Meet Echo’s previous Hall of Fame Inductees:

•Kirk Baxter •John Bircumshaw •Ed Buck •Bj Bud •Bill MacDonald •Bob Ellis •Amy Ettinger •Neil Giuliano •Don Hamill

•Bob Aronin •Morrie Carter •Babe Caylor •Dr. Kenneth Fisher •Gerrie MayerGibbons

•Madelaine Adelman •Gregg Edelman •Mike Fornelli •Scott Jacobson •Barbara McCullough-Jones •Annie Loyd

•Bob Hegyi •Linda Hoffman •John King •Steve May •Marti McElroy •Dianne Post •Steve Schemmel •Tish Tanner •Dale Williams

•Katie Gummere •Bill Lewis •Artie Michaelis •Jeff Ofstedahl •Don Pintacura •Bob Spier

•Dr. John M. Post •Boots/Ray Reid •Donna Rose •Bill Sheppard •Darin Simmer •Tom Simplot •Kyrsten Sinema

•Melinda Mae Brown •Bob DeJardine •Conrad Egge •Cheryl Emery •Bob Fernie •Regina Gazelle

•Ken Cheuvront •Randy Gorbette •Helena Grayson •Gary Guerin •Sam Holdren •Donna McHenry

•Jimmy Gruender •Lauren Henschen •Daniel Hernandez •Angela Hughey •Pussy LeHoot •Lawrence Moore

•Dr. Rebecca Allison •Ron Casola •Damon Dering •John Goldschmidt hall of fame

•Rocco Menaguale •Tambra Williams •Dr. David Payne •Roger Rea •Lila Sherman •The Rev. Patrick Stout •Bunny Tarquinio

•Barbra Seville •Brandi Sokolosky •Meg Sneed •Charlotte Strayhorne

•Nancy Nunez •Sheri Owens •Amanda Simpson •Megan Schmitz •Micheal Weakley •Rick Welts

•Sen. Jack Jackson Jr. •Robrt Pela •Kado Stewart •Rev. Brad Wishon •Rich Zavala

•Freddy Prinze Charming •Neil Cohen •The Rev. Charles Coppinger •Alan East •Al and Donna Ellis

•David Fiss •Austin Head •Kit Kloeckl •Lawrence Robinson •Donna Rossi

•Millie Carter Bloodworth •Rev. Jeffrey Dirrim •Linda Elliott •Jason Green

•Brendan Mahoney •Felicia Minor •George Martinez and Fred McQuire •Why Marriage Matters

•Eddie Broadway •The Pattersons •Bruce (Trethewy) (David, Kevin, Christian Caden and Cayla) •Tempest DuJour •Marshall Shore •Bobbi Lancaster •Keith Thompson •Claudia Work

•Daniel Eckstrom •Olivia Gardens •Neal Lester •Sheila Lopez •Gabriel Medellin

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•Ron Passarelli •Stephanie Sherwood •Eileen Yellin

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Dawn Bowman Photos courtesy of Dawn Bowman.

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ou have to look at things from the inside out to capture the essence of something,” is the vision posted on the Dawn Bowman Design website, a pearl of wisdom that the artist has (maybe even unknowingly) has applied to so many areas of her life, not only design. As a Phoenix native, Dawn Bowman has always been drawn to the arts – from theater and painting to music and design – but it wasn’t until about 17 years ago that she began looking at the LGBTQ community from the inside out as she began to capture its essence through volunteerism. “It was here I felt I could make a difference and manage up and coming artists, musicians and people in need,” she said. “That is what felt like community to me.” Throughout the years, Bowman has volunteered her time to such causes as Aunt Rita’s Foundation, American Red Cross, the Southwest Center for HIV/AIDS and Central Arizona Shelter Services She might be best known, however, for her 17 years as a Phoenix Pride volunteer. From behind the scenes, she’s witnessed the Bistro Stage entertainment evolve from a 10-foot-by-10-foot platform stage into an 80-foot tented art and music venue over the past six years.

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“I love supporting starting artists and musicians and giving them a platform to shine,” she said. “And the community art projects have been a great expression for the community ... I try to think of creative art projects that have meaning, like the Door to Equality Competition and “Recycle Pride” water bottle sculpture to name a couple.” As the winner of the National Endowment for Advancement in the Arts Promising Young Artist and recipient of Regent Art Scholarship from the University of Arizona, Bowman understands the importance of giving others the space and the resources to create. “Art is expression, and art speaks loudly without words,” she said. “It is a voice. Especially for the youth to be heard and to participate in a free expressive way. To be out and create, or out and receive the message of arts expression – community art is truly the most expressive – [means] leaving your mark. It’s saying, yes, I’m here now!” It was her commitment to community art that drew her to participate in the Juried Great Mural Competition in Tucson Arizona in 2011. “I like being involved in these causes because I feel strongly that it is so

important to give to the community,” she said. “Give of yourself, your time and your talents. The reward is seeing the joy and happiness – and sometimes gratitude – in people’s eyes.” Since 2010, Bowman has been involved with the Desperado LGBT Film Festival, which takes place each February at Paradise Valley Community College. While she initially became involved as an entertainer for the opening reception, Bowman was later asked to bring art and entertainment to the growing event and, over the years, this has involved coordinating music lineups, art booths, meet-and-greet receptions even assisting art gallery exhibitors with installation. In short, all the things she loves. “I don’t have kids, but all of these projects are like my kids, and kids need nurturing, love and attention to become great adults and great human being,” she said. “To teach others what I know so they carry on in their lives with a little piece of that, that is my legacy!”

READ THE REST For Echo’s complete Hall of Fame interview with Dawn Bowman, visit echomag.com/dawn-bowman. hall of fame


Photos courtesy of Jeremy Bright.

Jeremy Bright

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n 2014, Jeremy Bright was hired by the Southwest Center for HIV/AIDS as its testing and men’s program manager tasked with overseeing the center’s HIV testing program and building a community outreach program. His mission: recruit volunteers to distribute condoms in bars. His resources: three remaining volunteers from the previous project and one staff member who was interested in being involved. The result: IGNITE Your Status was born. According to Bright, IGNITE started with a conversation in the lobby of Southwest Center with four passionate members of the community who answered the question “What do you want this project to do?” This laid the foundation for the new volunteer-led outreach group. “Our mission [is] to normalize the conversations around safer sex and HIV in the Phoenix LGBTQ Community,” Bright said. “We still needed to hand out condoms – someone was giving us money to do that – but the founding [IGNITE] crew members felt we could do more and wanted to spark a dialog about HIV in a really fun and community-centric way while doing it. Right out of the gate, we were striving to do more.” Three years later, IGNITE has a planning council, a dedicated crew of nearly 70 volunteers and some much more specific goals.

Class of 2017

“We have some hard numbers we measure … But some of the work we do around stigma, normalizing conversations around HIV and addressing feelings of isolation faced by people living with HIV are often softer measurements,” Bright explained. Since IGNITE’s inception, Bright reports that it’s grown from distributing 20,000 condoms a year to more than 180,000 condoms. Southwest Center has also seen an increase in testing from 150 people a month to over 550 people a month. “Those are huge increases and definitely reflect the impact of the work from our amazing crew members and also our community’s willingness to embrace the work we’re doing,” Bright said. Bright’s role has also evolved with the successes IGNITE has experienced. Today, he’s the center’s director of marketing and community outreach, and he now splits his time between community outreach (75 percent) and marketing for the center (25 percent), based on funding. While you won’t catch Bright in the spotlight or poised as the face of IGNITE (unless he’s in drag as his alter ego, Rainbow Bright, raising money for a good cause), he has humbly asserted that he’s motivated by work that feels mission-focused and meaningful, and that he feels good about what he’s doing right now. Which is, as

he puts it, a perfect storm, one where his professional experiences were finally aligned with his passions, that had been brewing for many years. “When I was living in Richmond, Va., I was 21 and had a boyfriend who dumped me hard,” Bright recalled. “I went to a friend’s house to cry it out and, while sitting on his patio, he told me, ‘at least you don’t have to get out there and date while you’re HIV-Positive.’” This was the first person to ever disclose their status to Bright. “What was even more mind-blowing, was his partner was negative,” he continued. “It was the ‘90s … I was just beginning to try to figure this world out, and that really blew my mind at the time. However, while watching them hold each other and smile, they showed me an amazing side of love that inspired me to get more involved to help people like these friends.” Bright I knew some people who said they volunteered at an AIDS organization downtown, so one day he just walked in and said he wanted to help. And he’s been involved in some way around the cause ever since.

READ THE REST For Echo’s complete Hall of Fame interview with Jeremy Bright, visit echomag.com/jeremy-bright. EchoMag.com

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Josef Burwell Photos courtesy of Josef Burwell.

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ince July 26, countless service members and veterans have come forward to bravely fight – again, but for a different cause this time ¬– by showing the world the many variations of what transgender military service looks like. Josef Burwell is one of those brave warriors. Burwell enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1979 as a lesbian-identified female and served as a signals intelligence analyst, which required a top-secret security clearance in order to work with codes, ciphers and their interpretation. “I was questioned repeatedly about my sexuality, Burwell recalled. “… I hid my sexuality to get the clearance, thereby committing perjury, a serious offense that all gays and lesbians with clearances necessarily subjected [us] to in order to serve. Many of us got caught up in what became recognized as a purge of gay and lesbian intelligence personnel in 1980.” Burwell’s trajectory as a soldier was decidedly cut short, and he was held for four months for interrogations and subjected various types of abuse after being entrapped by a security officer who was also a lesbian and trying to lessen her charges of perjury.

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Because gays and lesbians were not allowed in the armed forces at all before 1994 and “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” (DADT) didn’t become law until 14 years Burwell’s ordeal, he warns, “My time in the U.S. Army is pertinent because it serves as a cautionary tale for what is happening to transgender people in uniform today.” It’s not only Burwell’s experience as someone who went back into the closet to fulfill her call to service that made him a qualified spokesperson when the “Trans Ban” was introduced, but he also transitioned genders while working alongside the military as a civilian contractor. “I literally transitioned genders while in the company of some of the bravest men and women on the planet. I was proud to be assigned to work among them,” he wrote in an essay that was published at echomag.com/transban and by the ACLU following the Presidents three Tweets declaring his intent to ban trans military service. “So many people can’t speak up because of fear for their jobs, fear in their families, or a sense of transphobia at large,” he said. “Either I’m naïve to think I’ve developed immunity after what happened to me in 1980, or the need to speak up blinds my better

senses, but I’m driven to speak for those who can’t.” While Burwell didn’t come out as trans until age 56, it did alter the focus of my career as a physician’s assistant. “I founded Peacework Medical in 2000 … [as] a fully volunteer nonprofit that provides primary care to the most vulnerable and marginalized in our communities,” Burwell said. “I transitioned Peacework Medical along with me. We had been in Haiti since 2010 … We turned the clinic over to our Haitian counterparts and, in September 2015, we opened the free clinic for undocumented gender and sexuality minorities [here].” Today, Peacework Medical is possible because of the space that Phoenix Allies for Community Health (PACH) provides the nonprofit to operate out of. Additionally, Burwell serves on the board for both PACH as well as Trans*Spectrum of Arizona (TSAZ), a peer support group for the transgender community.

READ THE REST For Echo’s complete Hall of Fame interview with Josef Burwell, visit echomag.com/josef-burwell. hall of fame


Photos courtesy of Edward Castro.

Edward Castro

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hat started off as a hobby (or so he thought) has evolved into a way of life for Edward Castro. The Tucson native first became acquainted with the world of pageantry in 2007 and, when reflecting on a decade dedicated to promoting a wide variety of contests and entertainers, Castro simply said, “I would have never imagined that it would lead me to where I am today.” As the director of Solo Entertainment Productions, a promotional company that specializes in red carpet entertainment, and the founder of arizonadrag.com, a website dedicated to the art of drag, Castro finds pageantry as the perfect complement to both. “Pageantry, to me, is my outlet to produce events, meet new people and network with people from all across the country,” he said. “Another part of pageantry, to me, is helping others achieve their dreams. There are [drag performers] in our community who … aspire to be national title holders, so they need promoters to promote pageants in order for them to do that.” What you may not realize when you see him out and about, however, is that he’s constantly working and learning whatever it takes to make someone else

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better – from helping performers get started in pageantry to helping bring new systems to Arizona. “I’ve been involved in a variety of different systems because I’m always looking on how to improve the drag community in Arizona and to keep traditions alive,” he said. “We have such a rich history of drag and pageantry here that [rest of] the country looks at Arizona as one of the top places to compete. We have some of the strongest competitors living right here in Arizona.” Additionally, Castro maintains that drag is a critical part of the LGBTQ community that serves as an outlet for creative expression, an avenue for fundraising, an entertainment escape for the audience and so much more. This, of course, led to another venture he thought was just a hobby: In 2009 he launched arizonadrag.com. “Once I realized that drag in Arizona was very popular, and there wasn’t a place where people could go to find out information about drag, I launched the [arizonadrag.com],” he said. Like any media outlet worth its salt, Castro realized arizonadrag.com needed a way to award annual recognition. So, he hosted the inaugural Diamond Crystal Awards 2010 with only 10 categories.

“The Diamond Crystal Awards are important because everybody likes to be recognized for their achievements … [and] we honor the entertainers’ achievements throughout the year,” Castro said. “It’s also a way to help promote the [arizonadrag. com] brand … and involve the community as each sponsor gets to present the award to the winners.” Community, to Castro, means working together. “I believe if we work together at one common goal everybody succeeds,” he said. “We are stronger together!” This outlook is the reason you’ll find Castro involved with so many organizations and causes locally. Some of his most memorable work has been as a part of Phoenix Pride’s Entertainment Team. “I love being a part of the Phoenix Pride organization ... It’s my way of giving back to the community,” he said. “It’s a lot of work but I’m always up for the challenge and learn something new every year.”

READ THE REST For Echo’s complete Hall of Fame interview with Edward Castro, visit echomag.com/edward-castro. EchoMag.com

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Geoffrey Dorsey Photos courtesy of Geoffrey Dorsey.

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hen Geoffrey Dorsey moved from Nashville to Phoenix in 2009, it marked the beginning of several new chapters in his life. First, he had never attended a PFLAG meeting until arriving in the Valley of the Sun. Today, he serves as the president of the nonprofit’s Phoenix Chapter. “PFLAG started many years ago for parents and families to get support when they had a child who was gay or lesbian,” he said. “It has evolved over time into much more. Many thought it was just for parents and families but LGBTI+ individuals are also welcome. We offer support to all. Some people just need a place to feel safe before they even tell anyone or they are questioning their sexuality. We provide that.” Second, Dorsey had never met a transgender individual before moving to Phoenix. This was key to his journey because he found out about the PFLAG’s leadership vacancy at a Trans*Spectrum of Arizona (TSAZ) meeting. “I decided to run for president last year. I had no idea at the time what it involved,” Dorsey said. “After a year of being president I love it and all of the opportunities it has brought me. For the most part it involves the community and connecting people with the support they need.”

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Making valuable community connections isn’t something that’s new to Dorsey either. “My journey has been a long one with many twist and turns,” he said. “I have always identified with the LGBTQ community. Even as I child I knew I was attracted to women … I came out as a lesbian in 1995 after I moved to Nashville. I had tried earlier but my family shoved me back into the closet before I could barely get the door open.” Since childhood, Dorsey has memories of not quite fitting in as a female, having unanswered questions, having to prove his identity and trying to pass as a female (which he was assigned at birth). In 2003, he and a woman he was dating began looking for answers online when they came across the word transgender. “I thought this must be it, I am a trans man. So, I started that part of my journey,” he said. The other new chapter that Dorsey’s move to Phoenix prompted was his search to find a new doctor, who asked inquired as to whether or not Dorsey had ever been tested. For what? was Dorsey’s reply. “He said, ‘it sounds to me like you are

intersex,” Dorsey recalled. “This was the first time I had heard this word … I made an appointment with an endocrinologist and told her my story. She looked at me and said, ‘you have Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.’ I just started crying. I was 44 years old and this was the first person who ever had any real answers to all of my questions as to why I was always so different.” All of Dorsey’s new chapters came together about a year ago, as he was on a quest for purpose. Following his move to Phoenix, he also found a reconciling church that accepted him: Dayspring United Methodist Church in Tempe. Two weeks later he learned that if PFLAG didn’t find a new president, the Phoenix the Chapter would have to close. “I stepped up and said I will do it,” he recalled, “and from there other doors opened.”

READ THE REST For Echo’s complete Hall of Fame interview with Geoffrey Dorsey, visit echomag.com/geoffrey-dorsey. hall of fame


Photos courtesy of Silvana Salcido Esparza.

Silvana Salcido Esparza

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he’s the mastermind behind the “comida chingona” that’s earned her Barrio brand national recognition and countless local honors. She’s one of the country’s foremost authorities on bold, regional Mexican cooking. She’s a five-time James Beard Award nominee and was inducted into the Arizona Culinary Hall of Fame in 2004. And while the first of her four current restaurants, Barrio Café, celebrated its 15th anniversary this year, Chef Silvana Salcido Esparza’s focus on familia, cultura and activismo have not waivered. “James Beard is like being nominated for an academy award and is the industry’s biggest honor,” she said. “I have received my accolades and honors, but to be recognized by the LGTBQ community is amazing and a real honor.” Esparza, who married her wife, Jo, in April 2013, has been an outspoken and visible member of the LGBTQ community, an advocate for immigrants, an ambassador of the arts and an integral part of her family’s 800-year legacy as bakers and chefs. “Familia es todo,” said Esparza,

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whose parents “arrived in a country with no papers, no language, no money and definitely no education, yet they managed to own and operate Mexican bakeries in California.” “Community service has always been part of our family … At my father’s bakery we helped folks fill out forms and translate for them,” she recalled. “My uncle placed an add in the newspaper that would fund and start the United Farmworkers union [UFW] in the early 1960s. He supported Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta during the ‘huelga’ … I feel a need for activism because of my upbringing and community service. Esparza has carried this commitment to community with her as she’s built her empire. One example of which was her participation in February’s A Day Without Immigrants protest, as a part of which she closed three of her restaurants for the business day in response to President Donald Trump’s immigration policies. “I cannot stand inequality,” she said. “When I see a group picked on or marginalized it drives me nuts. Perhaps because I was forced to live my youth in the closet, or perhaps because I cannot stand privilege ...”

Another battle Esparza has fought throughout the past year has been one against her own body. After being diagnosed with Sarcoidosis – a rare disease that causes clusters of abnormal inflammatory cells – the acclaimed chef adopted a vegan lifestyle (along with Rick Simpson Oil, natural Yierbitas [medicine] as treatment. “Looks as if it worked because, after a year long struggle,” she said, “I am in remission.” Whether it’s cuisine, art, politics, community or her health, Esparza has established herself as a force to be reckoned with. “I come from a long line of chingones and chingonas, we know how to thrive,” she said. “I look forward to the future as I feel that I am putting out my best food to date at Barrio Café Gran Reserva. Especially after a year of bullshit health issues and hater hating on me because of my political stance. I am back and I have something to prove!”

READ THE REST For Echo’s complete Hall of Fame interview with Silvana Salcido Esparza, visit echomag.com/silvana-salcido-esparza. EchoMag.com

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Jeffery Perales Photos courtesy of Jeffery Perales.

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rom bake sales and doggie adoptions to ballroom competitions and pajama parties, one local bar has set itself apart when it comes to giving back to the LGBTQ community. And, while he maintains it’s his staff that has been the secret ingredient, it’s Jeffery Perales who has been at the helm of Kobalt from the very beginning. Perales, who became part owner of the bar in 2010, runs the day-to-day operations and his business partner, Robert Mancuso, keeps his finger on the pulse of the business and works behind the scenes. “We will be celebrating 12 years in business in 2018,” Perales said. “A big part of our staying power is my staff. We have all become friends and take care of each other. Like most families we have our ups and downs but in the end, we have a common goal: to succeed. The work culture we’ve created here extends to our patrons. We do our best to be welcoming and empathetic. In return, our customers keep coming back. We take care of them and they take care of us.” At a time when gay and lesbian bars are closing at an alarming rate, Perales said he’s accepting that change is constant and exhibiting a willingness to evolve is key. “In the age of the dwindling gays bar I have found it more important than ever to be welcoming and inclusive to all,” he said. “More gay people are comfortable

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going to straight bars because the environment and culture has shifted … I think for [our] bars to remain relevant and competitive we must accept the fact that a gay bar can still cater to the LGBTQ community and be welcoming to our straight neighbors, friends and allies. Almost any weekend there are fundraising events for one cause or another being hosted at Kobalt. “The community has given a lot to us,” he said. “Winning isn’t the goal when it comes to fundraising for me. It feels good to do it and it is truly meant to give back to our community.” Being so connected to various organizations – and customers – throughout the LGBTQ community has had an unexpected outcome side effect for Perales: A community voice via several mainstream platforms. “Being a voice for the community is something I’ve never sought out, but when approached I never turn away,” he said, referring to his television interviews, including talking safety protocols following the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando. “For far too long the voices of the LGBTQ community have failed to reach the mainstream audience. As a result, the issues that are important to us have fallen on deaf ears. If an

opportunity presents itself and I feel I can lend my voice in a meaningful way then I will do what I can to help make a difference.” It’s Perales’ voice, in fact, that has opened up another facet of the community to him. While he’s been singing for as long as he can remember, it’s his involvement with the Phoenix Metropolitan Men’s Chorus for the past 13 years that has added another dimension to what it means to be part of the LGBTQ community. “I personally believe that involvement in local community organizations, joining a board of directors for a local nonprofit, joining subcommittees or simply supporting LGBTQ friendly businesses enrich and help diversify what it means to be LGBTQ,” he said. When asked what’s his next endeavor will be, his answer was perfectly Perales, “I’m currently working on big changes at Kobalt that will be unfolding in the coming months.”

READ THE REST For Echo’s complete Hall of Fame interview with Jeffery Perales, visit echomag.com/jeffery-perales. hall of fame


Photos courtesy of Stevie Tran.

Stevie Tran

Credit: Liz Cannon & Allie Broeniman.

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tevie Tran is an attorney, published author, and speaker whose scholarship has been focused on the intersection of diversity litigation and social issues in the transgender community. Tran called Arizona home from 2003 to 2010, and, during that period she left a lasting impression on the Valley of the Sun. She earned a Bachelor of Arts, summa cum laude, from Arizona State University in political science, with minors in Japanese and women and gender studies as well as a LGBT studies certificate. In 2005, Tran became a member of Sigma Phi Beta Fraternity which offers “a unique social and educational environment for our members within the traditional Greek fraternity system, while providing all open-minded men in college with career and character building opportunities” to gay, straight, bisexual, and transgender men in college. “Without my fraternity, I do not know where I would be,” Tran said, adding that she held various positions within the chapter throughout her collegiate experience, including chapter president. As Tran’s gender expression became more feminine, members of her fraternity began to ask questions around membership as it pertained to

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transgender individuals. As a result, the fraternity formed a transgender working group that led to the National Council’s enactment of its Policy on Gender, which provides that any individual who identifies as male, regardless of sex assigned at birth, is eligible for membership in Sigma Phi Beta. It further provides that no member may lose their membership rights as a result of a change in gender identity or gender expression. “Because of this Policy on Gender, I felt affirmed. I felt like I was seen. And I felt like my fraternity truly was living consistently with these values of lifelong Brotherhood,” she said. “To see myself in the words of the Constitution of my organization and to know that my Brothers have created a place for me was pivotal in the way that I viewed where I belonged in the fraternity. It was empowering to know that I would never lose my brotherhood along my journey of self-realization.” It was through this research and subsequent validation, that other young trans folks deserved the same opportunity to experience the supportive friendships that she found in Sigma Phi Beta – especially when, like in her case, college serves as the first time they feel safe enough to be honest with themselves and those around them.

“My fraternity provided me opportunities to interact with other campus organizations … [I] found the confidence to enter spaces that may have never seen a transgender person and I found my place at the table among my peers,” she said. “I wanted others to be able to access spaces like Sigma Phi Beta on their campus.” As part of the next chapter of her journey, Tran continued to examine the intersection of fraternal law and the role Title IX played in ensuring transgender individuals had access to these spaces. In doing so, she published several pieces on the topic, including “Transgenderless,” which was published by the Harvard Journal of Law & Gender. “It’s inspiring to see how the fraternal community is not afraid to take the lead and address this issue within each of their own organizations,” she said. “Many have already determined that trans men and women have a place in this community, and I’m ready to support those who are still working through the research and development of their own policies.”

READ THE REST For Echo’s complete Hall of Fame interview with Stevie Tran, visit echomag.com/stevie-tran. EchoMag.com

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30th Anniversary Gala December 9, 2-6 pm

Encanto Park Clubhouse 15th Avenue, south of Thomas Road

Come celebrate with Phoenix Shanti Group with live music, an art auction, hors d’ouevres, wine and spirits RSVP at shantiaz.org/3o or 602.279.0008 Gold Sponsor

Silver Sponsor

Bronze Sponsor


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Growing From The Center New location expands one•n•ten’s ability to serve today’s youth and tomorrow’s future By Liz Massey

Right to left: Dani Logan, Joel Mills, Kado Stewart and Wallace Hudson at the new one•n•ten Youth Center’s check-in desk. Photos by Fernando Hernández. 38 |

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ust months after a devastating fire at their previous location, the LGBTQ youth support organization one•n•ten opened its new Youth Center, located inside the Parsons Center For Health & Wellness at 1101 N. Central Ave. in downtown Phoenix.

Connect with one•n•ten facebook.com/1n10.org twitter.com/1n10 instagram.com/onentenphx

The organization, which provides services to LGBTQ youth and young adults ages 14-24, had been operating out of unoccupied space at the Parsons Center since shortly after the July 12 arson fire that severely damaged their previous building. However, the new location officially opened for business in Sept. 20 with a ribbon cutting ceremony – attended by Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and other local and LGBTQ community leaders – followed by a reception and tours for those in attendance. Although the organization was able to salvage very little from the Third Street location following the fire damage, Linda Elliott, one•n•ten’s executive director, attributed the fact that construction was already underway on the new youth center with their success in continuing services for youth without interruption. “If we hadn’t had plans in the works, we would have had a big scramble to keep going after the fire,” Elliott said. The center has provided a springboard for the organization to

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Higher Learning: Q-BLC Formerly known as Q High, Q-BLC continues to grown alongside one•n•ten and continues to operate under the same roof at the new Youth Center location. The blended learning center, which is a program of Arizona Virtual Academy and Insight Academy of Arizona – both online public schools – will gain the capacity the capacity to serve up to 35 students, a jump of 20 spaces from the previous facility. “Our students love the new facility,” said Kelly Van Sande, head of schools for Arizona Virtual Academy. “In addition to increased learning space, they have a modern and fun place to hang out where they can feel safe and accepted … We are excited about being able to serve so many more students and continuing to provide a safe space for LGBTQ youth to learn.” 40 |

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Right to left: Rachel Sherman, Danielle Bittner, Sam Castro, Robbie Fields and Eva Siler hanging out at the new one•n•ten Youth Center.

expand their services to youth on a number of fronts. The move to the Parsons Center was made possible thanks to a $275,000 grant from the Bob and Renee Parsons Foundation. That grant, along with additional grant monies, have allowed one•n•ten to shape the youth center’s 5,000-square-foot location into what Elliott called a “hub” for LGBTQ youth support activities throughout the Valley. Co-locating at the Parsons Center, which is across from the Roosevelt Street light rail stop, means that youth will have easy access to a number of the center’s other tenants, including the Southwest Center for HIV/AIDS, the

Phoenix chapter of the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN), McDowell Healthcare Center and Avella Specialty Pharmacy. Elliott said that this will enhance collaborations among the organizations, such as HIV/AIDS prevention programs and other health promotion efforts. “It’s going to be a great collaborative space and a true community center,” she said. Elliott and Stewart emphasized that youth served by one•n•ten were an integral part of the planning process for the Youth Center. Elliott noted that because of youth and parent input, the organization decided to expand the age range it serves. Because queer youth cover story


are coming out at younger and younger ages, the Youth Center will accept now participants as young as 11 years old. As a result of this decision, support group programming will be divided into nights for youth ages 17 and under on Thursdays and for young adults aged 18 to 24 on Fridays. The LGBTQ and allied community also played a key role in the opening of the new center, according to Stewart. Since the fire in July destroyed most of the organization’s physical assets, the new location has been stocked with furniture and supplies gathered through a donation campaign that went viral on social media. Stewart said that the youth served by the center were greatly encouraged by the community response. “It’s provided a renewed sense of hope,” she said. “Given the political climate of the past year, it’s been beautiful to see the youth and the community to step up to help.” As one•n•ten settles into the new Youth Center space, Elliott said it would soon be time for the organization’s board to craft a new five-year strategic plan, as their previous plan has reached the end of its five-year timeline.

“I think we’ll discover new activities and programs we can offer our youth,” she said. “We have more space, more resources and a more convenient location … I’m excited about how we can better serve all LGBTQ youth.” Stewart agreed, and said, “Youth coming into the new center have the most amazing smile on their face when they see our new space. Many of our youth have been a part of creating our new center, alongside the community and staff. It’s great to see the smiles on their face when they realize what we’ve all created together.” For more information on one•n•ten, its new Youth Center or its programs, visit onenten.org.

one•n•ten Youth Center 1101 N. Central Ave., Phoenix (entrance off Portland and First streets) Hours: 3-7 p.m. Mon-Fri

New space opens new possibilities The center’s new space offers one•n•ten youth, staff and volunteers double the amount of space they had at the previous location at Third Street and Weldon. According to Kado Stewart, program director, the Youth Center now has the following amenities:

 A full kitchen that can be used to teach healthy-living classes related to nutrition and cooking.

 A clothing closet stocked with attire that can help homeless LGBTQ youth, as well as transgender youth who need access to clothes that align with their gender identity.

 A video gaming area with two televisions and five gaming systems – from the original Nintendo system to XBOX One.

Scheduling: Mon-Wed, Ages 14-24 Thurs, Ages 11-17 only Fri: Ages, 18-24 only

 A full stage with three pull-out catwalks, which can be used for karaoke, drag shows, open mic nights and more.

 A space known as the “fishbowl room,” which has windows on three sides and is stocked with 10 guitars, a piano, and a multitude of hand percussion and intended as a place to hold musical jam sessions.

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Meet the Team at the Center of It All Linda Elliott (not pictured) • Executive director • Six years with one•n•ten • Linda is on the board of Centerlink, a national group of LGBTQ nonprofit centers. Nate Rhoton (h) • Director of operations & finance • Two years with one•n•ten • Nate was a member of Sunshine Generation, a regional song and dance troupe, in second grade. Kado Stewart (d) • Director of programs • 10 years with one•n•ten (three and a half years as a volunteer, contractor, Americorps VISTA and six-and-a-half years as full time staff) • Kado has guided backcountry trips in Alaska, Colorado, Utah, Arizona and Montana. On the weekends, Kado guides hikes up Camelback Mountain. Travis Shumake (j) • Development director • One year with one•n•ten • Travis competed at the cheerleading world championship 5 times and judged the Japanese national championship in 2011. Crystal Hughes (not pictured) • Office manager • Two years with one•n•ten • After being homeless as a youth and participating in one•n•ten programs, Crystal became dedicated to working with nonprofit work to end homelessness. Gina Read (c) • Program coordinator, Youth Center • 15 years as a volunteer, 4 years as one•n•ten staff) 42 |

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• Gina learned to surf at age 40. Robbie Fields (a) • Program coordinator (P.O.N.D. Housing & SOS) • Nine years as a youth and volunteer; four years as one•n•ten staff • Robbie loves to dance and perform. Sarah Kent (e) • Program coordinator, P.O.N.D. Housing • More than two years with one•n•ten • Sarah won the handstand contest in third grade. Eva Siler (b) • Program coordinator, P.O.N.D. Housing & Trans Support Group • One and a half years with one•n•ten • Eva is coparenting a 1-year-old with her partner’s sister. Dani Logan (g) • Program coordinator, Youth Center & Assistant Camp Director • Three and a half years as a volunteer and three months as one•n•ten staff • Dani is a vegan micro-blogger. Danielle Bittner (l) • Development associate • Six months with one•n•ten • This is Danielle’s first paid job. Rachel Sherman (i) • Program Coordinator (Y.E.S. Program & Volunteers) • 21 months with one•n•ten • Rachel uses floppy disks as coasters. Wallace Hudson (m) • Site director, Q-BLC and part-time program coordinator, Youth Center

• Five months with one•n•ten (just a few weeks in his new BLC role) • Wallace loves to camp and hike. Sam Castro (k) • Program coordinator, Y.E.S. Program & West Valley Satellite • Two years with one•n•ten • Sam named her dog after her grandma. Joel Mills (f) • Program coordinator, prevention. • Joel started at one one•n•ten this month • Joel was a special education teacher. Erin Dow (not pictured) • Contract coordinator, Queen Creek Satellite • Four months with one•n•ten • Erin grew up in Texas and loves to hike. Tally Iskovitz (not pictured) • Contract Coordinator, Scottsdale & Mesa Satellite • Six years with one•n•ten • Tally loves camping in the woods and reading books in hammocks. Victor Medina (not pictured) • Contract coordinator, Tempe Satellite • Three and a half years with one•n•ten • Victor has a deep passion for music. Bobby Beverly (not pictured) • Contract coordinator, Mesa Satellite • Six years with one•n•ten • Bobby started volunteering at Mesa the first week the location opened. Nicole Snow (not pictured). • Contract coordinator, Flagstaff Satellite • Two months with one•n•ten • Nicole was born in England. cover story


OUT & ABOUT One•n•ten Youth Center Grand Opening Sept. 20 at the Parsons Center for Health and Wellness, Phoenix. Photos by nightfuse.com.

For more Echo photos visit echomag.com/gallery.

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feature story

A Royal Return Former state titleholders earn Tucson Pride crowns By Laura Latzko

E

xperience as both a performer and a titleholder can be useful when competing for any crown. And, heading into the 2017 Miss and Mr. Tucson Pride pageant, both Diva and Kriis DiKay had a great deal of experience as both. With nearly a decade of drag experience and more than a few titles to her name, the most recent of which being Miss Gay Arizona USofA At Large 2016 (read more at echomag.com/viva-la-diva), Diva (aka Tatiana Blanco) took the stage with three other contestants. Similarly, DiKay (aka Kriis Quiroga) just stepped down following his reign as Mr. Arizona EOY 2016 (read more at echomag. com/kriis-dikay) in March. And, while DiKay entered Tucson’s male entertainer scene less than four years ago, he has a World of Dance Competition championship to his name. Both entertainers entered the 2017 Tucson Pride Pageant eager to be a part of Southern Arizona’s returning tradition. The event, which took place Sept. 24 at The Maverick, celebrated the previous reigns of Demi LaRaye and Romeo White. As part of the competition, contestants competed in creative evening wear, onstage question and talent categories. And after the panel of judges calculated

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the scores, Diva and DiKay were crowned as the 2017 titleholders and formally kicked off their reign at Tucson’s Pride on Parade (Sept. 29) and Pride in the Park (Sept. 30). As soon and Diva and Dikay settled into their new roles, Echo caught up with them to find out more about what these titles mean to them and their goals for the year ahead.

Diva, Miss Tucson Pride 2017 Echo: What made you decide to run for Miss Tucson Pride this year? Diva: Tucson Pride is a title that represents the essence of the community here in our city. It’s not a title that acts as a preliminary

Diva can be found at IBT’s hosting Diva La Diva on Wednesdays and as a cast member in Flawless Fridays and Saturday Night Starlets. Photo by Scotty Kirby. feature story


to another contest. It’s something that makes an entertainer give back to the community that they grew up in. I am proud to be from Tucson. Echo: What does winning this mean to you? Diva: It means so much. I was proud that the judges and community felt as though I was able and ready to represent them. Echo: What do you hope to accomplish as Miss Tucson Pride? Diva: My biggest project at the moment is the first Tucson Pride Scholarship Fund. I think it’ll be a wonderful step forward in our community’s effort to further our youth support and education. I wanted to start this because of seeing the success in our sister city. It inspired me. Echo: Tucson performers have recently been making their mark in Arizona pageant systems. What do you think makes Tucson’s drag scene different? Diva: Arizona has its own brand, and I love the diversity. Tucson has been evolving consistently. I love the new generation’s take on the art … Echo: In what ways do you feel you’ve evolved as a performer since you began back on 2008? Diva: I feel like I’ve grown up in an environment of great leaders. I feel like I grew into a performer that I liked to see from before I started. I love the old school, big hair, big jewelry [and a] lot of flowy fabrics. Echo: How do you think being Miss Tucson Pride will help you to grow as a performer and person? Diva: It’ll help me to connect more with the community that may not be at the shows or events. It’ll give me a platform in order to help those who need it the most. It’ll also help me create an opportunity for performers behind me to pick up where I leave off. Echo: Who have been the biggest mentors to you as a performer? Diva: The biggest mentors are those that came before and after me. All of those people around Arizona that keep performing, despite the price or the time. It makes me want to be a better performer.

I wanted to step back a little and focus on giving back to the community and bringing the people together. Echo: What did winning this title mean to you? DiKay: It was a complete honor. Feeling the spark inside me develop to a full flame is something that is beyond words. Echo: Are there any organizations or causes you hope to work with more as the titleholder? DiKay: I want to help cancer awareness organizations and also would like to focus to help any immigrant organizations who help or provide guidance to people in need. Echo: Tucson performers have recently been making their marks in Arizona pageant systems. What do you think makes Tucson’s drag scene different? DiKay: We give any entertainer the chance… It is all about diversity. Echo: You’ve become known for bringing something different with every number and for your dance abilities. What have you tried to bring to the stage recently to set yourself apart from others? DiKay: With our group HOK, we are giving Tucson something they haven’t seen before. We are bringing underground vogue and different styles to the drag scene … I still love performing top, and old, songs as well as doing characterizations and bringing new makeup looks into my art. Echo: You were very open with sharing your story of overcoming cancer. What made you decide to do this?

Kriis DiKay, Mr. Tucson Pride 2017 Echo: What made you decide to run for Mr. Tucson Pride this year? DiKay: After years of competing and taking my talent around the nation, feature story

DiKay: Being able to see that I can make a difference as an entertainer made me want to open up, give people the strength to fight … Right after the surgery, I also lost my grandfather and, two days later, my aunt to cancer. I knew I had to keep fighting in their memory and help others as much as I could.

Kriis Dikay hosts a show every first Thursday of the month at the PlayHaus with his group HOK, which also includes Dvyne Valentino and Or’ion Steele. Photo by Scotty Kirby.

Echo: How do you think being Mr. Tucson Pride will help you to grow as a performer and person? DiKay: Being able to represent the city of Tucson in other cities and states will show me what other communities and performers do. It will definitely give me ideas on how to grow as a performer but also ways to bring people together and give back to our communities.

READ THE REST For Echo’s full interviews with Miss and Mr. Tucson Pride 2017, visit echomag.com/a-royal-return. EchoMag.com

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Get the latest. Whenever, wherever.

to another contest. It’s something that makes an entertainer give back to the community that they grew up in. I am proud to be from Tucson.

feature story

Echo: What does winning this mean to you? Diva: It means so much. I was proud that the judges and community felt as though I was able and ready to represent them. Echo: What do you hope to accomplish as Miss Tucson Pride? Diva: My biggest project at the moment is the first Tucson Pride Scholarship Fund. I think it’ll be a wonderful step forward in our community’s effort to further our youth support and education. I wanted to start this because of seeing the success in our sister city. It inspired me. Echo: Tucson performers have recently been making their mark in Arizona pageant systems. What do you think makes Tucson’s drag scene different? Diva: Arizona has its own brand, and I love the diversity. Tucson has been evolving consistently. I love the new generation’s take on the art …

A Royal Return

Echo: In what ways do you feel you’ve evolved as a performer since you began back on 2008? Diva: I feel like I’ve grown up in an environment of great leaders. I feel like I grew into a performer that I liked to see from before I started. I love the old school, big hair, big jewelry [and a] lot of flowy fabrics.

Former state titleholders earn Tucson Pride crowns By Laura Latzko

E

xperience as both a performer and a titleholder can be useful when competing for any crown. And, heading into the 2017 Miss and Mr. Tucson Pride pageant, both Diva and Kriis DiKay had a great deal of experience as both. With nearly a decade of drag experience and more than a few titles to her name, the most recent of which being Miss Gay Arizona USofA At Large 2016 (read more at echomag.com/viva-la-diva), Diva (aka Tatiana Blanco) took the stage with three other contestants. Similarly, DiKay (aka Kriis Quiroga) just stepped down following his reign as Mr. Arizona EOY 2016 (read more at echomag. com/kriis-dikay) in March. And, while DiKay entered Tucson’s male entertainer scene less than four years ago, he has a World of Dance Competition championship to his name. Both entertainers entered the 2017 Tucson Pride Pageant eager to be a part of Southern Arizona’s returning tradition. The event, which took place Sept. 24 at The Maverick, celebrated the previous reigns of Demi LaRaye and Romeo White. As part of the competition, contestants competed in creative evening wear, onstage question and talent categories. And after the panel of judges calculated

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the scores, Diva and DiKay were crowned as the 2017 titleholders and formally kicked off their reign at Tucson’s Pride on Parade (Sept. 29) and Pride in the Park (Sept. 30).

Echo: How do you think being Miss Tucson Pride will help you to grow as a performer and person? Diva: It’ll help me to connect more with the community that may not be at the shows or events. It’ll give me a platform in order to help those who need it the most. It’ll also help me create an opportunity for performers behind me to pick up where I leave off.

As soon and Diva and Dikay settled into their new roles, Echo caught up with them to find out more about what these titles mean to them and their goals for the year ahead.

Echo: Who have been the biggest mentors to you as a performer? Diva: The biggest mentors are those that came before and after me. All of those people around Arizona that keep performing, despite the price or the time. It makes me want to be a better performer.

Diva, Miss Tucson Pride 2017

I wanted to step back a little and focus on giving back to the community and bringing the people together. Echo: What did winning this title mean to you? DiKay: It was a complete honor. Feeling the spark inside me develop to a full flame is something that is beyond words. Echo: Are there any organizations or causes you hope to work with more as the titleholder? DiKay: I want to help cancer awareness organizations and also would like to focus to help any immigrant organizations who help or provide guidance to people in need. Echo: Tucson performers have recently been making their marks in Arizona pageant systems. What do you think makes Tucson’s drag scene different? DiKay: We give any entertainer the chance… It is all about diversity. Echo: You’ve become known for bringing something different with every number and for your dance abilities. What have you tried to bring to the stage recently to set yourself apart from others? DiKay: With our group HOK, we are giving Tucson something they haven’t seen before. We are bringing underground vogue and different styles to the drag scene … I still love performing top, and old, songs as well as doing characterizations and bringing new makeup looks into my art. Echo: You were very open with sharing your story of overcoming cancer. What made you decide to do this?

Echo: What made you decide to run for Miss Tucson Pride this year? Diva: Tucson Pride is a title that represents the essence of the community here in our city. It’s not a title that acts as a preliminary

Kriis DiKay, Mr. Tucson Pride 2017 Echo: What made you decide to run for Mr. Tucson Pride this year?

Diva can be found at IBT’s hosting Diva La Diva on Wednesdays and as a cast member in Flawless Fridays and Saturday Night Starlets. Photo by Scotty Kirby.

DiKay: After years of competing and taking my talent around the nation, feature story

feature story

DiKay: Being able to see that I can make a difference as an entertainer made me want to open up, give people the strength to fight … Right after the surgery, I also lost my grandfather and, two days later, my aunt to cancer. I knew I had to keep fighting in their memory and help others as much as I could.

PLUS: Kriis Dikay hosts a show every first Thursday of the month at the PlayHaus with his group HOK, which also includes Dvyne Valentino and Or’ion Steele. Photo by Scotty Kirby.

Meet Echo’s 2017 Hall of Fame inductees

Echo: How do you think being Mr. Tucson Pride will help you to grow as a performer and person? DiKay: Being able to represent the city of Tucson in other cities and states will show me what other communities and performers do. It will definitely give me ideas on how to grow as a performer but also ways to bring people together and give back to our communities.

READ THE REST For Echo’s PLUS: full interviews Echo’s withMeet Miss and 2017 Hall of Fame inductees Mr. Tucson Pride 2017, visit echomag.com/a-royal-return. EchoMag.com

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Growing from the Center one•n•ten settles into new location to continue serving today’s youth and tomorrow’s future

Growing from the Center one•n•ten settles into new location to continue serving today’s youth and tomorrow’s future LGBTQ NEWS, VIEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT | VOL. 29, #2 | ISSUE 698 | NOVEMBER 2017 | COMPLIMENTARY

Subscribe today at

echomag.com/echogram.

LGBTQ NEWS, VIEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT | VOL. 29, #2 | ISSUE 698 | NOVEMBER 2017 | COMPLIMENTARY


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Feature Story

An Unexpected Tale Phoenix designer-turned-author looks to repeat debut success with second novel By Bruce Christian

W

ith a highly productive and critically acclaimed career in custom home construction as well as interior and landscape design, it was easy for local resident Michael Scott Garvin to keep another artistic outlet hidden for two decades.

But after taking the literary world by storm a year ago, with his award-winning novel A Faithful Son, Garvin is out of the writers’ closet and is being compared to some of America’s great novelists. “I think I had a lot of success in design and home construction, and I think I just hit that age when I wanted something more – maybe just another outlet for creativity,” Garvin said during an interview from his award-winning MSG Studio on north Seventh Street. “I had started novels in my 20s, in my 30s and even my 40s, but I think it wasn’t until my late 40s that I think I finally realized why I was able to

continue. This time I started writing about people I knew rather than people I wanted to know,” Garvin said. “I started writing about places I had been verses places I had wanted to go. I think I finally discovered that that’s the way I could tell a story.” A Faithful Son took him nearly three years to finish. He had planned to shove it away in a shoebox and maybe share it someday with nieces and nephews. “I knew the subject matter would not sell a lot of books,” he acknowledged. “I wrote it quietly for three years without telling a single soul. When I finished it, I went to my sister, who works with me, and told her I’ve written a novel. She was somewhat shocked, and I said ‘here you go.’ and I handed it over to her.” A Sister’s Love Garvin’s sister, Christi Seipel, loved it, so he decided to self-publish it. Unbeknownst to him, Seipel submitted A Faithful Son to the New York Book Festival. “One day last July we get notification that it is a finalist,” Garvin said. “It was a true surprise. Talk about someone living in a dream.” One reviewer went so far as to compare the Cactus High School graduate with Harper Lee of To Kill a Mockingbird fame. And, in the year it has been available, the coming-of-age novel has won an Independent Publisher Book Awards Gold medal; was declared the winner of the 2016 Beverly Hills Book Awards; was named a finalist at the 2016 New York Book Festival; and was declared Best Fiction of 2016 International Book Festival. While Garvin was being recognized at book fairs and book signings nationwide, his newly found writing success and fame remained a secret here in his hometown. And as the whirlwind of activity may have forced most people to seek a reprieve, Garvin dived head first into writing novel No. 2.

Photo courtesy of Michael Scott Garvin.

“This time I started writing about people I knew rather than people I wanted to know. I started writing about places I had been verses places I had wanted to go. I think I finally discovered that that’s the way I could tell a story.” – Michael Scott Garvin

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A Faithful Son by Michael Scott Garvin. Self-published, 308 pages.

“My sister will tell you that I work day and night,” Garvin said. “I’ve had a lot of success over the years, but once I got the bug to write, it is like I suddenly have dueling masters.” Lightning Strikes Twice His second novel, Aunt Sookie & Me: The Sordid Tale of a Scandalous Southern Belle, was released at the beginning of July. By the end of July, Garvin learned it too is being honored as a New York Book Festival finalist. “We are experiencing that same kind of adrenalin,” he said. “It’s like lightning is striking twice. I’m proud of what I’ve put out, because it’s a different novel than A Faithful Son.” The two novels are as different as a devout, Bible-reciting, coddling church lady is to a sarcastic, irreverent, jaded-to-the-Lord eccentric. And Garvin did that on purpose. “After A Faithful Son, I promised myself I would take a break,” he explained. “But I wasn’t expecting the kind of almost vacuum in my time it created. There was sort of an emptiness, so I had to go directly into another novel. “But I remember telling myself, if you are going to write again – if you are going to go into another manuscript – make sure it’s a satire, because I didn’t want to go through something as heavy as writing A Faithful Son,” he recalled. Feature Story

Aunt Sookie & Me: The Sordid Tale of a Scandalous Southern Belle by Michael Scott Garvin. Self-published, 352 pages.

Garvin purposely chose two distinct writing styles for his books. In A Faithful Son, his poetic prose prolifically paints a picturesque landscape of Durango, as well as penetrating portraits of each personality. In Aunt Sookie, the writer depends on delicious dialogue to drive the story. Pieces of Himself Garvin’s first novel centers around a young man, Zach Nance, growing up in a religiously devout family during the ’60s in Durango, Colo., – where his parents had a home. The book is introspective as Zach searches for answers, knowing he is different. Zach faces the same trials and tribulations that so many LGBTQ individuals face, and Garvin captures the innocence, conflict, purity and acceptance beautifully. Zach’s major antagonist is his sister, Laura, who becomes a zealot with her religious beliefs. “I just find that people who are zealots, whether you are right wing, ultra-religious, agnostic, I just believe anyone who is a zealot can look at their life in absolutes, and that is who I wanted Laura to be. I wanted her to be someone who looks through life through black and white, because I think life is toned with gray,” Garvin said. Aunt Sookie is a comedic romp with titillating surprises. It focuses on 13-year-old Poppy Wainwright, an “unusual” girl who moves to Savannah, Ga., also in the 1960s, to live with her EchoMag.com

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crusty, cantankerous, blunt and hoot of an aunt. The twists and turns keep readers turning pages at a torrid pace in anticipation of the next surprising reveal to occur – and there are plenty! “I think there are pieces of me in every character,” said Garvin, who came out during the mid-1980s. He acknowledged he was kind of a club kid at places such as Hot Bods, The Connection and Charlie’s before settling into his adult life, leaving all that behind. “I was once in a relationship with a Phoenix Police Officer, it was my only substantial relationship, and because of that, I think the only characters in these books that weren’t a part of me were Jackson Taylor, Poppy’s boyfriend, and Doug, Zach’s boyfriend. They were probably the least flushed out characters, because I just kind of created them out of the boyfriends of my dreams,” Garvin said. “While certainly A Faithful Son and Aunt Sookie are not my life story, I certainly knew those people,” he added. Despite the different moods set in each of Garvin’s novels, he leaves readers satisfied that in the end Zach Nance and Poppy Wainwright will be all right. Church Ladies A common thread in both books is religious references, which shows Garvin knows his Bible. He grew up in a Pentecostal household, where his family was “so kind and understanding” that his experience is nothing like the fictional Zach’s. “I approached the writing apolitical, because I don’t have an ax to grind with the Religious Right,” Garvin said. “I think there is a place for everything in this world.” However, he recalls vividly the almost smothering church ladies – their smells, behaviors, attitudes. He captured them in A Faithful Son. “I remember those women with their Polyester dresses and their bouffant hair-dos. I remember them pulling me into them and the smell of talcum powder and sweet perfume. They were momma bears, taking care of their young ones.” With Aunt Sookie, his fun side shines. “Again, I’m not a political person, but I think we all need to laugh,” he explained. “You can see how politically incorrect she is. And religion? When Aunt Sookie’s final draft was complete, I realized that some of the same religious themes repeated in both novels. “I had to tone down some things with the church ladies, and I had to edit out some of the scenes with the church, because I thought, ‘Hey, I’ve done that.’ So, I made the pastor in Aunt Sookie a good person. I liked the idea that a pastor – who often is a negative character – I liked that he is kind and sort of takes care of Poppy and oddly enough Sookie and Daryl the ice cream man.” Character development is rich in each book. Other than the two individuals who Garvin said he did not fully flush out – Jackson Taylor and Doug – readers will care deeply for each person, either because they recognize a trait or traits from the character in themselves, or because they have a relative just like those church ladies or Aunt Sookie. 52

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“I think there are pieces of me in every character ... While certainly A Faithful Son and Aunt Sookie are not my life story, I certainly knew those people.” – Michael Scott Garvin

Far from The End The former ASU College of Architecture student, who switched to the design program, continues working in that industry, which he calls his passion. However, writing has become something he must do, he said. And he writes whenever and wherever he can, such as when traveling to a job site across the country. “I actually look forward to a five-hour layover, because I get so much writing done in an airport,” Garvin said. As these were his first finished novels, Garvin admitted he learned as he wrote. He researched the cities and the kinds of people who lived in them during the time periods the stories take place. “With A Faithful Son, I wrote the first chapter and the last chapter, [before] I realized that because of the time it took me, I was being neurotic over every word and every sentence,” Garvin reflected. Once he realized that he couldn’t finish the book at the pace he was on, he said he used Google to search for “How to write a book.” The first suggestion he found was to set up an outline. “I found out very quickly that my neurotic tendencies went right along with me because I ended up having a 75-page outline,” Garvin laughed. “But the beauty of that, was that it was like the skeleton. It basically was my novel, and all I had to do was go in and add narrative and prose and description and dialogue. So, the outline was the body and soul of the novel. It was surprising how the outline helped me.” For Aunt Sookie, Garvin said he wrote the beginning of every chapter, before going back to complete the book. And, with his two-novel success, we can’t help but wonder if the same is true for the chapter that has been his writing career. While Garvin hasn’t committed to whether this is The End, he share that A Faithful Son sold well enough that it paid for itself and for Aunt Sookie and also that he’s received at least two offers from publishers. For up-to-date information on Garvin, his titles and travels, visit michaelscottgarvinbooks.com.

Bruce Christian is a former managing editor of Echo Magazine. He can be reached at btrethewy@yahoo.com.

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Cabin Whiskey & Grill Story and photos by Rachel Verbits

E

ven if we don’t truly experience all four seasons here is Arizona, history has proven that when we finally feel the relief cooler weather we go absolutely crazy for all things fall. For some, that means returning to patios for cocktailing for others that means a cornucopia of outdoor activities. And, in celebration of the official end of summer hibernation, we visited a restaurant that combines both (and should please just about anyone else you invite along as well). In addition to shopping for sexy Halloween costumes and sipping PSLs this month, we paid a visit to the cabin. Not just any cabin, though. Cabin Whiskey & Grill (aka Cabin West), located at 99th and Northern Avenues in Peoria, is the perfect dining experience to complement to the rest of your favorite fall flavors and festivities. But don’t take out word for it … As soon as we set foot in the cabin’s front door, we were met with the great outdoors – indoors. The restaurant’s tree-lined walls, river rock decor and wooden wall accents create such a palpable ambiance that I could almost smell the pine trees. And the large stone fireplace along the back wall, which provides natural warmth and coziness to the space, commands the attention of the cabin’s guests. Piles of freshly cut wood are strewn throughout the area, and the best part is, we didn’t have to chop it ourselves! Of course, this is still Phoenix, so the establishment wouldn’t be complete without a sprawling outdoor patio with a separate bar. Its high-top tables and lounge-style couches make for a perfect gathering place for friends on football Sunday, weekday happy hours or just about any other occasion imaginable this time of year. (This is why we live here, isn’t it?) As we took in the woodsy atmosphere, we turned our attention the whiskey menu, which serves as evidence that Cabin Whiskey is far more than just the

name of this place. Everything from single-barrel to small-batch varieties of whiskey grace the carefully crafted cocktail list. Looking for straight bourbon? They have it. Barrel strength proof whiskey? They have it. Rather drink by region? No problem. The Cabin knows there are great whiskey makers all over the world, so they feature choices from as close as Tennessee and Canada and as far as Scotland and Ireland. So, no matter how cold it is (or isn’t), there are options that are guaranteed to warm anyone – from beginners to aficionados – up from the inside out. But since it really was still summer at the time of my visit, I ordered The Cabin “Punch” which combines 3 Olives Mango, 3 Olives Pineapple, lemon, lime and pineapple juice. This tropical treat evoked more beach-y vibes than woodsy ones, but that, in my estimation, pretty much sums up the juxtaposition of living in Arizona. As much more of a purist, my dining partner treated himself to Cabin 44, which we agreed is a perfectly seasonal selection. Old Camp Peach Pecan Whiskey, white peach puree, sour mix and a squeeze of lemon are mixed and served over ice. We could definitely imagine sipping this flavor combination by a crackling fire in the middle of nowhere. If whiskey makes you frisky, then The Cabin’s menu is the antidote (not that there’s anything wrong with frisky). But brace yourself because this menu has it all. If you’re indecisive, you could spend a bit of time making your selections. To ease the decision-making process, we took advantage of Happy Hour, which boasts half off appetizers Monday through Friday from 3 to 7 p.m. From an entire list of starters – that included everything from southwest crab cakes and southern style potato skins – we decide on the macadamia coconut shrimp skewers and Cabin Torpedoes, which are bacon-wrapped roasted jalapeños stuffed with brisket Macadamia coconut shrimp skewers and Cabin Torpedoes.

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and pepper jack cheese. The shrimp was incredibly crispy, sweet and juicy while the torpedoes balanced them out with creamy, cheesy heat. Cabin Whiskey solves the classic where-do-you-want-to-eat debate, because there really is something for every palate. You’ll find the expected burgers and sandwiches as well as a pleasantly diverse selection of salads and pasta, but there are more than a few surprises on the menu as well. And while such dishes as chicken and shrimp carbonara and lemon chicken with roasted veggies are Cabin favorites, the spicy Moroccan chicken and couscous and the wood fired salmon are unexpectedly popular as well – I’m told. The meat of the menu, though (no pun intended), is the variety of carefully selected entrees, from BBQ ribs and New York strip steak to chicken (several ways) and the holy grail: bone-in ribeye. Our server doubled as the perfect compass as we navigated this wild wilderness adventure (er, the menu) and was refreshingly honest about what their favorite dishes were. We happily decided on the pepper-crusted bone-in pork chop, seasoned with pastrami pepper seasoning, grilled and topped with brown gravy and then served alongside Cajun fried onion strings and creamy mashed potatoes. A perfectly executed contrast to the pork and beans that you ate on your childhood camping trips. And we all know no camping trip is complete until you get your hands a little dirty. So, we also ordered the highly recommended Carolina pulled pork sandwich, which features slow-cooked shredded pork that’s been tossed in the

house-made BBQ sauce, coleslaw and Cajun onion straws piled high atop a toasted, buttery brioche bun. The Cabin’s signature “C” gets gently toasted into the bun, giving each savory bite a little taste of char. If you’re drooling – which you should be – by now, but you don’t want to make the hike to the West Valley, there’s good news. A second Cabin Whiskey & Grill location is slated to open in Tempe (between Mill and Ash avenues and Third and Fifth streets) by mid-October. From what we’ve heard, Cabin Tempe will offer a slightly smaller menu, but will still be chock full of Cabin Whiskey’s signature goodness. For details on Tempe’s grand opening and location, visit cabintempe.com or facebook.com/cabintempe.

Cabin Whiskey & Grill 9868 W. Northern Ave., Peoria Hours: Mon-Sun, 11 a.m.-2 a.m. 623-772-5974 cabinwest.com Rachel Verbits is a published writer and a selfproclaimed foodie who spends her time exploring all the amazing eats Arizona has to offer.

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at the box office

By James Fanizza

Lady Bird The Killing of a Sacred Deer Now playing | R | 121 Minutes | Drama, Horror, Mystery

Steven, a charismatic surgeon, is forced to make an unthinkable sacrifice after his life starts to fall apart and the behavior of a teenage boy he has taken under his wing turns sinister. Written and directed by Yorgos Lanthimos, this psychological horror film premiered at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival in May and will keep that spooky Halloween mood extended while at the same time showcasing some top-notch acting from a cast that includes Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell and Alicia Silverstone.

In theaters Nov. 10 | 93 Minutes | Comedy

Written and directed by Greta Gerwig, this comedic drama follows the tense relationship between a mother and daughter. Set in a small town in Northern California, this surprisingly touching and universal film features an amazing performance by Laurie Metcalfe (yes, Aunt Jackie from “Roseanne”) and Saoirse Ronan. Lady Bird is sure to be a hit among indie film goers. Because who doesn’t love a coming-of-age film about a rebellious teenager who squares off with her over-protective mother?

Call Me By Your Name In theaters Nov. 24 | R | 132 Minutes | Drama, Romance

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri In theaters Nov. 10 | R | 115 Minutes | Comedy, Crime, Drama

Nine months after her daughter is raped and murdered, Mildred (Frances McDormand) uses three billboards on the edge of her Missouri town to condemn the local police force for failing to find the culprit. Written and directed by Martin McDonagh, and starring Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell, John Hawkes and Peter Dinklage, this darkly comic drama which recently won the People’s Choice Award at the Toronto International Film Festival and will surely generate plenty of Oscar buzz, particularly for McDormand. 58

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A young man named Elio (Timothée Chalamet), living in Italy during the 1980s, meets Oliver (Armie Hammer), an academic who has come to stay at his parents’ villa, and a passionate relationship develops between them as they bond over their sexuality, their Jewish heritage, and the landscape. Together, they share an unforgettable summer of music, food and romance that will forever change them. Directed by Luca Guadagnino, written by James Ivory, this love story premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, and has been causing a buzz at major festivals around the world. James Fanizza is a proudly queer filmmaker, writer and recent Valley transplant. He can be reached at @jamesfanizza on Instagram and Twitter.

MOVIES


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Courtesy photos.

Opening Nights

Riders of the Purple Sage Phoenix-based composer pens world’s first Western opera By Seth Reines

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his year, Arizona Opera heralded two firsts: its first world premiere and the world’s first Western opera.

After a lush overture that sounded like the score from a vintage Hollywood film, first-nighters (a third of whom had never attended an opera before) were dazzled by Riders of the Purple Sage. Based on the Zane Grey novel of the same name, the Wild West adventure featured a $475,000 video wall with scenic projections by world-renowned Arizona artist Ed Mell, a libretto by Steven Mark Kohn and a stirring score by Phoenix composer Craig Bohmler.

Bohmler first discovered Zane Grey while hiking in Payson. To escape a rainstorm, he ducked into the Zane Grey Cabin and Museum (700 S. Green Valley Parkway in Payson). Intrigued by Grey’s body of work (64 western novels and 130 movies), Bohlmer began reading Grey’s quintessential western classic The Riders of the Purple Sage and knew immediately it had to be an opera. Bohmler’s Riders is the culmination of a four-year initiative dubbed “Arizona Bold,” which focused on recent works with specific relevance to Southwestern audiences. The Texas native, who thrives both artistically and personally in the Southwest, maintains “The desert speaks to a spiritual side of me and nature is abundant.” The overwhelming success of Arizona Opera’s Riders, with record ticket sales and 60

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sold-out houses, prompted two longtime supporters to donate $1 million to subsidize future premiere productions. Arizona Opera’s president and general director Joseph Specter affirms, “The gift empowered Arizona Opera to take greater artistic risks. The success of Riders of the Purple Sage was an affirmation that our community is deeply interested in experiencing dynamic new work.” A fount of imaginative works, Bohmler’s credits include four operas and 10 musicals, which have been performed throughout the United States, Canada, Europe and Japan. Echo caught up with Bohmler to find out more about his most-recent work, and here’s what he had to say. Echo: What is your greatest professional achievement? Bohmler: Certainly Riders. I am also very proud of Enter the Guardsman and Gunmetal Blues, which both had Off-Broadway and London productions. (Editor’s note: Guardsman won Musical of the Year in Denmark and was nominated for Best Musical at London’s Olivier Awards.) Echo: What is your greatest personal achievement? Bohmler: Meeting Rusty Ferracane and being with him for 22 years now. We were married in 2015 … Rusty is a very kind man with an open heart. He is an extremely talented singer, actor, director and my best dramaturg – and he makes me coffee every morning.

Craig Bohmler.

Echo: What upcoming projects can you tell us about? Bohmler: I usually work on two to three projects at a time. I am writing a small piece for viola and chamber orchestra for the San Jose Chamber Orchestra, my 10th commission by them. I am also writing the music for The Boob Show, which was created by my good friend Sally Jo Bannow. We have been working on it for a few years and are excited it will premiere on February 14, 2018, at Phoenix Theatre. (Editor’s Note: This will be Bohmler’s sixth new work for Phoenix Theatre.) This fall, Arizona Opera’s Riders of the Purple Sage will be broadcast as part of PBS’ American Opera Radio Series. For broadcast dates, visit radionetwork.wfmt. com/programs/arizona. Or, for more information on Bohmler’s masterworks, visit craigbohmler.com. M. Seth Reines is an award-winning theater buff who has directed more than 500 productions nationally for stage and television, and formerly served as head of Roosevelt University’s musical theatre program.

READ THE REST For Echo’s full interview with Craig Bohmler, visit echomag.com/riders-of-thepurple-sage. Opening Nights


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recordings By Julio C. Reyna

wonder if the trajectory on this album was to simply appease that type of audience. While the band has stated that this is their most progressive work to date, this album sonically and lyrically falls somewhere between Sam’s Town and Day and Age. In fact, the way the album progresses and the thematic points it hits tend to really follow the model that the former has laid out.

The Killers

Wonderful, Wonderful Island Records |

Brandon Flowers would like to remind you who “The Man” is. On Wonderful Wonderful, the first effort from The Killers in more than five years, the band aims to correct the missteps of their previous effort, but does not quite reach the peaks of their earlier work. The album finds the band in a curious place where name dropping and humblebragging band aid its struggle to determine self-identity.

ODESZA

A Moment Apart Counter Records/ Foreign Family Collective |

The stand out is easily “Run For Cover,” an urgent, guitar-heavy and synth-filled track that gives a chorus that will likely go down as one of the band’s classics. “Run for cover/Run while you can, baby/ never look back…” Flowers sings in the all too familiar key when his voice is being pushed to brink and you can almost hear it break. The song also finds the band getting more political than ever with not-so-thinly-veiled references throughout. Yes, “fake news” is dropped within the track.

ODESZA, the Seattle-based electronic duo, is not doing too bad for itself these days. Considering that Harrison Mills and Clayton Mills have been doing this for the past five years and have accomplished the type of following that is seldom matched within their genre is really awe inspiring. On the eagerly anticipated A Moment Apart the band finds itself in the middle of big pop aspirations and trying to stay true to their craft.

While each song feels, at times, loud and over-the-top in true the Killers fashion, so much of the album seems to struggle. Is this a love letter to the fans or is it another place holder for the next round of tour stops? For the better part of the past two years, The Killers have received headlining spots on countless festival bills and tours. It makes one

Like most of their previous work the album maintains the familiar sound sampling and whimsical feel. The journey that the album takes you on could easily be played in chronological order and the feelings that accompany experience their full sets live remains throughout (pro tip: Arizonan’s have the opportunity to experience an Odesza set live at the

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Lost Lake Festival, visit echomag.com/ lost-lake for more information.) The band clearly has world domination in mind and relies on pop fixtures throughout to try to reach its end goal. Over the summer the band released five tracks prior to the full album drop, and two of those songs stood out for all of the wrong reasons; “Higher Ground” featuring Naomi Wild and “Line of Sight” featuring WYNNE and Masionair. Outside of the context of the full album, these tracks seemed to indicate that the band is perhaps flirting with a more radiofriendly direction. Within the context of the rest of the album, these singles simply glide along and remain mostly forgettable and are countered by instrumental tracks like “A Moment Apart,” “Boy” and “Late Night,” which will easily go down the best in the group’s catalogue. Not to say that all of the albums collaborations fell short, “Across The Room” featuring Leon Bridges not only yielded a dream collaboration for the band, but a standout where mostly stripped down production and soulful vocals sound like nothing they have ever done before. Overall A Moment Apart is an album that can easily make them the mainstream act that they have always seemed destined to become.

Fergie

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It has been 11 years since Fergie graced the world with The Dutchess, arguably one of the biggest pop albums of the mid-aughts. Between then and now the star found herself back with her Black Eyed Peas bandmates temporarily, but has essentially not made a peep musically since her debut. Well, after a long wait, the world has finally been given a follow up with Double Dutchess. The question is, does anyone really want this?

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The album actually kicks off with a promising start, “Hungry” (feat. Rick Ross), on which she sounds confident and ready to reclaim the spot she gave up so long ago. But things immediately go downhill. Every track manages to sound like a light version or continuation of a song from her debut. The main problem the work stumbles upon is the fact that the album seems to sonically be stuck in 2006. The process to get to this point has more than likely been a challenge for Fergie, considering the fact that both singles – “LA Love (La La),” which was released back in 2014, and last summer’s, “M.I.L.F. $,” her most-recent failure – somehow managed to still make the cut. The album also comes with a 13-video visual companion that does not do it any favors. The videos feel like a low-rent emulation of a certain other star that also accompanies her albums with fullvisual presentations. The problem with this album is not the fact that it sounds dated, but the fact that there have been so many years in between her debut and this current effort. How does something that has taken so long to make somehow manage to sound so rushed, dated and like an afterthought? Even the title. Don’t call Double Dutchess comeback, because it is simply not. Julio C. Reyna is a music festival nomad who is finally getting paid for his quick wit, signature snark and musical prowess. He can be reached at @wholeeoh on Instagram. music

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between the covers

Death Goes Overboard By Terri Schlichenmeyer

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an you float me a loan? It’s a common question when your friends know you’re flush with cash. Can I hold a ten for a minute? Can you spot me five? Sure, you probably could but will it be hard to collect on that debt or, as in the new noir mystery, Death Goes Overboard by David S. Pederson, will you be paid back swimmingly? The weekend was all set. Detective Heath Barrington had everything planned down to the last detail: he and police officer Alan Keyes were heading to a cabin in Northern Wisconsin, just the two of them, under the guise of a “fishing trip.” It was 1947, after all, and discretion was absolutely necessary for two professional gay men, but the getaway would be a great chance to see where their new relationship was going. Still, despite his and Alan’s carefulness, rumors could come from anywhere, which was why Barrington was worried when his boss called him in early one day. Fortunately, the Chief didn’t want to quiz Barrington on his love life; he wanted to send the Detective on a special assignment. Assuming that he’d screw up eventually, Milwaukee law enforcement had been following Gregor Slavinsky ever since the small-time hood got out of prison, and that’s exactly what happened. Word on the street was that Slavinsky recently borrowed $25,000 from Benny Ballentine, a bigger crook and the guy the department really wanted to nab. Both were booked on a Lake Michigan excursion, and something

was afoot. The Chief needed Barrington to find out more. The “fishing trip” cancelled, Barrington boarded a small luxury boat for a weekend tour. With few fellow travelers – two known hoodlums, a henchman, plus a man and his elderly aunt – he thought he’d have no trouble keeping an eye on everyone, especially since the boat’s steward was an undercover cop, too. But when a scuffle, a splash, and a missing crook proved otherwise, Barrington knew his assignment had suddenly changed. Slavinsky was nobody’s favorite guy … but who among the handful of possible suspects had the most reason to kill him? Every cliché ever packed in a noir novel – every single one – seems to be inside Death Goes Overboard. You’ve got mobsters, a fedora-wearing detective in a pinstriped suit, seeminglyprim matrons, and man-hungry blondes eager for marriage. It’s like an old blackand-white movie in book form – but curiously, you probably won’t mind.

Death Goes Overboard by David S. Pederson. Bold Strokes Books, 2017 | $18.95.

You won’t mind because Pederson has packed a lot of else in this novel. You don’t normally find a soft-sided, poetry-writing mobster in a noir mystery, for instance, but he’s here. And then there’s the sweetly chaste, budding romance between two men; not so unusual, again, except that one of them is considering something drastic in order to hide his secret, a side-plot that’s historically accurate and that fits. So, this novel is both predictable and not, making it a nice diversion for a weekend or vacation. If that’s the kind of book you enjoy, then Death Goes Overboard will make you buoyant. Terri Schlichenmeyer, The Bookworm, lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 13,000 books. She’s been reading since age 3 and, to this day, she never goes anywhere without a book.

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talking bodies

Four Things the Food Industry Doesn’t Want You To Know By Tia Norris

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at fewer carbs. Eat more meat. Drink more milk. Drink less coffee. Supplement with fiber. Watch your cholesterol. Wake up, my friends. You’ve been lied to, for your entire life. It’s time we discuss the scandalous charade of dietary guidance in this country. You can’t trust the government, and you definitely can’t trust the food producers. Everyone has an agenda. Everyone wants you to keep buying their products, at whatever cost. What you need to know is this: Big Food is not your friend. When I say Big Food, I’m referring to such mass-producers as Kellogg’s, Nestlé, Nabisco; agricultural agencies including Dairy Farmers of America, North American Meat Institute and National Corn Growers Association; and even such entities as the American Heart Association, American Diabete s Association, and so on. Many of the studies are dangerously biased, and lots of documentaries are misleading and tragically incomplete, so you have to be very careful who you believe. As your health and fitness expert, I’m here to keep it real by letting you know what’s really going on behind what food industry is telling you to eat:

1. It’s A Business Big Food wants to make their products as cheaply as possible, to maximize their profits. Ultimately, Big Food wants to make money. They don’t care about you, your health or the long-term consequences that you will face as the consumer of their massproduced products – they only want to keep you eating more, more often and at a lower cost to them. Consequently, however, that cheap production inevitably means cheap nutrition for you, the consumer. One example of this is the difference between white bread and wheat 66

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bread. The white bread has literally been stripped of almost all nutritional qualities in order to be processed – some might say it is nutritionally dead, aside from empty calories. The more processed (and less natural) the ingredients are, the less your body will recognize those foreign ingredients, the less your body will be able to use those foreign ingredients, and the more malnourished you will be in the long run.

2. Most Advertising is False — or at least misleading Advertising for junk food is incredibly appealing but tragically misleading, especially to children. Advertisers spend billions of dollars per year, solely on marketing junk food to kids. On TV alone, it is estimated that children are exposed to about 15 advertisements, for everything from sugary cereals and snacks to drinks and candy, per day. These advertisements are oftentimes infectiously catchy, upbeat and portray consumption of the junk product as being cool or trendy. It is downright offensive how these garbage products are so cleverly packaged to be desirable to kids.

3. Statistics Are Skewed The studies that producers and agricultural agencies cite are overwhelmingly biased, and employ incredible skewing of the statistics to draw favorable conclusions for their products. Of course, the dairy industry is going to cite 10 studies supporting dairy consumption and, of course, they do not cite the other 10 studies showing that dairy may cause inflammation, gastrointestinal distress and endocrine disruption. The market is riddled with bias, lobbying, and shockingly shady behavior between Big Food, the government and everyone in between. Every single government agency that “advises” you on what you

should be eating, has taken millions of dollars in exchange for propagating certain opinions. Additionally, these intimidatingly wealthy agencies spend a significant amount of their resources on discrediting whistleblowers and anyone who exposes the corruption and distrust. That is the single most important thing you can take away from this article.

4. Labeling is Designed To Sell Products Labeling, nutritional claims and selling points are often misleading. Producers will stamp any claim they can get away with onto their products to make you believe they are healthier choices. For example, peanuts are commonly marketed with a “low carb” claim. Many naïve consumers will see “low carb” and instantly equate that with “healthy,” not realizing, that nutrition is extremely complex and can be completely different from one person to the next, further complicated by individual fitness goals. Be careful what you read and be INFORMED about what each component of your diet actually does. But, don’t just take my word for it. Your best weapon against this industry’s hot mess of lies and deception is becoming informed. Therefore, I challenge you to find neutral sources, refrain from blindly believing industry stakeholders, educate yourself on nutrition basics and what each component of the diet does, develop a highly critical filter for advertisements, statistics and food labels, look for evidence contradicting what you’re reading and make sure you know what all sides of the issue are saying. And then, of course, good luck at grocery store! Tia Norris is the president and head trainer at FitPro, LLC, a local fitness company. Find out more at fitprollc.com. HEALTH & FITNESS


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ALL OVER THE MAP

Someone To Look Up To By Liz Massey

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s part of LGBTQ History Month, Echo Magazine will induct another class of community leaders into its Hall of Fame. More than just measuring fame, this recognition amounts to a “hall of honor,” an award acknowledging civic achievement. One thing is certain: it’s not just a “hall of popularity.” Nominees for the Hall of Fame are carefully vetted, researched and examined in terms of their contributions to Arizona’s various LGBTQ communities.

As the roster of Echo’s Hall of Fame has expanded, the list has become a valuable resource – a library of stories about people who have found unique ways to build up other LGBTQ community members, our allies and Arizona’s metropolitan areas as a whole. The fact that Arizona now has a sizeable LGBTQ Hall of Fame demonstrates how our community continues to mature socially. One of the drivers of this phenomenon has been our visibility since the time of Stonewall; once we were able to find each other, it was exponentially easier to organize, support, advocate for and liberate one another. There’s a reason all anti-queer legislation aims to drive us back into the closet. When we are isolated and conflicted, we are powerless. Organize our colorful, vibrant tribe and we are an unstoppable equality force. Our community needs mentors and heroes like those found in the Hall of Fame because that sort of generative, reciprocal behavior builds a stronger movement. It balances our newfound abilities to succeed as out and proud individuals with the knowledge that this wouldn’t be possible without the efforts of those who faced down a hostile social and political environment to make life better for all LGBTQ people who came after them. There’s an old African proverb that says, “If you want to go fast, go alone, but if you want to go far, go together.” And we HAVE come a long way. Some of our local youth support organizations have been in place for nearly 25 years. Support groups exist for every situation, from coping with HIV to building a rainbow family, and we have a variety of queer professional groups to advance career development. Of course, even with the amount of progress we’ve made here in Arizona, much remains to be done. Transgender discrimination is widespread and troubling; far too many queer youth risk homelessness when they come out to unaccepting families; and the current presidential administration has made it clear that they are no friend of the LGBTQ community. The beautiful thing about mentoring is that it doesn’t require an enormous investment of time or money to make a difference. Providing a young LGBTQ protégée with survival tips and guidance can literally save lives, in some cases. Mentoring builds equity in our community, so more people enter it ready to contribute. And there are benefits for mentors, too; mentoring provides a channel for 68

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skilled individuals to share their gifts, and it provides them with a chance to honor those who made success possible for them. There are many ways to be a mentor, including … • Expanding someone’s access to the community. Introduce your protégée to your network and expand their social horizons. • Becoming a teacher. Whether it’s sharing professional development advice or life hacks for becoming a more effective activist, your “how-to” knowledge can be extremely valuable. • Telling the stories of your LGBTQ life. Hearing how you handled your life challenges can help others generate ideas for resolving their own issues. • Championing the whole family. Our newly out youth need support and role models, but so do their parents, siblings and other relatives, if they are to become effective allies. • Encouraging self-advocacy. Helping a protégée help themselves is the ultimate goal of all mentorship. Mentors can help by listening, discussing options and coaching apprentices through new behaviors. The novelist James Baldwin said, “Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.” We must be intentional about what sort of example we set as members of the LGBTQ community, because we never can be completely sure of who is going find our behavior worthy of repeating. Liz Massey has been involved in LGBTQ community-building activities in Kansas City and the Valley of the Sun, and is a former managing editor of Echo Magazine. She can be reached at lizmassey68@gmail.com. COMMUNITY


Geoffrey Louis Lawhon January 8, 1958 - August 12, 2017 Geoffrey Lawhon slipped the surly bonds of Earth on August 12, 2017, after a long illness. He passed with his family by his side, peacefully and quietly. Geoff was a man of many talents. His life hacks and camping exploits are the stuff of legends. In 2000, he embarked on what would be one of many journeys to the playa for Burning Man, where he was beloved member of the LAFF Camp. He loved Disneyland, roller coasters, Mexican food, dogs and Utilakilts. Geoff was a member of Bears of the West and actively involved with Phurfest for a number of years. He and his partner were involved with a number of bear organizations and actively supported the community. Geoff is survived by his wife, children and grandchildren; and his longtime companion, Scott Wilson of Sun City. He also leaves behind his two furry kids, Lilo and Lucky. Geoff will be remembered as a wonderful husband, father, grandfather and friend.

Geraldine M. Baier June 30, 1931– August 27, 2017

Geraldine M. Baier (Gerry, GB) was born in Chicago on June 30, 1931, and died in Phoenix on Aug. 27, 2017, at age 86. Geraldine was a very active LGBTQ proponent and was one of the pillars of our community. Not only was she was a founding member of Arizona Gay Rodeo Association (AGRA) and the first woman member of Los Amigos Del Sol (LADS), she was also a consistent volunteer for such community causes as the Community Aids Council (CAC) and Volunteers in Direct Aid (VIDA). Geraldine was always available to assist in any way she could. She had many, many parties at her home and everyone was welcome. The past few years were unkind to Geraldine, as breast cancer and increasing dementia caused her a great deal of pain. She is at peace now and is lovingly remembered by her many friends.

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Guest Columnist

I Want to Be Heard in My Healthcare

I just want to be heard. When I describe some of the health problems that I experience to my physician, like the embarrassing issue of HIV-related diarrhea, I wasn’t met with recommendations for FDAapproved diarrhea treatment [mytesi. com]. Instead, I was told on more than one occasion that my doctor “does not see diarrhea anymore” because of the improved HIV meds that we now have.

By Josh Robbins

I

want to be heard. It is as simple as that.

More specifically, I want to be heard in my healthcare. I want my healthcare delivered to me to be personal, derived specifically for me, and the exact opposite of communitywide healthcare. I don’t want to be a statistic anymore and I couldn’t care less what risk pool in which I’ve previously been placed or grouped. Sometimes the labels and words like “MSM”[men who have sex with men] and “high risk”[sexually] completely veil my identity within my own health. And it isn’t okay, anymore.

Residential • Commercial Historic Home Specialists Licensed • Bonded • Insured

Phoenix Tucson 602-276-5515 520-300-5353

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I joke sometimes that I could run into a glass door and break my nose, and when I hit the emergency room instead of helping me with my sideways nose, they would be attempting to study how HIV is starting to affect my cognition. “My nose is broken because I ran into a glass door. HIV isn’t to blame,” I would say.

I am an individual first, and my healthcare needs to be mine. I want to be heard. As a cisgender white male, I have substantial privilege, obviously. I completely accept that, as neither my fault nor my reward. I cannot affect it. But as an HIV-positive queer trying to navigate healthcare, at times, I feel I am losing. I have yet to find health equity – and I’m putting in the work. Since the Affordable Care Act was implemented, I have been dropped by insurance companies four times – each followed by brief interruptions of me seeing my doctor and once completely stopping my adherence to antiretroviral meds. I consider myself to be pretty savvy at navigating the system. If I am having trouble with the system, I suspect others may have already just stopped trying to figure it out altogether. But I am not giving up on healthcare. I am fighting to stay engaged. When I finally make it to the doctor’s office, I also want to be heard. In 2012, my first appointment with my HIV specialist focused on community-wide recommendations to begin antiretroviral therapy immediately. Sure, there are benefits to starting treatment early, but at that time, arguments could be made for waiting - especially because I was showing signs of being an HIV controller [healthline. com/health/hiv-aids/hiv-controllers]. Since being diagnosed with HIV in 2012, almost every time I have a minor illness or issue arise, I sometimes cringe when telling any non-HIV specialized doctor or nurse practitioner that I am positive because it immediately changes how they treat me both literally and medically. Usually the moment that I disclose that I am positive, everything is attributed to the virus. I understand, accept, and believe that HIV treatment works[cdc.gov/actagainstaids/ campaigns/hivtreatmentworks/index. html] – but not every minor issue is related to living with HIV.

Honestly, I do not care what they see or don’t see among patients living with HIV, because I am experiencing that side effect. And I wanted to be heard – to be treated individually and not ignored. This year I have learned that my healthcare requires my active participation, my active engagement, and my resolve to fight battles for myself like I could never imagine I would be fighting. When an insurance company dropped my coverage in my state – I fought to get new coverage. I will fight at the end of this year again. I will be heard. When I was told that I had to order my medicine from a specific pharmacy – I fought to keep my pharmacist because I believe they are important in my patient journey because they know all my allergies. I will be heard. When my doctor made treatment plans based off of statistics instead of recommending what would be best for me as an individual, I fired that doctor and found a new one who now listens to me and takes what I have to say into consideration before making a plan. I will be heard. As much as we are told to stand up and fight for social issues, to rise up and speak against inequalities, and to do the important work to bring justice and equity to all people – I realize that each of us has the right and needs to be heard as an individual in our own personal healthcare. I will be heard. You should be heard, as well. Let’s fight to make it happen. Josh Robbins is a GLAAD Award-nominated blogger for imstilljosh.com and an HIVpositive patient advocate. He is a Nashville-based paid spokesperson for #MyHIVThankYou campaign sponsored by Napo Pharmaceuticals, Inc., makers of Mytesi.

Community


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LOCAL BUSNESSES


Your Ad Here! For details, call 602-266-0550. LOCAL BUSNESSES

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THE GAYBORHOOD

19

22

7

5

21

25

16

18 10

15

5th

8

32nd St.

Bethany Home

24 20

e. Av

6

3 1 14

2

23

9

12 4 17 13

11 *Map is not drawn to scale

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LOCAL BUSNESSES


1

ANVIL

2424 E. Thomas Road

602-334-1462

M, D, L

2

AQUA NIGHT CLUB

1730 E. McDowell Road

602-253-0682

F, N, E, D

3

BAR 1

3702 N. 16th St.

602-266-9001

M, N, E

4

BLISS REBAR

901 N. Fourth St.

602-795-1792

M, N, E

5

BOYCOTT BAR

4301 N. Seventh Ave.

602-515-3667

MF, D, E

6

BS WEST

7125 E. Fifth Ave.

480-945-9028

MF, D, E

7

BUNKHOUSE

4428 N. Seventh Ave.

602-200-9154

M, N, L

8

CHARLIE’S

727 W. Camelback Road

602-265-0224

M, C, E, D

9

CLUB VOLT

3108 E. McDowell Road

602-244-1465

MF, D, E

10 10

CRUISIN’ 7TH

3702 N. Seventh St.

602-212-9888

M, E

11 11

DICK’S CABARET

3432 E. Illini St.

602-274-3425

M, G

12 12

FEZ

105 W. Portland St.

602-287-8700

R

13 13

FLEX SPAS PHOENIX

1517 S. Black Canyon Hwy

602-271-9011

M, AO

14 14

KARAMBA NIGHTCLUB

1724 E. McDowell Road

602-254-0231

D, E

15 15

KOBALT

3110 N. Central Ave., Ste. 125

602-264-5307

MF, E, N

16 16

LOS DIABLOS

1028 E. Indian School Road

602-795-7881

MF, R, N

17 17

NU TOWNE SALOON

5002 E. Van Buren St.

602-267-9959

M, N, L

18 18

OFF CHUTE TOO

4115 N. Seventh Ave

602-274-1429

M, A

19 19

OZ BAR

1804 W. Bethany Home Road

602-242-5114

MF, N

20 20

PLAZMA

1560 E. Osborn Road

602-266-0477

MF, N, E

21 21

ROYAL VILLA INN

4312 N. 12th St.

602-266-6883

M, AO

22 23

STACY’S @ MELROSE

4343 N. Seventh Ave.

602-264-1700

MF, D, N

23 24

THE CASH NIGHTCLUB & LOUNGE

2140 E. McDowell Road

602-244-9943

F, C, D

25 24

THE CHUTE

1440 E. Indian School Road

602-234-1654

M, AO

26 25

THE ROCK

4129 N. Seventh Ave.

602-248-8559

M, N, E

MAP CODES: A M F MF

Adult Retail & Entertainment Mostly Males Mostly Females Mixed Male/Female

LOCAL BUSNESSES

N R D C

Neighborhood Bar Full Restaurant Dance Club Country Dancing

L E G AO

Leather/Bears Entertainment (Karaoke, Drag) Go-Go Dancers Accommodations/Other

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2017 |NOVEMBER OCTOBER 2015

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bar specials BUNKHOUSE S $1 drafts & HH prices all day & night M 7 p.m. Darts with Acxell

Photos by Stephanie Anne Donoghue.

W 9 p.m. Karaoke T Underwear night: $1 off all drinks if in skivvies! GoGo dancers 9p.m.

F 8 p.m.-close: $2.50 Miller family products. 4 & 6 p.m.: Free-to-join poker

S 8 p.m.-close: $2.50 Bud family products

CHARLIE’S S Super HH 4-7 p.m., $3 pitchers; $3 Long Islands open to close

M 2-8 p.m. 2-4-1 well & domestic bottles, $3 pitchers; 8 p.m.-close, 1/2 off drinks for wearing underwear, $3 Jack Daniels

T 2-8 p.m. 2-4-1 well & domestic bottles, $3 pitchers; 2-4-1 cocktails & beer 8 p.m.close

W 2-8 p.m. 2-4-1 well & domestic bottles, $3 pitchers; $3 Three Olives vodka, 8 p.m.close

T 2-8 p.m. 2-4-1 well & domestic bottles, $3 pitchers; 2-4-1 drinks open-close

F 2-7 p.m. 2-4-1 well & domestics, $3 pitchers; HH 7-9 p.m.; $1 well & domestics, $1 drafts 10 p.m.- midnight

S Noon-7 p.m. 2-4-1 well & domestics; HH 7-9 p.m.; $1 well & domestics, $3 Absolut & Bacardi 10 p.m.-midnight

STACY’S @ MELROSE S $1.50 Rolling Rock pints & well drinks until 10 p.m.

M Karaoke, 9 p.m.-close; HH & $3 charity shots ALL DAY

T HH, 4-8 p.m.; $1 draft pint, $3 charity shots, $4 Mojitos & Caipirinhas ALL DAY; live DJ

W 2-4-1 ALL DAY; $3 charity shots ALL DAY; live DJ, top 40 & dance

T HH & $1.50 draft pint, 4-8 p.m.; $1.50 draft pint & wells, 8 p.m.-midnight; live DJ, top 40 & dance, 8 p.m.-close

F HH, 4-8 p.m.; $3 charity shots ALL DAY; $2 Kamikaze shots ALL DAY; live DJ, top 40 & dance, 8 p.m.-close

S HH, 4-8 p.m.; $3 charity shots ALL DAY; $2 Kamikaze shots ALL DAY; live DJ, top 40 & dance, 8 p.m.-close NOVEMBER 2017

Tucson Pride Parade After Party Sept. 29 at Sky Bar, Tucson.

T Latin Night with Diego

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OUT & ABOUT Sausage Fest Oct. 14 at the Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown. Photos by nightfuse.com.

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OUT & ABOUT Drag Does Disney Sept. 21 at IBT’s in Tucson. Photos by Stephanie Anne Donoghue.

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lambda directory Please support our advertisers who help keep Echo free. To find out more about advertising in Echo, call 602-266-0550.

ACCOUNTANTS/TAX PREPARATION

COUNSELING SERVICES

Jeffrey J. Quatrone PLLC p. 64 Robert F. Hockensmith, CPA, PC p. 48 ADULT ENTERTAINMENT/ RETAIL Flex Spas Phoenix Pleasure World The Chute

p. 81 p. 63 p. 80

AIR CONDITIONG & HEATING Valdez Refrigeration

p. 73

Building Blocks Counseling Stonewall Institute

p. 72 p. 48

DENTISTS My Dentist Open Wide Dental

p. 63 p. 4

DISPENSARY The Mint Dispensary

p. 11

EDUCATION Maricopa County Community College District

p. 67

Don’s Painting Service Lyons Roofing Rainbow Bug TRM Roofing Wallbeds n More

Benefits Arizona Edward Vasquez, Allstate Health Markets Insurance

AUTO SERVICES Community Tire Pros & Auto Repair

JW Advisors Inc. p. 72 Abel Funeral Services p. 83 p. 10

BAR & CLUBS

NOVEMBER 2017

GALLERY Melrose Collective

Bunkhouse p. 75 Charlie’s Phoenix p. 9, 84 Stacy’s @ Melrose p. 74, 75, 77 82

FINANCIAL SERVICES

|

p. 61

HOME SERVICES ADD/WES Roofing

EchoMag.com

p. 72

p. 63 p. 3

Community Church of Hope

p. 72

RESTAURANTS

MORTGAGES

Original Wineburger

p. 57

Jeremy Schachter, Pinnacle Capital Mortgage p. 3

RETAIL

CVS/Specialty Pharmacy Fairmont Pharmacy

Jackson White-Attorneys At Law p. 59 Phillips Law Group p. 17 Tyler Allen Law Firm p. 5

p. 3

p. 57

Festival of Trees p. 48 Hedwig and the Angry Inch p. 53 Hidden In The Hills p. 54, 55 Labelhorde Fashion Show p. 21 Rainbows Festival p. 49 Red Brunch p. 69 Scottsdale Center For the Arts p. 2 Sedona Visual Artists’ Coalition p. 25 Shanti 30th Anniversary Gala p. 36

ATTORNEYS

West USA

p. 57

Broadstone Arts District Dolce Villagio Apartments East and West Apartments El Cortez Apartments Muse Inspired Urban Living

p. 49

p. 3

Shawn Hertzog,

China Chili

PHARMACY

p. 72 p. 59

Executives

Hula’s Modern Tiki

EVENTS

p. 47

Nicholas Yale, Realty

RELIGIOUS GROUPS

INSURANCE

APARTMENTS p. 61

p. 72 p. 70 p. 73 p. 65 p. 65

p. 61

p. 63 p. 67

p. 79

The Classy Kitchen

p. 73

RETIREMENT PLANNING Calvin Goetz, Strategy Financial

REAL ESTATE Encue Living The Rosedale Residences

Off Chute Too

p. 53 p. 13

REALTORS Arizona Gay Realtors Alliance p. 3 Berney Streed, Re/Max Excalibur p. 73 Bradley B. Brauer, HomeSmart p. 3 David Oesterle, ReMax p. 3 Fred Delgado Team, Keller Williams p. 3 Jan Dahl, HomeSmart p. 3 Matthew Hoedt, Realty One p. 3 Melinda Murphy, Lifestyle Partners p. 65

Group

p. 3

SALON Exodus Hair Studios

p. 72

Salon 24

p. 73

WELLNESS FitPro, LLC

p. 72

Gilead PrEP

p. 23

HIV PrEP

p. 79

IGNITE

p. 71

JWW Fitness

p. 73

Skin Frenzy Aesthetics

p. 67

Southwest Center for HIV/AIDS

p. 37

Spectrum Medical Group

p. 47

Willo Medi Spa

p. 73

lambda directory


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Echo Magazine November 2017  

Echo Magazine – Arizona's leading media outlet dedicated to serving the LGBTQ community in news, views and entertainment. Hall of Fame Novem...