Page 1

47th Annual Washington State

Autumn Leaf Festival

September 24 - 26 see supplement inside

Your best source for Cashmere news

September 22, 2010 • Volume 104, No. 38

Single Copy 75¢

Cashmere trounces Connell Photo submitted by Geralynne Padilla

Cashmere Convalescent Center Activity Director Geralynne Padilla snapped this photo of some of the dedicated beauty shop volunteers several years ago, many of them volunteering for more than 25 years. Pictured left to right are Joan Braun, Mary Newberry, Eloise Day, Mindy Peterson and Sharon Graaf. Not pictured, Patty Lindaberry and Dorothy Schmitten. Recent health issues have made getting a photo of the crew in action difficult. The Wednesday morning sessions have been cancelled for the past three weeks.

Curlers, combs and conversation, beauty shop volunteers boost spirits By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer

Photo by Ian Dunn

Cashmere quarterback Tyler McNair weaves his way downfield against the Connell Eagles in action last Friday night in Cashmere. On rainy night, the Bulldogs defeated the defending state champions 26-0.

Peshastin residents invited to serve on community council Two positions up for Nov. 1 vote

for a two-year election rotation, so not all the positions are open at once. Springer said two positions are up for election this year, two more By Nevonne McDaniels in November 2012 and three in 2014. Staff writer All of the terms are for six years The Peshastin Community and all positions are considered Council, the seven-member ad- at-large, which means candidates visory group to Chelan County can come from anywhere within government and organizer of local activities and events, has two positions up for election Nov. 1. Nominations for Positions 1 and 2, currently held by Kathy Springer and June Bergren, are due Oct. 4. Candidates must be at least 18 years old and live in the Peshastin area. The election is set for 7 p.m. – Chairman Steve Keene Nov. 1 at the Peshastin Legion Hall, at the group’s regularly scheduled monthly meeting. the designated Peshastin area. Other councilmembers are Keene said Bergren and SpringChairman Steve Keene, Vice Chair- er, whose terms are up for election man Doug Clarke, Brian Burnett, this year, likely will run again, “but Tricia Ortiz and Cheryl Parsley. we are looking for other people Bergren has been serving as trea- to run as well,” he said. Votes surer and Springer as secretary. will be cast by Peshastin commuThe election is, in part, due to nity members attending the Nov. revised bylaws approved by the 1 meeting. council earlier this year, which “The council has been around called for changing how coun- for years,” Keene said. “We don’t cilmembers are elected and stag- have a budget. We’re not a taxing gering the number of terms up for election each year. The bylaws call See PESHASTIN on Page 4

“For the people in Peshastin, we are their voice.”

Bear attacks man at Lake Wenatchee By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer The wife of a man attacked by a bear Friday night at Lake Wenatchee is being credited by state Fish and Wildlife officers with saving his life. “She heard a ruckus and ran outside to see him lying on the ground,” said Deputy Chief Mike Cenci of the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. “She kept the bear at bay, yelling and screaming at the bear while trying to attend to her husband.” John Chelminiak and his wife, Lynn Semler, were at a Lake Wenatchee vacation cabin when he went out Friday evening to

Index Along the Wenatchee . . . . . . . B6 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

walk their dogs, a 5-pound lap dog and a 20-pound sheep dog. Cenci said Semler heard her husband yell and went to see what was wrong. “Frankly, her actions made all the difference in the world,” Cenci said. Three state Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers, along with a biologist and a Karelian bear dog named Cash responded to the call between 8 and 9 p.m. By the time the wildlife officers arrived, the victim had been transported to the hospital and eventually was taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

We’re ALL over the web

See CURLERS on Page 4

New garbage rates face first official challenge By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer “Impractical” and “more expensive” are two different things. That was the ruling by the Cashmere City Council Sept. 13 in one of the first tests of the city’s new garbage rate structure that went into effect Sept. 1. Tom Dew, owner of Country Boy’s Barbecue at 400 Aplets Way in Cashmere, submitted a letter to the council in August asking to be waived from city garbage collection in favor of using Waste Management, which would save him around $300 a month and contain his trash in one large 8-yard container rather than three smaller ones picked up twice a week. “We create a lot of trash on Friday and Saturday, so I needed a larger dumpster. This is something we’ve been struggling with for a lot of years. We had a 4-yard dumpster, but even that wasn’t enough. We’d been needing to go to an 8-yard dumpster for quite a while.” And that is what Dew proposed, but about that same time, the city’s new “automated” garbage system, which started Sept. 1, did not allow for either a 4-yard container or an 8-yard container. Instead, Country Boy’s was switched to three 1.5-yard dumpsters to be picked up twice a week

at a cost of about $600 a month, a $100 per month increase over the old 4-yard dumpster system. Dew said the three containers take up more space in the parking lot and are less efficient than one 8-yard container would be. “You’re not going to fit as much in three small containers as you would in one big box,” he said. Dew said he spoke with Waste Management and was told that company could supply an 8-yard dumpster, which would be dumped once a week at a cost of $315 a month. But he needed a waiver from the city to get it. The city maintains the franchise for garbage collection, which means Waste Management can contract for collection only with express permission of the city. Cashmere Director of Operations Bob Schmidt denied Dew’s request for the waiver. “My determination is that it is not impractical for the city to serve your garbage disposal needs,” he wrote in a letter dated Sept. 9. The city’s new ordinance states waiver requests are considered on a case-by-case basis. “The city may waive the requirement ... when the type or volume of solid waste makes it impractical for the city to deliver service,” the ordinances states. That includes hazardous materials and solid waste with excessive weight or volume.

Photo by Nevonne McDaniels

Cashmere sanitation worker Clay Johnson loads garbage at Riverside Park using the city’s old garbage truck. A new truck, with a mechanical arm that picks up cans, was put into service on Sept. 1, but isn’t yet used in park or downtown because the containers to go with it have not yet arrived. Along with the new system, the city has implemented new rates, which are taking some getting used to for commercial and residential customers. Cost is not part of the equation. Dew appealed Schmidt’s decision to the council on Sept. 13. Schmidt said Dew’s request had been delayed by a paperwork error and should have been addressed before the new rate structure was implemented, but his recommendation is the same as it would have been earlier. “I am asking the council not to give in to the request on the

basis of financial concerns,” Schmidt said. “He has room for the containers. Our customer base includes up to 20 yards a week for customers. It’s not considered impractical unless we’re past that range.” Councilwoman Debbie Knutsen said at some point cost is a factor, the difference between a tax and a fee. “This sounds like we See GARBAGE on Page 4

Wenatchee River clean up effort considered a success By Ian Dunn Editor

The second annual Wenatchee River Clean Up effort pulled 3,420 pounds of metal and junk out of the river. By any reckoning, that is a lot of junk. But sadly, it is but a portion of crud still in the waterway. This fact is why the Chelan County Natural Resources Department, which sponsors the clean up, plans to continue the See BEAR on Page 4 program year after year. Key

Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 5 Church Directory . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Life & Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . B5 Neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Mary Newberry was visiting her mother-in-law in the Cashmere Convalescent Center 28 years ago when a friend asked her if she was interested in “helping us do hair.” A small group of volunteers had set up a makeshift beauty shop and showed up each week to set, curl and comb the hair of the center’s residents.

Newberry said she knew little about fixing hair, but she knew the boost in spirits that comes with looking good. She signed up to help, showing up nearly every Wednesday morning for 28 years. “It gives them all a little lift,” Newberry said. “Some of them don’t give a hoot what you do with it as long as it’s set. Sometimes you have to cajole them into doing

Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 3 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B6 Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B5

to that is getting enough volunteers to show up. Promises of free food and music enticed some 60 volunteers to help out this year. Natural Resource Specialist Matt Shales, who helped organize the event on Aug. 14, said most of the people who showed up wanted to float the river looking for junk. But there some shore volunteers as well. Submitted photo “We focused on the public ac- Volunteers came together recently to help clean up the Wenatchee River around Cashmere. More 3,000 pounds of metal was removed See RIVER on Page 5 in this most recent clean up effort.

Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 8 Sheriff’s Report . . . . . . . . . . . B6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 8

Classifieds Index Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . B1-B4 Businesses & Services . . . B3-B4 Health Care Directory . . . . . . . B5

Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 Real Estate Guide . . . . . . . . . . B1

201 Cottage Ave. Cashmere, WA 98815 Phone: (509) 782-3781 www.cashmerevalleyrecord.com


Cashmere Valley Record • September 22, 2010

2

©2010 NCW Media, Inc. 201 Cottage Ave, Suite 4 Cashmere, WA 98815 Phone: (509) 782-3781

Office Hours

Opinion Anything worthwhile costs money

Cashmere

Mon. & Thurs., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Leavenworth

Mon. - Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Contact Information Publisher Bill Forhan • (509) 548-5286 publisher@leavenworthecho.com Editors Ian Dunn • Upper Valley Vince Lovato • Chelan/Manson Reporters/Photographers Nevonne McDaniels • Upper Valley Carrie Draeger • Manson/Chelan Advertising Sales Director Carol Forhan • (509) 548-5286 echoads@leavenworthecho.com Advertising Sales Lindsay Timmermans • Cashmere (509) 782-3781 Bookkeeper Marie Kieso • (509) 782-3781 Creative Services Annette Shacklett Bob Rankin • Steve Johnson RuthEdna Keys • Jennifer Campbell Classified / Legal Notices Susan Dodrill Production Coordinator RuthEdna Keys • (509) 682-2213 General Manager, Chelan Jeff Walter • (509) 682-2213 Circulation Audrey Walter • (509) 689-2507 Toll Free 1 (866) 833-0873 Distribution Debbie Walker Cashmere Valley Record (USPS 009 260) is published every Wednesday by NCW Media, Inc. 201 Cottage Ave, Cashmere, WA Telephone: (509) 782-3781. Fax: (509) 782-9074. Periodical postage paid at Leavenworth, Wash. (and additional mailing offices) Postmaster: Send address corrections to: The Leavenworth Echo, P.O. Box 39, Leavenworth, WA 98826-0039

Classified Advertising Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling (509) 548-5286 or emailing classifieds@leavenworthecho.com.

Weekly rates:

$7.50 for first 15 words 40¢ each additional word

Run your ad longer and pay as little as $6.38 for 15 words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges.

Deadlines Calendar Listings: News Submissions: Letters to the Editor: Display Advertising: Legal Notices: Classified Ads:

5 p.m., Thursday Noon, Friday Noon, Friday Noon, Friday Noon, Friday Noon, Monday

Subscriptions In Chelan County (yearly) In State (yearly) Out of State (yearly) Senior (65+ yearly in county)

$32.50 $33.50 $36.00 $30.50

The Cashmere Valley Record does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might fail to meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issues missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization.

Letters policy The Cashmere Valley Record welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification purposes only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. Email your letters to publisher@leavenworthecho.com.

Corrections The Cashmere Valley Record regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call (509) 782-3781. We will publish a correction on this page in the next issue.

Services Back Issues are available up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo Reprints are available for most photos taken by staff. Check www.cashmerevalleyrecord.com photos we may have not had room to print.

News Tips Have an idea for a story? Call the Record at (509) 782-3781

On The Internet website:

www.cashmerevalleyrecord.com

e-mail:

record@cashmerevalleyrecord.com

advertising e-mail:

echoads@leavenworthecho.com Washington Newspaper Publishers Association Member NCW Media, Inc. prints on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please recycle

In My

Opinion Bill Forhan Publisher

Cashmere Record’s online site converting to paid service My kids are always quick to tell me that the Internet is free. That’s largely true but it is also true much of the content found on the Net isn’t worth the time viewers invest. The Net will provide you with a bottomless well of information on any and every

subject – much of it wrong. It is also true that most newspapers today are suffering from declining circulation much of that attributed to the availability of free news on the Internet. Like most things in life, generalities about these issues do not always provide the real truth of the matter. Circulation in metropolitan and regional newspapers is declining. That has been true for decades. The Internet is just one more nail in the coffin of a business model that has been losing favor with readers. Community newspapers on the other hand have experienced renewed life as technology has reduced their costs of production and enhanced the quality of their products. For these newspapers the Internet offers an opportunity to further improve the timeli-

ness and quality of their service to their local communities. For the last year we have offered the Record online for free. That free service will end on Oct. 1. Some will see this as just another example of a greedy capitalist trying to line his pockets with money from content that should be free and cancel their subscription. That is regrettable. Truth is the subscription price will not make us rich but will help us to continue to make improvements to the Web service. Building and maintaining these sites takes time and money. Oddly enough, our staff need to make a living as well and expect to be paid for the time they work to develop the content. Our competitor down the road wants to develop a local

Web service with free labor. We wish them luck in maintaining the quality and consistency of content that we endeavor to provide. There will still be some free content available on the siteclassified advertising is just one example. And we will be adding more free content as we upgrade the site. Content that is available nearly everywhere for free will continue to be freely available on our site. But local news content that is developed by our staff such as city council reports, school district news and local sports will only be fully available to paid subscribers. Paid subscribers to the Cashmere Valley Record will continue to have full access to the site as part of their newspaper subscription. Online only sub-

scriptions will be available to out of state subscribers who currently get their print edition up to a week late. The truth is that advertisers, who now pay for most of the cost of providing a local newspaper, still expect their advertising rates to be based on the print edition’s circulation. As we approach our 10th anniversary of publishing the Cashmere Valley Record we hope that you will join us in our continuing efforts to improve the quality of the products we bring to the community. My wife and I may live in Leavenworth, but we have actively supported Cashmere through community organizations ever since we took over in September of 2000. Bill Forhan can be reached at (509) 548-5286 or publisher@ leavenworthecho.com.

Political lies will empty your wallet Adele

Ferguson Syndicated Columnist I see the Seattle Times decided to rattle Bill Gates Srs’ cage in its editorial column instead of sticking The Truth Needle into him. The Truth Needle is what The Times calls its investigations into claims made by political candidates and campaigns. They’ve zeroed in on U.S. Sen. Patty Murray and Republican challenger Dino Rossi so far. You know, Patty takes credit for stopping the feds from awarding a $35 billion aircraft tanker contract to a foreign company

thus giving Boeing another shot at a bid. The Times responds that she was “mostly right” although she goes a bit far in giving the impression she was a Lone Ranger and did it all by herself. Rossi got the needle for claiming she voted for every spending bill in Congress since 2004 and The Times tells us she voted against four consecutive budgets starting in fiscal 2004 when Republicans controlled the House, the Senate and the White House. Actually, I don’t know why it matters since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that candidates were not required to tell the truth about their opponents but The Times has taken it upon itself to help us voters distinguish between fact and fiction. But back to Bill Gates Sr., who appears in a television ad that

touts Initiative 1098, proposing a state income tax of 5 percent on annual income above $200,000 for individuals and $400,000 for couples, the supposed sweetener being a cut in the state property tax by 20 percent and an increase in the Business and Occupation tax credit for small businesses to $4,800. He never utters the dreaded words state income tax. “I love Washington,” he says. OK, can’t argue with that. He certainly has every reason to. “That’s why I helped write Initiative 1098.” Middle class families have been struggling, he says, so 1-1098 will tax higher earning folks plus giving tax breaks to property owners and small businesses. The proceeds will be over $2 billion a year to improve education and health care. “Only 1.2 percent of the wealthiest will pay more. Sup-

port 1-1098. It’s good for Washington.” 1-1098 is good for Washington like earthquakes and forest fires are good for Washington. In an article in The Times by a couple of King County business organization execs, Mike Sotelo and Craig Dawson, we learn that the very business owners Gates claims to want to help, are hit the hardest. Almost 70 percent of those earning $200,000 are small business owners, they say. Also, we lost 130,000 jobs here last year, but mostly in the private sector. The state lost 3,100, local governments 1,900 and the feds added 1,900. The Times zaps Bill Jr.s’ pop for not calling it a tax increase and not explaining that the property and B and 0 tax cuts are chickenfeed. It’s something else that Gates Sr. doesn’t say, however, that needs to be repeated over

and over between now and Nov. 2. He knows but the average voter forgets that while the Legislature can’t monkey with an initiative for two years after passage, from then on it’s open sesame. I’ve seen a few letters to the editor praising 1-1098 because the big earners will pay it. Boy, are these people in for a surprise if, God forbid, it passes. Our lawmakers would adjust the rate down into the middle class as soon as it’s possible to ensure a more stable return. We would all be paying it. The property tax cut and B and 0 tax increase would be rewritten to restore the bucks there too. I don’t think it will pass. We’ve said no four times before. We’re not stupid. Adele Ferguson can be reached at P.O. Box 69, Hansville, Wa.,. 98340.

Article VI, para 3: “ no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.” Later, but added quickly after the Constitution was ratified, this further, clearer statement: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof ” which was later extended to apply also to the states). In different times and places, religions have been and can be foundations of governments. This applies to Christianity and it applies to Islam, as to others. I can certainly agree with Ms. Vinje that people should not be killed for their religion, and should be able to practice their religions freely. I hope Ms. Vinje agrees with me that the things that distinguish our country from others are the values expressed in the U.S. Constitution, including freedom of religion and separation of church and state. That freedom and that separation apply to all.

Failing to follow it is to fail our country. While Americans are of different colors, ethnicities, religions and dates of immigration, I believe this says it best: “We may have come on different ships, but we are all on the same ship now.” Let us treat one another with respect and kindness. Peace be unto us all. Nancy M. Miller Leavenworth

NFIB Poll shows big support for busting state liquor monopoly Submitted by Tony Malandra A little less state influence over martinis, Mars bars, and Mountain Dews would be a healthy change of everyone’s budgetary diet, according to some final poll results on November ballot initiatives taken by NFIB of its membership. NFIB is the representative group for the state’s small business owners who employ more working Washingtonians and generate more jobs than big businesses ever have or ever will. By a margin of 79 percent to 16 percent, with 5 percent undecided, NFIB-member small business owners support passage of Initiative 1100, which would end the state’s monopoly on hard-liquor sales and open up retailing opportunities to a greater pool of licensed providers. Ending one monopoly, however, does not mean handing it over to another, which is why 54 percent of small business owners oppose Initiative 1105, which would run all hardliquor sales through licensed distributors only.

“Our members believe consumers should be able to directly purchase hard alcohol through a variety of private sector providers, such as manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, clubs, as well as distributors,” said Patrick Connor, Washington state director for NFIB. Last month’s fax and e-mail poll of 8,000 NFIB members in the state also found big support for Initiative 1107 (79 percent Yes, 17 percent No, 4 percent undecided), which would repeal new taxes recently imposed on bottled water, candy, and gum and reverse tax increases on soda pop. In the final question of the poll, 81 percent of NFIB-member small businesses intend to vote No on Referendum 52, which would put a stop to the Legislature’s plan to spend $500 million for weatherization and other energy efficiency projects on public buildings at a cost to taxpayers of nearly $1 billion over 30 years. Fourteen percent will vote to uphold the bond measure, 5 percent were undecided. “Small business believes that these so-called ‘green’ jobs

lawmakers pay slavish devotion to in their incessant and meaningless rhetoric should be self-starting, self-funding, and self-sustaining like every other enterprise, not subsidized by a generation of taxpayerfinanced debt,” said Connor. On two previous NFIB-member ballots, small business owners have come out in large support for Initiative 1053 requiring a two-thirds vote of the Legislature to increase taxes and for Initiative 1082 breaking the state’s monopoly on the sale of workers’ compensation insurance. Initiative 1098, essentially asking small business owners if they’d like to pay a new state income tax on top of everything else, was not balloted because of its obvious response, according to Connor. NFIB is the nation’s leading small business association, with offices in Washington, D.C. and all 50 state capitals. NFIB’s mission is to promote and protect the right of our members to own, operate and grow their businesses. More information is available online at www.NFIB.com/newsroom.

Letters to the editor Peace and freedom In her letter Sept. 15, Ms. Vinje mistakes my criticism. While I agree that she should have fully quoted her sources, my comments point out that the sources cited within the source she used (and failed to cite) do not say what they are there presented as saying. My earlier letter commented on the first set of statistics, so let me use the second set as a further example and another kind of error. These statistics refer to Christian deaths. Her sources are Barrett & Johnson, World Christian Trends AD 30-AD 2200 (note that this work’s field of coverage extends to AD2200, a date almost 200 years in the future – perhaps expressive of its intentions rather than its substance?) and Moore’s History of Asia Minor. For purposes of discussion, accepting Barrett & Johnson’s figure of 9,121,000 Christian martyrs killed by Muslims from 33-2000AD as accurate, the site quoted by Ms. Vinje then adds Moore’s estimate

of 50,000,000 (did somehow that 50,000,000 occur outside the time span of 33-2000AD of her first source?). Then, African Christian martyrs are thrown into the mix. Ms. Vinje’s source takes all these numbers (which are grim enough) and adds them together to create an even more immense number. While I would have to look extensively into methodology and original sources to establish the validity of the numbers, I am clear that adding a presumably valid count to another presumably valid count of the same does not create a doubly valid count: it creates a misrepresentation. When a source is so easily taken to task, its reliability is clouded and everything it presents becomes suspect. The motivation of those who put together such statements must be questioned. In the early days of America, often Christianity was not only a religion but a government. Only professing members of the

church were enfranchised (the governance of the Massachusetts colonies are examples of this), and members of some religions were excluded from the communities altogether. For many years, many colonies/states had state churches, to which all residents paid taxes no matter what their personal beliefs. Where did this lead? To events like the Salem witch trials, which all agree now were a phenomenon of mass hysteria from some buried-inhistory-or-psychology cause. Not to mention the moral violation practiced on one’s fellow citizens by forcing contribution to a religion which they did not support. Such are the sources of violence. Recognizing that religion was one absolute over which people would fight and fracture a community, one of the wisdoms of our Founders was to separate church from state, and to guarantee all religions freedom to practice, and to remove religious tests from political practices (Constitution,

Two things The county is quiet on reducing property tax assessments due to the drastic reductions in property values. They did raise them under the banner of drastic increases in value before the bubble broke. Second, I warned everyone a couple of year’s back, in this forum, that we could expect to be taxed on all our assets and savings. Did you notice the frantic printing of money? The value of the dollar is dropping daily. Feel the tax yet? Richard Curtis Leavenworth


September 22, 2010 • Cashmere Valley Record

3

Opinion

Expiring Bush tax cuts will hit Washingtonians hard By Paul Guppy Vice President for Research How would you like to do nothing and receive $2.8 trillion? That is what Congress is on course to do on Dec. 31. On that date the tax cuts enacted under President Bush expire, and federal tax rates will immediately revert to the level they were at ten years ago, taking us back to an era of higher taxes and lower take-home pay. Washingtonians will be hit hard. According to the Tax Foundation, the average middle income-family will see its take-home income fall by $1,574 next year alone. People have conflicting opinions about President Bush and his eight-year presidency, but one thing is certain, he was serious about reducing the financial burden the federal government places on its citizens. The landmark tax

relief bills he signed in 2001 and 2003 are among the largest tax cuts in U.S. history. These bills formed the centerpiece of Bush’s domestic policy, and together they freed more than a trillion dollars for private-sector business growth and job creation. The tax cuts were also good social policy. They encouraged entrepreneurship and financial independence by rewarding work, savings and investment. They promoted social justice and fairness. Letting people keep more of what they earn reduces the reach of government power, and allows citizens to care for their families, give to charity, volunteer more and otherwise contribute to our nation’s civic life. Those wide-ranging social and economic benefits are now at risk. The expiration of the Bush tax cuts would increase federal

taxes across the board, with tax rates for low-income families rising the most. While the top rate would increase by 13 percent, from 35 percent to 39.6 percent, lowincome earners would see a rate hike of 50 percent, as the lowest rate increases from 10 percent to 15 percent. Families with children would see the child tax credit cut in half, from $1,000 down to $500 a year. This policy change would function as a tax on kids, with larger families being hit hardest. The household budget of a couple with four children would be cut by $2,000 in 2011. Higher taxes on children would discourage adoption, meaning fewer waiting children would be placed with a forever family. At a time when people are trying to reduce personal debt, federal taxes on saving and invest-

ment would soar. The tax rate on capital gains would increase by 33 percent, rising from a 15 percent tax rate to 20 percent. The rate on qualified dividends would rise even more, jumping from 15 percent to as high as 39.6 percent. The marriage penalty would return, so married income earners would again pay more than if they filed as singles. Washington state’s economy, with its reliance on world trade, aerospace, high-tech software and cutting edge medical research, depends heavily on access to a steady supply of venture capital. Every additional dollar sent to the federal treasury means one less dollar available in our state to expand a business or create a job. Higher taxes on investment would particularly hit the elderly living on fixed incomes. Not only would the government take more

of the dividend payments seniors receive, there would be fewer dividends paid out overall. A study by the independent CATO Institute found that as taxes on dividends rise, companies are less likely to pay dividends in the first place. This is harsh news for seniors relying on a lifetime of careful investing to make them secure in their old age. Investment earnings are no longer limited to the retired and the wealthy. Today millions of working Americans participate in the stock market through 401ks, IRAs and employer pension plans. If the federal levy on investments returns to pre-Bush levels, Barclay’s Capital predicts stock prices would drop 8 percent, meaning thousands of dollars in lost value for households in Washington and across the country. For Members of Congress

campaigning in a tough election year, letting the Bush tax cuts expire seems like the ideal political strategy. With no roll call vote, no floor debate, and no annoying inquiries from local reporters, they need only sit back and wait for the money to roll in. When the higher taxes hit in January, however, their constituents may feel differently. Letting the Bush cuts expire would turn back the clock, imposing one of the largest tax increases ever, just as Washingtonians and all Americans are struggling to recover from the worst economy in decades. Paul Guppy is Vice President for Research at Washington Policy Center, a non-partisan independent policy research organization in Washington state. For more information visit washingtonpolicy.org.

State predicts vibrant private market with I-1082 Report dispels opponent’s myths of lax oversight, ‘cherry picking,’ benefit reductions

Impact Statement on Tuesday analyzing Initiative 1082 as part of the state Voters’ Guide process. OFM predicts private insurers would acquire slightly more than half of the workers’ compensation market by 2014 as businesses flee the existing state-run monopoly. With a reduced case load, “… state expenditures for claims costs will Submitted by Kris Teff correspondingly decrease,” according to the report. A new state government report The report estimates 320 insurindicates a vibrant competitive ers and as many as 500 insurance market for workers’ compensation agents and brokers would ultiinsurance would be created if vot- mately be licensed by the state ers approve Initiative 1082. to sell workers’ compensation The Office of Financial Manage- insurance if private competition is ment (OFM) released its Fiscal allowed. That new business activ-

ity is expected to generate at least $20 million in annual tax revenue to support the state’s general fund budget. The report also severely undermines opponents’ false claims by demonstrating the wide range of consumer protections available in the initiative. OFM confirms that under Initiative 1082: Existing benefits levels to injured workers are maintained; Private insurers will be subject to the regulatory requirements of the state’s insurance code involving admission to the market, financial, solvency and market analysis oversight; Private insurers will be subject to the unfair claims practices rules and

statutes; Consumers who disagree with claims decisions made by private insurers will be able to file complaints with the Office of the Insurance Commissioner (OIC). The OIC will regulate private insurers who offer industrial insurance, including licensing, financial examinations and oversight, rate filing analysis, responding to consumer complaints, rule making, etc. The OIC will select a licensed rating organization that will submit rate-making documents; those rates and any variations from the proposed rate will require OIC approval. Private insurers will pay all

costs and fees associated with the OIC’s administration and oversight of the private market. OFM also predicted that just 6.2 percent of employers would be referred to the assigned risk plan, a pool made up of businesses with the worst safety records and highest likelihood of costly claims. With the assigned risk plan spread across private insurers under Initiative 1082, insurers would not be able to pick and choose only the least expensive businesses to insure, as critics have falsely alleged. The Fiscal Impact Statement was released the day after West Virginia’s Insurance Commis-

sioner announced workers’ compensation insurance costs in that state would decrease nearly three percent this year. West Virginia privatized its workers’ compensation market in 2006, similar to what is proposed in Initiative 1082. Since then, workers’ compensation costs have decreased by 44 percent, saving West Virginia employers more than $150 million dollars. The Save Our Jobs WA / Yes on I-1082 campaign is composed of the state’s leading business organizations and supported by hundreds of small businesses across the state. For more information, visit www.SaveOurJobsWA.com.

Take a good look at the Public Employee Union scam By Jarrett Skorup   Under the National Labor Relations Act, private-sector unions are allowed to extract dues and fees from workers if the employer agrees. The NLRA, passed in 1935 during Franklin Roosevelt’s first term, does not, however, apply to public-sector employees—including state and federal workers— because the thinking was that this would over-politicize government and cause a conflict of interest between unions and politicians. In a Weekly Standard piece by professors Fred Siegel and Dan DiSalvo titled, “The New Tammany Hall,” this problem is described: Unlike private sector unions, the sheer number of workers represented is not the linchpin of [the public sector unions] influence. Private sector unions have a natural adversary in the owners of the companies with whom they negotiate. But public sector unions have no such natural counter-

weight. They are a classic case of “client politics,” where an interest group’s concentrated efforts to secure rewards impose diffused costs on the mass of unorganized taxpayers. In the 1960s, many states began chipping away at the wall of separation between unions and public workers. In 1965, the Michigan Legislature revised the Public Employment Relations Act (PERA) to establish mandatory collective bargaining and exclusive representation for state and municipal government workers. This has caused the number of public-sector union employees to skyrocket. A conflict of interest would be as follows: First, a government union elects politicians by funding their campaigns and organizing a massive get-out-the-vote drive; second, the politicians support employee pay increases, generous pensions, and condition of employment; third, the union takes dues (read: taxpayer money) and starts the

cycle all over again for selected politicians. At both the state and national level, public-sector union support for many Democrats has been well documented. One of the largest public-sector unions in the country, the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) has given over $40 million to politicians since 1990, with more than 98 percent of that going to Democrats. The SEIU, AFL-CIO, and United Steel Workers have all promised big help in the coming election. In return, the Democratic Party has voted nearly lockstep with these unions’ demands. But political cronyism knows no party lines, and many Republicans likewise have been guilty here in Michigan. In just the past year, the state has had several such instances. Last fall, nine Michigan Education Association-supported House Republicans nixed a 3 percent cost-saving plan for the school aid

budget. In April, MEA-supported Senate Republicans watered down a modest bill that would “increase state and school employee payroll contributions to their pension system by 3 percent, cap pension ‘service credits’ at 30 years, and create a somewhat less generous defined benefit system for new school employees.” At the same time, a union subsidiary of the SEIU pushed GOP Senators into coming up short on a vote that would have opened a prison to competitive bidding and privatized it, if privatization promised to save money. Last August, one Republican state senator came under fire for introducing a bill that would have forced some 42,000 in-home health care workers into a union, sending approximately $6.6 million in taxpayers’ money to the SEIU in the form of “dues.” Unfortunately, what  has happened in Michigan has taken place

elsewhere in America. The end game for these types of relationships is already happening in our country’s most public union-friendly states: in California, where budget gridlock has forced the government to issue IOUs and minimum-wage salaries to public officials, and in Illinois, where the governor has promised massive tax hikes combined with severe cuts to education. Both states have some of the highest tax rates in the county, and yet both face pension obligations that they cannot ever hope to pay. These types of political dealings and financing may not be illegal, but they’re still an offense to the political process. Politicians can take money from governmentemployee unions and then vote on legislation that directly improves the financial well-being of these entities. A possible quid pro quo exists that would not if public-sector

unions were restricted from giving money to politicians. Politicians granting unsustainable government-employee salaries, benefits, and pensions is a problem everywhere, but the states with the strongest publicsector unions will have the hardest time correcting the problem. More broadly, as long as these incestuous relationships between government unions and the political class remain in place and unchallenged, the size and scope of government will continue to grow. Jarrett Skorup is a 2009 graduate of Grove City College and former student fellow at The Center for Vision & Values. He is the research associate for online engagement for Michigan Capitol Confidential at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, a research and educational institute headquartered in Midland, Mich. Mr. Skorup can be reached at Skorup@mackinac.org.

t Troop 1 Centenn u o c S ial Boy Century Troop #1 • 1910 - 2010 in Cashmere

Celebrating 100 Years. You’re Invited!

Open HOuse Scout Hall, 201 Riverside Drive, Cashmere

Oct. 9, 2010 • 1 to 4 p.m. • Scout Building Tours • • Photo Displays • • Dutch Oven Cooking • • Old Fashioned Knot Rack • (see if you remember the bowline)

• Video Record of Your Scout Memories • • Cake, Punch & Coffee • • Time Capsule Ceremony at 3:30 p.m. • contact:

Chairman Chuck Dronen, 6410 Flowery Divide, Cashmere, WA 98815, droboscout@kashmircc.com or 509-782-1278

“Once a Scout, Always a Scout!” THiS AD SponSoReD by

Independence... Choices... It’s about YOU!

Epledalen Retirement & Assisted Living

Chuck and Barb Dronen, Administrators Phone: 509-782-7600 • Fax: 509-782-1821 Email: epledalen@kashmircc.com 809 Pioneer Ave., Cashmere, WA 98815

• One inclusive rate • Great activity program • Family owned and operated

Community Bear cub orphans find shelter By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer The two orphaned bear cubs whose mother was shot Sept. 9 on Icicle Road have found a new temporary home. State Fish and Wildlife agents said last week the cubs would have to be euthanized if a shelter to take the cubs could not be found. At that time, the agency had been working with two shelters, one in Western Washington and one in Boise, Idaho, and both were full. Rich Beausoleil, the cougar and bear specialist for state Fish and Wildlife, said they expanded their search and found a third shelter, in McCall, Idaho, that had just one bear cub inhouse and room for the two orphans. The cubs were given a clean bill

of health by a veterinarian in East Wenatchee, who did a full work up on the animals. “They were pretty healthy. He did give them some penicillin shots as a precaution,” Beausoleil said. They got their ear tags and were set to be shipped to the shelter last Wednesday. The cubs will winter there and be released back into the wild next year. In the meantime, the investigation of the shooting incident continues. The mother bear was shot by a homeowner, who was concerned about his dog. At the time, he didn’t realize it was a mother bear with cubs. And bears are continuing their quest for food before winter sets

in. Several others have been sighted. Beausoleil said he set a trap for a rusty-colored bear that was attracted by the barbecue grills at the Leavenworth condos. The traps are set for bears who tend to stick around rather than take what they can and move along. “This one was a candidate for relocation,” he said. But the best way to keep them from sticking around is to put away the big three, he said. “Garbage, birdseed and petfood,” he said. And maybe barbecues, too. “There’s certainly not much reward there, but they do smell good,” he said. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ cashmerevalleyrecord.com.


Cashmere Valley Record • September 22, 2010

4

Community CURLERS: “I knew the lift it gave them to have their hair done” Continued from Page 1

it. We have a good time. It’s been a lot of fun over the years.” The staff has worked it so a good share of the ladies have their showers on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday mornings. “So when we go on Wednesday, we don’t have to shampoo a lot. That makes it handy,” Newberry said. The volunteers also offer their services for Easter, Mother’s Day and Christmas. In the beginning, they had to find dryers and other equipment, Newberry said. “We scrounged yard sales for curlers, brushes and combs. We even found a dryer at one yard sale – and a coat rack,” she said. Community groups also have made donations over the years. “There were three volunteers

when I started,” Newberry said. “Then gradually we added some, including two who have been here more than 20 years.” Dorothy Schmitten, who has been involved in the beauty shop for more than 30 years, said she is one of the volunteers who does have a background in the beauty business. While the others can set and curl hair, she can actually cut it. “It’s all free. We don’t charge a thing,” she said. “It’s hard for some of them to understand. They try to find money in their pockets. Some there know what’s going on and they really appreciate it.” Eloise Day started volunteering about 18 years ago. A neighbor, who played the organ once a week at the center, told her the beauty shop was looking for help. “I figured if she can go once a week, I can go once a week,” she said. “It’s been very satisfying

seeing the ladies looking very nice.” Joan Braun got involved when her mother and her aunt were patients at the Convalescent Center. “I knew what a lift it gave them to have their hair done,” she said. “After they passed away, I continued to help out. It’s a wonderful service to the ladies who live there. And we are desperately in need of more help.” The immediate challenge is that three of the core five or six beauty shop volunteers are now over age 80 and some of the volunteers have been temporarily sidelined because of health problems. For the past three weeks, the beauty shop didn’t open. “You have to have a certain number of people to open it up,” Braun said. “You can’t do it with two.”

Geralynne Padilla, who has been the activity director at the Cashmere Convalescent Center for eight years, said the beauty shop is a highlight for the women residents. Each Wednesday, from 7 to 11:30 a.m., between 30 and 40 women get their hair done thanks to the volunteers. “They start lining up before it opens. It’s a quality of life issue. As women, we know what it means to have your hair done,” Padilla said. She can tell the difference on weeks when the beauty shop doesn’t open, she said. And it is a concern to the volunteers as well. “The three of us won’t be available much longer,” Newberry said of the volunteers who are in their 80s. Newberry herself has been unable to volunteer since February because of back problems.

She misses it. She recently had surgery and will be out at least another month, she said. But she hopes other volunteers will step forward. Newberry’s daughters, Mindy Peterson and Gayle Pendergrass, have been regular volunteers, but more are needed. You don’t need experience, but it does take the right personality, Newberry said. “You have to kind of like it,” she said. “It has been fulfilling. Even when they don’t want to get their hair done, it will boost them a little bit. They’re down and don’t want to do anything. They will listen to us chatter back and forth and talk to them. It’s amazing. You get to know them.” Day said she isn’t sure why more people don’t volunteer. “A lot of people don’t want to go where old people are. I’m one

of those old people, so it doesn’t bother me. It’s truly very satisfying,” she said. Braun said volunteers are welcome. “Experience isn’t necessary. You spend time with the ladies. They are wonderful people. Most of them truly do appreciate what you’re doing and that’s very gratifying. Sometimes it’s just a matter of listening to them, talking to them, reminiscing with them. You don’t have to have skills. If you absolutely don’t want to roll ladies hair, you can go and get them from their rooms,” Braun said. For information on volunteering for the beauty shop or any other area at the Cashmere Convalescent Center, call Geralynne Padilla at 782-1251. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ cashmerevalleyrecord.com.

GARBAGE: City says “no” to Country Boy’s garbage request Continued from Page 1

are asking him to pay a $300 tax,” because he could get the service elsewhere for less. But Schmidt said because the council opted to continue to operate its own garbage system, the rates are part of the package. Waste Management is less expensive because its customer base is larger and the costs are spread out. “We just don’t have that customer base,” he said. Schmidt suggested the rate structure might need some tweaking, particularly for large commercial users, which is something that had been discussed when the rates were approved. City attorney Terry McCauley cautioned the council in setting a precedent by allowing a waiver

less money by going with Waste Management.” The council voted unanimously to uphold the staff’s denial of Dew’s request, but said they will take another look at the city’s month-old rate structure and look at whether setting up an appeal process to the hearing examiner is warranted. Dew said he is taking the decision in stride, but questions the rates. “It’s frustrating when it could be done for so much less through Waste Management,” he said. He also is working with the city on finding a way to lock the dumpsters. He said he has since found one of the dumpsters full of sofa cushions. “I’m pretty sure that wasn’t from my restaurant,” he said. “If I’m paying that much, I don’t want

to be paying for other people’s trash.” The switch to the new automated garbage system is a work in progress. The learning curve by both the driver and customers has been high. A newsletter was sent to the city’s 1,400 customers in August notifying them of the changes, but not everyone has complied. Knutsen said she has received several calls from customers upset because they had to change where they leave their garbage cans. One of the challenges, Schmidt said, is garbage cans need to be placed facing the street and the lids must be closed completely. And the receptacles must be in an area where the truck can get to them. In some cases, customers have

PESHASTIN: All council positions are “at large” Continued from Page 1

authority. We operate on donations. To keep costs down, we publicize our activities through the media and on our website,” Keene said. He serves as webmaster. “The people come to us to cast their votes. For the people in Peshastin, we are their voice.” The volunteer group’s biggest projects lately have been working the Chelan County Commission on developing the Peshastin Urban Growth Area. “That’s probably the biggest thing we’ve done. It was completed in 2008. And it’s an ongoing issue, with zoning in the area and sewer

BEAR: No previous problems with Lake Wenatchee bear Continued from Page 1

“It’s my understanding that he has severe injuries, but is in stable condition,” Cenci said Monday morning. The officers and Cash found the bear within 100 yards of the vacation home where the attack occurred. “The dog pursued the bear across Highway 207 and kept the bear distracted while Officer Snyder was able to get close enough to put it down. They made every effort to preserve the forensics and DNA evidence, but we are certain this is the offending bear.” The female bear was 8 or 9 years old and weighed 148 pounds and had worn teeth, missing a canine tooth. “She had some fat reserves, but not the amount you would anticipate at this time of year,” he said. Bears store fat in their rumps, he said. “She didn’t have the junk in her trunk where she should,” he said. “You could feel her hip bones.” Cenci said there is no indication that the victims’ dogs or the victims “did anything to bring this on. We can make an educated guess, but only the bear really knows that.” This particular bear had not been causing problems elsewhere, as far as anyone had reported. Cenci said the bear had no tags. “There is no evidence that we had ever handled this particular bear,” he said. A necropsy will be performed to look for any indication that would explain the bear’s behavior, he said. “It was not a well-fed bear. Whether something in the lab tests will tell us anything further remains to be seen. Given its condition, it was not at the top of its game.” Cenci said the bear behaved strangely when fish and wildlife officers were tracking it. “They found it 100 yards from the incident and the dog was unable to tree the bear. Often they

been asked to place their garbage cans on the opposite sides of the street or around a corner. And some alleys are presenting some logistical challenges for the truck driver who must maneuver the truck so the mechanical arm can get to the can. City Clerk Kay Jones said sticky reminder notes have been ordered that the garbage truck driver will be able to leave on garbage cans that are placed incorrectly or have other issues. She said she believes the notes will be more effective, and less expensive than a second newsletter.

fees charged for the two bond anticipation notes and the actual bond sale. • After hearing complaints from residents this year, next year the city will leave all the flowers left at the cemetery during Memorial Day until the following weekend. “We will mow as late in the week as we can and just let it go for a while,” said city Director of Planning and Building Bob Schmidt. • The vote on whether the city wants to authorize the Greater Wenatchee Regional Events Center Public Facilities District to seek voter approval of a sales tax increase has been tabled again. Other Cashmere City It was presented by Town Toyota Council news Center officials on Aug. 23 and • The decision to hire Foster tabled at that meeting with the Pepper PLLC as bond counsel for intention of being revisited at the the sale of the $13 million in water Sept. 14 meeting. Before the meetand sewer revenue bonds to the ing, though, Town Toyota Center United States Department of Ag- representatives asked city officials riculture will be made at the Sept. to hold off until a further presenta27 meeting. tion is made. The council had questions on Nevonne McDaniels can be egg hunt, ice cream social in the Keene said typically a handand utilities,” he said. ful of Peshastin residents attend a proposed contract presented at reached at 782-3781 or reporter@ The council also has played a summer and Santa parade. The council also is hosting a the meetings, in addition to the the Sept. 14 meeting regarding cashmerevalleyrecord.com. role in getting the Port of Chelan to allow public access at the Peshastin candidate forum at 7 p.m. Oct. 13 councilmembers. That number at the Peshastin-Dryden Elemen- can grow in a hurry, though, if Mill site. “We really serve as a go-between tary School. All the candidates for something comes up. Nevonne McDaniels can be between the public and county gov- local elections have been invited, ernment,” Keene said. “We take including those for county council reached at 548-5286 reporter@ cashmerevalleyrecord.com. community concerns to them and and sheriff. they come to us on occasion.” At the Oct. 4 meeting, for inPeshastin Community Council stance, County Commissioner Peshastin Community Council Positions 1 and 2 are up for elecKeith Goehner and the county’s tion Nov. 1. new planning director, Jeff Wilson, The deadline for petitions declaring candidacy is Oct. 4. The will make a presentation. petitions can be submitted in person or by mail to the Peshastin But community events also are Community Council, P.O. Box 711, Peshastin, WA 98847. part of the Peshastin Community Information on the bylaws, a map of the area served and candidate Council’s scope of work. Those positions, are available at www.peshastin.org. include a variety of fundraisers for For information, call Steve Keene, council chairman, at 548-0829. the Peshastin Library, an Easter based on financial concerns. “The council rarely acts in a quasi-judicial capacity,” he said. In other cases, such as land-use applications, code interpretations go to a hearing examiner, who makes a decision based on the code and submits findings and conclusions. Those decisions set a precedent for future rulings. But in this case, the council is being asked to make that ruling since an alternative process has not been established. “This is a different ballpark,” he said. “If you overturn the staff decision, you will need to provide findings on when you can and when you can’t [waive the city’s garbage collection]. Financial is not a word in the code. The findings need to be based on the code — or you can change the code. He’s not the only one who would pay

• If the animal does attack, fight back aggressively. “That maybe be enough to stop the attack.” Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 reporter@ cashmerevalleyrecord.com.

Photo submitted by Chris Kelly

Many bears have been spotted in the Upper Valley lately, including this one at Blackbird Island near downtown Leavenworth. Chris Kelly reports the bear swam over to check out him and his dog, but never seemed aggressive, just curious. will go up a tree, but it was intent on escaping. That is not normal behavior,” he said. Cenci said Cash, the Karelian bear dog, kept the bear in one place long enough for Jason Snyder to manage a running shot. Bear attacks on humans are rare in the state, Cenci said. A bicyclist was attacked in Kitsap county three years ago. Prior to that, the records show only three other attacks and one fatality. What to do in a bear attack Deputy Chief Mike Cenci of the

Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife said bear attacks are rare, but should it happen, lists some key things to remember: • Don’t run and turn yourself into prey. Pick up small children. • Wave your hands and make yourself as big as you can. “That what the victim’s wife did. Raise all kinds of hell,” Cenci said. • Don’t approach the animal. Leave it an escape route. • Try to get upwind, so it can identify you as a human.

YOUR HISTORY, YOUR BOOK Tree Top Creating a Fruit Revolution David H. Stratton

Washington is the largest domestic apple producer, and the fruit is the state’s top-ranked agricultural commodity. Tree Top celebrates Northwest apple history and the innovative grower cooperative’s contributions to the industry’s success. Paperback • ISBN 978-0-87422-306-4 • $29.95 Washington State University Press books are available at bookstores, online at wsupress.wsu.edu, or by phone at 800-354-7360.


September 22, 2010 • Cashmere Valley Record

5

Community Performer and songwriter Joe Jencks in concert in Leavenworth

Photo submitted by Cindy Rietveldt

Singer-songwriter Joe Jencks plays the Leavenworth Coffeehouse this Friday evening. The performance begins 7:30 p.m. The Coffeehouse is a family-friendly event sponsored by Icicle Arts and held at Barn Beach Reserve at 347 Division Street in Leavenworth. There is a $3 cover charge at the door, children 12 and under are admitted free. er, and educator Joe Jencks opens the new season for the Leavenworth Coffeehouse. From International touring per- venues like Carnegie Hall and former, songwriter, entertain- Lincoln Center in New York, to Submitted by Cindy Rietveldt

coffee houses, festivals, spiritual communities, and schools, Joe has spent the last nine years touring full time. His songs have traveled to every continent via radio, CDs, webcasts, and other musicians. He is noted for his unique merging of musical beauty, social consciousness, and spiritual exploration. His music invites us to live inside of our passions and our beliefs. “Joe Jencks is the type of musician that will cause you to drop that morning newspaper or pull your car to the side of the road when you hear his songs. He is the type of artist that will turn heads in his direction when he walks onto a stage. His voice will instantly draw you into his passionate songs. He is the type of musician whose music will become a part of you.” -Ron Olesko, WFDU FM, Teaneck, N.J. The Friday evening performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. The Coffeehouse is a familyfriendly event sponsored by Icicle Arts and held at Barn Beach Reserve at 347 Division Street in Leavenworth. There is a $3 cover charge at the door, children 12 and under are admitted free, and the hat is passed to pay the musicians. Refreshments are available.

RIVER: Big party held to thank volunteers Continued from Page 1

cess areas, mainly because it’s a good place to get in the river,” Shales said. “There is metal up and down the river.” The group focused on access points in Cashmere, Dryden and Monitor. There were also some boats that floated the river to remove garbage from the shoreline between Leavenworth and Monitor. In Cashmere, the volunteers pulled a car frame out of the river near Riverside Park. There was also a street sign removed, a crumpled 50-gallon barrel and metal pipes. Shales said, in this second year, he is never too surprised by anything coming out of the river. “There were landfills next to the river way back when,” he said. “The riverbanks are being scoured out and rolling downstream.” There is a 25 foot lampost under the bridge in Cashmere, but the crew could not budge it. Shales said the lampost is too heavy and would require heavy equipment to remove. The Tibits Bridge was removed, Shales said. It was a bridge, located near the Hitching Post in Cashmere, decommissioned in the 1950s. Some was removed last year as well. Another item, Shales said

they have their eyes on is a car body in the lower Wenatchee River, which was washed into the river in the early ‘90s floods. “We have the money and want to take a look at it,” he said. “It just depends on the water level. We are going after that.” This year, Shales said some rafting companies floated down the river to spot debris. Most rafters float in high water, so naturally would not notice some debris in the river. In the low water, the rafters were asked to spot debris in the river. “Trout Unlimited floated from the East Leavenworth Bridge. That is the highest float we have done,” said Shales. “There has been a lot of talk of doing this higher up river, but we haven’t floated it much. We asked the rafting companies where it is needed most. They thought from Peshastin down. But I am sure if you started looking for stuff (up river), you find it.” When the river is low, Shales said you really notice the pieces sticking out of the river, especially if you are looking for it. When the guides get out on the river, one they know very well, at low water levels, they really notice a lot of debris they might not otherwise. Partners in the clean up were Cascadia Conservation District, city of Cashmere, U.S. Bureau

of Reclamation, Chelan County Public Works, and Trout Unlimited. Several local businesses also contributed by sponsoring a celebration to thank the volunteers, including Good Mood Food, Sleeping Lady Mountain Resort, Sure to Rise Bakery, Weinstein Beverage, Crunch Pak, Dan’s Food Market, and Food Pavilion. Chelsey Craven provided the music thanks to sound system donated by Avalon Music. “We filled the biggest raft in our fleet with a pick up load of rusty debris. It would have been nice to fill a dozen more,” said James L. Moore, Orion River Rafting, in a press release. Even after a second year of clean up, Shales said no one will say the river is clean. They plan to keep concentrating on the areas full of metal. “We hope to continue as long as the volunteers want to help out. It’s a good deal,” Shales said. “The Wenatchee River is our local gem. People come from all over the state to enjoy it. We need to keep it clean for us and everybody else.” In addition, Shales said, the river also provides habitat for endangered spring chinook, steelhead, bull trout and other species. Ian Dunn can be reached at 548-5286 or editor@leavenworthecho.com.

Community Bulletin board Cashmere Kiwanis taking nominees Waconka Kiwanis of Cashmere is taking nominations for the 2010 Friend of the Young Child Award which honor a community member who has shown extraordinary service to the youth of the area. The deadline for nominations is Oct. 8. Nominations can be sent to Wacoka Kiwanis, P.O. Box 48, Cashmere, WA 98815. Include the person’s name and a brief explanation of why they are deserving of the award. Contact Carolyn, 860-8713, for information. (r38,39)

insert in next week’s paper providing drop off locations and times. Also, for information visit Chelan County’s Website at www.co.chelan.wa.us or contact Chelan County Public Works 667-6415. (er38)

Cashmere kids at Salmon Fest

Leavenworth Season passes on sale Leavenworth Winter Sports Club season pass sales ends Oct. 1. Passes can be purchased at prices up to 55 percent off last year’s cost. Passes are available online at www. skileavenworth.com or pick up a form at the Icicle Trail ticket booth. (er38,39)

Recovery banquet scheduled Chelan/Douglas County Chemical Dependency Agencies are sponsoring a Recovery Month Banquet at the Red Lion Inn on Sept. 25. The evening will include an Italian dinner and motivational speakers. State Rep. Mike Armstrong will emcee. Tickets are $20. Contact any chemical dependency agency in the valley for information. (er37,38)

Fundraiser planned Autumn Leaf for Nyland family Harvest Sunday A spaghetti feed and raffle service scheduled with prizes to help the Nyland family with memorial expenses and medical bills is planned for Oct. 3 from 1 to 6 p.m. at Mission Creek Club House. The suggested donation is $5 and raffle tickets are $1 each or 12 for $10. For information contact Tiffany Briggs, 679-1960, or Angela Gosvener, 679-0495. (r38,39)

Hazardous waste will be collected Households in Chelan County may bring unwanted hazardous waste materials to four locations throughout the County on Oct. 2. Locations include Chelan, Peshastin, Wenatchee and Entiat. There are no fees collected for participating in this event, though donations are greatly appreciated. Please try to keep all materials in their original containers. Participants must bring ID as proof of residency. Watch for the

Community United Methodist Church will celebrate Autumn Leaf Harvest Sunday on Sept. 26. The worship service is at 10 a.m. followed by a harvest meal on the lawn and Jumping Castle and games for the whole family. The community is invited to attend the event at 418 Evans St. (er37,38)

Plain Just Plain Fun Run set The Just “Plain” Fun Run will be Sept. 26 beginning at 10 a.m. The event is a 3-mile trail run and family walk that begins and ends at Plain Hardware. Registration is the day of the event at from 9 to 9:30 a.m. The fee is $10 and proceeds go to Beaver Valley School. Post-race prize drawings, as well as a party and healthy refreshments are provided. For information call 630-5340. (er37,38)

to share summer wildflower adventures and highlights before the program begins and refreshments are served. Ellen Kuhlmann (Seeds of Success Program Manager, Rare Plant Care and Conservation, University of Washington Botanic Gardens) will present the program, “Squirrels for the 21st Century: Seed Saving around the World.” Contact co-chair Susan Balliner at skylinebal@gmail.com for information. (er37,38)

Submit bulletin board entries Announcements from nonprofit groups are published Photo by Nevonne McDaniels in the Record for two weeks. Vale Elementary School fourth grader Kendall Head raises her eyebrows at a container of fertilized Groups can submit announcefish eggs during a tour of the Leavenworth Fish Hatchery complex during Salmon Fest’s Kids ments by: Day Sept. 16. Elizabeth Dominguez, left, documents the visit with a photo from her cell phone. • Using the online form at The students, participating in the Salmon in the Classroom program, were being shepherded www.cashmerevalleyrecord. by their teacher Scott Griffith through the tour Thursday morning. com • E-mailing them to echo@ leavenworthecho.com (attn: Bulat Wenatchee Avenue and First. contact Laura Herrera, 667-9300 letin Board) Regional The unveiling of the exhibit is or ddfab@nwi.net. (er38,39) • Dropping them off at the ReBra exhibit benefits at 5 p.m. Participating women Seed saving is cord office at 201 Cottage Ave. are asked to wear colors that • Mailing them to P.O. Box 39, Wellness Place indicate their participation— meeting topic Leavenworth On Oct. 10, the Cure Bra Exhibwhite for supporters, pink for Washington Native Plant So• Faxing them to 548-4789. it to benefit the Wellness Place survivors and black for those ciety, Wenatchee Chapter, meets Please submit your announcewill be held on the Riverwalk who have lost someone to breast Sept. 23 at 7 p.m. at Wenatchee ment by Thursday at 5 p.m. Bridge at the bottom of First cancer. Until Oct. 8 the group is Valley Museum and Cultural at least two weeks before the Street in downtown Wenatchee. collecting donations of decorated Center, 127 Mission St. The meet- event. Limit the announcement Construction of the exhibit starts bras to which money donations ing is open to the public. The to 75 words and include contact at noon at Drop Dead Fabulous, can be pinned. For information group will take a few minutes information.

Community Calendar Bruce Cheadle, 782-1659. 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Oil Painting, Cashmere Senior Center, 1 to 4 p.m., Appliqué Club, Senior 8:30 to 10 a.m., Play and Learn Center, 120 Cottage Ave., Evelyn 782-2415. Group, Peshastin Head Start, Davis, 782-4818. Noon, Rotary Club, Cashmere PresLiliana Torres, 682-6761. byterian Church, 303 Maple St., 6:30 p.m., Cashmere Park and Recreation Committee, City Hall. 782-3513. 6:30 p.m., Tillicum Riders drill team, Chelan County Fairgrounds biscuit. Lunch: Pepperoni boat, Vale Elementary School arena, Cindy Fowler, 662-5984. celery sticks with peanut butter, 7 p.m., United Methodist/PresbyteThursday, Sept. 23, Breakfast: pears and molasses cookie. rian Church Youth Group, United Peach coffee cake and yogurt. Methodist Church, 213 S. Division Lunch: Cheese pizza, green Cashmere Middle/High St., 782-2431 or 782-3811. salad, applesauce and oatmeal School 7 p.m., Youth group for sixth to cookie. eighth graders, Underground, Friday, Sept. 24, Breakfast: Cheese Thursday, Sept. 23, Hamburger with potato rounds or cheese 206 Vine St., 782-2825. pizza. Lunch: Hamburger, oven pizza, and oatmeal cookie. fries, peaches and Jell-O. Monday, Sept. 27, Breakfast: Ce- Friday, Sept. 24, Fish sticks with Thursday, Sept. 23 potato rounds or chicken burger, Noon, Alcoholics Anonymous, real or blueberry scone. Lunch: and juice bar. Buckboard Restaurant, Hwy. 97, Chicken burger, corn, Mandarin Monday, Sept. 27, Chicken burger, 548-4522 , 664-6469 or 425-773oranges and birthday cake. cheese quesadilla or corn dog, 7527. Tuesday, Sept. 28, Breakfast: and birthday cake. 1 to 4 p.m., SCORE small business Waffle sticks and sausage links. counseling, Wenatchee Valley Lunch: Cheese sticks, fresh car- Tuesday, Sept. 28, Ravioli or chicken nuggets, and french bread. Chamber of Commerce, 300 S. rots and cucumbers, and fruit Wednesday, Sept. 29, Cheese Columbia St., Wenatchee, call for salad. sticks, turkey and cheese wrap appointment 662-2116. Wednesday, Sept. 29, Breakfast: or burrito, and molasses cookie. 3:30 p.m., Cashmere TOGETHER! Egg and cheese omelet and

Wednesday, Sept. 22

School Menus

for Drug Free Youth, Vale Elseventh to 12th graders at the ementary School, Reneé Hunter, Underground, 206 Vine St., 782662-7201. 2825. 6:30 to 10 p.m., Cashmere Sports- 7 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, men’s Gun Club shooting range, Leavenworth Senior Center, Turkey Shoot Road, Ed Pipkin, 548-4522, 664-6469 or 425-773782-1192. 7527. 7 p.m., Chelan County Historical Society board meeting, Cash- Monday, Sept. 27 mere Museum, 600 Cotlets Way, 3 to 5 p.m., Girl Scouts, Methodist Church, 213 S. Division, Janis 782-3230. Hayden, 782-4397. Friday, Sept. 24 6:30 p.m., Wacoka Kiwanis, American Legion Hall, 401 Sunset Hwy., 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Cashmere FarmGloria Reichman 782-3649. ers’ Market, Rotary Pavilion Park 6:30 to 8 p.m., Upper Valley Free next to the Pioneer Museum. Medical Clinic, Cascade Medical 7 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous and Center in Leavenworth, Laurie Alanon, 220 Cottage Ave., Bob, Peek, 548-7186. 782-0568. 7:30 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, 220 Cottage Ave., Bob, 782-0568. Plain Community Church, 5484522, 664-6469 or 425-773-7527. 7 p.m., Boy Scouts of America, Boy Scout Building, 201 Riverside Dr., Sunday, Sept. 26 Jim Kill, scoutmaster, 782-1730. 9 a.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., Cashmere City Council, City Buckboard Cafe, Hwy. 97, 548Hall boardroom, 782-3513. 4522, 664-6469 or 425-773Tuesday, Sept. 28 7527. 6 to 7:30 p.m., Youth Group for 1 to 4 p.m., SCORE small business

counseling, Wenatchee Valley Chamber of Commerce, 300 S. Columbia St., Wenatchee, call for appointment, 662-2116. 7 p.m., Narcotics Anonymous, St. James Episcopal Church, 222 Cottage Ave., Robert Hendricks, 782-1476.

Ongoing events Cashmere Library, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday and Thursday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Children’s story time, , Wednesday, 10 a.m. 782-3314. Cashmere Pioneer Village and Museum, Daily, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 600 Cotlets Way, 782-3230. U p p e r Va l l e y M u s e u m a t Leavenworth, Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 347 Division St., 548-0728. Tillicum Riders, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Chelan County Fairgrounds, Cindy Fowler, 6625984.


Cashmere Valley Record • September 22, 2010

6

Neighbors

Kaylee Ann Radach born Aug. 13

Upper Valley

Kaylee was born Friday, Aug. 13, 2010, at Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee. Her parents are Jeremy and Jennifer Radach of Leavenworth. Sister is Emma, 2. Her maternal grandparents are Dave and Cindy Creech of Leavenworth. Her paternal grandparents are Tom and Kathy Radach of Leavenworth. Maternal great grandparents are Earl and Joyce Johnson of Wenatchee and Wayne and Annette Creech of Leavenworth. Paternal great grandparents are Frank and Jody Fassnacht of Wenatchee and Hank and Carla Radach of Cashmere. Kaylee lost her great, great grandfather Richard S. “Dick” Darlington just five days after her birth.

ChUrCh GUide AL

LA

RE WELCO

M E

Obituaries Harris A. Watson Harris A. Watson, picked to be another flower in the Masters bouquet. Born to Frank and Alice (Rayfield) Watson around the Smoky Mountains in Tennessee came to Leavenworth as a young boy where he attended school. He spent most of his life in the Northwest working construction and at the Peshastin Lumber Mill. He was a Harley-Davidson man, having bought his first one of many at the age of 17. Due to insulin dependant diabetes, he gave up Harleys for a short while and got into muscle cars. His specialty, Oldsmobile 442s and the last one, a Hurst Olds which he and his long time companion, Norma drove to Indianapolis and drove it on the famous Brickyard 500 Speedway. Harris got back into Harleys for the past 16 years and he and Norma rode to Sturgis several times and finally sell-

ing out and having their Harley trucked back to Yuma. At that time they took up RVing and settled in Yuma where they loved the Southwest with its Sunshine and Deserts. A man of silent strength, he has battled diabetes for over 35 years, six cancers in the last five years and never complained. He was brought back to Leavenworth to be with his brother and wonderful cousins. Harris is survived by his longtime companion, Norma Deeter of Leavenworth; three sons, Doug (Nancy) Watson of Leavenworth, Keith Watson of Seattle and Kevin (Sue) and their two daughters, Karly and Rachel of Everett: one brother, Dan (Char) Watson of Leavenworth; Norma’s three children, Geri Hampton of Wenatchee, Marty Deeter and Marla LaPlante and her two

daughters, Ashley and Tyler all of Stanwood. He was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Alice. A graveside service of commemoration for family and close friends to celebrate the life of Harris A. Watson was held on Sept. 20, 2010 at the Mt. View Cemetery in Leavenworth with Rev. Roger Hudson officiating. Memorial contributions may be made to the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society or the charity of ones choice. The family would like to extend a special thank you to Central Washington Hospital Hospice, all the cousins, friends and extended family for there love, wonderful care and support through this difficult time. Wa r d ’s F u n e r a l Ch a p e l , Leavenworth is in charge of the arrangements.

Richard S. “Dick” Darlington, 84, went to be with the Lord on Saturday, Sept, 18, 2010 at the Cashmere Convalescent Center. Dick was born in Cashmere on Nov. 23, 1915, to Alfred and Myrtle Sparks Darlington. Dick attended School in Peshastin for 11 years. On April 3, 1937, he married Florence Mounter in Rice, Wash. Dick and Florence made their first home in Peshastin, then in 1941, they moved to Leavenworth until 1969 when they moved to White Pine off of the Stevens Pass Highway. In 1983, they moved back to Cashmere, and in 2003, they again moved to the Stevens Pass area. Dick was raised in the family orchard and also worked on the bridge over the Wenatchee River east of Leavenworth in 1935. In the late 1930s he started working in the woods in road construction for Peshastin Lumber and Box Company and in the 1940s was a mechanic for the company and in the 1950s moved into management for the sawmill, retiring in 1978. After his retirement, Dick maintained and raised 90 fruit trees, hauling the produce to Spokane. His most enjoyable entertainment was riding his Harley Davidson Motorcycle. Dick is survived by his four children, Carla (Hank) Radach, Cary (Carla) Darlington, Mary (Clay) Steele, and Randall (Barb) Darlington, sister; Shirley McArthur; Grandchildren, Tom Radach,

Cashmere First Baptist ChurCh 509-782-2869 • 103 Aplets Way Sunday School 9:45 a.m.- Worship 11 a.m. Bible Study, Wed., 7 p.m. Bob Bauer, Pastor

Cashmere presByterian ChurCh 303 Maple Street • 782-2431 Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Call for activities: Charles Clarke, Pastor

Cashmere united methodist ChurCh 213 S. Division • 782-3811 Worship and Sunday school at 10 a.m. Office Hours: Mon. - Thurs. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Rev. Cheryl Fear, Pastor

Christ Center Worship and Sunday School 10 a.m. Conservatory at Apple Annie Mall Underground Youth Group, Sun., 6 p.m., 206 Vine Middle School meeting, Wed., 7 p.m., 206 Vine Paul B. Williams, Pastor Andy Robinson, Associate Pastor Steve Haney, Youth Pastor Christcentercashmere.org • 782-2825

evergreen Baptist ChurCh

Richard S. “Dick” Darlington Ron Radach, Cinty Hartman, Laurie Steele, Jeff Steele, Darin Darlington, Amy Hanford, Alex Darlington, and Audra Darlington; 13 great-grandchildren, and three great great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife Florence in 2005, grandsons Kelly and Nason Darlington, sisters, Helen Bernice, Marg., and Judy; brothers, Ned, Ralph, Tom and Al, and his parents. A funeral service of commemoration to celebrate the life of Richard “Dick” Darlington will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2010 at 1 p.m. at the Leavenworth

Cashmere

Church of the Nazarene, 111 Ski Hill Drive. Visitation will be held Monday, Sept. 27, 2010, from 1 to 6 p.m. at Ward’s Funeral Chapel, 303 Pine Street. Private family will be at the Peshastin Cemetery. Memorials may be made in Dick’s name to the Upper Valley Christian School, 111 Ski Hill Drive, Leavenworth, WA. 98826 or to the Chelan County Humane Society, 1474 S. Wenatchee Ave. Wenatchee, WA. 98801. Wa r d ’s F u n e r a l Ch ap e l , Leavenworth, is in charge of the arrangements.

5837 Evergreen Drive, 782-1662 Sunday School - 8:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10 a.m. christforcashmere.com • Alan Jarboe, Pastor

graCe Lutheran ChurCh Vine & Elberta Streets • 782-3583 Worship 10:30 a.m. Rev. Robert Gohl, Pastor

st. FranCis Xavier 300 S. Division • Office: 548-5119 Rectory: 782-2643 Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m. Spanish Mass: 12:30 p.m. Daily Mass Wednesday: 8:30 a.m. Friday: 9:30 a.m. Mass Convalescent Center Fr. Dan Dufner, Pastor

st. James episCopaL ChurCh 222 Cottage Ave. • 782-1590 Holy Eucharist 9 a.m. Rev. Carol Forhan, Deacon Rev. Rob Gohl, Vicar - Cell 860-0736

DryDen dryden Community ChurCh Hwy 2 at Dryden Ave. • 782-2935 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. • Worship 10:45 a.m. Matthew Payne, Pastor • 782-4987

mid-vaLLey Baptist ChurCh 1 Frontage Road • 782-2616 Sunday School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Brian Ross, Pastor

Leavenworth CasCade mountain BiBLe ChurCh ‘Where God’s Word Remains The Pillar Of Truth’ 1205 Chumstick Hwy. • 548-4331 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. Adult Bible Study Tuesday 6:30 p.m. AWANA (Youth Program) Wed. 6:30 p.m. (school year) Todd James, Pastor • www.cmbiblechurch.org

Community united methodist 418 Evans Street • 548-5619 Worship and Sunday school for children at 10 a.m., Nursery provided Rev. Roger Hudson, Pastor www.leavenworthumc.org

Cornerstone BiBLe ChurCh Leavenworth Grange Hall • 621 Front St. 548-0748 Sunday Worship 10:15 a.m. Weekly Bible Study/Fellowship Groups Monday & Wednesday 6:30 p.m

“With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible.” -Matthew 19:26 548-5286 P.O. Box 39 • 215 14th Street Leavenworth, WA 98826-0039 echo@leavenworthecho.com

Leavenworth Faith Lutheran ChurCh 224 Benton Street • 548-7010 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. - Education Hour 10:45 a.m. Alex Schmidt, Pastor “Being the gracious healing and reconciling presence of God through: Sacramental Worship, Congregational Nurture and Ministries of Peace, Mercy and Justice for all creation”

First Baptist ChurCh oF Leavenworth, sBC 429 Evans Street • 548-7624 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday prayer 7 p.m. 1st Sunday evening worship 6 p.m.

Leavenworth Christian FeLLowship A Foursquare Church 7591 Hwy. 97 (1/4 mile up Blewett Pass) Sunday 10 a.m. leavenworthchristian@charterinternet.com Call for other meeting times • 548-4222 Mike McGrath, Pastor

Light in the vaLLey Community ChurCh Icicle River Middle School Commons 10195 Titus Rd. • 548-7832 Sunday Worship 10 a.m. John Romine, Pastor • www.lightinthevalley.org

Leavenworth ChurCh

oF the nazarene 111 Ski Hill Drive • 548-5292 Sunday Worship Services 8:45 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Family Night: 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Jon Vandel, Pastor James O’Connell, Youth Pastor Bryan Anderson, Children’s Pastor www.lcn.org

our Lady

oF the

snows CathoLiC ChurCh

145 Wheeler Street Daily Mass • Tuesday & Thursday 8:30 a.m. Saturday Vigil 5 p.m. • Sunday Mass - 10:30 a.m. Parish Office - 548-5119 Fr. Dan Dufner, Pastor

seventh day adventist ChurCh 10600 Ski Hill Drive • 548-4345 Saturday Services Bible Study 9:30 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6 p.m. Roy Churchill • 548-5542

spirit LiFe Center 210 Benton Street • 548-7138 Sunday Worship 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Intercessory Prayer Tuesday 8:30 a.m. Call 548-4709 for prayer information Russell Esparza, Pastor

monitor monitor united methodist ChurCh 3799 Fairview Canyon • 782-2601 Sunday Service & Sunday School 9:30 am Mike O’Neal, Pastor

Peshastin peshastin assemBLy

oF god 8353 Lake Street (at School St.) • 548-7523 Cross the bridge, make a right turn for your life. Sunday Services 10 a.m. Wednesday night Bible Study 7 p.m. Larry Wooten, Pastor

peshastin united ChurCh

oF Christ 8455 Main Street • 548-7517 10:30 a.m. Worship Celebration 9:30 a.m. Sunday School (nursery provided) Rev. Dr. Ann Hinz, Pastor

PLain pLain Community ChurCh “Helping people connect with God and one another in caring community.” 12565 Chapel Dr. • 763-3621 plaincommunitychurch.org Worship 10 a.m. • Nursery (ages 1-3) Children’s Church (ages 4-8) Phil Strong, Pastor

782-3781 201 Cottage Avenue, Suite 4 Cashmere, WA 98815 record@cashmerevalleyrecord.com

To place informaTion in The church Guide call 548-5286.


September 22, 2010 • Cashmere Valley Record

7

Schools & Sports Bulldogs make statement with 26-0 victory

Caleb Barnes for keeping the middle stuffed up and Michael Ruether for effective pressure on the quarterback. He also was pleased with the secondary again for solid pass coverage, Joey Michael, Joe Green, Mitch Darlington, Kevin Kenoyer and Cooper Elliot. So far this has been an effective and tested unit. Cashmere had an outstanding performance from the defensive line containing Hadley and pressuring the quarterback.

By Kyle Green Special to the Record Cashmere may have secured an early grab on the number one ranking in the state with a convincing win over the defending state champions from Connell last Friday night in Cashmere. The last two state champs faced off on Cashmere’s field for an early season showdown. The Cashmere boys asserted themselves with a 26-0 win, racking up points early and playing solid defense the whole game. “It was a great defensive effort, ” said Cashmere Head Coach Phil Zukowski. “Team ball where everyone executed their assignments with no breakdowns. We had great communication on the field and everyone was on the same page.' To put it directly, the Connell Eagles came with what was being held as an unstoppable offense, with returning starter Mat Hadley at running back and a host of other weapons. Hadley was awarded the state 1A most valuable player for 2009. “We had to stop Hadley first, then we worked on their passing game,” said Zukowski. “Hadley is a great running back and he showed he is as good as they say.” The Bulldogs were able to hold Hadley to 93 yards rushing, and three receptions for 0 yards. “Thanks needs to go out to Kenny Johnston who imitated Hadley all week. He has similar speed and he was hammered pretty hard for a few days” he said. Connell’s quarter back Chan-

This week: Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary School

Photo by Ian Dunn

Bulldog runningback Kevin Kenoyer runs through the nice hole opened by his offensive line in action against Connell last week. Cashmere had their way with the Eagles, winning convincingly 26-0. This week, the Bulldogs host a team from Canada, Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary School. dler Salisbury was held to 6-for-18 passing for 50 yards with one interception. “Our secondary confused their quarter back a bit. We played man coverage most of the night, about 85 percent and he couldn’t deal with it like a zone coverage,” Zukowski said. “Their offense is designed to throw against zone defense and we have a great secondary to play man.” Cashmere’s offense executed superbly scoring on the opening drive after getting the kickoff. “We wanted the ball first and felt we could score right off,” he said.

The Bulldogs drove from their own 48 and six plays later Tyler McNair scored a 14 yard run to make it 7-0. “They had eight men on the line the whole night and we still moved the ball,” he said. The defense then went to work forcing the Eagles to punt on their first possession. Cashmere took the ball on the Connell 31 after a great punt return by Casey Ruether. One play was all McNair needed to score, after a two point conversion run by Kevin Kenoyer Cashmere led 14-0. Things continued to go bad for

the Eagles in the first quarter. On the first play of their second possession Hadley fumbled and Cashmere recovered on the Eagle 16 yard line. After three plays McNair scored his third touchdown with a 5-yard run, the PAT failed, but the Bulldogs had a stunning 20-0 lead before the end of the first quarter. McNair ended the evening with 126 yards as the game’s leading rusher. The second and third quarters were scoreless as the Eagles defense made adjustments but none on offense would work for them. Cashmere scored early in the forth on a 21-yard run by Michael

Ruether. Connell punted six times, turned the ball over twice and failed on a forth down attempt one time. The Connell offense threw everything they had at the Bulldog defense and made a strong effort to score and not be shutout as the game ended. “I was very happy with how well Kyle Weiler played,” Zukowski said. “He has improved a great deal.” Weiler said he tries to get better every day. “The team helps me get better. I work on the things coaches tell me to,” Weiler said. Coach also gave recognition to

The game this week will have an international flair as the Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary School Panthers from Surry, British Columbia. The Canadian team is traveling Thursday with a practice joining Bulldogs for a team dinner that evening. The Panthers are “billeted” in Cashmere homes for the night for interaction with Americans. “This will be a chance for our boys to learn a little about Canadians” said Coach Zukowski. “They know a lot about us but I think our boys could learn.” The Panthers come from a larger school. It would be considered a 3A high school in the States. They play a versatile style of offense and have some good size on their team. “I told their coach we will have about 1,000 people to play in front of and he told me they would see that many the whole season,” he said. This will be the last non league game before Bulldogs open against Caribou Trail next week.

Cashmere soccer team scores 2-0 win over Okanogan By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer A 2-0 win over Okanogan on Saturday was a nice way for the Cashmere Bulldogs girls soccer team to end the week after a whirlwind of non-league matches that included

a high and a low — with a 14-0 win over Cle Elum Tuesday and a 1-0 loss to Ephrata Thursday. In the match against Cle Elum, Coach Dennis Tronson said the offense woke up. “Not that it hasn’t been awake,” he said.

A week earlier, the team shutout both Omak and Quincy, scoring six goals each game. Against Cle Elum, the score was 7-0 by halftime. In the game, Gaby Gonzalez scored four, Monique Blanchard, Mackenzi Brunner and Tianna Helm each scored three and Lauren Johnson scored one. Dani Morseman had three assists. “Gaby leads us in goal scoring,” Tronson said. And it was Goalie Suzy McCall’s third shutout of the season, though she didn’t have too much to do during the game. Cashmere had 35 shots on goal to Cle Elum’s one. “That says a lot about the defense in front of her,” Tronson said. “They eliminate the opportunity to shoot.

Cle Elum had the ball down there, but couldn’t get in position to shoot the ball.” And that, Tronson said, is one of the things the team has been working on. Senior Kaylee Carson is the center of defense, with three freshmen — Mikayla Sites, Jesica Bauer, Karly Theis — around her. “She organizes the defensive line. So far it works really well. Limiting opportunities is the key. You can’t stop every shot, but limiting their chances makes it harder for them,” he said. “This is just her second game. She scored two in Omak, as well.” Tronson said in addition to limiting shots on goal, the defense and midfield is also working on holding onto the ball longer in the midfield to give the fowards a chance to find space. He said the outcome against Cle Elum might be different in a couple weeks. “They had a really young team, with five freshman starting. It might take them a couple games to get organized. The score could be entirely different in a couple weeks,” he said. The Bulldogs faced the Ephrata Tigers last Thursday in Ephrata, for the first time in two years. “We expected it to be competitive,” Tronson said. He got what he bargained for. The Bulldogs outshot Ephrata 10-4 and Suzy McCall had three saves during the match. But in the 53rd minute, Ephrata scored on a deflection from a Bulldog defender.

Photo by Nevonne McDaniels

Gaby Gonzalez fights her way around an Okanogan defender Saturday. She assisted in both goals in the match. “My personal thoughts on this match is that we played our best overall match of the season to date,” Tronson said. “We had great ball movement and good defending all over the field. This match was more of a playoff type match in the level of play. The players at the end of the match made the comment that they want to play Ephrata again.” They will get their chance on Oct. 7 at home. By Saturday, in the match against Okanogan, the team was starting to wear down, facing the third match in five days. The first half hour was spent testing the field, then Mackenzi Brunner scored off an assist from Gaby Gonzalez. The two teamed up again for a goal in second half.

“For the match, we outshot Okanogan 13-0,” Tronson said. “Again, our backline of freshmen — Karly Theis and Mikayla Sites — and Senior Kaylee Carson did not allow a shot on goal.” Going into Tuesday’s match against the Cascade Kodiaks (results were not available at press time), Gonzalez was leading the team with eight goals and four assists followed by Brunner and Helm, who both had six goals and two assists. Suzy McCall had four shutouts and only allowed one goal. The team moves out of league play to host 2A Ellensburg on Thursday. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ cashmerevalleyrecord.com.

Cross country runners performs well By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer Cashmere’s Cross-Country runners Roman Velazquez and Kea Paton both placed first in the 3-mile Varsity II race at the Highland’s Apple Ridge Run Challenge in Cowiche on Saturday. Velazquez ran the course in 16:31, the second best time in all three of the mens’ races. Juan Reynoso of Sunnyside placed first in the third race with a time of 16:15. Paton ran the course in 19:28, the second best time in the three women’s races. Sammi Blodgett of Wapato crossed the line in 19:15. The Bulldog’s teammates weren’t far behind.

Freshman Drew Van Polen placed fourth in the same race as Valazquez with a time of 17:39. Sophomore Dawson Taylor placed fourth in the Varsity 1 race with a time of 17:11, followed by Kevin Bailey who placed sixth with a time of 17:49. “Kevin ran better this race. He started slow this year, but he’s getting faster,” said Coach John Durheim. On the girls side, Ashton Weddle placed fourth in the third race with a time of 22:02. Molly Kenoyer, in her first race of the season, placed seventh in the Varsity I race with a time of 22:06. The teams were split into three races for invitational. Durheim

2.7 Million Prospects. One Phone Call. The LeavenworTh echo P.O. Box 39 215 14th Street Leavenworth, WA. 98826

Reach 2.7 million Washington newspaper readers for as low as $1,250 per ad.

cashmere vaLLey record 201 Cottage Ave. Suite 4 Cashmere, WA. 98815

IMPACT AD SPECIAL Learn how it works, call

360.659.1300

said he divided them up so they wouldn’t run together. If they hadn’t been split up, the girls would have been first overall, he said. The meet included more than 200 runners in the three men’s races and 99 in the women’s races. “It was an outstanding race,” Durheim said. “The boys ran great as a team. The girls ran a good race and they’re going to get a lot better.” He said it was the first race for several girls, including Jozie Kimes, Joslin Odle, Meggie Green and Kenoyer. Durheim said he will split up the team next week, taking six boys and six girls to Runner’s Soul Cross Country Invitational on Saturday in Plantes Ferry, Spokane Valley, and the rest to Walla Walla Point State Park for the Wenatchee Invitational. In Spokane, the Bulldog’s top runners, including Velazquez and Paton, will be competing against some of the best teams in the state. “I’m not sure how they’ll do. I’m hoping someone comes in the top 20,” Durheim said. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ cashmerevalleyrecord.com.


Cashmere Valley Record • September 22, 2010

8

Schools & Sports

Cashmere volleyball wins thriller By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer The Cashmere Bulldog volleyball team provided the home crowd with some suspense Thursday night, winning over Okanogan three games to two. “There was plenty of heartattack factor,” said Head Coach Wendy Crossland. Cashmere won the first game 25-13, lost the second 25-19, won the third 25-14, lost the fourth 25-21. The fifth game stayed within a point until Cashmere rallied at the end to win 17-15. As the first home game of the season, it was nice to see the crowd, Crossland said. And the logistics of what balls to use, which bleachers to set up and other details were quickly dealt with so they could focus on the game. It was also the team’s first match that went to the full five games. The jamboree had three games, they lost to Chelan in three games and beat Omak in four. “We won against Okanogan, but it went to five games. Frankly that is good. We played more volleyball and realized we can play five full games. We’re in good shape,” she said. “We showed up to play. The girls have a desire to make this one of the best seasons for volleyball. We have the talent to do that for sure.” And the score was pretty close even on the games they lost, scor-

ing 19 in the second game and 21 in the fourth game. “We missed some serves and maybe a hit or two,” she said. But the defense was solid. “Erin Smith and Kaylee Caudill had the most digs and passes and rarely shanked out. I’m confident in our defense. They were willing to get to the ball and cover everything and follow through,” she said. “Our libero, Breanna Lee, is doing great.” Mikela Kowatsch, who did not play last year, was an effective server in the game. “Her serves were consistent. In clutch times, she kept doing her thing,” Crossland said. On the offense, the team was also finding its groove, with consistent sets from Caitlin Salgado, finding hitters Erin Smith and Kendra Weiler. “When they’re on, they’re on,” she said. Weiler had 12 serves in game three. In game five, Kaylee Caudill had eight hits and four kills. “That was her biggest game for kills,” Crossland said. Overall, she said, it was a good game, though a quick finish would have been nice, too. Her wish was granted Saturday in a game on the road against Tonasket. The Bulldogs won all three games, 25-22, 25-21 and 25-13. “Overall, the team played well and they did a good job,” Crossland said. Caudhill had nine kills, Weiler

Cashmere Scoreboard Bulldogs Football Sept. 17

Cashmere 26, Connell 0 upcoming games

Sept. 24

Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary School, 7 p.m.

Bulldogs Girls Soccer Sept. 14

Cashmere 14, Cle Elum-Roslyn 0

Sept. 16

Ephrata 1, Cashmere 0

Sept. 18

Cashmere 2, Okanogan 0 upcoming games

Sept. 23

Ellensburg at Cascade, 7 p.m.

Sept. 28

Cashmere at Brewster, 4:30 p.m.

Bulldogs volleyball Sept. 16

Cashmere 2, Okanogan 2

Sept. 18

Cashmere 3, Tonasket 0 upcoming games

Photo by Nevonne McDaniels

Kaylee Caudill blocks a shot during the five-game marathon match against Okanogan last Thursday. had eight kills and Smith had 10 kills. Salgado, the setter, had 29 assists. Crossland said Lee, the libero, had two aces with 10 solid serves in game three. “The team played well and they did a good job,” Crossland said. The Bulldogs faced the Cascade Kodiaks on Tuesday. Results were not available at presstime, but beforehand Crossland said the girls were up to the challenge of facing

last year’s number two team. “We’ll show up. We’re really excited. We’ve already faced Chelan, the number one. Initially I was concerned at facing Chelan three times, but now I’m grateful. It ups the ante and ups our abilities and the challenge.” Next up on the schedule is an away game at Manson on Saturday. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ cashmerevalleyrecord.com.

Sept. 25

Cashmere at Manson, 1 p.m.

Bulldogs Cross Country Sept. 18

Highland Invite Roman Velazquez, 1st, 16:31 Kea Paton, 1st, 19:28 upcoming Meets

Sept. 25

Runners Soul/Erik Anderson, 10 a.m. Wenatchee Invite, 11 a.m.

CHS drama presents ‘Dracula’ and haunted theater By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer Susan Gubsch has been Cashmere High School’s drama class teacher since 1995 and has been directing the school plays since 2004. And all of her students know “she doesn’t do scary.” Not scary movies, not scary books. Not scary plays. Until this year. Rehearsals for “Dracula” are underway. The play is set for Oct. 28-30 at Cashmere Middle School’s performing arts center. With it will be a haunted theater. “Two for the price of one,” Gubsch said. “But people can opt out of the haunted theater if they want.” She admits she might be one of those to opt out of what her students foresee as a creepy, gruesome, expect-the-unexpected thrill that will be a warm up for the story played out on the stage. Gubsch and the Cascade High School drama club, along with a lot of help from parents and community members and her director, Nan Missal, put on a fall play and a spring musical each year. And she tries to make sure each class has an opportunity to get a variety in the four years, from classics like “Little Women” to “All I Really Needed I Learned in Kindergarten.” She also alternates plays that have relatively small casts one year with those that include everyone the next year. And each year, she asks the juniors what they would like to do during their senior year. “They wanted scary,” she said of this year’s seniors. (She is carrying over the theme — in a way — to the spring musical “Beauty and the Beast.” Auditions for that start in November.) And, since it is also a year when she wanted everyone to be involved, she decided a haunted theater would be in order for the fall production. Students who did not get a role in Dracula, will have a character in the haunted theater. “It gives everyone a chance to

“Black curtains go a long way in a vampire play.” In all, between students in the club after school, students in her drama class and parent and community volunteers, about 100 people will be involved in the production end of the play and haunted theater. But that’s nothing new. “The parent and community support is wonderful every year,” she said. “There’s no way we could do it without their help.” Photo by Nevonne McDaniels

Ideas for the haunted theater get some laughs during a planning session at the Cashmere High School’s Drama Club meeting Sept. 21. The haunted theater and the play “Dracula” will be presented to the public on Oct. 28-30 at the Cashmere Middle School. work on characterization and make up,” she said. And planning. Lots of planning. Play auditions were Sept. 7 and 8. The cast list was posted Sept. 9 and planning for the haunted theater commenced Sept. 14, between play rehearsals. The first planning session included turning loose the creative energy of the club, with its 30-plus members imagining the worst and writing it all down on butcher paper and then sharing the ideas with the rest of the group. Gubsch said the seventh graders at the middle school also will add their input. Their ideas included scenes from nearly every horror movie ever produced — though surprisingly few were vampire-related — but inspiration wasn’t limited to the big screen. Simply creepy things like clowns, dolls and spiders were also high on the list. Along with blood. Lots of blood. “We want it to be as scary as possible without leaving scars,” said Senior Benjamin Conrad. “Well, maybe little scars.” And the students were looking forward to the opportunity to be more interactive with audience members — especially if it means jumping out from behind a wall in the hopes of making them

scream. But it’s done in good fun. They are looking to strike a balance. And, as Gubsch said, attendees don’t have to go through the haunted theater to get to the play. The cast and crew read-throughs started immediately. One of the challenges is to tweak the play to fit the cast. For instance, Dr. Peter Seward’s part was written for a male, but Karley Blomquist has the role as Dr. Patricia Seward, so all the “he” and “him” are being changed “she” and “her.” The next step in the production process is to pare down the scary ideas for the haunted theater into a workable piece and start building the set. That will be in full swing by early October, with the help of parents, who also help with costumes. Set-building parties have been scheduled for Oct. 9 and 16. Fortunately, Gubsch said, the”Dracula” set is simple, so the set crew can pay more attention to the haunted theater. “We’re going with the less is more idea for the play,” she said.

The Dracula cast In order of appearance Jonathan Harker (Michael McCormick); Count Dracula (Michael Larson); Vampire women (Hannah Capelo, Erica Elias, Nona Isenhart, Maira Ramirez); Mrs. Martha Westenra (Jordan Maydole); Mr. Henry Westenra (Chad Robinson); Edith (Tayler Wood); Miss Lucy Westenra (Ariana Rodriguez); Miss Mina Murray (Austyn Nichols); Arthur Holmwood (Hans Schreiner); Dr. Seward (Karley Blomquist); Abraham Van Helsing (Ben Conrad); Servant/understudy (Britnee Collins); Servant/understudy (Shelby Simonson); Renfield (Cody Lippert)

The crew Stage manager, Gavin Burnett; props mistress, Randi Zodrow; stage crew, Brea Colburn

Haunted Theater actors Miroslava Blahova, Willy Chang, Kelsey Christensen, Zoe Ho, Apryl Johnson, Vanessa Keran, Ashlyn Lewis, Star Medina, Ali Miller, Azure Parmenter, Shi Shi Sackatook, Megan Turner and Isabel Valentin. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 782-3781 or reporter@ cashmerevalleybank.com.

Rd o c e R e h t Read in pRint oR online! Beginning in October some articles on the Cashmere Valley Record Website will be available only to subscribers. What does this mean for you? Everyone with a subscription to the print edition of the Record automatically has a subscription to the Internet edition. You will use your phone number and subscriber number as your username and password to log on. Without a subscription you will have access to all the classified ads and legal notices, as well as some of the articles.

YOUR BEST SOURCE FOR CASHMERE NEWS • 782-3781

YearlY SubScription rateS:

Leavenworth ad executive and ad Manager Carol Forhan • 509-548-5286 carol@leavenworthecho.com

JONES & JONES ~ BETTS Funeral Home

JONES & JONES ~ BETTS Funeral Home

CashMere, CheLan and wenatChee ad executive Lindsay Timmermans • 509-860-7301 lindsay@cashmerevalleyrecord.com

Chelan County Residents ................................... $32.50 Seniors (65 and older) in county ..................... $30.50 Washington state, outside Chelan County ........ $33.50 Out of state (print and online) ........................... $36.00 Out of state (online only).................................... $32.50

To subscribe, mail your check along with your phone number and address to cashmere Valley record circulation c/o Lake Chelan Mirror P.O. Box 249 Chelan, WA 98816 For assistance or information call 1-866-833-0873 (toll free) ncW Media — Building the newspaper of the future


September 22, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record

HOUSES FOR SALE

HOUSES FOR SALE By owner Brewster Hospital Hill Nice views

Two story plus daylight basement, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath, hardwood floor in kitchen, new GE range, Bosch dishwasher, tiled walk-in shower, heated tile floor, large front room with Quadra-fire insert, large family room with wood stove, fenced yard. $250,000. By appointment, 509-733-1694.

MANUFACTURED HOMES Mansfield Double wide manufactured home

3 bed, 2 bath, corner lot, metal roof, 2 storage sheds, carport $45,000 509-686-2355

LOTS & ACREAGE

COMMERCIAL RENTALS Leavenworth class A office space, 225 - 635 sq. ft., excellent location, off street parking. 509-630-4203.

FOR RENT

Available November 1, 2 bed, 2 1/2 bath, $850/ month, $400 deposit, WSG included. Fireplace, carport, W/D, storage. No pets. Call 509-6991393. 6 month lease. Beautiful Leavenworth Apartment, 1300 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, large living room, dining, new kitchen, stone fireplace, all remodeled, amazing view. $850/ month and utilities included. Adults only. Please call 679-2080 for appointment. Beautiful one bedroom apartment with garage, Leavenworth. $850.00 per month, no smoking or pets. All utilities and cable included. 509-670-5115. Charming 1900 square foot, 2 bedroom, 2 bath house loLand For Sale By Owner cated off of Chiwawa Loop. Leavenworth Wood stove, hardwood 1. 24 flat acres, with shared floors, W/D, garage, covered well, $275, 000. In well es- porch, insulated basement tablished neighborhood. good for storage. $1075.00 Desirable SKi Hill area. plus deposit. No smoking. 509-548-7126. Contact Teri- 509-630-2568. For Rent! Two bedroom, Two adjacent, 60 x 132 foot one bath home in beautiful lots, Prospect Street, Leav- Plain. Gorgeous meadow enworth. $150, 000 each, or view! Home is off Shugart $280,000 for both. 548-7526 Flats Road at 12211 Allen or 360-435-8908. Road. W/D, fireplace. $695/ month. Call Still Properties, Wow! Reduced! 509-888-2400. Perfect Lot Rare Opportunity Fully furnished, two bedE. Leavenworth Rd., 0.5 mile room, two bath condo, walkfrom Hwy. 2, across road ing distance from town. Covfrom City Beach on We- ered parking. Leavenworth. natchee River, on school $900/ month. 360-873-2471 bus route, power, cable, or 360-770-4897. perks, City Water. one acre. Mini Storage, 5´ x 10´. Great 509-630-2568, by owner, value in Peshastin. $40 to may carry. $45/ month. Still Properties. 1-509-888-2400.

FOR RENT

ANNOUNCEMENTS

HELP WANTED

Newly remodeled 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,800+ sq ft unit, with parquet floors and spectacular views of Lake Chelan. All appliances including W/D. Single car garage, plus parking. Great shape, $995./ month, includes all utilities. 509-630-4538. Newly remodeled one bedroom, with parquet floors, double car garage, plus 2 car carport. Full appliances, W/D. Across from lake. $650/ month. 509-630-4538 One bedroom apartment in Leavenworth. W/D, Internet, water/ sewer/ garbage included. No smoking/ no pets. References. $650/ month. 509-548-7205. Two bedroom, one bath cabin, 2 miles from Leavenworth, 2 1/2 acres, pets ok. $950/ month plus $500 deposit. Call or text (541) 292-2478.

LOOKING TO AMBUSH A BUYER? There is a better way! 20 words for only $30

Cascade School District #228 is in need of Substitutes in the following areas Teacher, Para Educator, Custodial and Bus Driver. Please pick up an application at the District Office 330 Evans St. Leavenworth WA 98826.

SERVICES Chelan Dog: puppy socialization and dog training, small classes; boarding and daycare. Call Jon or Robbie at 509-682-2959

for 13 weeks! Extra words $1.25 each. Your picture is worth a thousand words by adding a photo for only $5.00 extra Bold Words, Special Fonts and Borders additional charge *Must be paid in advance No Refunds.

Private Party Ads Only No Real Estate Agent Ads Call to place ad: Leavenworth & Cashmere 509-548-5286 Chelan-509-682-2213 Your ad will run in all of our papers and shoppers. 28,000 readers from the Canadian border, Oroville to Stevens Pass.

NCW Media, Inc.

•The Leavenworth Echo •Cashmere Valley Record •Lake Chelan Mirror •Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune Quad City Herald, Brewster NCW Bargain Hunter’s Guides Deadline: Friday Noon

12-2009

LOST & FOUND Did you lose a personal item? Your camera, a pet, your purse? Place it in the classifieds one week for FREE. Call Leavenworth 548-5286, or Chelan 682-2213. DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words. Call Leavenworth, 548-5286 Lake Chelan Mirror 682-2213 or Quad City Herald, 689-2507 before Noon on Mondays. Lost- Leavenworth, 7/3/10, man's gold ring/ gold intital set/ black stone. Reward offered. (360) 527-2930.

Cascade Medical Center Job Opportunities • Oscopy Nurse- Part-time • ER RN- Pool • Housekeeper- Full-time Apply at www.cascademedicalcenter.org. Volunteer opportunities available. EOE Oscopy RN Cascade Medical Center is seeking an experienced RN for growing Oscopy program. Conscious sedation training or certification preferred. BLS required. Mondays and Tuesdays or other days when cases are scheduled. Competitive wages. For more information call, (509) 548-5815 and ask for Human Resources or apply directly to Cascade Medical Center, 817 Commercial Street or fax/ email resume to: (509) 548-2521 or lanceh@cascademedicalcenter.org EOE.

Vacation Internationale Front desk position now available at the Blackbird Lodge. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. If interested please call or pick up application at: 305 8th St. Leavenworth. 509-548-5800.

PUZZLE SOLUTION


The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record • September 22, 2010

B2

Classifieds & Public Notices PUZZLE SOLUTION

AUTOMOBILES

TRUCKS & VANS

94 Chevy Blazer LT

BOATS & TRAILERS 2004 Bayliner Ciera, Condition Excellent, Maintenance Record Available. Located at Lake Chelan Marina. 509-682-8287

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES Estate Sale 60 Years of Collecting: antiques, collectibles, furniture, china, art, kitchenware, women’s +size clothing and more. Friday Sept. 24 - Sunday Sept. 26 from 9-4. 5950 Sunburst Lane, Cashmere. From Hwy. 2 take Hay Canyon Exit and follow signs.

STATEWIDES

515 Leather Interior Power Windows, Seats, AC Locks & Cruise New Tires Tow Pack V6 Beautiful Two-Tone Blue $3,600 509-687-0677 509-860-7465 2004 Subaru Outback

GARAGE & YARD SALE Saturday, 9/25, 8 to 3, no earlies please. Some estate items, antique, vintage, and other great stuff. Minimal clothing. In town, Leavenworth. Location, 223 West Street.

35th anniversary model. 80K miles. Excellent condition. $10,900 Email gofish@methownet.com or Call 509-996-4543

WANTED

CAMPERS, TRAILERS & RVS

BUYING! Silver or Gold Coins - Guns. Call Spence Confidential, by appointment. 509-429-4722

1983 Sportcoach Motorhome For Sale

GENERAL

MERCHANDISE Mill Close Out, 6 inch cedar decking, 89 cents per linear. Hurry!! Sunshine Lumber, 509-664-0600.

FIREWOOD

all the ammenities excellent condition runs great $8,000 OBO Call Jerri at 682-1562 or 679-5496

BOATS & TRAILERS 1987 24 ft. Bayliner cabin cruiser with queen bed. 350 hp Chevy engine. Excellent shape. $10,000. Dave 687-0576.

BUILDING SUPPLIES Mill Close Out, 6 inch cedar decking, 89 cents per linear. Hurry!! Sunshine Lumber, 509-664-0600.

AUTOMOBILES 1949 PACKARD

TRUCKS & VANS ‘82 GMC Sierra

455 Pontiac motor with 0 miles. $6,000.00 invested. Trade for van or truck 4x4 or best offer. 509-888-4000 1988 Toyota Celica Convertible

Very Clean Auto. 2000cc 4CYL $2,995 509-687-0677 509-860-7465

2002 4WD Subaru Legacy Sedan. 100K miles. New brakes, water pump, gasket. One owner. $6000 OBO. Call 509-393-2223.

Mileage Maker (1) owner 4 spd • Insulated Canopy New Tires • Stereo New 2.8 V6 & Shocks $2,250 509-687-0677 509-860-7465

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a "make good", in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPT -- Adoring couple, Doctor & Lawyer promise your baby unconditional love, laughter & happiness. Expenses paid. 1-800-933-1975 BUILDINGS STEEL ARCH BUILDINGS Huge Savings on some of our Summer Clearance Buildings Selling for Balanced Owed plus Reps. 16x20, 20x24, 25x30, etc. Supplies Won't Last! 1-866-339-7449 MISC FOR SALE FASTER INTERNET! No access to cable/DSL? Get connected with High Speed Satellite Internet. Call now for a limited time offer from WildBlue -1-877-369-2553 NEW Norwood SAWMILLSLumberMate-Pro handles logs 34" diameter, mills boards 28" wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N EDUCATION-INSTRUCTION ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. Call 866-483-4429; www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS BIG DISCOUNTS from over 200 Antique Dealers, 28th Anniversary, September 24-26 Historic Snohomish Star Center Mall (360) 568-2131 www.myAntiqueMall.com ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,000. Call this newspaper 509-548-5286 or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED WARM, CARING HOST FAMILIES needed for high school exchange students. Volunteer today! Call 1 (866) GO-AFICE or visit afice.org. HELP WANTED-TRUCK DRIVERS DRIVERS: CDL-A Drivers & Owner Operators. Drive for the Nation's Largest Tank Carrier!

STATEWIDES *Lease Purchase Available* Above Average Pay, Benefits * Plate, Permit & Insurance Programs Available. * Paid Orientation. Call for Details: 866-921-9651 or 866-922-2691. www.Work4QC.com REEFER DRIVERS NEEDED? Experienced Drivers and Class A Commercial students welcome! Our incredible Freight network offers plenty of miles! 1-800-277-0212 www.primeinc.com DRIVERS -- Company Drivers Up to 40k First Year. New Team Pay! Up to .48c/mile CDL Training Available. Regional Locations. (877) 369-7105. www.centraldrivingjobs.net REAL ESTATE 20 ACRE RANCH Foreclosures only $99/mo. $0 Down, $12,900, great deal! Near Growing El Paso, Texas. Owner Financing, No Credit Checks, Money Back Guarantee. Free Map/Pictures 800-343-9444 ARIZONA big beautiful lots $89/mo. $0 down, $0 interest. Golf Course, Nat'l Parks. 1 hours from Tucson Intl't Airport. Guaranteed Financing. No credit check Pre-recorded msg. (800) 631-8164 code 4044 www.sunsiteslandrush.com

PUBLIC NOTICES SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CHELAN COUNTY In re the Estate of Daniel Clair Lenarth, Deceased. NO. 10-4-00117-6 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed and has qualified as the personal representative of this estate. Persons having claims against the deceased must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, serve their claims on the personal representative, or the attorney of record, at the addresses stated below, and file an executed copy of the claim with the clerk of this court within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or within four months after the date of filing of the copy of this notice with the clerk of the court, whichever is later or, except under those provisions included in RCW 11.40.011 or RCW 11.40.013, the claim will be forever barred. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with clerk of the court: August 31, 2010. Personal Representative: Deborah Shultz 1515 E. Mariposa Avenue El Segundo, CA 90245 Attorney for Estate and Resident

PUBLIC NOTICES Agent: Kyle D. Flick Attorney at Law 222 South Mission Wenatchee, Washington 98801 (509) 662-3333 DATED this 31st day of August, 2010. Law Office Of Kyle D. Flick, P.S. By s/s Kyle D. Flick, WSBA #14963 Attorney for Estate and Resident Agent. Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 8, 15, and 22, 2010. #41463. Beaver Valley Play Area Project Bids are requested by Cascade School District No. 228 for the Beaver Play Area Project. Sealed base bids will be received until 3:00 p.m., local time on Friday, October 1, 2010, and must be marked Beaver Valley Play Area Project - Base Bid. Sealed Alternate Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. local time on Friday, October 1, 2010, and must be marked Beaver Valley Play Area Project - Alternate Bids. Proposals received after these times will not be considered. All bids will be received at Icicle River Middle School 10195 Titus Road, Leavenworth, Washington 98826. Proposals will be opened and publicly read aloud at 3:00 p.m., local time on Monday, October 4, 2010, at Icicle River Middle School, 10195 Titus Road, Leavenworth, Washington 98826. General contractors may obtain one (1) set and subcontractors may obtain one (1) set of contract documents from Kenny Renner-Singer, Principal, at Icicle River Middle School, 10195 Titus Road, Leavenworth, Washington. A check for a refundable deposit of $25 per set is required. Plan deposits will be returned to actual general contractor and subcontractor plan holders upon return of all contract documents; provided, however, that said documents are returned in an unmarked and unmutilated condition on or before October 11, 2010, at 5:00 p.m. local time. A non-mandatory Pre-bid Conference shall be held on Tuesday, September 21, 2010, at 1:00 p.m. local time at the project site. No bidder may withdraw its bid after the hour set forth for opening thereof or before award of contract, unless said award is delayed for a period exceeding sixty (60) days. Cascade School District No. 228 reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive informalities or irregularities in any bid or in the bidding. Cascade School District No. 228 by: Dr. Steve McKenna Superintendent. Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 22 and 29, 2010. #41889


September 22, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record

B3

Classifieds & Public Notices PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

File No.: 7523.20562 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. OneWest Bank FSB Grantee: Darrin D. Dietrich and Shari Lynne Dietrich Tax Parcel ID No.: 27-22-13-935-010 Abbreviated Legal: Unit 1, Wapato Street Condos Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 1, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: Unit 1 of Wapato Street Condominiums, a condominium, according to the declaration thereof, recorded under Auditor's File No. 2257951 and amendments recorded thereafter, records of Chelan County, Washington. Survey map and plans for the Wapato Street Condominiums, recorded under Auditor's File No. 2257952, in Volume 31 of Condominiums, Pages 59 and 60, records of Chelan County, Washington. Commonly known as: 316 East Wapato Avenue Unit 1 Chelan, WA 98816 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/18/07, recorded on 06/26/07, under Auditor's File No. 2259085, records of Chelan County, Washington, from Darrin D. Dietrich and Shari Lynne Dietrich husband and wife, as Grantor, to Security Union Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Elec-

tronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by IndyMac Federal Bank FSB to OneWest Bank FSB, under an Assignment/ Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2325195. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/ or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/24/2010 Monthly Payments $25,914.80 Late Charges $1,218.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $2,672.46 Total Arrearage $29,806.06 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $508.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $70.00 Recording Costs $141.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $789.00 Total Amount Due: $30,595.06 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $180,000.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and

the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 1, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Darrin D. Dietrich 316 East Wapato Avenue Unit 1 Chelan, WA 98816 Shari Lynne Dietrich 316 East Wapato Avenue Unit 1 Chelan, WA 98816 Darrin D. Dietrich 12 Dietrich Road Chelan, WA 98816 Shari

Lynne Dietrich 12 Dietrich Road Chelan, WA 98816 Darrin D. Dietrich 316 East Wapato Avenue Unit 3 Chelan, WA 98816 Shari Lynne Dietrich 316 East Wapato Avenue Unit 3 Chelan, WA 98816 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 02/13/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 02/13/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to

the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/24/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7523.20562) 1002.111259-FEI. Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 1, and 22, 2010. #41251.

City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: A parcel of land in the West half of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 16, Township 23 North, Range 20, E.W.M., Chelan County, Washington, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron rod in a monument case that is the South Quarter corner for said Section 16; thence North 0 degrees 20'59'' West on the North-South center of Section line for 1949.18 feet; thence North 86 degrees 35'25'' East for 66.54 feet to a 5/8'' iron rod on the East side of existing Burch Mountain Road right of way boundary, and the True Point of Beginning for this description; thence continuing North 86 degrees 35'25'' East for 178.69 feet to a 5/8'' iron rod; thence South 4 degrees 09'35'' East for 208.16 feet to a 5/8'' iron rod; thence South 86 degrees 34'45'' West for 178.70 feet to a 5/8'' iron rod at the Easterly boundary of the right of way for Burch Mountain Road; thence Northerly along said right of way boundary defined by a bearing of North 4 degrees 09'24'' West and a chord of 208.19 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Commonly known as: 3707 Burch Mountain Road Wenatchee, WA 98801 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/01/04, recorded on 09/03/04, under Auditor's File No.

File No.: 7777.12366 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust Series 2004-HE3 Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates Grantee: Robert T. Benedict and Tana T. Benedict, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 232016420050 Abbreviated Legal: PTN SEC 16 TWP 23N RGE 20E NW QTR SE QTR, Chelan County Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 1, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the

Thomas M. Sauvageau M.B.A. Owner QuickBooks Expert 11756 U.S. Hwy. 2, Suite 3 Leavenworth, WA 98826

509-741-9549 509-548-1500 tom@sauvageauandco.com

immermann construction, inc. setting the standard for quality & integrity since 1987

New Custom Construction & Remodeling WWW.LEAVENWORTHCUSTOMHOMES.COM 509-548-5954 / 509-630-8581 LIC#ZIMMEC106501

TELL THESE BUSINESSES THAT YOU FOUND THEM HERE! TO ADVERTISE, CALL 548-5286.


The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record • September 22, 2010

B4

Classifieds & Public Notices PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

2182485, records of Chelan County, Washington, from Robert T. Benedict and Tana T. Benedict, as Grantor, to Bishop & Lynch of King County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for WMC Mortgage Corp., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust Series 2004-HE3 Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, under an Assignment/ Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2320938. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/ or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/22/2010 Monthly Payments $19,453.28 Late Charges $785.96 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,349.60 Total Arrearage $21,588.84 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $583.74 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $15.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,285.80 Total Amount Due: $22,874.64 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $135,882.11, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 1, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together

with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS ROBERT T BENEDICT 3707 BURCH MOUNTAIN RD WENATCHEE, WA 98801 TANA T BENEDICT 3707 BURCH MOUNTAIN RD WENATCHEE, WA 98801 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 03/12/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 03/12/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are

incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/22/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7777.12366) 1002.149491-FEI. Published inThe Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 1, and September 22, 2010. #41242

following amounts now in arrears and/ or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/29/10 Monthly Payments $7,737.65 Late Charges $295.10 Lender's Fees & Costs $55.00 Total Arrearage $8,087.75 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $751.30 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $17.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,582.42 Total Amount Due: $9,670.17 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $189,253.51, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 1, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/20/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jose Luis Ochoa 804 South Western Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 Juana Zaragoza De Ochoa 804 South Western Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 Jose Luis Ochoa 602 Pioneer Drive Cashmere, WA 98815 Juana Zaragoza De Ochoa 602 Pioneer Drive Cashmere, WA 98815 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/14/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/14/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of de-

fault or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/29/10 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.74129) 1002.156775-FEI Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 1, and 22, 2010. #41253.

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF CHELAN IN PROBATE

Join the wise businesspeople...

File No.: 7023.74129 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Grantee: Jose Luis Ochoa and Juana Zaragoza De Ochoa, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 22-20-08-930-025 Abbreviated Legal: 16, 4, Western Homesites Addition Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 1, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: Lot 16, Block 4, Western Homesites Addition to Wenatchee, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Page 16, Chelan County, Washington, except that portion conveyed to the City of Wenatchee by Deed recorded December 1, 1987, under Auditor's No. 8712010012. Situate in the County of Chelan, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 804 South Western Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/15/07, recorded on 11/21/07, under Auditor's File No. 2270464, records of Chelan County, Washington, from Jose Luis Ochoa and Juana Zaragoza de Ochoa, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the

509-782-5071 Serving all of Eastern Washington...

call Carol, 548-5286 or Lindsay, 782-3781

Sell your unwanted items with a Classified ad. Call Susan at 548-5286 today.

“The Water Professionals” Chelan & Kittitas County

...advertise here!

some ca$h!

� Water Well Drilling � Pump Systems � Water Treatment � Full Service Store � Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981 � Free Water Analysis � Zimmatic Pivots � Hydrofracturing � Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems

Colville � Spokane � Republic Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

TELL THESE BUSINESSES THAT YOU FOUND THEM HERE! TO ADVERTISE, CALL 548-5286.

In the Matter of the Estate of Kenneth Gordon Marson, SR., Deceased. NO. 10-4-00200-8 Probate Notice To Creditors (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020; or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date Of First Publication: September 22, 2010. By s/s Marydell D. Marson Personal Representative Address: 200 Joseph Street, Unit 601 Leavenworth, WA 98826 Attorneys for Personal Representative: Jeffers, Danielson, Sonn & Aylward By s/s Todd M. Kiesz, WSBA NO. 25975 2600 Chester Kimm Road P. O. Box 1688 Wenatchee, WA 98807-1688 Chelan County Clerk’s Office Ms. Siri A. Woods, Clerk Chelan County Superior Court Chelan County Law & Justice Facility 401 Washington Street, Fifth Floor P.O. Box 3025 Wenatchee, WA 98807-3025 Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 22, 29 and October 6, 2010. #41901


September 22, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record

B5

Life & Health

Along the Wenatchee Along the Wenatchee Pat Morris It is very likely you have never taken such a trip as the Egbert Trasks did in May 1892, traveling from the Yakima Valley to Na-hahum Canyon. The incidents preserved in letters to a friend in Boston relate hardships of a not unusual kind for that day, when dropping down from a 5,000-foot summit to less than 1,000, as well as other difficulties of interest to us, who whiz over the same mountains so easily. The Trasks had tried farming in the Moxee Valley, but abandoned it for the prospects of a ranch not far from the new railroad line going in but not finished. On the morning they left, their

farm wagon was loaded with plow, seeds, farm implements, food for the summer and a camp outfit. It would take all day, even with their four horses, to reach a spring. The next morning they came to a freighting trail, long established, carrying goods to Ellensburg. Along it, and property spaced, were stage stations offering food and lodging. Egbert drove the teams and his wife, Annie, rode one of their saddle horses, herding a second, plus a colt. Watering the horses when coming to a stream, letting them graze, a necessity also, they traveled until darkness threatened. Nine days later and crossing the Kittitas Valley, they could see the wooded slopes of the Wenatchee Mountains and their rugged peaks growing closer daily. In this valley there were many evidences of homesteading, where land was cleared and in crops and a cabin run up for a home. A railroad had been built

Corn, a harvest report Corn season was late this year and it is already winding down. We sell corn at our fruit stand ooking from the Kallstrom Farm in with Quincy, and they tell me the growing season will soon come eri to an end. The Kallstrom family grows a super sweet corn, that Teri Miller has been the best corn I remember eating in a long time. It is so good the boys that work for me eat it uncooked everyday they work. Corn has had to struggle this year to grow like everything else, and supplies have been limited. The food processors in Quincy have had quite a few days this year of shutdown, due to lack of product. I have not heard how the potato crop is this year, but I am hoping the spud growers have a great harvest. Washington is the nations top potato producer and creates many jobs in this state. Recently while in the Palouse, the wheat harvest was under way, and many calling it a vintage year for wheat. Our weather pattern this year was not good to vegetable or fruit growers, but was very beneficial to the dry land wheat growers. Home gardens also have struggled this year, so if need some delicious fruits or veggies, come out to the Tuesday or Thursday Farmers’ Market or a local fruit stand. There is still plenty of time to freeze or can food for the winter. Don’t forget the corn.

C

T

Corn Pudding 4 eggs, separated 2 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon vanilla Pinch of ground cinnamon and nutmeg 4 ears of corn 1 cup half and half 1 cup milk Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 1-1/2 quart baking dish. Remove kernels from corn. In a mixing bowl, beat egg yolks until thick and lemon colored, about 5-8 minutes. Add butter, sugars, salt, vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg ; mix well. Add corn. Stir in cream and milk. Beat egg whites until stiff; fold into yolk mixture. Pour into baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees about 35 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center comes clean. Cover loosely with foil, the last 10 minutes if necessary to prevent over browning.

“Sex is good, but not as good as fresh sweet corn.” —Garrison Keillor, (1942- )American author, humorist and radio personality.

through and the prospect of prosperity was growing. One more long day and the last stage station before the climb to the Wenatchee Mountain summit was endured with no stop for lunch. At dusk they halted at this goal. When they stopped to eat a warm meal at this lodging place, they received little encouragement to risk crossing the summit where snow and mud and steepness forbid. Next morning they set out, daring the risks. The first mile was a delusion. The snow was there alright. Thankful they had lightened the wagon load by packing gear on one of the ponies, they pressed on. Pine trees and steep slopes were everywhere. The mud mired the team many times. About 4 p.m. the travel and the

exhausted team signalled stop. After tending the stock, the Trasks pitched their tent and went to bed. Just outside a fire blazed. When the night wind came up, they were astonished to find the pine tree next to it had been set afire. A move was necessary. Dawn brought more reasons for astonishment. Three of their four horses had left camp for lower levels. Saddling the ponies, the couple searched all day without results. They had come on all sorts of draws and canyons with grass and wildflowers to attract horses, but so far none were the right ones. Finally they returned to camp. In the last rays of the setting sun, they spotted the horses two canyons away. Too tired to go along and be-

lieving she was near the stage station, Mrs. Trask set out on her pony. Only after coming to the end of the road did she realize she was lost. Fighting to keep her composure, she decided to backtrack her pony’s hoof prints. She rode into camp as her husband brought back the horses. Electing to spend one more night at the stage station, they met a freighter with his load also headed for the Wenatchee Valley. He offered to help them gain the summit if they helped him by pulling his load up with additional horses. Next morning Egbert fastened two of his team to the freighter’s wagon and with all six horses, he was relieved to see them able to make fairly good time on the route. Here we read from one of An-

nie’s letters: “Meanwhile we took the other horses and went up to where our wagon was and where I stopped and got dinner in a snowstorm over a campfire. “We found our hens and other possessions safe and sound. When the men returned I had some good hot coffee for them and crackers, fried ham and hot potatoes. “After dinner the freighter put two of his horses on with our four and pulled the wagon to the summit. We had only ordinary, two-horse loads, but it was all six horses could pull to get through the mud. Before we reached the summit we went about 2 miles in old snow a foot deep. If the going up was bad, what shall I say about going down!” Next week: A hair-raising experience.

Robotic surgery is all the rage, but price is high By Dr. David Lipschitz ©2010 Creators Syndicate Inc

make the impossible possible. One of the most valuable therapies has been the development of enThe last few decades have led doscopic surgery, which involves to great advances in health care using very tiny incisions and -- new breakthroughs in medical small endoscopic tubes to perform therapies and treatments seem to a variety of procedures.

Christina’s Culinary Adventures By Christina Forchemer-Zucktriegel My niece, Allie, and I, took our aunt and uncle from Germany up to Gustav’s the other day for lunch. They wanted a juicy, American hamburger and I knew just where to bring them for a great sandwich or salad with a world-class view. We were sure to sit up on the deck with a panoramic view of the mountains and breathtaking surroundings. This is a great place to take visitors when the weather permits, because this is definitely one of the best ways to experience our gorgeous village. Gustav’s Pub and Restaurant has been open for 30 years and is very proud of their hand-cut, homemade french fries which are made daily on premises. Famous for their burgers, especially the Ortega Burger, which is made with melted Jack cheese, a mild green chili and all of the other usual condiments and toppings, Gustav’s is a popular eatery for locals and visitors alike. It’s casual, rustic and appeals to the outdoorsy crowd, young and old. I ordered the Gustav burger and fries ($9.75) and the rest of the gang ordered a Caesar salad served with garlic bread and the Patty Melt. This is a classic sandwich made with ground beef, grilled onions, Tillamook cheddar and Swiss on toasted rye. Everything was delicious and perfectly prepared with warm, toasted buns, crisp greens and just enough sauce. My burger was very well done but that was my fault because with all of the chatting, I forgot to order it medium, definitely the juicier and better alternative. I love crispy fries and noticed that Gustav’s are soft and far from crunchy in any way, but they are natural, freshly cut from large, substantial russet potatoes and that is a real plus. For budgetconscious diners, the grilled tomato, green chili, and cheese sandwich with potato salad is the best bargain on the menu at $7.95. I am looking forward to ordering the Alaskan Halibut and Chips ($13.95) next time we stop in. So many establishments serve cod as a fried fish option but halibut is by far my favorite albeit a more spendy choice. The wild salmon on greens or spinach salad are awesome and healthy menu options, as well. I noticed that Gustav’s serves Thomas Kemper Rootbeer on draft. One of my favorites! They also serve 30 beers on draft with an emphasis on Northwest Microbrews and are home to Icicle Ales since 1981. If you stop in between 4 and 6 p.m., Sunday through Thursday, Sept. through June, take advantage of their special menu with deep discounts. Either way, have a great time! Cheers! I’m sure you all know where Gustav’s is located, but if you don’t their address is: 617 U.S. Hwy. 2, across from Lions Club Park. Christina Forchemer-Zucktriegel is a passionate “foodie” with over 25 years of experience in the culinary arts. d Vote

#1

With this minimally invasive technique, it is now possible to remove gall bladders, the uterus and ovaries, perform back and sinus surgeries and many more. Recovery occurs within days, there is little pain, and side effects are reduced. This approach has not only shortened hospital stays and improved quality of life, but it also has reduced the cost of care. In recent years, the development of robotic surgery has offered a new and exciting frontier for surgical procedures. Marketed as the Da Vinci system, this device allows the surgeon to perform highly complex procedures without ever touching the patient. Working from a console, the physician uses the robot to make small incisions. And with miniaturized instruments and a high definition 3-D camera, is able to perform the most delicate of procedures. Robotic surgery allows the surgical treatment of colon, rectum, bladder and kidney cancers and is now widely used to perform prostatectomies for prostate cancer. The machine has also been used to repair heart valve abnormalities and coronary bypass surgery. Like endoscopic surgery, the robotic approaches allow a shorter recovery time, less blood loss, less pain and a lower risk of infection. This technology has created a great deal of excitement in the health care community, and the use of this approach has shown explosive growth. Though the robotic surgery has brought many medical advances and benefits, it comes with a high price tag. In a recent article published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers examined the significant impact that this technology has had on health care costs. In the past three years, the number of robotic surgeries performed in the United States has increased from 80,000 to 205,000, and the number of Da Vinci systems available in hospitals rose from 800 to 1,400. Each system ranges in price from $1 million to $2.5 million, and the use of robotic surgery increases the cost of procedures anywhere from $3,200 to $8,000. Overall, robotic surgeries increases the annual cost of health care by $2.5 billion. And if the number of procedures continue to increase at the current rate,

the total cost could run higher in the billions. In addition to cost, there are other concerns with robotic surgeries. While it has opened up complex and very difficult surgeries to minimally invasive approaches, the system is often used for operations such as gall bladder surgery and hysterectomies, which could just as easily be performed using cheaper endoscopic approaches. There is also evidence that the availability of the robotic surgery increases the number of procedures performed. Between 2005 and 2008, prostatectomies increased by 60 percent, despite a reduction in the incidence of prostate cancer. It has been suggested that the availability of the robotic approach has led to more surgeons recommending prostatectomy over other forms of treatment. Making matters more complicated, studies have shown the robotic surgery for prostate cancer has the same risk of adverse effects as earlier surgical approaches. The incidence of erectile dysfunction, incontinence or infection is identical with all forms of surgical treatments for prostate cancer. The case of the robotic surgery is a perfect example of how great breakthroughs come with great challenges. Robotic surgery is a valuable and exciting advance in surgical treatment. However, it should be used in circumstances where other approaches are not available or effective. We must be aware of the cost implications and use the tried, proven, highly effective therapies when possible. More research is also needed to compare the various approaches to treatment, so the health care community truly understands all the alternatives. Your physician is not the only one responsible for determining when to employ the greatest advances in medicine. You, the patient, must be an empowered and active participant in your medical decisions. This is the only way to assure the most appropriate treatment possible. Remember, newer does not always mean better. In medicine, while the tried and true therapy may not be the most exciting option, it is often the most reliable.

Massage therapy

MeDical services

naturopathic MeDicine

put your aD here

public awareness

yoga

advertise your health care service or specialty here! Call Carol at 548-5286 or Lindsay at 860-7301


B6

Sheriff

The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record • September 22, 2010

The sheriff’s report is compiled from public records as provided by the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office. The publisher cannot certify the complete accuracy of the information provided. Saturday, August 11 Property call at the gazebo bathroom. Traffic offense reported on Plain Ranches Road. Assist agency call at Tumwater Campground. Leavenworth Harassment or threats call on Cherry Street. Friday, August 10 Noise complaint on Commercial Suspicious circumstances reported Street. on U.S. Hwy. 2 at Mile 102. Property call on U.S. Hwy. 2 and Tr a f f i c o f f e n s e r e p o r t e d o n Ninth Street. Chumstick Hwy. A dark colored SUV was doing over 70 mph as Sunday, August 12 he passed caller’s residence. Animal problem reported on Park Leavenworth City Hall called again, Avenue. Caller reported a bear and reported that a homeless got into the trash can and was in person was camping outside the the trees having a snack. Wildlife library. He was inside the library agent advised. and they wanted him removed. Caller in the 7600 block of U.S. Caller from Appaloosa Lane reportHwy. 2 reported that at 4:30 ed that a bear had been visiting or 5 a.m. that morning he saw their property but was not there three vehicles get loaded into at the time. a Beakins semi trailer. The semi Court order violation reported at was still there. Coles Corner. Occurred the day Caller reported a hazard in the area before. of Shore Street. Young adults Theft reported on North Shore Drive. were going up and down the Tools were taken that morning. street on a 4-wheeler. One person Caller believed suspects were was on the handle bars drinking the same people to whom he a beer. gave a truck. Caller reported their son walked Monday, August 13 home on Birch Street and was Caller reported the theft of golf clubs, bag and cart from West shot with a paintball gun. Caller Whitman Street. Caller had sussaid one shooter was wearing a pect information. high school football uniform and was driving a red pickup, pos- Caller from Sumac Lane had questions on obtaining an order for sibly a Dodge. caller’s sister to not have contact Bavarian Lodge reported lewd conwith their mother who lives with duct. A guest was using suggescaller. tive language towards staff and touched someone in the kitchen. Search and Rescue call at the Enchantments, Vivan Lake, where This had occurred several times. a 50-year-old female had a posThe guest was contacted two sible severed artery. She slipped times and was staying there three on rocks and fell. The injury was more nights. to her calf. Caller requested a pubic assist for his daughter who works at the King County Sheriff’s office reported a male caller on the east side of library and had called about a Stevens Pass on a USFS road homeless person at the library had located property and cash. last week. Caller wanted a deputy King County requested that a to walk her to her car when she Chelan County deputy call the got of work at 10 p.m. reporting party on cell and deAssist agency call in which a deptermine location. uty was en route with Burlington Northern Railroad to check on a Caller reported a suspicious vehicle stopped in front of their residence suspicious vehicle at the tunnel on Mountain Home Road which on Winton Mill Road. had a spotlight shining into the Attempt to contact a subject in woods. Vehicle had a loud mufDryden who would be released fler, and was last seen heading from home monitoring on Saturtowards Leavenworth Road. day and has a no-bail warrant out Bavarian Lodge reported a struck of Kittitas County.

deer. It was unknown if it was dead. Two fawns were with it. Tuesday, August 14 Caller reported fraud. There were charges on his debit card between Sept. 9 and 13, in London, England. Peshastin Hi-Up Warehouse reported a hydro cooler of ammonia taken sometime during the night. Caller reported trespassing on King Creek on private property. It had been occurring over the previous couple of weeks. The property is marked with no trespassing signs. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation reported two intoxicated people were harassing them and other customers at Coles Corner. They were mad when they were refused a ride. Caller from Lee Street reported loud music that had been an ongoing problem. Caller from Hansel Lane reported a window shot out, with a BB gun or .22 caliber, since Sept. 7. Wednesday, August 15 Vehicle prowl reported at the KOA Pine Village Campground. Caller reported seeing a black ’80s model Nissan Pathfinder prowling around the campground. That morning coolers were missing and a couple vehicles broken into. Animal problem reported at U.S. Hwy. 2 and East Leavenworth Road. A skunk was hit and injured. It was limping back and forth, and was in pain. Barking dog reported on Lynn Street. The dog was barking at the neighbor children who were playing in their yard. Civil call on Chiwawa Loop Road. Caller reported his 52-year-old male cousin lived on a trailer on caller’s property, and caller told him he needed to leave. He did leave towards Lake Wenatchee, possibly to get some liquor. Caller was worried about him drinking and coming back. Caller from Chiwawa Loop Road reported that his cousin had come back. He was pounding on the window and making threats.

The neighbors were being loud and there was a motor home at the end of the trailer park with several people outside of it being loud. Extra patrol requested on Allen Lane at the community center where they were having a community meeting on cleaning up the neighborhood and they had been getting threatening calls from locals who were going to attend. Civil call on Chiwawa Loop Road. Caller said there is a court order, but says there was a note in there saying he can go to the residence and pick up items. Caller wanted to set up a time to do so. Non injury two vehicle accident at U.S. Hwy. 2 and East Leavenworth Road. Partially blocking traffic. Traffic offense reported on North Road where speeding vehicles were an ongoing problem at all times of the day. Cascade Medical Center requested a welfare check on people on Cherry Street. Healthy Options had been unable to contact them and the male was discharged from acute care the day before.

Cashmere Friday, August 10 Subject wanted to speak with a deputy from Sky Meadows Road about a past complaint. Search and Rescue notified by a hiker of a person with a dislocated hip. Caller had a poor signal and low battery, Caller said he went up Sand Creek area then signal cut off. Subject was later reached by ambulance and transported. Civil complaint in which caller from Airport Road as separated from his wife and wanted to know how to keep her from taking stuff from his truck. Caller from Nahahum Canyon Road stated that at least 45 vehicles had sped by her house and believed there was a party up the canyon. Possibly up off the end.

Saturday, August 11 Caller from Scheble Road reported that her 17-year-old daughter was a runaway. She left, without permission, with a friend in a black Thursday, August 16 VW Beetle. Noise complaint on Alice Avenue. Civil call on Airport Road.

Theft report on Fisher Street. Suicide threat on Elberta Avenue. Civil call on N. Douglas Street. Domestic disturbance at La Rumba.

not know which friend’s house she went to. She was riding her pink bike. Tuesday, August 14 Non injury accident on Taber Road. Caller was backing out of the driveway, went off the road and hit a line that goes to a power pole. Caller requested an attempt to locate or contact a silver 4-door Escort which left Cle Elum and was possibly en route to Wenatchee. Driver had dementia and caller was concerned for his well being. He was supposed to be on oxygen. Disturbance reported on Kimber Road. Neighbors were arguing in a house. Possible DUI reported on Tigner Road. A brown Ford Astro Van that pulled into a residence.

Sunday, August 12 Public assist requested on Cottage Avenue. Caller wanted an officer to go to his daughter’s house and get his keys back. Welfare check requested on Cottage Avenue for person who sounded very upset. Wanted him taken to CWH for a mental health evaluation. Washington State Patrol requested to assist Forest Service unit out with two people with warrants on Hay Canyon Road at Mile 4, just past the shooting pit. Graffiti reported to the retaining wall on Olive Street and Chase Avenue. Graffiti reported on Railroad AvWednesday, August 15 enue. Graffiti reported on Railroad Avenue Caller from Evergreen Drive reported a suspicious vehicle drove and Division Street. around the block several times Monday, August 13 and then parked in the middle of Caller from Butler Road reported the street with its lights out. the theft of unlicensed 4-wheelers Disturbance reported on Cottage taken during the night from the Avenue. Caller received about orchard area. someone who could hear items Century 21 reported that property being broken and screaming. in process of repossession on Vehicle fire in the driveway at 304 North Douglas Street, where the Chapel St. former homeowner told them Thursday, August 16 he had worked things out with Caller from North Douglas Street the bank, was moving back in. reported a trespass at a vacant Caller checked with the bank, residence where she believes and reported that the former someone is living. She thought homeowner had no right to be whoever it was, was getting in at the location. Requested asthrough a window late at night sistance. and leaving early in the mornCaller from Pioneer Avenue reing. ported a suspicious “sketchy” character trying to sell power Traffic offense reported on Nahahum Canyon Road. A large motor equipment, and claimed the home almost tipped over roundequipment was in a Home Depot ing the corner and was headed commercial. Caller thought it was down the canyon at high speed. possibly stolen property. Suspect described as a 30-year-old male Public assist call on North Douglas Street. A person was staying at with a female passenger, driving a a residence that had been forered Ford Super Duty pickup. closed on. Caller from Oak Street reported suspicious activity in her neighbor- Missing person report from the area of Larson Street. Caller hood. Her son was approached a said a 75-year-old female had couple of times this summer and been missing for the previous offered marijuana for sale. two hours. She left on foot about Caller from Washington Street re12:45 p.m. They had looked and ported her 12-year-old daughter could not find her. was missing. She left the house at 5:30 p.m. for a friend’s house Deputy requested case number for drugs on Kelly Road. and had not returned. Caller did

Outdoors Beauty found at Alpine Lakes

BRAGGIN’ Rights Photo by Amanda Davis

Shane Magnuson and little Cohen Davis show off his salmon caught on the Icicle River in June. (Send your Braggin’ Rights photo and information to editor@ leavenworthecho.com.)

Photo by Lindsay Timmermans

Craig Timmermans stands at the edge of Colchuck Lake, looking up Aasgard Pass on a family outing into the Alpine Lakes Wilderness in mid-August. The lake is around 5,500 feet of above sea level. Aasgard Pass is another 2,200 feet or so. With the fall weather arriving, it won’t be long until the green turns white.

INSIDE INFORMATION ON THE OUTDOORS Fishin’ Magician Dave Graybill

the town and to the west are the Caliche lakes. These lakes will have unrestricted fishing through October 10th. Licensed anglers are encouraged to harvest the remaining game fish in all of the lakes mentioned prior to the rehab. I know the Caliche lakes are full of perch. I just may go down and get a bunch myself.

Friday, Sept. 17

Monday, Sept. 20

Every once in a while I get one of these notices that some anglers find hard believe. No size restrictions and no limit? I know, that’s not what we’re used to reading when it comes to lake fishing in our area. However, there are several lakes slated for rehabilitation in Grant County, and temporarily the daily limits and size restrictions have been removed for all game fish. The lakes found in the Columbia Wildlife Area south of O’Sullivan Dam include: Heart, June, all of the Windmill lakes, Canal and Pit. These lakes are open to unrestricted fishing until Oct. 3. Bag limit and size restrictions have been removed from nearby North and South Teal lakes for the same time period. Other lakes that will be rehabbed and have temporarily suspended bag and size limits are found near George, Washington. Martha Lake is found just east of

The fall-run salmon bite is beginning to get hot below Priest Rapids Dam. Anglers have been hooking big fall-runs for a while now, but the fishing has definitely improved in the past ten days or so. These salmon are still coming over Bonneville Dam at a rate of 10,000 to 12,000 a day, and the really big numbers, the 20,000 a

day counts haven’t even reach John Day. Fall-runs are passing over Priest Rapids at up to 800 a day, and those fish will be hitting the Wenatchee area soon. I have three trips planned to the Vernita area in the next week or so and I can’t wait to do battle with some of these big, bright kings. I will tape a show early this week, and it will be on the air in early October, early enough to give anglers some important tips before the season closes on the 22nd. I have been told to bring along a bunch of Super Baits in the lemon-lime color, and I just happen to have a bunch of them in my box. The steelhead fishing is also good in this stretch of the river. I hope to load up on kings early enough to spend some time getting some these, too.

w w w.c a

www.lea

venwort

hecho.c

shmere

v a ll e y r e

c o r d .c o

om

Breaking news for all anglers... The Wenatchee & Methow rivers are open for steelhead! This is the biggest and earliest opener in 30 years with a four-fish limit. Selective gear is needed. You will need knotless nets. Bait is allowed in the Columbia, but not in the Wenatchee or Methow. Get to Hooked On Toys... Get your line re-spooled. Get the proper gear including knotless nets, spoons, jigs and hooks. Don’t forget to pinch your barbs. Even with our huge inventory, gear is going fast!

NCW’S largest selection at everyday discount prices

509-663-0740 1444 North Wenatchee Ave. www.hookedontoys.com

P.O. Box 39 • 215 14th Street Leavenworth, WA 98826-0039 (509) 548-5286 • Fax: (509) 548-4789 echo@leavenworthecho.com

201 Cottage Avenue, Suite 4 Cashmere, WA 98815 (509) 782-3781 • Fax: (509) 782-9074 record@cashmerevalleyrecord.com

m

Cashmere Valley Record - Sept. 22, 2010  

Cashmere Valley Record - Sept. 22, 2010

Advertisement