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September 15, 2010 • Volume 107, No. 37

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Salmon Festival celebrates 20 years By Ian Dunn Editor

was a Forest Service fisheries biologist workshop happening at the time. Soon, the two biologists began brainstorming ideas about special event for a natural resource. The ever curious Broaddus could not help but overhear the discussion. And as she pondered the possibilities for such

an event, she could not help but notice the bountiful run of summer chinook salmon coming coming up the Tumwater It was in the fall of 1990, and Corky Canyon. Broaddus, then public information ofThen came the epiphany. ficer for the Lake Wenatchee Ranger “As we drive up the canyon, I think..... District, was riding a car with a pair that’s it!!,” Broaddus recalled. “Look at of fisheries biologists. You see, there those salmon! Maybe this event should be about salmon.” And so it was, the idea for a Salmon Festival was hatched. The following fall, in 1991, a modest Wenatchee River Salmon Festival was produced at the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery. Some 2,500 people attended. There were some Indian dances, a fish tent, a couple guitar players, and a hatchery tour. It was considered a success at the time. This week, as the Wenatchee River Salmon Festival celebrates its 20th anniversary, more 10,000 people will attend. It is now considered one of the premier natural resource festivals in the country. “Multiply that by 30 times,” Broaddus said, comparing this year’s festival to first one. “We have 35 activities on kids day alone. Now we have 94 classrooms from 30 schools, from the Canadian border to Zillah. We never stopped growing File photo or trying to make it better.” Education has long been the primary theme at the Wenatchee River Salmon Planning that first one was quite an Festival. In the early years, it was not known how many school children would endeavor, as Broaddus soon found out. show up. Now, more than 90 classrooms are involved from all over the state. She took her idea to Greg Pratschner,

Steelhead season opens again this year By Ian Dunn Editor Heavy rains accompanied the start of the steelhead season on the Wenatchee and Columbia rivers last Wednesday. Art Viola, a fish biologist with Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WSDFW) said the heavy rains may have induced the steelhead to run up upstream sooner. “In general, the steelhead move up the tributaries when they get the rain,” he said. “It will make a little bit of difference. It will encourage more steelhead to go up the Wenatchee and Entiat

Rivers.” Typically, Viola noted, the good fishing on the Wenatchee does not come until later in the year. Right now, the Columbia River might be the best bet to catch a steelhead. Still, it is highly likely the rains induced some steelhead to come up the Wenatchee, so fishing may not be a complete bust. With a huge run of steelhead reportedly heading up the Columbia River, Viola said they are a being pretty liberal with the catch limits and the season itself. “Steelhead over Priest Rapids is

then the Leavenworth Hatchery Complex Manager. He thought the hatchery grounds would make an ideal place for the festival. “We could set it up for however many people came,” said the now retired Pratschner. “That was the highlight of my career, together with the Cascade Discovery School program. A bunch of us just got together and talked about the wildlife heritage we have here.” One of Broaddus’ first tasks was to find a person to head up the festival, but after a long consideration, it was decided she would take on the assignment, which was to last for nine months. She would have that time to get the ball rolling on the new festival. She picked a team of people to help put it all together, including USFS Wildlife Biologist Heather Murphy, USFS Fish Biologist Ken MacDonald, Lake Wenatchee District Ranger George Pozzuto, Leavenworth District Ranger Becky Heath, Leavenworth Chamber Director Laura Jobin and Wenatchee National Forest Supervisor Sonny O’Neal. “We had this one meeting. I will never forget it,” Broaddus said. “It was in Kristall’s banquet room. I was nervous. The focus was going to be eduction, but also getting the community to know what was in our backyard. Something we

Locals savor the flavor at salmon cook off By Ian Dunn Editor The savory smell of finely prepared salmon wafted through the Lions Club Park recently. It was the first Wenatchee River Salmon Festival Salmon Cook Off. Seven restaurants participated, Wild Huckleberry, Cafe Christa, JJ Hills, Good Mood Food, Idyllwild Inn. Tumwater Inn, and Haus Dog Kaffee and Tea. Previously, the festival produced a salmon dinner event called, Salmonchanted Evening. But this year, Festival Director Betsy McIndoe thought a salmon cook off would be a worthwhile venture. “It’s more local,” she said of the cook off. “It’s just easier for us to put on. It just really gets Leavenworth more involved. It’s right in the middle of town. It’s great for the farmers’ market. There’s built in audience for both.” The cook off was held Sept. 2, in the park adjacent to the weekly Bauermarkdt, or Leavenworth Farmers’ Market. The judges were Leavenworth Mayor Rob Eaton, Jim Craig, Rhona See COOK OFF on Page 4

See SALMON FESTIVAL on Page 4

Fair means fun

See STEELHEAD on Page 4

Homeowner kills bear; cubs may be euthanized Wildlife officials advise getting rid of garbage, birdfeeders and dog food By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer A homeowner shot and killed a 160-pound mother bear Thursday evening at 7776 Icicle Road. The two orphan cubs, that each weigh about 35 pounds, were treed and captured by state Fish and Wildlife representatives Friday morning. Rich Beausoleil, the bear and cougar specialist for the Washington Fish and Wildlife Department, based in Wenatchee, said the incident was entirely avoidable.

He said the homeowner apparently had been having problems with raccoons getting into his birdfeeder and dog food, so when he heard a noise Thursday night, he turned his dogs loose to chase away what he figured were raccoons. When one of the dogs didn’t come back, the homeowner went back into his house and grabbed his gun and went in search of his dog. He found the bear between him and his dog. “He thought something might happen, so he shot it,” Beausoleil said. “Then he By Nevonne McDaniels saw the two cubs up the tree.” Staff writer The dog was unharmed. Fish and Wildlife agents are trying The Upper Valley pear season is in to find space in a rehabilitation facility full swing. Bartletts are about finished and the pickers are moving on to Bosc See BEAR SHOT on Page 3 and Anjou. But that’s about all the information being released at the moment. “We don’t have a lot of information right now,” said Dan Kelly, assistant Photo by Nevonne McDaniels manager at the Washington GrowLeavenworth’s Beth Whitney performs ers Clearing House Association in barefoot at the Icicle Prize Main Stage Wenatchee. “They’re in the middle of Performance Sunday afternoon at harvest and no want wants to talk.” Sleeping Lady’s Chapel Theater, one But, he said, all indications are it’s goof 12 finalists in the Icicle Prize in Songwriting. Whitney won the top award and $1,000 in the “working artist” category for her song “Let’s Pretend.” By Nevonne McDaniels Brian McMahon of Leavenworth took Staff writer second place ($800) and Sandy Vaughn of Tonasket took third ($600). Preserving the land for generations to In the student category, Chloe Grace come can also mean inviting the public Caemmerer of Leavenworth won the top prize of $300, Marija Bosnar of to hike, bike, horse and bird — if it’s Ephrata took second ($200) and Claire done right. Seaman of Leavenworth took third That’s the balance the International ($100). The performance and award Mountain Biking Association’s trail crew ceremony was part of the Icicle Arts believes they have figured out. The crew Festival Sept. 10-12, which included will be in Leavenworth Sept. 16-19, at the a new art installation at the Icicle Arts invitation of the Chelan-Douglas Land Gallery, a recital by flamenco guitar Trust, to put their theory to the test. player and songwriter Andre Feriante, IMBA’s trail program, sponsored by songwriting workshops, and more. Subaru, sends two teams of experts

Photos by Nevonne McDaniels and Ian Dunn

Nina Gonzalez, 3, of Cashmere, looks to make sure mom is watching during her pony ride at the Chelan County Fair Friday evening. A lively scene (inset) looking down the main walkway at the fairgrounds.

Pear harvest underway, but packers quiet about the size of the 2010 crop

Whitney wins song contest

ing to be a good harvest. Not the best, not the worst, but somewhere in between. “The fruit looks good on the trees,” he said. He noticed that much when he was riding his bike on the back roads of Cashmere last week. The projection is it’s going to be just below last year for overall volume, but we still don’t have a good number on that,” he said. “The rain the last two days hasn’t helped, but it seems to be a temporary issue. Weather-related, we haven’t had anything too major to be concerned about,” he said. Nothing like the hail storm that hit trees in the spring several years ago.

“The next weather issue might be a possible freeze, but most of the pears should be off by then,” he said. “That’s more a concern for apples. The pears are usually done by the end of September.” The tariff on fruit shipped to Mexico remains an issue for selling the fruit, he said. “It’s not going away anytime soon. That has to be done through Washington, D.C. Easier said than done,” Kelly said, “but we’ve been able to live with it until now. It’s one of the negatives and will probably slow down our exports to See PEARS on Page 4

IMBA experts to hold trail building sessions

Index Along the Wenatchee . . . . . . B7 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Community . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 5 Church Directory . . . . . . . . . . 6 Life & Health . . . . . . . . . . . . B7 Neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B8 Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 8

Sheriff’s Report . . . . . . . B6, B8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 8

Classifieds Index Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . B1 - B6

“The land trust basically applied for and was able to get IMBA to come to Chelan County for a weekend of learning about sustainable trails,” said Bridget Egan, the land trust’s interim trails coordinator. The crew’s visit will start with a social event at 6 p.m. Thursday at München Haus in Leavenworth. — Bridget Egan, trails coordinator On Saturday, from 8 to 11 a.m. at the Barn Beach Reserve, the IMBA crew will teach locals to build trails that last and around the country each year to lead require minimal maintenance. Lunch trail-building sessions and work with will be provided to attendees. From 1 to residents to improve mountain biking See TRAILS on Page 3 opportunities.

“The trail we have planned, maybe a mile or so, has spectacular views of the Icicle and into the Peshastin drainage.”

Businesses & Services . B3 - B4 Health Care Directory . . . . . . B7 Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 Real Estate Guide . . . . . . . . . B1

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The Leavenworth Echo • September 15, 2010

In My

Opinion Bill Forhan Publisher Atlantic Monthly reporter Jeffrey Goldberg recently interviewed former Cuban President Fidel Castro and reported that according to Castro, “communism no longer works for Cuba.” Of course by Friday he was denying the statement saying his comment was misunderstood. First he said he was joking, then he said he meant to say capitalism doesn’t work. Whether he was joking or confused doesn’t really matter because 50 years of communism

has clearly not resulted in a higher standard of living for the Cuban people. One would think that our President would be able to use the power of his great intellect to look around the world at the failures of centralized planning and recognize that fact. But no, Obama continues to use his worn out story that “spreading the wealth around” improves life for everyone. But exactly whose life is Obama trying to improve? His policies have continued to exacerbate the problems of a troubled economy. Let’s just look at one really local example. The Mexican government imposed 20 percent tariffs in April 2009 on a lengthy list of American exports after Congress killed a pilot program that allowed a limited number of Mexican trucks full access to U.S. high-

ways. That new tariff contributed to a $19.7 million decline in the value of Washington agricultural products exported to Mexico last year according to the Washington Department of Agriculture. Why was the pilot truck program killed? Unionized American truckers protested the program. Now Washington growers and the Washington state economy are being heavily impacted by the inaction of a union controlled Congress and President. After complaints from Washington growers, Mexico lowered the tariff on potatoes to 5 percent but then added apples to the list to be taxed at 20 percent. Democrats are always blaming private industry for taking jobs overseas, but they never blame themselves or the unions for the harm they do to private sector jobs.

The truth is that in a worldwide economy every policy we enact has an impact on the lives and the livelihoods of each one of us. Some of those policy changes are positive and some are negative. Our economy can be restored but only if our leaders are willing to quit blaming American business for the problems and recognize we all need to work together to restore the power of the American economy. Policies of increasing regulation, excessive taxation and demonization of profit as a fair return for business risk has not worked to improve

the economy. In fact, our country has enjoyed its greatest economic progress when private industry has been encouraged and supported. Think this is just another of my radical right wing rants? Well consider the following letter I received this week from a local producer. Then decide if our leaders are doing everything they can to insure our farmers have a level playing field in the global market for their crops. Bill Forhan can be reached at (509) 548-5286 or publisher@leavenworthecho.com.

The tariff will increase the cost to retailers by $3 to $4 a box making it more attractive for Mexico’s retailers to purchase apricots, cherries and pears from other countries such as Argentina. Mexico is the number one export market for Washington pears. During the 2007-08 marketing season Washington State shipped approximately 2.6 million boxes of pears to Mexico, worth approximately $48 million FOB. It is estimated that the tariff will cause a 30 percent decline in Washington pear sales and about 50 percent decline in cherry and apricot sales. The reduction in Mexican demand for fresh Washington tree fruit products will force US marketers to put those apricots, cherries and pears in other already supplied markets, reducing fob prices in other markets and significantly reducing incomes to family tree fruit growers in the rural areas

of Washington State. Especially during this worldwide economic downturn Washington growers, shippers, marketers, affiliated suppliers and their employees can ill afford significant reductions in their incomes. Maintaining access to export markets, such as Mexico, is crucial for the sustainability of Washington State’s rural economies and tree fruit farm families who are facing very difficult economic times, trade restrictions, high input costs, increasing regulatory costs, volatile prices, tightening credit, and weather related issues. It is crucial that prompt action be taken to eliminate tariffs. Growers stand to lose more than $3.5 million in the remaining three months of this season. Please act fast to resolve this issue. Thank you. Kirk B. Mayer Manager

could increase significantly. The Republican solution? Protect the exemptions that favor the wealthier by making SS recipients work till they are 70. The real opposition to Social Security is corporate America, represented by such groups as the US Chamber of Commerce. Because if the income cap were lifted for earners, the fear is it might also be lifted for employers. In fact, the system is not in trouble as structured. It has, according to Dave Lindforff /columnist, “been pilfered over the years by politicians unwilling to raise taxes to fund America’s wars, schools, infrastructure, etc.” In other words, they rob it and then blame it. Social Security, if allowed to stand on it’s own as FDR gave it to us, and if not capped so all earners paid the same rate, would be a very solvent and secure system...a safety net that would temper much of the need to trust our retirement to Wall Street. And we know how secure that is. Mark Lindstrom Lake Wenatchee, Wash. Publisher’s response: Mark, interesting way to look at this, but what happens if the politicians continue to rob the plan? Also, what would happen to a corporate manager who mismanaged their employee’s pension plan as badly as our robber baron politicians? Oh, that’s right they would be in jail.

when it comes to Islam. The Quran/Koran states that “Infidels” should be killed. You say that people should not form opinions from talk shows, just facts. Does this include seeing a video of a person having his throat cut? You also say that Muslims “became enlightened” and banned slavery over 1,000 years ago. However, it’s still practiced by Saudi Arabia today where Sudanese, especially girls, are bought from poverty-stricken parents or kidnapped. If Islam is a religion of “peace and friendship,” what is the evidence? Hamas in the Gaza strip firing indiscriminate rockets into Israel? Girls being doused with acid in Afghanistan for the “crime” of attending school? A couple stoned to death for adultery in Iran? In short, you are full of bull. Verne Lietz Peshastin, Wash.

Please help with pear tariff Well, here we are again in Pear harvest. Like last year, our livelihood is greatly affected by the Mexico Tariff. Even more farmers are going to go bankrupt this year. Did you know that processed potatoes are also subject to a 20 percent retaliatory tariff, as are pears and cherries. In the last two weeks even more tariffs have been added. The new Mexican tariff on apples alone will cost Washington tree fruit growers over $44 million dollars in 2010-11. You may know that Bob (Boyd) made a trip to Washington DC with other farmers and talked to many folks about getting this tariff issue resolved. So far no one in DC has listened or lifted a finger to help. Please contact the White House and urge that they resolve the Mexican Trucking issue. They’ve promised for months, and nothing has been done. Go to www.whitehouse.gov and scan to the bottom of the page and click contacts to send an electronic message or call 202-456-1414. I am in 
hope that you will pass this on to others on your email list. We need a huge
 flood of emails and calls to get some attention before the situa-

tion gets worse. I’ve included some other details below about the financial and job losses in the last few months. It does not just affect pear growers. It’s a huge ripple effect. It’s the workers. The grocery stores where they buy their food, and it’s the whole town’s economy. It’s the whole state economy. The largest private employer in Prosser — the town’s potato processing plant ConAgra Lamb Weston— shut down on May 30, putting 250 out of work! Prosser is located along the Yakima River in Benton County in south-central Washington. The town has about 5,000 people. Officials at the Washington State Potato Commission blamed the U.S. Congress for the plant closing, because a cross-border trucking program with Mexico was terminated and that generated “retaliatory tariffs” and “decreases in exports.” “The resulting 20 percent tariff on U.S. French fries exported to Mexico has cost Washington state over 32 million pounds of export business with Mexico at a value of over $15 million,” said Matt Harris, director of trade for

the state potato commission, in a statement.  Linda Boyd Peshastin PS: Here’s a letter that was sent last year in hopes that someone would listen and work on the problem: April 9, 2009 Gary Locke, Secretary U.S. Department of Commerce 1401 Constitution Avenue, NW Washington DC 20230 Dear Secretary Locke, The Washington Growers Clearing House Association is a non-profit tree fruit grower association with approximately 2,135 tree fruit grower members in Washington State. As a result of recent US Federal action, Washington State apricot, cherry and pear growers find themselves caught in a trade dispute between the US and Mexico. Because the 2009 US Omnibus Appropriations Act (Section 136) eliminated the U.S./Mexico crossborder truck safety inspection program (previously agreed to as partial compliance with NAFTA) Mexico has decided to punish apricot, cherry and pear growers with a 20% tariff.

Letters to the editor When bad things happen I recently took an ill-advised trip onto my high and steep roof. Ropes securing the roof ladder failed and I slid about 25 feet down a 12/12 pitch roof and fell about 15 feet to the ground. Witnesses to the accident immediately called 911. The Lake Wenatchee based Aid 113 arrived within ten to fifteen minutes followed shortly by Aid 111 from Leavenworth and personnel from Fire District 9. I was transported by Aid 113 to Cascade Medical Center in Leavenworth where the emergency room staff diagnosed multiple fractures in the calcaneus bone, a hairline compression fracture of the T-12 vertebrae and other areas of severe bruising. Recovery will be a prolonged process after surgery in which 9 screws were put in place to re-assemble the calcaneus. From the moment they arrived, the responders of Cascade Medical and District 9 provided calm, professional and reassuring care. The emergency room staff was thorough and correct in their examinations and diagnosis. This could have been a much worse situation but I think the folks in this area should be aware of and appreciate the medical response that is provided us by Cascade Medical, from the EMT’s and Paramdedics right up through the emergency room personnel. My words are inadequate to convey the gratitude me and my family owe this dedicated group of professionals. Thank them sometime when you see them- they do a great job for us all when bad things happen. George Wilson Leavenworth, Wash.

PEACE-PEACE! BAH-BAH! Indeed I failed to quote the website “Tears of Jihad” - www. politicalislam.com/tears/pages/ tears-of-jihad/. My error and apology, however, I don’t apologize for the truth of the barbarity of Islam. Those who love to use the Crusades, which occurred a 1000 years ago, and thereby compare Christianity to 1400 years of Islam’s terror by the sword, fail to recognize the following: The Crusaders sought to deliver Jerusalem from Muslim

control and also murdered Jews as “Pope the innocent III” practiced Jihad, the deception of Islamic theology by promising, “Kill a Jew and go to heaven.” What an abomination in the name of Jesus Christ! Roman Catholics at least have apologized and gone through many reformations for centuries. However, I dare you to find a single historical record of a Muslim system or nation admitting or apologizing for their atrocities committed in the name of Allah, - as you won’t find it! Muslims defend their so-called honor as admitting Islam’s ruthless conquests as wrong, never mind evil, would mean they are dishonoring Allah and Islam. Just for one, to this day Turkey has refused to call the slaughter of over 1 million Armenians genocide, although historians agree this mass-murder under the Ottoman Turkish Empire was the first genocide of the 20th century. Furthermore, those who committed barbarity in the name of Christ did so in direct opposition to the example of the person and teachings of Jesus. To this day he is the example, the perfect godman of Christianity. In contrast, Muslims who commit barbarity do so by following their master Mohammed. One who raided caravans. A murderer slaughtering tribes after deceiving them with false peace treaties and took the wives and raped them. He even married Kadisha, a 6 year old and consummated his sexual rights when she was only nine. To this day, he is the example, the perfect man of Islam. Now, religious or not, Mohammed is no example by any stretch of imagination and no prophet as they were holy people living separated lives. Of course, I should be killed for speaking against the prophet, “dishonoring” his name although I am merely and simply speaking the truth of his life recorded in their own books, the Hadith. Islam not merely a religion: Those who speak about the constitutional right of Islam, obviously ignore our founding fathers who assured separation of church and state so that what began in Europe under the Roman Catholic Church would never occur here, as this system controlled nations, with religious, political, economic, legal,

social and military components. Why not admit Islam is not merely a religion, it is a constitution - a theocracy, a system of law called Sharia, with religious, economic, legal, political, social and military components, however it is much worse. Muslims are not only commanded to submit every knee to bow to Allah, either willingly or by force, but submit the whole earth under the constitution of Islamic Sharia Law, to establish their one world religion and government. This is their idea of peace on earth! Although a threat to any nation and in violation against our constitution, Islam freely operates under the mask of mere religion within the USA and other western nations. Therefore, it is in total opposition to our Constitutional right of freedom of religion, yet defended by the politically correct bunch. Soon it will backfire! As stated before, Mohammed laid low in the beginning lacking power, spoke of peace, then in Medina became a conqueror, Jihad warrior. For this reason Islam practices abrogation, meaning; the later verses supersede the earlier. No wonder, it is ok to preach peace -peace, until their bah-bah turns into a roar! After all, they follow their perfect example Mohammed. Renate Vinje, Leavenworth, Wash.

Social Security safe For those in this column who have been critical of Social Security as being “bankrupt” or who are having heartburn over it being too “socialistic,” here’s a few reminders: SS is not slated to hit the wall [when benefits exceed collections] until 2037. Currently, SS tax is capped at 6.2 percent of the first $106,800. Meaning someone who earns double that pays half the rate and someone who earns ten times that pays 1/10the rate, while the primary income of our wealthier citizens-investment income-is not taxed at all by SS. How socialistic is this? As well, the Congressional Budget office estimates if the cap was eliminated, the 2037 wall would be pushed out to 2075. And if investment income were not exempt, there would be no Social Security crisis ever and benefits

Respect for his ability It was wonderful to see my friend Bill Slusher get a nice “call out “ in the paper. We often differ in our political opinions, but I have a huge amount of respect for anyone that can sit down and write a novel. Much less five of them! As to his ability to write fiction, I have no doubt he’s good, as I’ve been reading his letters to the editor for several years now, and fiction is his specialty. (Written with slight smile on my face!) Greg James Seattle, Wash.

Muslims In reference to the letter by Keith Guenther in the Aug. 25 issue, sir you sure have your head in the sand (or somewhere else)

Not one size fits all Back when I was a journalism student had I ever wanted to find an editorial rant that violated nearly every ethical rule of what is considered the test of a free press I could not find a “better” example than Publisher Forhan’s editorial (Aug. 26). Rather than “journalism” his column is the raving of a demagogue who appeals to ignorant emotions and prejudice. He sees no difference between “Islamic terrorists” and the millions of peaceful Muslims who worship basically the same God Christians do. “Liberals would eliminate the Second Amendment” - I challenge him to find one credible “liberal” organization that advocates such action. Preventing nuts from having guns or the belief the average American doesn’t need a machine gun in their garage is not advocating doing away with the Second Amendment! Mr. Forhan sees an “Islamic culture of hate and intolerance” - if he believes himself to be a Christian using his “one size fits all” judgment on a whole people we would have to conclude all Christians (like him) belong to a culture of hate and intolerance. Wouldn’t be fair would it? William F. Johnston Tacoma and Chesaw, Wash.


September 15, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo

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Community

LPGA vet Rarick sponsoring tourney

BVBA Business news Submitted by Carl Galliway Meeting of Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2010 Great things are happening in downtown Leavenworth. The Leavenworth Bavarian Village Association meets at 8 a.m. on the first and third Tuesday of every month at King Ludwigs Restaurant. Please make plans to attend our meetings-we need the downtown merchants to be involved and give us their input. The BVBA was established in 1997 so downtown merchants could unite together to solve problems and promote the business community. We had another informative meeting lots of new ideas. The Share Golf Tournament went really well. There were a lot of good golfers and they raised a lot of money for the affordable housing. Hope you plan to attend next year’s Share Golf Tournament. We had an update from Frank Calipresti on the downtown walking accordion. If you would like to donate to the walking accordion please call Cary Sanger at 548-4857. We had an update from the city and they have another picnic bench and table on order for the downtown park. The two benches that we have there now are working out great. Some people have commented they buy their food and sit down with other visitors and have lunch or whatever and meet new people. The Chamber of Commerce and the BVBA have decided to make November Military Month in Leavenworth. If anyone has any ideas on what we can do please let us know. Most have decided a percentage discount which most give now, but for the month of November, maybe giving a bigger discount. This is just one idea. If you have something please bring it to our next meeting. We discussed having signs. Ken Kohnhorst brought to our attention at the prior meeting, the “All American City” signs on both ends of town this will be voted on at our next meeting. Some thought maybe even having the “Number One Christmas town” put up too and several other suggestions. Elsa Meinig and Julia Gerhardt spoke to the crowd about the Christkindlmarkt that it will be held outside next time. There was a discussion about closing off Front Street, but some were against it. It was brought to their attention that closing off the Front Street would lose customers. And the contention was that small children during the lantern parade would be in danger of passing cars. That will be worked out with the committee and the city. Bob Francis talked about the Amber Leaf Theater held at the Icicle River Middle School and encouraged everyone to come out to the play after Autumn Leaf Festival. Last, but not least, the Salmon Festival this year is supposed to be one of the biggest events ever. Some of our merchants are putting out discount coupons for people who visit. We are talking about busses coming back to Leavenworth again. We are trying to head up a delegation to talk to the tour directors from Seattle to Chicago now that we have the train. Did you know there was a bus in town all the way from Ohio last week? They stayed for two days and were very impressed with our town. We talked to the bus driver and he said there are a lot of bus companies that would love to come to Leavenworth from the Midwest. We have received the information and will follow up on more bus tours to our town. The BVBA will be putting on a golf tournament next May. We need volunteers and a committee to head this up. We are talking about giving away some really nice prizes as well as a new golf cart for a hole in one. For more information on this please see Cary or come to our next meeting. Our next meeting is Sept. 21, 2010. Tony Kaiser will be giving us an update on the new ice rink. We would like to invite the business community to our meetings. It is an informal setting and we welcome your comments and concerns. Our goal is to make the downtown retail area a usable and valuable asset to locals and tourists. See you at the next meeting Tuesday, Sept. 21. For information contact Cary Sanger at 548-4857. This column sponsored by:

By Ian Dunn Editor Cindy Rarick, a 25 year veteran of the LPGA, is sponsoring an upcoming tournament at the Leavenworth Golf Club, the second annual Cascade Couples Championship. Rarick and her partner Gary Seidler own the nearby Silvara Vineyards, so she frequently practices at the Leavenworth Golf Club. “Sally Sebring asked me if I would be interested in sponsoring,” Rarick said. “They said it was for the high school golf team and I am supportive of that. So many good things have happened to me in golf. It’s a great opportunity for young people.” Proceeds from the Cascade Couples Championship are to benefit the Cascade High School Golf Team. Cascade Golf Head Coach Randy Alexander said he became very excited when heard the news. “I am happy because this hasn’t happened before,” Alexander said. “It will be good to have funds for things that may arise. Maybe we could play an extra match. It’s very highly appreciated.” Cascade High School Athletic Director Elia Ala’ilima-Daley said the money would likely go into the golf team fund set by the Cascade Booster Club. Proceeds could be used for a variety of things including golf shirts, clubs, and golf lessons. “Leavenworth is a small town, so I am sure funding is short for the golf team,” Rarick

“I had never been to eastern Washington,” she said. “But when we saw this area, we thought, ‘What a spot!’” In subsequent years, Gary came up to Wenatchee and spotted some acres in Peshastin he thought would make a good location for a winery, and thus became Silvara Vineyards, which has been open about 11 months now. Rarick, who still maintains a home in Arizona, liked the idea of a opening a winery. “I thought it would be great to get involved with, and would be a great new career,” she said. “I am real social through golf.” And since building the winery, Rarick has discovered Leavenworth and the Leavenworth Golf Club. “I love Leavenworth and love that golf course,” she said. “Leavenworth (Golf Course) is one of the prettiest settings I have ever seen. I find it to be a lot of fun. I just wish it had a driving range.” The Arizona native, who was a five time winner on the LPGA Tour, is now competing on the Legends Tour, similar to the Senior Submitted photo Tour for the men. So, that keeps her pretty Cindy Rarick busy. In fact, she will be flying in from Boston said. “I have travelled all over the world play- so she can attend the Couples Tournament. The Cascade Couples Tournament is Sating golf and it has been very good for me. It urday, Sept. 25. at the Leavenworth Golf Club. teaches so many things in life.” Rarick’s connection to North Central Those interested in playing should contact Washington began five years ago when she the Leavenworth Golf Club at 548-7267. Ian Dunn can be reached at 548-5286 or and Gary met a couple from Wenatchee who editor@leavenworthecho.com. invited them to come visit.

CEF plans fundraiser barbecue Saturday By Ian Dunn Editor

most amount of students,” he said. The fundraiser barbecue began when the foundation was created some years ago. In The Cascade Education Foundation (CEF) recent years, it was dropped but the foundais hosting its annual fundraiser, “Back to tion board saw fit to revive the popular comSchool” Barbecue at Lions Club Park in Leavenworth this Saturday. The event is the single largest fundraiser for the foundation each year. CEF Board President Ken West says the foundation contributions to the school district are needed more than even during these tough economic times. “It’s probably more important now,” he said. “We started after a levy failure. Now, because of the economy, it is needed desperately. We purchase a lot of items the school district just cannot fund.” Some of the recent foundation contributions include, Mobys and Clickers teaching aid, Brain Pop learning device, field trip to Photo by Ian Dunn Central Washington University for seniors Smiles all around at last year’s Cascade interested in college, and funds to help start Education Foundation “Back to School” the Cascade High School Dance Team. Barbecue. Here, some kids participate in “We try to help with things that cover the the ice cream eating contest.

munity event. More than 300 people attended the function last year. This year also provides an opportunity to meet the new Cascade School District Superintendent Steve McKenna. “It’s an opportunity to meet the superintendent and mingle with friends and support the schools,” he said. The menu features steak, chicken and all the fixings. There will also be games for the kids. “We’ll have game, face painting, and some surprise booths. It should be fun for the kids,” he said. “Plus, there is a dessert auction.” Anyone who would like to contribute a dessert to the auction is invited to bring it to the barbecue, West said. The Cascade Education Foundation “Back to School” Barbecue is planned for Saturday, Sept. 18 at Lions Club Park from 5 to 7 p.m. Tickets are available at the event. Cost is $15 for adults, $10 for students and $5 for a kids hot dog meal. Ian Dunn can be reached at 548-5286 or editor@leavenworthecho.com.

BEAR SHOT: Property owner within his rights to shoot Continued from Page 1

for the cubs, but space is tight. If space is not available at one of the two state certified facilities in the region (one in Western Washington and the other in Boise, Idaho), the cubs will have to be euthanized. But Beausolleil said he would like to get the word out that this is not a bear problem. “There are bears and raccoons there because there’s food.

You can’t blame the animals for taking advantage of a free drivethrough,” he said. “We need people to understand that, especially now, when they are getting ready for winter slumber and trying to pack on pounds, they are looking for food. And when they come through Leavenworth, if there’s a free lunch, they’re going to stay.” People need to secure their garbage, take down their birdfeeders and don’t feed pets outside.”

The incident is being investigated by state Fish and Wildlife. No arrests were made. “The owner was within his rights,” Beausoleil said, “but all they had to do was not turn the dogs out. If you see a bear lumbering around, let it go. “We’ve had quite a few incidents. It keeps coming back to letting people know it’s not a bear problem. It’s not overpopulation. It’s because people are offering them a free meal,” he said.

The bears are looking at hibernation in the next 45 to 60 days and will take food wherever they can find it, he said, so it is imperative that people be smart about not offering the big three: garbage, pet food and bird feeders. “Those are the three things that seem to be at every call we go on,” he said. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ leavenworthecho.com.

TRAIL: Land Trust has identified a one mile stretch cluding picks, loppers, shovels, grubbers. 5 p.m., the IMBA team will help Egan said the land trust has volunteers build a new trail sec- identified a stretch about a mile tion on the land trust’s Mountain long that would be suitable for Home property. Participants are a sustainable trail. But whether asked to wear work clothes and it will be completed depends on workboots and bring tools — in- how many show up for the work

Continued from Page 1

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party, she said. “The trail we have planned, maybe a mile or so, has spectacular views of the Icicle and into the Peshastin drainage,” she said. The trail would climb from the edge of the property to a viewpoint. She said other trails have

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been developed on neighboring properties. Once completed, the trail would be available for non-motorized use — hiking, biking, birding and horse riding. The property was acquired by the Chelan-Douglas Land Trust about two years ago and is an important wildlife migration corridor, she said. “We have taken field trips to the property before, some geology trips and birding trips. This is an opportunity to think about where we want to build trails and how to build them,” she said. The event is free and open to the public. Registration is required for the workshop and work party, though. Call 667-9708 or visit www.imba.com/civicrm/ event/info?reset=1&id=54. Egan said early registration shows about 20 volunteers, but “the sky’s the limit.” Once the trail complete, the IMBA visit wraps up with a day set aside to ride local trails. IMBA is based in Boulder, Colo. According to its website, the nonprofit group’s mission is to create, enhance and preserve trail experiences for mountain bikers worldwide. The Chelan-Douglas Land Trust is a private, nonprofit organization based in Wenatchee. It’s mission is to create a community that conserves and cherishes the land, water and way of life through voluntary land agreements, education, partnerships, stewardships and well-planned growth. For information, see www.cdlandtrust.org. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ leavenworthecho.com.


4

Community

SALMON FESTIVAL: ’94 Festival focused on fires Continued from Page 1

can teach our neighbors about.” All along Broaddus says it was their intent to continue after the first festival, but the reality was they wanted to see how it went the first time and see where they could take it. “In our view, it did become a success,” Broaddus said. “so much so that the agencies and partners involved said we are going for it another time.” With education as the cornerstone, USFS employee Susan Thomas came on board in 1993 as the education specialist and help shaped the educational foundation of the festival. In the early years, it was pretty much a free-for-all in terms of what school buses might show up. But three years into it, Thomas said all recognized the focus really needed to be on education. “We really wanted to focus with teachers,” Thomas said. “How can we optimize the learning that can go on here. Not just as a festival itself. But how can we frontload that learning in the classroom, engaging teachers, engaging kids before they even get to the festival.” Thomas, who was former public school teacher, and Rachel Little of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service basically hunkered down and created the curriculum which is still in place to this day. They dissected every single activity at the festival and examined the learning opportunities, and possible tie-ins to state standards. The fish printing would be one example. “The teachers are beginning in the classroom, teaching all about fish anatomy, so when they come to the festival, they are not just painting those fish,” she said. “They are also breaking down the anatomy of the fish.”

Little and Thomas created seven activities. When Rebecca Franco came on board, Thomas said they added more activities. In all, there is now an inch and half think binder full of curriculum. “It’s been a collective of us building this education piece,” Thomas said. “It’s so much more meaningful when they learn in the classroom about the Stone Fly, then get into the water and hold one in their hand.” In 1994, devastating fires hit the Leavenworth area, mainly in the Icicle Canyon near the hatchery. Since the hatchery was a base camp for the fire crews, presenting a festival that year was very much in doubt. In the end, Broaddus and company had only six weeks to present the festival. They decided part of the festival would focus on the fires. “It was such a shattering event for this community, I realized we have to have this,” Thomas said. “We need a meeting ground. It was reunion and tying in and an amazing educational opportunity. Wedge Mountain was still smoking.” The biggest ever crowd showed up at the festival that year, mostly locals just needing to talk about the fires. “People just needed to get together,” Broaddus said. “It was an emotional time. That was a big year for us.” In 1996, Broaddus stepped from the role as festival director. Others came on board to serve in this capacity including Chris Rader and Rhona Baron. Betsy McIndoe came on board as director in 2001 and has been there ever since. She acknowledges the challenges of producing the festival each year, trying to top what was done the year before. “It’s always hard to try and

Submitted photo

Corky Broaddus, circa 1995. bring something new. We try and do new activities and get entertainment that we haven’t had before,” McIndoe said. “We just try to keep it fresh. It’s a challenge to coordinate so many different agencies. And working with the tribes.” There were so many contributors to the festival over the years, including longtime volunteer Sheila Bergren. Her favorite part is to watch all the children come on the school buses. David Winters, who was supervising a YVC crew, helped with the first festival. He continued to be involved for a number of years. “We had no idea what we were getting into,” Winters said. “But now with all the activities. It is such a cool thing for the community.” Becky Heath, who is now the supervisor of the WenatcheeOkanogan National Forest, said she is thrilled to see how the festival has grown the past 20 years.

“Children who attended Salmon Fest in the early days are now parents bringing their kids,” Heath said. “The commitment and passion of the early partners was critical to making the Salmon Fest a reality. Today, it has become a nationally recognized environmental education event that annually reaches thousands of children and adults in the U.S. and Canada.” The salmon festival has become a model for other natural resource festivals around the country. Several years into the festival, Broaddus was tasked with putting together a “how to” book on producing special events based on a natural resource. The government printed 500 copies of this manual, which were distributed all over the country. Now, there are seven salmon festivals on the West Coast. “This has been one of the premier models for other natural resource events around the country,” Broaddus said. “It was one of the first ones. The manual shows our organization, our timelines, our partners, programs, leadership. We did economic studies and visitor surveys.” What does the future hold for the Wenatchee River Salmon Festival? The one person that has nurtured the festival since it’s beginning is planning to retire. Corky Broaddus is retiring, but insists she is not saying goodbye to the festival. “I am not afraid to let it go because I know what the team is behind me,” she said. “I will always be involved with salmon fest but in a different capacity. I don’t know what that means right now. I have all the confidence this thing is going to go on and be wonderful. We’ll just continue.” Ian Dunn can be reached at 548-5286 or editor@leavenworthecho.com.

Quilters show their wares Photo by Ian Dunn

The 15th annual Quilt Show was held in the Festhalle last weekend. A number of prizes were awarded for the best quilts. The featured artists were Susie Decker of Bellevue and Judy Irish from Arlington.

COOK OFF: Judges took their job very seriously Continued from Page 1

Baron, Dave Graybill and Isaac Kaplan Woolner. Graybill, better known as the Fishing Magician, thought the event turned out quite well. “This was fantastic. I can’t think of a better or more appropriate thing to do than a salmon cook-off to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Salmon Fest,” he said. “We got great participation for the first year, getting seven restaurants here.” The variety of dishes impressed the judges, and made the decision that much tougher. “It was not easy to come up

with a winner,” Graybill said. “We saw a lot of variety. We all have our favorite way for preparing salmon. We saw a whole bunch of good ones. It was fabulous.” Sheila Bergren, who has been a volunteer at the hatchery for more than 20 years, thought the even went really well, especially the dedication of the judges. “What impressed me was how serious the judges were,” Bergren said. “They took their job serious. It was so much fun. With the Food Channel, people are really thinking about what they are eating. I think they did a wonderful job.” The winning dish was a “maple

PEARS: Smaller crop? Continued from Page 1

Mexico, which is our number one export.” Cristie Mather, director of communications at Pear Bureau Northwest, said orders for northwest pears are coming in from around the world, and the first shipments are on their way. “Overall, the crop is smaller than last year’s record-breaking size, and about 2 percent smaller than the five-year average size.” She said the harvest started about two weeks later than normal due to the cold, wet spring, and individual pieces of fruit are a bit smaller than average size. “The wet weather at harvest time doesn’t affect the pears as much as the cooler spring, but it doesn’t help the pears grow any larger in the final days before

they’re picked,” she said. “Still the crop is of good quality, and sales this season have already been brisk. In June, Pear Bureau Northwest estimated the 2010 harvest for Washington and Oregon to be 8 percent smaller than last year’s record-breaking crop. Part of the reduction was because of the unseasonably cold spring weather and that trees needed to take a rest after a record production year. The Pear Bureau has export promotions in 39 countries. The top export markets for USA pears are Mexico, Canada, Brazil, Russia, the UAE, Columbia and Hong Kong. India is a growing market. Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ leavenworthecho.com.

salmon” made by the Wild Huckleberry Restaurant. For Graybill, it was the simplicity of the dish that impressed the judges the most. “This recipe stuck with the judges because it was done in a very simple way, probably a very traditional way,” he said. “It brought out the salmon flavor and impressed everyone.” The second place finisher was “salmon cooked over applewood” by JJ Hills. New Leavenworth Hatchery Complex Manager, Dave Irving, came away impressed. “The cook off was great. There is a special feeling here. People

are excited,” he said. The event also featured several small Salmon Fest fundraisers, including a silent auction. McIndoe said they put the event together with the intent of continuing it next. This time, there were only Upper Valley restaurants involved. “We invited some Wenatchee restaurants but they declined. Hopefully, next year we can get more restaurants from down valley involved,” she said. “The dishes were all wonderful. It turned out great.” Ian Dunn can be reached at 548-5286 or editor@leavenworthecho.com.

The Leavenworth Echo • September 15, 2010

STEELHEAD: Bountiful run Continued from Page 1

double the 10 year average,” he said. “We’ve made the limit four hatchery fish and you have to keep them. Having hatchery fish in the stream does nothing for the wild fish.” The goal of the fishery is different that any other, Viola said. The goal of the fishery is to remove the excess hatchery steelhead in the stream. “We have to monitor how many are harvested versus any wild fish in the river,” he said. Normal catch limits vary between two and four fish. Because so many steelhead are headed this way, it just made sense to make the limit four, Viola said. He admits it will be hard to catch four steelhead in Wenatchee River, but considers the Columbia River limit very reasonable. He believes the Methow River will have some good fishing as well. Local fishing guru, Bob Stroup with Trout Unlimited, said he expects the fishing to start out slow and then pick up. “A lot of hatchery fish will be caught,” Stroup said. “The height of the fishing on the Wenatchee will be in November and December. I caution everyone to follow the rules.” The rules include the use of single, barbless hooks. Bait cannot be used in the Wenatchee River, but is allowed on the Columbia. If a wild fish is caught, it is not to be removed from the water or handled in any way. These fishing rules supersede any of the fishing rules, Viola said. Most important is that anglers keep the hatchery fish. Catch and release does not help them accomplish their goal. After years of trying, Viola said WSDFW is finally seeing the light and letting them establish a wild fish sanctuary above Tumwater Dam on the Wenatchee River. No hatchery fish are allowed to pass the Tumwater Dam. “Every wild fish at Tumwater Dam gets transferred above. The best spawning areas are above,” he said. “We would like to get enough wild fish up there to completely seed it.” To date, nearly 800 wild steelhead have been counted going over the Tumwater Dam. The two overall goals for the Wenatchee River are to boost wild fish numbers so they will not go extinct. The other goal is to mitigate for Columbia River dams. This is why the hatchery fish are being raised. “The two goals are separated, so people can fish and have fun and the fish have a chance to recover,” he said. “Taking those hatchery fish out is really going to help us. There are some spawning areas below the dam so we want to give those fish as much of a chance as possible.” The steelhead will not spawn until the spring, so any heading up river are just looking for a good space to hang out until then. And unlike their entire life cycle, the main goal is not to eat. “Their main goal is to get to the spawning grounds. Eating is secondary,” Viola said. “Water temperature determines where you can catch a bunch of them. When the water is warm, they don’t want to eat. At the right temperature, they eat more food.” Once the hatchery fish are turned away at Tumwater Dam, Viola said they typically move back downstream and hang out between Leavenworth and Wenatchee. Normally, steelhead season does not open until mid to late September, but with the big run coming, Viola said they did not hesitate to open the season. They wanted those anglers out their early. Stroup thinks word about the Wenatchee opening is getting around, mainly because of the stream’s longtime reputation among anglers. “A long time ago, when we had a steelhead season every year, guides marked this as one of the best streams around. It’s renown,” Stroup said. “People will target this area. Making the Wenatchee River as a year round destination to fish is one of Trout Unlimited’s goals” The limited amount of public access for boats to the river is a problem, Stroup admits. He said his group is now trying establish a new access point near Dryden Dam. Ian Dunn can be reached at 548-5286 or editor@leavenworthecho.com.


September 15, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo

5

Community

Community Bulletin board Leavenworth Cub Scout meeting set

Leavenworth. The event is open to runners of all ages, with start times for each age group staggered from 8:45 to 9:30 a.m. Registration is from 8 to 8:30 a.m. The event is Anyone with children in grades sponsored by Mt. Stuart Physical 1 through 5 who is interested in Therapy, and Balance Point Health Cub Scouts is invited to a meetand Fitness. All proceeds go to the ing on Sept. 19 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Salmon Festival. For information the Osborn Elementary gym. For call Claudia at 548-3113 or Liz at information call Debbie at 548548-4378, e-mail claudia@mtstu7703. (e37) artpt.com, or visit the Website at www.mtstuartpt.com. (er37) Bell ringer needed Marlin Handbell Ringers arelooking for a ringer with at least 3 or 4 years experience ringing handbells. Anyone interested is asked to call 548-4319 or 5485138. Rehearsals for Christmas performances start in September. (er37,38)

Kiddies’ Parade invitation offered Anyone wanting to join in the Autumn Leaf Festival Kiddies’ Parade is asked to meet at the Festhalle at 11:15 a.m. on. Sept. 25. Marchers can come in costume, decked out in their finest, with a tricycle or pet and join in the parade. The parade will go down Front Street, led by Deputy Bob Francis, then across U.S. Hwy. 2 to Lions Club Park and receive goodies provided by Wells Fargo Bank. Call Charlotte, 679-8661, for information. (e37,38)

“Echoes of Leavenworth” performances slated Amberleaf Theatre’s production the play “Echoes of Leavenworth” is offered at 7 p.m. on Sept. 24, 25, Oct. 1 and 2 and at 2 p.m. on Sept. 26 and Oct. 3 at 2 p.m. at Icicle River Middle School. The plot centers on a man who lives vicariously through his subscription to The Leavenworth Echo. The audience will see his idea of what Leavenworth might be like through his reading of the articles. He then decides to move to Leavenworth and discovers the reality of it all. Admission is $8 for adults, and $6 for seniors and students. Information about the production and the Amberleaf Theatre is on the Web at nwi. net/~baballetnut. (e37,38)

Salmon Run scheduled

The annual Salmon Run will be Sept. 19 at the Leavenworth Fish Hatchery on Icicle Road in

supporting Mountain Meadows. (e37)

Book donations welcomed

Leavenworth Friends of the Library are still collecting used books for the book sale to be held Sept. 24 through Oct. 3 on the plaza across from the hospital. Books can be dropped off at the Leavenworth Public Library or at the Sept. 16 Farmers’ Market from 3 to 7 p.m. Friends of the Library Salmon Sunday supports the needs of the library celebrated and provides books for children Community United Methodist in a variety of programs. Contact Church will celebrate their sixth Cheryl, 548-5501, to help with the annual Salmon Sunday on Sept. 19. sale or for information. (e37) The worship service is at 10 a.m. followed by a Salmon Bake on the Plain lawn. The community is invited Plain Fun Run set to attend the event at 418 Evans The Just “Plain” Fun Run will St. (er36,37) be Sept. 26 beginning at 10 a.m. The event is a 3-mile trail run and Crush Festival family walk that begins and ends planned at Plain Hardware. Registration is A Leavenworth Crush Festival the day of the event from 9 to 9:30 is set for Sept. 18 from 3 to 7 p.m. a.m. The fee is $10 and proceeds at the Leavenworth Festhalle. go to Beaver Valley School. PostThe event will feature dozens of race prize drawings, as well as a Washington wineries, local food party and healthy refreshments vendors, live jazz music provided are provided. For information call by Lenny Price and grape stomp630-5340. (er37,38) ing. The event is for those who are 21-years-old or older and I.D. will Cashmere be required. Tickets are $30 and include a souvenir glass and 15 Common Bond 5 to tasting scrips. Tickets are avail- perform able at the Leavenworth Chamber Local Southern Gospel singof Commerce office, 548-5807, or ing group, Common Bond 5, will online at LeavenworthCrushFesperform a Christian concert durtival.EventBrite.com. The event is ing the 10 a.m. service on Sept. a fundraiser for the Leavenworth 19 at Evergreen Baptist Church Civic Center Foundation. (e37) in Cashmere. Common Bond 5 is known for their wonderful Autumn Leaf harmonies, their spirited yet Harvest Sunday reverent singing, and their genuservice scheduled ine love for the Lord. Evergreen Community United Methodist Baptist Church is located at the Church will celebrate Autumn corner of Evergreen Drive and Leaf Harvest Sunday on Sept. 26. Sunset Highway. A love offering The worship service is at 10 a.m. will be taken. Everyone is invited. followed by a harvest meal on (er37) the lawn and Jumping Castle and games for the whole family. The Regional community is invited to attend the Broadband program event at 418 Evans St. (er37,38)

10 Percent Tuesday benefits Mountain Meadows

holding meetings

The Department of Information Service’s Broadband Program and state Department of ComOn Sept. 21, South Restaurant merce will conduct a broadband in downtown Leavenworth will workshop on Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. donate 10 percent of the food sales to noon in the Entiat Room at the for the day to the Mountain Mead- Confluence Technology Center, ows Assisted Living. Everyone is 285 Technology Center Way in invited to enjoy a fine meal while Wenatchee. The departments will

Heartbreak Pass comes to Cashmere

Photo submitted by Marie Vecchio

Heartbreak Pass. Submitted by Candace Egner On Sept. 18 at 7:30 p.m., the Cashmere Community Coffeehouse is proud to open its 2010-2011 season with one of the hottest and brightest Bluegrass bands in the Northwest. Heartbreak Pass, a five-piece from the Spokane area, was such a hit at our Wenatchee River Bluegrass Festival’s gospel show this year we asked them back to kick off our new season. With Stan Hall’s rock solid rhythm and spot-on flat-picking, Bonnie Bliss and her driving bass, they are joined by Kevin Pace’s red hot mandolin, Austin Little’s amazing banjo and Barry Ehlert with some of the best fiddling you’ll hear; it’s a solid lineup of talent. These folks have discuss opportunities for funding for telehealth, distance learning and small businesses. The departments are collecting information about the type of broadband applications many kinds of industry sectors and many groups of consumers in the state use or need, especially for businesses and community services (e.g., schools, hospital, nonprofits, public safety, etc). The information collected will be included in a preliminary report on the broadband capability and needs of the state. Participants are asked to R.S.V.P. to Alisha Reitan, Alisha.Reitan@dis. wa.gov or 360-902-2981. (er37)

Seed saving is meeting topic Washington Native Plant Society, Wenatchee Chapter, meets Sept. 23 at 7 p.m. at Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center, 127 Mission Street. The meeting is open to the public. The group will take a few minutes to share summer wildflower adventures and highlights before the program begins and refreshments are served. Ellen Kuhlmann (Seeds of Success Program Manager, Rare Plant Care and Conservation, University of Washington

won individual awards and raves for years, all starting out in music when they were youngsters and coming together some years ago, adding big vocals and sweet harmonies. Heartbreak Pass opened for Rhonda Vincent and the Rage this summer to rave reviews. The performance is at Cashmere Riverside Center, 201 Riverside Dr. in Cashmere. A cover charge of $3 per person at the door helps cover expenses. Refreshments are provided. The musicians are paid by a one time hat pass, a suggested donation of $8 to $11 per person is appreciated. Doors open at 7 p.m. For information call Marie, 548-1230, or Chuck, 548-8663. The Coffeehouse is on the web at www.CashmereCoffeehouse.com.

cal Dependency Agencies are sponsoring a Recovery Month Banquet at the Red Lion Inn on Sept. 25. The evening will include an Italian dinner and motivational speakers. State Rep. Mike Armstrong will emcee. Tickets are $20. Eco friendly lawn Contact any chemical dependency presentation offered agency in the valley for informa“Eco Friendly Turfgrass & tion. (er37,38) Turfgrass Alternatives” is the Submit bulletin topic of a presentation to be hosted by WSU Tree Fruit Research board entries and Education Center. Speakers Announcements from nonwill include Chris Hilgert, Urban profit groups are published in Horticulturist, WSU Spokane The Echo for two weeks. Groups County Extension; Dale Whaley, can submit announcements by: Integrated Pest Management, • Using the online form at www. WSU Douglas County Extension; leavenworthecho.com and Paula Dinius, Urban Horti• E-mailing them to echo@ culturist, WSU Chelan County leavenworthecho.com (attn: BulExtension. The program is Sept. letin Board) 16 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 1100 N. • Dropping them off at The Western Ave. in Wenatchee. The Echo office at 215 14th. St. registration fee is $10 and lunch • Mailing them to P.O. Box 39, is not included. Register by calling Leavenworth WSU Chelan County Extension at • Faxing them to 548-4789. 667-6540, or go to www.ncw.wsu. Please submit your announceedu/uh for brochure, agenda and ment by Thursday at 5 p.m. on-line registration. (er37) at least two weeks before the event. Limit the announcement Recovery banquet to 75 words and include contact scheduled information. Chelan/Douglas County Chemi-

Botanic Gardens) will present the program, “Squirrels for the 21st Century: Seed Saving around the World.” Contact co-chair Susan Balliner at skylinebal@gmail.com for information. (er37,38)

Community Calendar Wednesday, Sept. 15

Noon, Alcoholics Anonymous, Buckboard Restaurant, 548-4522, 664-6469 or 425-773-7527. 1 p.m., Grandparents raising grandchildren support group, 224 Benton St., Stacy Barnhill, 5480447. 1 to 3 p.m., Square dance class, Leavenworth Senior Center, 5486124. Beginners welcome. 1 to 4 p.m., SCORE small business counseling, Wenatchee Valley Chamber of Commerce, 300 S. Columbia St., Wenatchee, call for appointment, 662-2116. 4 to 8 p.m., Der Bauernmarkt, Leavenworth Community Farmers’ Market, Lions Club Park, Kim Langston, 679-3378. 4 to 8 p.m., Friends of the Leavenworth Library collects books for the fall sale, Lions Club Park, Cheryl at 548-5501, Kirsten Thursday, Sept. 16 at 548-7018. 8 a.m., Leavenworth Chamber of Commerce, Kristall’s Restau- 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Knitting Night with Wooly Bully Yarns. 905 Comrant, Karl Ruether, president, mercial St., 548-0895. 548-5807. 9 a.m., Tai Chi Exercise, Leavenworth 6:30 to 10 p.m., Cashmere Sportsmen’s Gun Club shooting range, Senior Center, Tracy Brulotte, Turkey Shoot Rd., Ed Pipkin, 548-5583. 782-3922. Noon, Leavenworth Lions Club. 7 p.m., Autumn Leaf Festival AsKristall’s Restaurant.

8 a.m., Ladies 9 Holers, Leavenworth Golf Course, Margie Bryson-548-4571. 8 a.m., Ladies 18 Hole, Leavenworth Golf Course, call Pro Shop, 5487267. 8:30 a.m., Aerobics, Plain Community Church, $1 fee, 763-3621. 8:30 to 10 a.m., Play and Learn Group, Peshastin Head Start, Liliana Torres, 682-6761. 10:30 a.m., Exercises, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548-6666 or 5485334. 1 p.m., Pinochle, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548-6666. 7 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548-4522, 664-6469 or 425-7737527.

sociation., Chelan County PUD auditorium, 222 Chumstick Hwy., Cindy Puckett, 782-3030. 7 p.m., LWSC Board of Directors, Ski Hill Lodge, 548-5477. 7 p.m., Celebrate Recovery, Leavenworth Church of the Nazarene, 111 Ski Hill Drive, doors open at 6 p.m. for free dinner, 548-5292.

Friday, Sept. 17 8:30 a.m., Aerobics, Plain Community Church, $1 fee, 763-3621. 10:30 a.m., Exercises, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548-6666. 10:45 a.m., Preschool story time, Leavenworth Library, 548-7923. 11:45 a.m., Leavenworth Rotary Club, Kristall’s Restaurant, Ross Frank, 548-4512. 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548-6666. 7 p.m., Women’s Alcoholic Anonymous, Leavenworth United Methodist Church, 418 Evans St., 548-6851. 7:30 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, Plain Community Church, 5484522, 664-6469 or 425-7737527.

Saturday, Sept. 18

8:30 a.m., Aerobics, Plain Community Church, $1 fee, 782-3621. 7 to 9 p.m., Music and dancing, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Foot care, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548Leavenworth Senior Center, $23 6666 or Jack Bauer, 548-6650. for appointment, Sue Anez, R.N., 669-0349. Sunday, Sept. 19 8 a.m., Men’s Division, Leavenworth 10:30 a.m, Exercises, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548-6666. Golf Course, call Pro Shop, 5486 p.m., Bavarian Volkssport Asso7267. ciation, Pat Russell, 548-4084. 9 a.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, Buckboard Cafe, Hwy. 97, 548- 6:30 to 8 p.m., Upper Valley Free Medical Clinic, Cascade Medical 4522, 664-6469 or 425-773Center, Laurie Peek, 548-7186. 7527. 1 or 4 p.m., Church service, Moun- 7 p.m., Leavenworth Mosquito District Board, Cascade Medical tain Meadows Assisted Living, Center, Jennifer Mullins, 548548-4076, call for time. 3316. 6 to 7:30 p.m., Nazarene Middle School Youth Group, Leavenworth 7 p.m., Al-Anon and Al-ateen meeting, Leavenworth United MethodChurch of the Nazarene, 548ist Church, 548-7939. 5292. 6 p.m., Nazarene High School Youth 7 p.m., Boy Scout Troop 28, Ski Hill Lodge, Betty Palmer, 548-6624. Group, 128 Prospect Street, 5485292. 7 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, Tuesday, Sept. 21 Leavenworth Senior Center, 8 a.m., Senior Men’s Division, Leavenworth Golf Course, call 548-4522, 664-6469 or 425-773Pro Shop, 548-7267. 7527. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Leavenworth Farmers’ Market, Lions Club Monday, Sept. 20 Park, Betty Kuch, 548-5309. 8 a.m., Ladies 9 Holers, Leavenworth Golf Course, Margie Bryson, 548- 8 a.m., Bavarian Business Association, King Ludwig’s, Cary Sanger, 4571.

Community Meals Cascade School District Elementary

• Tuna • Beef Stew • Peanut Butter • Etc.

Thursday, Sept. 16, Breakfast: Cereal or jumbo cinnamon roll. Lunch: Cheese pizza or hot dog on a bun, corn, sliced peaches. Friday, Sept. 17, Breakfast: Cereal or breakfast combo bar. Lunch: Spaghetti with meat sauce and garlic bread, or chicken nuggets, baby carrots and banana. Monday, Sept. 20, Breakfast: Cereal or maple bar with yogurt. Lunch: Chicken drumstick or beef and bean burrito, oven baked fries and fruit cocktail. Tuesday, Sept. 21, Breakfast: Cereal or breakfast burrito. Lunch: Grilled cheese sandwich or chicken nuggets with fries, and sliced peaches. Wednesday, Sept. 22, Breakfast: Cereal or breakfast pizza. Lunch: Pancakes with link sausages and syrup, or pasta with meat sauce

and garlic bread, mixed vegetables and sliced pears.

Middle and High Schools Breakfast choices offered daily: Smoothie, ham and egg muffin, maple bar, cinnamon roll and more. Lunch choices offered daily: Pepperoni cheese specialty pizza, hamburger, cheeseburger, chicken burger, nachos, burrito, taco salad, variety of sandwiches and salads. Thursday, Sept. 16, Chili dog with oven baked potato wedges. Friday, Sept. 17, Spaghetti with meat sauce, garlic bread and zucchini. Monday, Sept. 20, Lasagna with garlic bread. Tuesday, Sept. 21, Chicken nuggets with mashed potatoes and gravy, and sweet peas. Wednesday, Sept. 22, Back yard barbecue: Honey barbecued chicken, baked beans, corn on the cob and biscuit.

Senior Meals

Call 548-6666, 24 hours in advance, to reserve a meal. Meals are served at noon at the Leavenworth Senior Center. Thursday, Sept. 16, Chicken and rice casserole, green beans, garden salad, pears, whole wheat bread and Jell-O. Friday, Sept. 17, (Home delivery only) Clam chowder, cottage cheese, carrot slaw, green salad, orange, whole wheat roll and pumpkin bars. Monday, Sept. 20, Barbecued chicken, baked beans, garlic pasta, spinach salad, cauliflower, banana, roll and Jell-O. Tuesday, Sept. 21, Deluxe hamburger with lettuce and tomato, tomato soup, Waldorf salad and jo jo potatoes. Wednesday, Sept. 22, Swedish meatballs, rice, beets, trio vegetables, peaches, roll and cookies.

548-4857. Noon, Upper Valley Women’s Bible Study, Wedding Haus, Delores Hall, 548-7803. 1 p.m., Buns, Books and Tea, Peshastin Book Club, Peshastin Library, Kathy Springer, 5484807. 1 to 4 p.m., SCORE small business counseling, Wenatchee Valley Chamber of Commerce, 300 S. Columbia St., Wenatchee, call for appointment, 662-2116. 3 p.m., Crafts, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548-6666. 4:15 p.m., Karate, Leavenworth Senior Center, 548-6666. 6:45 p.m., Celebrate Recovery, Leavenworth Christian Fellowship, 7591 Hwy. 97, Peshastin, free dinner at 6:15 p.m., 5484222. 7 p.m., Narcotics Anonymous, St. James Episcopal Church, 222 Cottage Ave., Robert Hendricks, 782-1476. 7 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous, United Church of Christ, 8455 Main St. in Peshastin, 548-4522, 664-6469 or 425-773-7527.

Ongoing events Leavenworth Library, Monday and Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Children’s story time, Friday at 10:45 a.m., 548-7923. Peshastin Library, Tuesday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.; Thursday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. and 6 to 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m., 548-7821. Upper Valley Museum, Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 347 Division St., 5480728. Cashmere Pioneer Village and Museum, Daily, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 600 Cotlets Way, 782-3230. Tillicum Riders, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Chelan County Fairgrounds, Cindy Fowler, 6625984. Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily, 548-7641.


6

Neighbors Obituaries

Floyd Rayfield

neral Chapel at 1 p.m. with Pastor Jon Vandel officiating. Concluding service and interment will be in the Mt. View Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of ones choice. Wa r d ’s F u n e r a l Ch ap e l , Leavenworth is in charge of the arrangements.

Thomas Magna Olson

Floyd Rayfield, 90, a resident of the Upper Valley for the past 65 years, went to be with the love of his life Pearl on Friday, Sept. 10, 2010, at his home in Peshastin. Floyd was born on Sept. 6, 1920, to George Newton and Martha Ellen (Barnes) Rayfield at Sevier County, Tenn., where he received his early education. From 1937 to 1939, Floyd was in Gatlinburg in the Civilian Conservation Corps. After leaving the CCC’s, he married Pearl I. Justus on Aug. 12, 1939, at Sevierville, Tenn. In 1940, they moved to Geauga County, Ohio, where he worked for a vault company. In 1942, they moved back to Sevierville, and in 1943, to Leavenworth where Floyd worked for the Peshastin Lumber and Box Co. on the woods crew. In February of 1944, he enlisted in the United States Navy and served in WWII. After receiving his honorable discharge in September of 1945, he moved back to Leavenworth where he went back to work for Peshastin Lumber and Box woods crew, retiring in 1982. Floyd enjoyed working around his home, especially in his yard and garden. He was also an avid fisherman and snowmobiler. He is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, David and Sharon Rayfield of Leavenworth; two daughters and son-in-law, Betty “Cookie” and Roy McGregor of Leavenworth and Helen Rayfield and her companion Tom Hanson of Peshastin; 10 grandchildren and 24 great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife Pearl in 2004, four brothers, six sisters and one grandson, Dean Rayfield. A Funeral Service of Commemoration to celebrate the life of Floyd Rayfield will be held on Friday Sept. 17, 2010 at Ward’s Fu-

Thomas Magna Olson, 66 passed away on Sept. 8, 2010. Tom was born in July 27, 1944 to Bjorne and Marcella Olson. He grew up and attended schools in the Mountlake Lake Terrace area but resided for the past 30 years at Lake Wenatchee and Cashmere. In Lynnwood, he owned and operated the Overland Express Restaurant and had his own building company, Suburban Homes. With his wife, he owned 59er Diner, Lake Wenatchee, Bronze Bodies, Leavenworth Java Buzz,Cashmere. He will be best remembered for his 20 years owning and operating the Cougar Inn Resort at Lake Wenatchee. Of all his businesses, Cougar Inn was the one he was the most passionate

about, the one that inspired the most vision, and the one he worked the hardest at. His time at Cougar Inn, his staff and his customers gave him great joy. That was the time in his life when he was having the most fun of all. Tom loved golf and especially his Thursday golf day at Leavenworth with his long time partner, Pete. He was awe struck with the breathtaking beauty, warmth and relaxation of the Wailea, Maui golf course, which was the place he loved the most on earth. He leaves behind his wife of 30 years, Dodee, and the person he treasured the most, daughter Nicole Olson of Mukilteo, his sons Darrell and wife Donna Moser of Cashmere, and Doug and wife Cari Moser of Lynnwood who worked and played right beside their dad at Cougar Inn. He also leaves behind his mother Marcie Olson, Mountlake Terrace, sisters: Beverly and husband Heinz Prast, Dallas, TX, Patricia Newton, Cashmere , Cindy Olson, Mill Creek, three grandchildren Cameron, Jordan and Raegan Moser. Tom was preceded in death by his father Bernie Olson, brothers Ricky, Bob, Larry and James (Buzz) Olson. Tom was a visionary when it came to business. He lived a life full of exciting business adventures. He was surrounded by a loving family who always took delight in the gatherings, good food, and spirited fun at Cougar Inn; the vacations in Maui, and the warmth, love and great times he showed everyone. Tom’s memorial service will be held Thursday Sept. 23, 1 p.m. at Evergreen Funeral Home, 4504 Broadway, Everett.

The Leavenworth Echo • September 15, 2010

Upper Valley

ChUrCh GUide AL

Cashmere Cashmere First Baptist ChurCh 509-782-2869 • 103 Aplets Way Sunday School 9:45 a.m.- Worship 11 a.m. Bible Study, Wed., 7 p.m. Bob Bauer, Pastor

Cashmere presByterian ChurCh 303 Maple Street • 782-2431 Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Call for activities: Charles Clarke, Pastor

Cashmere united methodist ChurCh 213 S. Division • 782-3811 Worship and Sunday school at 10 a.m. Office Hours: Mon. - Thurs. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Rev. Cheryl Fear, Pastor

Christ Center Worship and Sunday School 10 a.m. Conservatory at Apple Annie Mall Underground Youth Group, Sun., 6 p.m., 206 Vine Middle School meeting, Wed., 7 p.m., 206 Vine Paul B. Williams, Pastor Andy Robinson, Associate Pastor Steve Haney, Youth Pastor Christcentercashmere.org • 782-2825

evergreen Baptist ChurCh 5837 Evergreen Drive, 782-1662 Sunday School - 8:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10 a.m. christforcashmere.com • Alan Jarboe, Pastor

graCe Lutheran ChurCh Vine & Elberta Streets • 782-3583 Worship 10:30 a.m. Rev. Robert Gohl, Pastor

st. FranCis Xavier 300 S. Division • Office: 548-5119 Rectory: 782-2643 Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m. Spanish Mass: 12:30 p.m. Daily Mass Wednesday: 8:30 a.m. Friday: 9:30 a.m. Mass Convalescent Center Fr. Dan Dufner, Pastor

st. James episCopaL ChurCh 222 Cottage Ave. • 782-1590 Holy Eucharist 9 a.m. Rev. Carol Forhan, Deacon Rev. Rob Gohl, Vicar - Cell 860-0736

DryDen dryden Community ChurCh Hwy 2 at Dryden Ave. • 782-2935 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. • Worship 10:45 a.m. Matthew Payne, Pastor • 782-4987

mid-vaLLey Baptist ChurCh 1 Frontage Road • 782-2616 Sunday School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Brian Ross, Pastor

Leavenworth CasCade mountain BiBLe ChurCh ‘Where God’s Word Remains The Pillar Of Truth’ 1205 Chumstick Hwy. • 548-4331 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. Adult Bible Study Tuesday 6:30 p.m. AWANA (Youth Program) Wed. 6:30 p.m. (school year) Todd James, Pastor • www.cmbiblechurch.org

Community united methodist 418 Evans Street • 548-5619 Worship and Sunday school for children at 10 a.m., Nursery provided Rev. Roger Hudson, Pastor www.leavenworthumc.org

Cornerstone BiBLe ChurCh Leavenworth Grange Hall • 621 Front St. 548-0748 Sunday Worship 10:15 a.m. Weekly Bible Study/Fellowship Groups Monday & Wednesday 6:30 p.m

“With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible.” -Matthew 19:26

LA

RE WELCO

M E

Leavenworth Faith Lutheran ChurCh 224 Benton Street • 548-7010 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. - Education Hour 10:45 a.m. Alex Schmidt, Pastor “Being the gracious healing and reconciling presence of God through: Sacramental Worship, Congregational Nurture and Ministries of Peace, Mercy and Justice for all creation”

First Baptist ChurCh oF Leavenworth, sBC 429 Evans Street • 548-7624 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday prayer 7 p.m. 1st Sunday evening worship 6 p.m.

Leavenworth Christian FeLLowship A Foursquare Church 7591 Hwy. 97 (1/4 mile up Blewett Pass) Sunday 10 a.m. leavenworthchristian@charterinternet.com Call for other meeting times • 548-4222 Mike McGrath, Pastor

Light in the vaLLey Community ChurCh Icicle River Middle School Commons 10195 Titus Rd. • 548-7832 Sunday Worship 10 a.m. John Romine, Pastor • www.lightinthevalley.org

Leavenworth ChurCh

oF the nazarene 111 Ski Hill Drive • 548-5292 Sunday Worship Services 8:45 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Family Night: 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Jon Vandel, Pastor James O’Connell, Youth Pastor Bryan Anderson, Children’s Pastor www.lcn.org

our Lady

oF the

snows CathoLiC ChurCh

145 Wheeler Street Daily Mass • Tuesday & Thursday 8:30 a.m. Saturday Vigil 5 p.m. • Sunday Mass - 10:30 a.m. Parish Office - 548-5119 Fr. Dan Dufner, Pastor

seventh day adventist ChurCh 10600 Ski Hill Drive • 548-4345 Saturday Services Bible Study 9:30 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6 p.m. Roy Churchill • 548-5542

spirit LiFe Center 210 Benton Street • 548-7138 Sunday Worship 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Intercessory Prayer Tuesday 8:30 a.m. Call 548-4709 for prayer information Russell Esparza, Pastor

monitor monitor united methodist ChurCh 3799 Fairview Canyon • 782-2601 Sunday Service & Sunday School 9:30 am Mike O’Neal, Pastor

Peshastin peshastin assemBLy

oF god 8353 Lake Street (at School St.) • 548-7523 Cross the bridge, make a right turn for your life. Sunday Services 10 a.m. Wednesday night Bible Study 7 p.m. Larry Wooten, Pastor

peshastin united ChurCh

oF Christ 8455 Main Street • 548-7517 10:30 a.m. Worship Celebration 9:30 a.m. Sunday School (nursery provided) Rev. Dr. Ann Hinz, Pastor

PLain pLain Community ChurCh “Helping people connect with God and one another in caring community.” 12565 Chapel Dr. • 763-3621 plaincommunitychurch.org Worship 10 a.m. • Nursery (ages 1-3) Children’s Church (ages 4-8) Phil Strong, Pastor

Common Bond 5 Will perform during the 10 a.m. service on Sept. 19 Evergreen Baptist Church is at the corner of Evergreen Drive and Sunset Hwy. in Cashmere. A love offering will be taken. Everyone is invited.

EvErgrEEn Baptist ChurCh

5837 Evergreen Dr., Cashmere • 782-1662 • Worship Services at 10 am To place informaTion in The church Guide call 548-5286.


September 15, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo

7

Schools & Sports

Kodiaks crush Naches 54-7 in home opener By Ian Dunn Editor Nearly everything went right for the Cascade Kodiaks in their convincing 54-7 win over Naches last Friday night in Peshastin. The defense played well, the offense played well, and the special teams played well. All in all, it was a good night for the young squad. And it was the Nick Wood coming out party. The junior speedster overcame a disappointing performance against Sultan to rush for 117 yards and four touchdowns on just five carries. “After last week, that was

good to see,” said Head Coach Elia Ala’ilima-Daley of Wood’s performance. “That is what we expected from him since the summer. It was nice to see him get the opportunity and take advantage.” But Wood is not the only weapon in the Kodiak offensive arsenal. Sophomore Fabian Alvarez, who wears the number 82 in remembrance of his late brother, former Kodiak standout Ramiro Alvarez, took the opening kickoff to the house, 80 yards to paydirt. For the normally slow starting Kodiaks, that was a positive sign for Coach Daley. “It was a good way to start the

Photo by Ian Dunn

Cascade running back Nick Wood (23) darts his way upfield on the way to a 48 yard touchdown run. The junior speedster racked up 117 yards rushing and four TDs against Naches. game,” he said. “We always have slow starts so that was a nice way to get the game started.” Naches, which ran the pistol offense, moved the ball some on the first two possessions, but the Kodiaks defense kept them at bay for the most part. After a Naches fumble early in the second quarter, Cascade quarterback Dan Betz found Ethan Nash in the corner of the endzone for a 27-yard strike to make it 14-0 Cascade. On their next possession, Cascade marched downfield 63 yards on 10 plays. Wood scored from 11

yards for the first of his four touchdowns on the night. Cascade led 21-0. After a blocked punt on the next Naches possession, Cascade punched it back into the endzone with just 36 seconds before halftime. It was an 8-yard TD run by Wood to make it Cascade 28-0 at halftime. While the offense was showing mightily, Daley was very pleased with his defense on the Rangers varied attack. “For the most part, our backers and D-line did a good job of keeping things in front of them,”

he said. “We were just attacking. They did an outstanding job of getting into the backfield. Nick Wood at defensive end. His speed was causing some problems for their blockers.” In the third quarter, Nick Wood raced 34 yards, making a couple nifty moves on potential tacklers, to score yet again. It was now 34-0 Cascade. Then, on the next possession, it was Wood again, from 48 yards for the score to make it 41-0 Cascade. Capping the scoring was Dwight Stoddard III with a straight ahead 35 yard run. And Alvarez again,

playing with mostly second and third unit players, who ran it in from 47 yards out. The lone Naches TD came with mostly subs in the game. “The offensive linemen did a good job of getting out,” he said. “The tackles were getting those down blocks.” The Kodiak defense was stellar, holding Naches to just 124 yards in total offense. Conversely, Cascade racked up 419 yards in total offense, 318 rushing, and 101 passing. Cam Williams had 62 yards rushing, Geoffrey Linn had two catches for 41 yards. With a punt block, and kickoff return for touchdown, Daley was quite pleased with the play of his special teams. “Just like any coach, I try to explain the importance of special teams,” he said. “We have struggled in practice with that. I even extended practice because of that.” Next up: Cheney. Cascade (2-0) finishes off their non-league schedule with a game at 2A Cheney this Friday. “We are pretty excited,” he said of playing Cheney. “The first couple games were good to get some younger players some confidence. Cheney is going to be our toughest opponent. It will be a good gauge for league play.” Daley hopes his team will gain some confidence playing again a team like Cheney. Cheney is 1-1-1 with a win over Priest River (21-14), a 7-7 tie against Priest River, and a 14-12 loss to Peninsula. Ian Dunn can be reached at 548-5286 or editor@leavenworthecho.com.

Kodiak runners face learning curve Freshmen girls showing promise By Nevonne McDaniels Staff writer The Tonasket Invitational on Saturday gave Casdade Kodiak’s cross-country coach Dayle Massey an opportunity to see what his team is capable of and how to focus practices this next week at Whidbey Island. “They’re in decent shape now,”

he said, “so we’re going to focus on getting them going faster and pushing it more.” The boys’ team came in fourth overall in Tonasket, but was missing Jake Whitten and Paul Hartl for this meet. “That certainly would have helped if they were there,” Massey said, but others stepped up. Cristian Rivas, a junior, took 10th place in the 2.8-mile crosscountry run with a time of 17:39, leading the boys team. “He’s going to get better and better, the more experience he gets racing,” Massey said. Sophomore Michael Olmstead placed 18th with 18:24. The girls’ team came in third overall at the invite with a relatively young team. Four of the six runners are freshmen. “This was their first meet, so they were seeing what it was like to run in high school. They did well,” he said. Charlotte Massey placed 16th with a time of 22:36, just missing out on a ribbon (given for 15th). Andrea Chavez crossed the finish line at 23:20, finishing 21st, and Mady Harris finished 25:55. Junior Michaela Barich, who finished 23rd with a time of 24:43, and senior Julia Anderson, who finished at 31st with a time of 26:56, were both fighting injuries and health issues, Massey said. The Kodiak’s next challenge is the South Whidbey Invitational on Sept. 18, followed by the Lib-

Photo by Emily Hanson

Ryan Rosenau placed 31st in the Tonasket Invitation last Saturday. The boys team finished fourth in the meet. Next Saturday is the South Whidbey Invitational. erty Bell Invite on Sept. 21. Tonasket Invitational Sept. 11 Kodiak Cross-Country

2.8-mile varsity boys 10. Cristian Rivas, 17:39; 18. Michael Olmstead, 18:24; 21. Tyler Harrod, 18:41; 31 Ryan Rosenau, 19:56; 35 Caleb Matheson, 20:29 2.8-mile varsity girls

16. Charlotte Massey; 21. Andrea Chavez, 23:20; 23. Michaela Barich, 24:43; 28. Mady Harris, 25:55; 31. Julia Anderson, 26:56; 32. Lizzy Noland, 27:25

Nevonne McDaniels can be reached at 548-5286 or reporter@ leavenworthecho.com.

Golf tourney champs

Photos by Carol Forhan

The second annual Upper Valley M.E.N.D/SHARE golf fundraiser was held last week at the Leavenworth Golf Club. In first place with a score of 61 are Steven Edlund, Doug Edlund, Don Gates and Chuck Egner.

The LeavenworTh echo P.O. Box 39 215 14th Street Leavenworth, WA. 98826

cashmere vaLLey record 201 Cottage Ave. Suite 4 Cashmere, WA. 98815

The second place team at the Upper Valley M.E.N.D/SHARE golf tournament, with a score of 62, were Ted Bidman, Chuck Reppas, was coordinator of this year’s event, Jeff Green, Brad Green and Stuart Sargent. Not pictured, the last place finishers, with a score of 88, Karl and Dawn Kranz, and Richard and Theresa D’litzenberger.

Photo by Emily Hanson

Andrea Chavez of Cascade c o m p e t e s i n t h e To n a s k e t Invitational last Saturday. Chavez placed 21st in the race. The girls team place third in the meet.


8

The Leavenworth Echo • September 15, 2010

Schools & Sports

Kodiaks begin season as tourney champs club played an extensive and successful summer campaign in 2010. That experience seemed to play big dividends in Yakima last Friday as Cascade beat Seattle Prep, Heppner, Kings Way Christian, Bear Creek, Newport and Lyden Christen on the way to the title. Head Coach Marni McMahon said it was a great experience for her team. “Especially being on the center court in the dome, just like State,” she said. “This is a huge momentum builder for us. If we can keep playing good volleyball, this experience will help us.” In the opening match, as part of pool play, Cascade faced off against 3A Seattle Prep, and won 25-16 and 25-18. From there, the Kodiaks moved on to play Heppner, a school from Oregon. Cascade again won in Photo submitted by Marni McMahon straight games, 26-24 and 25-20. The Cascade Volleyball team celebrates their victory in the Sundome Tournament last Friday in Cascade finished off pool play Yakima. The Kodiaks beat Lynden Christian in the finals 2-1 to win the championship. with another straight game win over Kings Way Christian of SeBy Ian Dunn standing season for Cascade onship. attle, 25-16 and 25-19. Editor Kodiak volleyball were solidified It was the first action of the “Depth is huge thing for us and last Friday as the team won the new season for the team, but not it definitely showed. Every girl Any thoughts of another out- Sundome Tournament Champi- the first action of the year. The contributed,” she said. “Toward

Kodiak soccer team off to solid start By Ian Dunn Editor The Cascade Kodiak girls soccer team started the season off in fine fashion with a convincing 7-0 over Chelan on a rainy day last week in Leavenworth. In what is likely to be a familiar theme for the Kodiaks this season, sisters Hannah and Hailey Ziegler combined on the first goal of the season just nine minutes into the contest. “Zig and Zag, we call them,” said Cascade Head Coach Colin Powers of the Ziegler girls. “They are unbelievably fast. They both have great dribbling skills and trapping skills. They both relentlessly pursue the ball. They never give up. It’s awesome. With their speed, they are always a threat to break through the defense.” Hannah Ziegler scored four goals in the opening win over Chelan, Hailey scored one. Caroline Ward had the other two goals. I was expecting this type of game because Chelan only had 15 girls eligible,” he said. “They can play us tough. We are fast. That never slumps.” Cascade had 15 shots on goal

Photo by Ian Dunn

Cascade forward Amanda Scott moves the ball upfield in action against the Chelan Goats last week. The Kodiaks beat Chelan 7-0. In other games, Cascade beat Highland 3-2 and lost to LaSalle 5-1. versus just three for Chelan. The aggressive Kodiaks did rack up 13 fouls in the game too. Last Thursday, Cascade travelled to Yakima to take on the defending state champions from LaSalle. The Lightning flexed their muscle in this one, beating

School bond discussed

Photo by Nevonne McDaniels

Community members talk with school officials and architects about construction projects proposed to be paid for by a bond election that goes to Cascade School District voters in February. This gathering at the Peshastin-Dryden Elementary School Sept. 7 was the first of four community meetings designed to gather public input on the construction proposals, which range from $71.8 million to $63.4 million and include replacing Cascade High School, building a new elementary school to replace both Peshastin-Dryden and Osborn schools and replacing the heating and cooling systems at Icicle River Middle School. A phone survey to gather more information is set for the end of September or early October. For information on the proposals, go to cascade.wednet.edu and click on “pre-bond info.”

Honoring Life “On behalf of our family, we want to thank you for the good service. We got many compliments on the service. Thanks to you for being so caring.”

Cascade 5-1. “They are an outstanding soccer team,” he said. “They are locked and loaded for another run at State. They are big, strong and fast. Any facet of the game, they were stronger. But the girls didn’t come out the game depressed. They said, ‘that is the level we want to play at. That’s where we want to be.’ ” The morning before their next game, Powers said the team watched the LaSalle game film. He said they saw the benefit of not forcing the ball in. It seemed to pay dividends as Cascade scored an impressive 3-2 win over a talented Highland team last Saturday in Leavenworth. “We are not going to sell Highland short. They are extremely fast. But they were one dimensional,” he said. “They had one really good player. We focused at halftime to take away that threat. She was getting frustrated because our defense was focused on taking her out of the equation.” Highland standout Alyssa Wickenhagen opened the scoring five minutes in the game. But the Kodiaks came back to tie the game 1-1 at the 35-minute mark as Hannah Ziegler banged one in off the assist from freshman Ariel Rayfield. Zig and Zag were at it again just

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plays.”

First league match: Chelan Even McMahon admits playing their archrival in the first league game of the season is not ideal. But the way Cascade is playing, she feels the timing may be just about right. “We are coming off a strong summer and the Sundome experience,” she said. “I think these girls are ready for the challenge right off the get go. It’s going to be a battle.” The past four years, either Cascade or Chelan has won the league championship. Typically the winner of the head-to-head match ups will take the title. Last season, Chelan won both games against Cascade on the way to the league championship. Gone is sparkplug Kelly Bowers, but the Goats do return seven starters including star forward JC Harris. Most fans know the stakes are high in this match, which typically draws the largest crowds of the regular season. “There’s a lot of talk. The girls are excited. They get just as jacked up as we do,” she said. “They are ready to play. Hopefully we can control our unforced errors and get some defensive stops on JC and control the game.” Results for the Chelan match were not available before press time. Other matches this week for the Kodiaks include at 4A Wenatchee on Thursday and at 2A powerhouse Selah on Saturday. Ian Dunn can be reached at 548-5286 or editor@leavenworthecho.com.

CASCADE Scoreboard Kodiaks Football Sept. 10 Sept. 17

Cascade 54, Naches 7 upcoming games Cascade at Cheney, 7 p.m.

Kodiaks Volleyball

Sept. 10

Sept. 16 Sept. 18 Sept. 21

Sun Dome Tournament Cascade 2, Seattle Prep 0 Cascade 2, Heppner 0 Cascade 2, Kings Way Christian 0 Cascade 2, Bear Creek 0 Cascade 2, Newport 0 (Championship) Cascade 2, Linden Christian 1 upcoming games Cascade at Wenatchee, 7 p.m. Cascade at Selah, 1 p.m. Cascade at Cashmere, 5 p.m.

Kodiaks Girls SocceR Sept. 7 Sept. 9 Sept. 11 Sept. 16 Sept. 21

Cascade 7, Chelan 0 LaSalle 5, Cascade 1 Cascade 3, Highland 2 upcoming games Quincy at Cascade, 4 p.m. Cascade at Cashmere, 4:30 p.m.

Kodiaks Cross Country Sept. 11 Sept. 18 Sept. 21

Tonasket invite Cascade Boys 4th, Cascade Girls 3rd upcoming Meets Moses Lake Invite, 11 a.m. Liberty Bell Invite, 4 p.m.

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a minute later, as Hailey scored off the Hannah assist to make it 2-1 Cascade. Just two minutes before halftime, Wickenhagen struck again to tie the game at 2-2. “We made some positional changes late to adapt,” he said. “We moved Caroline back from her midfield position. That was a good fit. And we had some freshmen step up.” One of those freshmen, Haley Hassinger, provided the winning margin with her rebound goal at the 70 minute mark off the Ward assist. Cascade held on the final 20 minutes for the win. Cascade outshot Highland 1210. Goalie Annika Enloe had eight saves. “This kind of game means more than a 7-0 blowout. This is the kind of game that you remember,” he said. “You fought your way through it and showed your heart. Our freshmen really played their hearts out.” Next up: Cashmere. Cascade played Quincy at home Sept. 14, but results were not available before press time. The next match is Tuesday at Cashmere. Powers, who has yet to beat the defending league champs, knows what is at stake. “You want to be the champs, you have to beat the champs,” he said. “I think we are every bit as good. We’re anxious. We’re looking forward to it.” After playing Cashmere the past couple years, Powers has learned a few things. “I’ve learned that Cashmere likes to attack the corners against us,” he said. “It’s worked for him (Cashmere Coach Dennis Tronson) and if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. I see him doing the same. But I don’t think he is going to be ready for our speed. Our speed of play is much better this year.” Typically, Powers designs something tricky for the Bulldogs, but this year he is “playing his cards close his chest.” “I want to run under the radar and pop up when it’s too late,” he said. Ian Dunn can be reached at 5485286 or editor@leavenworthecho. com.

the end, our outside hitters, Arielle Turner and Audrey Nichol, were siding out and Tori Smith, our Libero, did a great job of keeping the ball in system which allowed us to run our offense. That was huge.” In the quarter finals, Cascade outlasted Bear Creek 25-22, 2521. In the semi-finals, Cascade matched up against a very solid team from the NEA League near Spokane, Newport. The Kodiaks won 25-18, 25-21. It is likely Cascade will meet Newport again in the 1A playoffs. In the championship game, Cascade met up with 1A powerhouse Lynden Christian. In the summer, Cascade beat the Lynx in five games so the team knew another tough match lay ahead. It was a close first game, but Cascade squeaked it out 25-23. In another close game, it was Lynden Christian winning the second game 24-26. In the final deciding game, the gritty Kodiaks held for the 16-14 win. “The experience factor was huge,” she said of the close win over Lynden Christian. “We have been there many times. We have been in this situation many times. We have played Lynden Christian and Kings. All these big games with high level teams have prepared us. Learning how to win in those tight situations. Hopefully we can keep doing that.” McMahon praised the serving of Jordy McGregor and Dakota Rieke, and the strong play of underclassmen, Kelsey Graham and Hannah Cowan. “They played like upper classmen,” she said of Graham and Cowan. “They did some really good things and made some great

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September 15, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record

HOUSES FOR SALE River views in Chelan Falls

HOUSES FOR SALE By owner Brewster Hospital Hill Nice views

Updated two bedroom, one bath, with appliances. Large kitchen and laundry room. Secluded back yard Garage/ storage $126,500 509-679-6201

Two story plus daylight basement, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath, hardwood floor in kitchen, new GE range, Bosch dishwasher, tiled walk-in shower, heated tile floor, large front room with Quadra-fire insert, large family room with wood stove, fenced yard. $250,000. By appointment, 509-733-1694.

HOUSES FOR SALE

LOTS & ACREAGE

3,100 Square Foot Tudor

Renovated 5 Bedrooms and Baths 40 Feet from Lake Two Blocks Downtown Income Potential $580,000 (509)888-4000

MANUFACTURED HOMES Mansfield Double wide manufactured home

Waterfront cottage on Lake Chelan at Stehekin. 100' no bank with floating dock. Beautiful location and view. Perfect condition. $449,000. 1-800-555-7781

some ca$h! Sell your unwanted items with a Classified ad. Call Susan at 548-5286 today.

3 bed, 2 bath, corner lot, metal roof, 2 storage sheds, carport $45,000 509-686-2355

For sale- Cashmere 1/2 Acre Lot on Mission Creek $79,000! Water, sewer and electricity available. Close to schools, pool and town. Call Jan Widener at 509-670-2444 Laura Mounter Real Estate.

FOR RENT

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Beautiful Leavenworth Apartment, 1300 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, large living room, dining, new kitchen, stone fireplace, all remodeled, amazing view. $850/ month and utilities included. Adults only. Please call 679-2080 for appointment. Charming 1900 square foot, 2 bedroom, 2 bath house located off of Chiwawa Loop. Wood stove, hardwood floors, W/D, garage, covered porch, insulated basement good for storage. $1075.00 plus deposit. No smoking. Contact Teri- 509-630-2568. For Rent! Two bedroom, one bath home in beautiful Plain. Gorgeous meadow view! Home is off Shugart Flats Road at 12211 Allen Road. W/D, fireplace. $695/ month. Call Still Properties, 509-888-2400.

LOOKING TO AMBUSH A BUYER? There is a better way! 20 words for only $30

Fully furnished, two bedroom, two bath condo, walking distance from town. Covered parking. Leavenworth. Two adjacent, 60 x 132 foot $900/ month. 360-873-2471 lots, Prospect Street, Leav- or 360-770-4897. enworth. $150, 000 each, or House- completely furnished, $280,000 for both. 548-7526 two bedroom, two baths. All or 360-435-8908. utilities paid. 127 Commercial Street, Leavenworth. AvailWow! Reduced! able October 1, 2010 to May Perfect Lot 1, 2011. $750/ month and Rare Opportunity $200 deposit. 509-264-4452 E. Leavenworth Rd., 0.5 mile or 816-674-8160. from Hwy. 2, across road from City Beach on Wenatchee River, on school bus route, power, cable, perks, City Water. one acre. 509-630-2568, by owner, may carry.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS Leavenworth class A office space, 225 - 635 sq. ft., excellent location, off street parking. 509-630-4203.

FOR RENT Beautiful 1800 sq ft, 2 bedroom, 2 bath unit, with spectacular view of Lake Chelan. Great shape, $995./ mo, includes all utilities. 110 Water St., Chelan. 509-630-4538. Mini Storage, 5´ x 10´. Great value in Peshastin. $40 to $45/ month. Still Properties. 1-509-888-2400.

for 13 weeks! Extra words $1.25 each. Your picture is worth a thousand words by adding a photo for only $5.00 extra Bold Words, Special Fonts and Borders additional charge *Must be paid in advance No Refunds.

Private Party Ads Only No Real Estate Agent Ads Call to place ad: Leavenworth & Cashmere 509-548-5286 Chelan-509-682-2213 Your ad will run in all of our papers and shoppers. 28,000 readers from the Canadian border, Oroville to Stevens Pass.

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HAPPY ADS SAY IT IN THE CLASSIFIEDS *HAPPY BIRTHDAY! *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? *Always a Special Deal* PREPAY ONLY $6.00 for the first 15 words, additional words $1.00 each. Add a picture for only $1.50 extra Ask about Bold words, Special Font s and Borders for a small additional charge. Leavenworth/Cashmere 509-548-5286 Chelan: 509-682-2213

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LOST & FOUND Did you lose a personal item? Your camera, a pet, your purse? Place it in the classifieds one week for FREE. Call Leavenworth 548-5286, or Chelan 682-2213.


The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record • September 15, 2010

B2

Classifieds & Public Notices LOST & FOUND

MOVING SALE

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words. Call Leavenworth, 548-5286 Lake Chelan Mirror 682-2213 or Quad City Herald, 689-2507 before Noon on Mondays.

Large Moving Sale, Thursday September 16, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., 5381 Majeska (off Hughes Rd.) Cashmere. Christmas items to power tools, household, yard item’s and so much more. To much to list. Don’t miss this one!

Lost- Leavenworth, 6/3/10, man's gold ring/ gold intital set/ black stone. Reward offered. (360) 527-2930

AUTOMOBILES

TRUCKS & VANS

2004 Subaru Outback

1987 24 ft. Bayliner cabin cruiser with queen bed. 350 hp Chevy engine. Excellent shape. $10,000. Dave 687-0576.

WANTED BUYING! Silver or Gold Coins - Guns. Call Spence Confidential, by appointment. 509-429-4722

GENERAL

HELP WANTED

MERCHANDISE

Cascade School District #228 is in need of Substitutes in the following areas Teacher, Para Educator, Custodial and Bus Driver. Please pick up an application at the District Office 330 Evans St. Leavenworth WA 98826.

Mill Close Out, 6 inch cedar decking, 89 cents per linear. Hurry!! Sunshine Lumber, 509-664-0600.

35th anniversary model. 80K miles. Excellent condition. $10,900 Email gofish@methownet.com or Call 509-996-4543

FIREWOOD

Gifts from Russia- taking applications for a part-time retail sales person, two days mid week, $10/ hour. Experience necessary. Drop resume to 900 Front St., Suite H, Leavenworth, WA. 509-548-2388. Ask for Josh or Vera. Cascade Medical Center Job Opportunities UILDING • Oscopy Nurse- Part-time • ER RN- Pool UPPLIES • Housekeeper- Full-time Apply at www.cascademedi- Mill Close Out, 6 inch cedar calcenter.org. Volunteer opdecking, 89 cents per linear. portunities available. EOE Hurry!! Sunshine Lumber, 509-664-0600. Join our great team at Der Markt Platz. Permanent UTOMOBILES year-around with set schedule. Apply in person 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at 801 Front 1949 PACKARD Street.

STATEWIDES

B S

MOTORCYCLES

A

Rudloof's Pizza taking applications for part-time work. Must be 21. Food Handlers and Liquor Serving permits required. Drop off applications at 265 Highway 2, Leavenworth. The Best Bite is looking for experienced wait and prep staff. Please call 782-2222 to interview for part and full-time positions. Vacation Internationale Front desk position now available at the Blackbird Lodge. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. If interested please call or pick up application at: 305 8th St. Leavenworth. 509-548-5800.

455 Pontiac motor with 0 miles. $6,000.00 invested. Trade for van or truck 4x4 or best offer. 509-888-4000

TRUCKS & VANS ‘82 GMC Sierra

CAMPERS, TRAILERS & RVS 1983 Sportcoach Motorhome For Sale

1988 Toyota Celica Convertible Mileage Maker (1) owner 4 spd • Insulated Canopy New Tires • Stereo New 2.8 V6 & Shocks

PUZZLE SOLUTION

Very Clean Auto. 2000cc 4CYL $2,995 509-687-0677 509-860-7465 94 Chevy Blazer LT

$2,250 509-687-0677 509-860-7465

all the ammenities excellent condition runs great $8,000 OBO Call Jerri at 682-1562 or 679-5496

BOATS & TRAILERS 2004 Bayliner Ciera, Condition Excellent, Maintenance Record Available. Located at Lake Chelan Marina. 509-682-8287

GARAGE & YARD SALE Saturday 9/18 from 8 a.m. New Organic baby clothes; boys and girls; 0 to 12 months, office tables, bike rack, wall mount tv/ stand , rocket box. Lone Pine Drive, from Leavenworth first right after Prey's Fruit Stand, red house. There is still time to have a great yard or garage sale. Let everyone know what treasures you have and make some money for school, a trip, a worthy cause or some other fun. Place your ad in The Leavenworth Echo and Cashmere Valley Record before Noon on Mondays. 548-5286 or classifieds@leavenworth echo.com.

BOATS & TRAILERS

515 Leather Interior Power Windows, Seats, AC Locks & Cruise New Tires Tow Pack V6 Beautiful Two-Tone Blue $3,600 509-687-0677 509-860-7465

2002 4WD Subaru Legacy Sedan. 100K miles. New brakes, water pump, gasket. One owner. $6000 OBO. Call 509-393-2223.

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a "make good", in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPT -- Adoring couple, Doc-

STATEWIDES tor & Lawyer promise your baby unconditional love, laughter & happiness. Expenses paid. 1-800-933-1975 BUILDINGS STEEL ARCH BUILDINGS Huge Savings on some of our Summer Clearance Buildings Selling for Balanced Owed plus Repos. 16x20, 20x24, 25x30, etc. Supplies Won't Last! 1-866-339-7449 MISC FOR SALE FASTER INTERNET! No access to cable/DSL? Get connected with High Speed Satellite Internet. Call now for a limited time offer from WildBlue -1-877-369-2553 NEW Norwood SAWMILLSLumberMate-Pro handles logs 34" diameter, mills boards 28" wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N EDUCATION-INSTRUCTION ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. Call 866-483-4429; www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,000. Call this newspaper 509-548-5286 or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED WARM, CARING HOST FAMILIES needed for high school exchange students. Volunteer today! Call 1 (866) GO-AFICE or visit afice.org. HELP WANTED TRUCK DRIVERS REEFER DRIVERS NEEDED? Experienced Drivers and Class A Commercial students welcome! Our incredible Freight network offers plenty of miles! 1-800-277-0212 www.primeinc.com DRIVERS -- Company Drivers Up to 40k First Year. New Team Pay! Up to .48c/mile CDL Training Available. Regional Locations. (877) 369-7105. www.centraldrivingjobs.net REAL ESTATE 20 ACRE RANCH Foreclosures only $99/mo. $0 Down, $12,900, great deal! Near Growing El Paso, Texas. Owner Financing,


September 15, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record

B3

Classifieds & Public Notices STATEWIDES

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PUBLIC NOTICES CASCADE MEDICAL CENTER BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING CANCELLATION The Board of Commissioners of Cascade Medical Center will cancel the regularly scheduled Board Meeting on Tuesday, September 14, 2010. This meeting will be a workshop to meet with the representative with the Murdock Foundation for a site visit for applied for grant funding for the future build out of the clinic. Place: Cascade Medical Center, 817 Commercial Street, Leavenworth WA Time: 9:00 a.m. Date: September 14, 2010. Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 15, 2010. #41651

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

File No.: 7037.06303 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Ivan Gregory and Brandy Deeann Gregory, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 232032925225 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 149, WESTERN HEIGHTS, PHASE 5, VOL. 25, P. 60-62, CHELAN COUNTY Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 15, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: Lot 149 Western Heights, Phase V, Chelan County, Washington, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Volume 25 of Plats, Page 60-62. Commonly known as: 1912 Leavenworth Place Wenatchee, WA 98801 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/21/06, recorded on 11/22/06, under Auditor's File No. 2243090, records of Chelan County, Washington, from Ivan Gregory, Brandy Deeann Gregory, husband and wife, as Grantor, to First American Title Ins. Comp, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/ Successive Assignments recorded

under Auditor's File No. 2323074. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/ or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/08/2010 Monthly Payments $26,225.10 Late Charges $932.04 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $27,157.14 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $943.71 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,786.71 Total Amount Due: $28,943.85 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $320,317.77, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 15, 2010.

The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Ivan Gregory 1912 Leavenworth Place Wenatchee, WA 98801 Ivan Gregory 409 Burnham Road Oakview, CA 93022 Brandy Deeann Gregory 1912 Leavenworth Place Wenatchee, WA 98801 Brandy Deeann Gregory 409 Burnham Road Oakview, CA 93022 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/27/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on

04/27/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW

61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/08/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.06303) 1002.154757-FEI Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 15, and October 6, 2010. #41659.

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File No.: 7777.12768 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC ARMT 2006-3 Grantee: Brian L Bement and Lauren E. Bement, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 272213590090 Abbreviated Legal: Unit 102, Grandview on the Lake Phases 2-5, Vol. 48, P. 28-30, Chelan County Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 24, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: Unit 102, Grandview on the Lake Phases 2 through 5, a condominium recorded in Volume 48 of


The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record • September 15, 2010

B4

Classifieds & Public Notices PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

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PUBLIC NOTICES

Condominiums, Pages 28 through 30, according to the declaration thereof, recorded under Chelan County Recording No. 2209823 and any amendments thereto. Commonly known as: 322 West Woodin Avenue #102 Chelan, WA 98816 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/22/06, recorded on 05/31/06, under Auditor's File No. 2228386, records of Chelan County, Washington, from Brian L. Bement and Lauren Bement, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Transnation Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Premier Financial Services, Inc, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC ARMT 2006-3, under an Assignment/ Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2296807. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/ or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/18/2010 Monthly Payments $46,960.20 Late Charges $2,181.78 Lender's Fees & Costs $2,284.62 Total Arrearage $51,426.60 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $1,099.38 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,796.00 Total Amount Due: $53,222.60 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $401,250.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 24, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/13/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinu-

ance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/13/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/13/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS BRIAN L BEMENT 322 West Woodin Avenue #102 CHELAN, WA 98816 BRIAN L BEMENT 638 TIMBERCREEK DR NW ISSAQUAH, WA 98027 LAUREN BEMENT 322 West Woodin Avenue #102 CHELAN, WA 98816 LAUREN BEMENT 638 TIMBERCREEK DR NW ISSAQUAH, WA 98027 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/04/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/05/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the pur-

chaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/18/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7777.12768) 1002.155513-FEI Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on August 25, and September 15, 2010. #41045

sche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for HSI Asset Loan Obligation Trust 2007-WF1, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2323892. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/ or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/21/2010 Monthly Payments $31,648.60 Late Charges $1,327.20 Lender's Fees & Costs $245.00 Total Arrearage $33,220.80 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $1,303.69 Statutory Mailings $47.80 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $2,042.99 Total Amount Due: $35,263.79 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $505,749.82, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 24, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/13/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/13/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/13/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI.

A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #1 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #2 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #3 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #4 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #1 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #2 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #3 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #4 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 WILLIAM K RICHMOND 6125 132ND AVENUE NORTHEAST KIRKLAND, WA 98033 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of WILLIAM K RICHMOND 6125 132ND AVENUE NORTHEAST KIRKLAND, WA 98033 WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET WENATCHEE, WA 98801 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of WILLIAM K RICHMOND 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET WENATCHEE, WA 98801 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/10/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE

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File No.: 7023.73487 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for HSI Asset Loan Obligation Trust 2007-WF1 Grantee: William K. Richmond, as his sole and separate property Tax Parcel ID No.: 232033783221 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 8, Mckittrick SP No. 2005-065, Book SP-20, P. 23 & 24, Chelan County Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 24, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: Lot 8 as delineated on McKittrick Short Plat No. 2005-065, Chelan County, Washington, recorded November 17, 2005 in Book SP-20 of Short Plats, Page 23 and 24. Situate in the County of Chelan, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1410 MCKITTRICK STREET UNIT #1, 2, 3 & 4 WENATCHEE, WA 98801 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/15/06, recorded on 09/21/06, under Auditor's File No. 2238036 and Loan Modification on: 10/9/2009 under Auditor's File No.: 2312762, records of Chelan County, Washington, from William K. Richmond, a married man as his sole and separate estate, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. to Deut-

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September 15, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record

B5

Classifieds & Public Notices PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.73487) 1002.156285-FEI Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on August 25, and September 15, 2010. #41047.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF LEAVENWORTH HEARING EXAMINER September 29, 2010 at 2:00 P.M.

MENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE CENTERLINE OF PEARL STREET AND THE SOUTH LINE OF BURRELL'S FIRST ADDITION; THENCE RUN EAST ON THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SUBDIVISION, A DISTANCE OF 170 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH AND PARALLEL TO THE CENTERLINE OF PEARL STREET, A DISTANCE OF 15 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH PARALLEL TO THE CENTERLINE OF PEARL STREET A DISTANCE OF 105.94 FEET; THENCE RUN EAST PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SUBDIVISION, A DISTANCE OF 60 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH PARALLEL TO THE CENTERLINE OF PEARL STREET, A DISTANCE OF 105.94 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SUBDIVISION, A DISTANCE OF 60 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING, EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO THE CITY OF WENATCHEE BY DEED RECORDED OCTOBER 13, 1973, UNDER AUDITOR'S NO. 704198. Commonly known as: 1118 A-B Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/14/06, recorded on 07/24/06, under Auditor's File No. 2232931, records of Chelan County, Washington, from Walter Ray Mace, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/13/2010 Monthly Payments $6,153.10 Late Charges $246.12 Lender's Fees & Costs $153.85 Total Arrearage $6,553.07 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $642.11 Statutory Mailings $10.44 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,344.05 Total Amount Due: $7,897.12 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $169,748.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 15, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of

the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Walter Ray Mace 1118 A-B Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of Walter Ray Mace 1118 A-B Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/10/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27203) 1002.159703-FEI Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 15, and October 6, 2010. #41661.

Street a distance of 120.94 feet, more or less, to the South line of Lot 2, Block 16, the True point of beginning; thence run North parallel to said centerline 100 feet, more or less, to the centerline of vacated Columbia Avenue in said addition; thence run East on said Centerline a distance of 110 feet; thence Run South Parallel to the centerline of Pearl Street a distance of 100 feet, more or less, to the South line of Lot 1, Block 15; thence Run West parallel to the centerline of vacated Columbia Avenue A distance of 110 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 1118 G-H Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/14/06, recorded on 07/24/06, under Auditor's File No. 2232930, records of Chelan County, Washington, from Walter Ray Mace, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/ or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/13/2010 Monthly Payments $5,873.40 Late Charges $234.92 Lender's Fees & Costs $153.85 Total Arrearage $6,262.17 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $632.39 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,343.89 Total Amount Due: $7,606.06 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $162,033.01, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 15, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Walter Ray Mace 1118 G-H Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 Walter Ray Mace 3219 34th Avenue West Seattle, WA 98199 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of Walter Ray Mace 1118 G-H Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic

Partner 3219 34th Avenue West Seattle, WA 98199 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/10/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27219) 1002.159754-FEI Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 15, and October 6, 2010. #41664.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF LEAVENWORTH HEARING EXAMINER September 29, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Leavenworth Hearing Examiner will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday September 29, 2010 beginning at 2:00 P.M. In the Leavenworth City Hall Council Chambers at 700 Highway 2, Leavenworth, Washington, to consider the following: Variance: The purpose of the hearing is to review and consider approval for Variance Application #VAR 2010-02. The applicant is seeking a variance (pursuant to LMC 18.56) from minimum lot width standards required by Leavenworth Municipal Code (LMC) Chapter 18.20 in order to accommodate division of the existing lot into three lots with frontage widths of 56.7-feet each. This is an application for a Variance for the purpose of short subdivision of the existing approximately 19550 square-foot lot. The property is located at 915/925 Pine Street, Leavenworth, Washington also known as Lot 7A of Leavenworth Plat Alteration #PA 1996-01, Chelan County Plat No. 3445. The Chelan County Assessors Tax Parcel Number is 241701910078. The Hearing Examiner will take action at the public hearing to: close the public hearing; establish a date and time that the public record closes; and/ or continue the public hearing to another date, time, and place. The Hearing Examiner will take action ten working days after the public record closes to approve, approve with revisions/ conditions, or deny the proposal. Complete information, copies of the proposals and legal descriptions may be reviewed during normal business hours at Leavenworth City Hall, located at 700 Highway 2, Leavenworth, Washington. For further information please call (509) 548-5275. The public is invited to attend the public hearing and comment on all pertinent matters. Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 15, 2010. #41769

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Leavenworth Hearing Examiner will conduct public hearings on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 beginning at 2:00 P.M. in the Leavenworth City Hall Council Chambers at 700 Highway 2, Leavenworth, Washington, to consider the following: Shoreline Substantial Development Permit #2010-01: The applicant proposes the construction of an 825 square-foot deck and 216 square-foot laundry room addition to the existing 17-unit Blackbird Lodge hotel. The project is in conjunction with surfacing and associated improvements for additional parking and new vehicular access to the property. Due to the proximity to the Wenatchee River and value of the construction / improvements, a Shoreline Substantial Development permit is required for the proposed development, as is other associated construction permitting. Shoreline Substantial Development Permit #2010-02: The applicant proposes the construction of a three-level, 18-unit hotel building and associated improvements as the second phase of the “Posthotel and Spa” project. This project phase is also known as the “Old Posthotel.” The approximate total square footage of the project is 15,000 square-feet, with an approximately 5,000 square-foot footprint located at 309 8th Street, Leavenworth. The project also involves surfacing and associated improvements for addition of a plaza area adjacent to Commercial Street for the purpose of a public viewing area to Waterfront Park. Due to the proximity to the Wenatchee River and value of the construction / improvements, a Shoreline Substantial Development permit is required for the proposed development, as is other associated construction permitting. The Hearing Examiner will take action at the public hearings to: close the public hearings; establish a date and time that the public records close; and/ or continue the public hearings to another date, time, and place. The Hearing Examiner will take action ten working days after the public record closes to approve, approve with revisions/ conditions, or deny the proposals. Complete information, copies of the proposals, and legal descriptions may be reviewed during normal business hours at Leavenworth City Hall, located at 700 Highway 2, Leavenworth, Washington. For further information please call (509) 548-5275. The public is invited to attend the public hearings and comment on all pertinent matters. Please note that the hearing date is subject to change. Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 15, 2010. #41771 File No.: 7763.27203 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Walter Ray Mace, as his sole and separate property Tax Parcel ID No.: 232033493300 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn Block 15, Burrell's First Add. To Wenatchee, Vol. 1, P.4, Chelan County Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 15, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: THAT PORTION OF BLOCK 15 IN BURRELL'S FIRST ADDITION TO WENATCHEE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 4, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COM-

File No.: 7763.27219 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Walter Ray Mace, as his sole and separate property Tax Parcel ID No.: 232033493275 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn Blocks 15 & 16, Burrell's First Add. To Wenatchee, Vol. 1, P. 4, Chelan County Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 15, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: That portion of Blocks 15 and 16, Together with vacated street and alley in Burrell's First Addition to Wenatchee, According to the plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, page 4, described as follows: Beginning at the Intersection of the centerline of Pearl Street and the South line of Burrell's First Addition; thence Run East on the South line of said subdivision a distance of 120 feet; thence Run North parallel to the center line of Pearl

File No.: 7763.27220 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Walter Ray Mace, as his sole and separate property Tax Parcel ID No.: 232033493280 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn Block 14, Burrell's First Add. To Wenatchee, Vol. 1, P. 4, Chelan County Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 15, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Chelan County Courthouse, 401 Washington Street in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Chelan, State of Washington: That portion of Block 14 and of vacated streets adjacent thereto in Burrell's First Addition to Wenatchee, according to the plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, page 4, described as follows: Commence at the Intersection of the center line of Pearl Street in said addition, with the South line of said addition and run thence East along said South line for 270 feet; thence Run North, parallel with the centerline of said Pearl Street, for 115 feet to the true point of beginning; thence continue on the same course for 105 feet, more or less, to the centerline of vacated Columbia Avenue in said addition; thence Run East on said centerline for 100 feet, more or less, to a point 20 feet West of the North and South centerline of Block 14


The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record • September 15, 2010

B6

Classifieds & Public Notices PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

aforesaid, as extended Northerly; thence Run South, parallel with said Centerline of Block 14 for 105 feet; more or less, to a point 115 feet North of the South line of said addition; thence Run West, parallel with said South line, for 100 feet, more or less, to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 1118 C-D Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/14/06, recorded on 07/24/06, under Auditor's File No. 2232929, records of Chelan County, Washington, from Walter Ray Mace, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/ or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/13/2010 Monthly Payments $5,873.40 Late Charges $234.92 Lender's Fees & Costs $153.85 Total Arrearage $6,262.17 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $632.39 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $140.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,413.89 Total Amount Due: $7,676.06 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $161,970.09, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 15, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Walter Ray Mace 1118 C-D Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 Walter Ray Mace 3219 34th Avenue West Seattle, WA 98199 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Walter Ray Mace 1118 C-D Springwater Avenue Wenatchee, WA 98801 Unknown Spouse and/ or Domestic Partner of Walter Ray Mace 3219 34th Avenue West Seattle, WA 98199 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/11/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/11/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted

on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27220) 1002.159839-FEI Published in The Leavenworth Echo/Cashmere Valley Record on September 15, and October 6, 2010. #41666. SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CHELAN COUNTY In re the Estate of Daniel Clair Lenarth, Deceased. NO. 10-4-00117-6 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed and has qualified as the personal representative of this estate. Persons having claims against the deceased must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, serve their claims on the personal representative, or the attorney of record, at the addresses stated below, and file an executed copy of the claim with the clerk of this court within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or within four months after the date of filing of the copy of this notice with the clerk of the court, whichever is later or, except under those provisions included in RCW 11.40.011 or RCW 11.40.013, the claim will be forever barred. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with clerk of the court: August 31, 2010. Personal Representative: Deborah Shultz 1515 E. Mariposa Avenue El Segundo, CA 90245 Attorney for Estate and Resident Agent: Kyle D. Flick Attorney at Law 222 South Mission Wenatchee, Washington 98801 (509) 662-3333 DATED this 31st day of August, 2010. Law Office Of Kyle D. Flick, P.S. By s/s Kyle D. Flick, WSBA #14963 Attorney for Estate and Resident Agent. Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 8, 15, and 22, 2010. #41463.

PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE This Notice Is an Atempt To Collect A Debt, And Any Information Obtained Will Be Used For That Purpose. TO: Robbin Freeman Jennifer Freeman

Occupants First Franklin, a Division of National City Bank Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.

I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Karen L. Gibbon, P.S., will on October 15, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at the main entrance of the Chelan County Courthouse, 350 Oronda Street, in the City of Wenatchee, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Chelan, State of Washington, to wit: LOT 11, DOGWOOD LANE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 28, PAGES 92 AND 93, CHELAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. APN #222009531110 (Commonly known as 1403 Dogwood Lane, Wenatchee, WA 98801), which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust, dated September 27, 2006, recorded September 29, 2006, under Auditor's File No. 2238768 records of Chelan County, Washington, from Robbin L. Freeman and Jennifer D. Freeman, Husband and Wife, as Grantors, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which has been assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-FF16, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-FF16, under Chelan County Auditor's File No. 2325363. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts, which are now in arrears: Monthly payments: 1 monthly payment(s) at $2,383.58, (April 1, 2009):

$2,383.58

6 monthly payment(s) at $2,159.63, (May 1, 2009 - October 1, 2009): 9 monthly payment(s) at $2,006.91, (November 1, 2009 – July 1, 2010):

$12,957.78 $18,062.19

Late charges: 1 late charge at $103.83 Accrued late charges: Less suspense:

Friday, September 3 Caller from Mountain Lane Road reported that there were two giant Australian dogs that run at large. They have caused $1,000 damage to her vehicle over the previous two years. That morning they chased the vehicle to her house. They do not appear aggressive to people, just vehicles. Leavenworth City Hall wanted to talk to a deputy about a homeless man. Caller’s black 2007 Toyota Camry was hit on the front at 633 Front St. The party at fault left a note with a name and phone number. Caller reported misplacing a Sony digital camera in a black Sony camera bag at a beer garden on Front Street two days before. Caller reported two males in a red Ford Ranger with fishing poles and a cooler at Dryden Beach. Caller told them the river was closed to fishing and he would call the “poaching line” if they didn’t put their poles away.

$34,680.49

Default other than failure to make monthly payments: None

IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $287,952.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from March 1, 2009 and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 15, 2010. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by October 4, 2010 (11 days before the sale) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before October 4, 2010 (11 days before the sale) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/ are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after October 4, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: Robbin Freeman Jennifer Freeman

Both At: 1403 Dogwood Lane, Wenatchee, WA 98801 And At: PO Box 3905, Wenatchee, WA 98007

by both first class and certified mail on June 11, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on June 11, 2010, with said written Notice of Default and/ or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale.

The sheriff’s report is compiled from public records as provided by the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office. The publisher cannot certify the complete accuracy of the information provided.

Leavenworth

$103.83 $1,173.11 $0.00

TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS AND LATE CHARGES:

Sheriff Caller backed in to another vehicle at Safeway and the people who own the vehicle were claiming more damage than there was. Caller reported a suspicious vehicle, an unoccupied white Honda 4 door, at 708 U.S. Hwy. 2. Caller didn’t know how long it had been there, but the driver’s door was open and a fresh-looking pizza box was in the back seat. Caller reported excessive noise coming from the beer garden at Der Hinterhof. Another noise complaint at the Der Hinterhof. Disturbance reported on Front Street in which a male was lying in the street bleeding. He then walked eastbound. He seemed to have difficulty walking and was harassing people.

PUBLIC NOTICES

on Lake Street. Welfare check requested on Sumac Lane. Noise complaint on Chiwawa Loop Road.

Sunday, September 5 Weapons violation reported on Chiwawa Loop Road in which caller was outside her residence and heard seven gun shots, possibly from across the river. She heard about 50 shots. Report of an injured deer in the area of Kinnikinick Drive. Deer will be dispatched. Public assist requested on School Street. Caller locked her 1-yearold child in a running vehicle. Child was secured in a car seat and the air conditioning was on, so no windows were open. Caller from Conard Road reported Saturday, September 4 a weapons violation. People were Agency assist request on U.S. Hwy. shooting high powered rifles with 2 at Mile 77 in the westbound no target. Caller was hiking in the lane. area and had to turn around. He Suspicious circumstances reported attempted to yell at the subjects on East Leavenworth Road. to say he was there, but they Extra patrol requested on North could not hear him. He said it Road. sounded like several people. Traffic offense at U.S. Hwy. 2 and Traffic stop and warrant arrest on Ninth Street. Chiwawa River Road at Mile 3. Noise complaint on Ninth Street at Caller requested assistance on the beer garden. River Road. A person who was Suspicious circumstances reported See SHERIFF’S REPORT on Page B8

VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall prove a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 12, 2010. Karen L. Gibbon, P.S., Successor Trustee By: s/s KAREN L. GIBBON, President Law Offices Of Karen L. Gibbon, P.S. 3409 McDougall Avenue, Suite 202 Everett, WA 98201 (425) 212-3277 Published in The Leavenworth Echo/ Cashmere Valley Record on September 15, and October 6, 2010. #41470.


September 15, 2010 • The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record

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Life & Health

Along the Wenatchee Along the Wenatchee Pat Morris The first years after Chelan County’s birth in 1899 were almost without road funds. Although Leavenworth had produced the lion’s share of tax income for Okanogan County, and the towns south of the Wenatchee produced a good income for Kittitas County, state legislators had stipulated the new county assume large amounts of debt accrued during the depression years just behind them. It was a tremendous load for a new entity. So, when residents asked for a new road, county officials told them the engineer would survey it for them, but there were no funds

for construction or upkeep. The county’s streams and canyons, steep mountainsides and rock outcroppings made road construction expensive. Even with the acknowledgement that every settler ought to have a connection to a farm-to-market road, it was not always possible at first to bring it about. Accustomed as they were to hard work and helping themselves, the Chelan County residents undertook the project without the county’s help. Take, for instance, the settlers above Lake Wenatchee. As land was homesteaded along White River, a 7-mile road to the fork of that stream was desirable. A donation sheet circulated on which each landowner signed his name and the number of days’ work he was willing to contribute. Ten days was the minimum by most. D.W. Fowler, who operated a sawmill, offered lumber for bridges and culverts. The names

Zucchini, zucchini Someone said, “If you don’t have any zucchini, you either have no friends or you do not garden.” ooking This time of year gardens are with overflowing with this versatile vegetable, which botanically is a eri fruit. Zucchini probably originated in North America, and found Teri Miller its way to Italy by adventurers of the New World. Milan is believed to be the area where zucchini was first cultivated in Europe. This easy to grow plant later became popular throughout Europe and the Middle East, particularly Turkey and Egypt. In the United Kingdom, a survey taken last year, showed the Coquette (zucchini) as the 10th most popular vegetable. In France, “ratatouille” which is made with zucchini and eggplant is considered a national dish. In Rome, the blossom is deep fried into a dish called “Fiori de Zucca” and is considered a delicacy. Our neighbors in Mexico also batter and deep fry the blossoms. Here at home we make bread, cakes, relishes and just about anything we can with this prolific vegetable. So this week I am sharing a recipe for a very special zucchini bread, I think you will enjoy.

C

T

Pineapple Zucchini Bread 3 eggs 2 cups finely shredded zucchini 1 cup vegetable oil 1 can (8oz) crushed pineapple, drained 2 teaspoons vanilla 3 cups all-purpose flour 2 cups sugar 2 teaspoons baking soda 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon salt 3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1 cup chopped nuts 1 cup dried raisins or currants, optional In a bowl, combine the eggs, zucchini, oil, pineapple and vanilla. Combine the dry ingredients; stir into egg mixture just until moistened. Fold in nuts and raisins if desired. Pour into two greased loaf pans. Bake at 350 degrees 50-60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted comes clean. Remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool. Cool at least 10 minutes before removing from pans. Makes 2 loaves.

“Minutes after you plant a single seed, hundreds of zucchini will barge out of the ground and sprawl around the garden, menancing the other vegetables.” —Dave Barry, (1947- ), Pulitzer Prize winning journalist.

Photo submitted by Pat Morris

Early logging operations increased the need for good roads. Auto trucks were of great help transporting supplies during World War I. on the list included Logan, Duncan, Nelson, Sears, Drum, Batchelor, Henry and Siverly. M u c h l a t e r, s e t t l e r s o n Wenatchee Park land requested a road that did not go over the summit of Beaver Creek Hill. The county engineer laid out a road through a side canyon. The county was to blow the rock outcroppings, if the residents could do the rest. These were one-lane, horse-and-

buggy roads, and so, far different from today’s. When “Dude” Brown was elected commissioner in the 1920s, he stated, “I never knew there were so many such roads in it.” It was scarcely easier to obtain a bridge in the early years. Leavenworth merchants, in need of a river crossing to bring Blewett miners to town to shop, constructed their own in 1898. The bridge

Christina’s Culinary Adventures By Christina Forchemer-Zucktriegel We had a big family dinner at our house the other night and I invited my nephew, Max, to join us. I had managed to produce a homemade nectarine and raspberry pie earlier in the day and I served it after dinner with fresh whipped cream. It seems that all of the adult cooks in our clan have a specialty and when it comes to desserts, mine is pie, especially the fruit variety. Since there were so many of us, Max decided to bring extra dessert, just in case there wasn’t enough. After short deliberation he bought three huge slices from the Big Y Cafe in Peshastin. He had stopped there for breakfast with friends and loved it. He mentioned that he had met the owners, Jim and Betty Bristow, and found them very engaging and hospitable. It’s hard to compete with Helen Rayfield’s many years of superb hospitality at the Big Y but the Bristow’s have pulled it off, serving up dependable and good-quality dinerstyle fare with hometown friendliness which our locals expect. Max noticed the above-counter cool case loaded with fresh homemade pies and couldn’t resist. He bought a slice of blueberrycream cheese, fresh strawberry and peaches and cream. That evening, after dinner, we passed around the Big Y pie slices first so everybody could try a bite. The fresh strawberry was Max’s favorite and the blueberry-cream cheese was Stefan’s, hands down. Some of us couldn’t make up our mind which one was the best. They were all so delicious, fresh and flavorful. I have to say the peaches and cream was by far my favorite. The crumbly crust, tapioca- thickened layers of sweet peaches and thick, creamy layer of sour cream topping was an incredible combination! The fresh fruit is perfectly foiled by a wonderful blanket of rich creamy goodness. I am sorry, but I can’t say enough about the wonderful Big Y’s pies. One can often be easily disappointed by restaurant pies, but at the Big Y Cafe this is clearly not the case. I enjoy conversing and catching up with other folks in the restaurant business. It’s fun to exchange stories and share opinions, new ideas, etc.. There definitely is never a dull moment in this field and the scene is always new and exciting. Jim Bristow and I caught up while watching our youngest sons’ football jamboree on Saturday and he informed me the Big Y Cafe has extended their hours on Friday nights after the home football games. What a great idea! If the spectators didn’t get enough hot dogs and snacks while watching the game they can get a wonderful hot meal afterwards just down the road. The football players have a great local hangout for fifth quarter after the home games too. Next time you’ve got a craving for a juicy burger, homemade soup, delicious chicken......followed by world-class pie (am I making you hungry yet?) or a hearty breakfast made to order, stop by the Big Y Cafe in Peshastin. It’s only a five minute ride from downtown Leavenworth and yes, they have ample parking. Christina Forchemer-Zucktriegel is a passionate “foodie” with over 25 years of experience in the culinary arts. d Vote

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consisted of cribbing in which rocks were dumped to support the structure that was made of timbers laid across them. Peshastin’s first bridge was of this sort also. Timber and rocks were available. The only other ingredient necessary was “sweat.” Often these structures were short-lived, thanks to the snowmelt water roaring down in spring. Leavenworth’s bridge washed out in 1906, as did others downriver. By then, steel bridges were in place, which could be moved to other places when a concrete bridge was built. For a good many years, a steel bridge did yeoman’s service over Chumstick Creek on North Road. L e ave nwo r t h o n c e h a d a steel bridge leading to the East Leavenworth Road farms. It was no longer needed when South Road was built to Peshastin, connecting to the new road at Leavenworth built on the abandoned railroad right-of-way, which is now part of Highway 2. The concrete bridge erected then is still in use, though widened. Once the debt owed by the county was paid off, the needs of

the growing population for bridges were attended to more readily. By 1914, the Wenatchee River had a total of 11 bridges, connecting farms and orchards to warehouses and railroads. For many years, there was no route to Snoqualmie, the sole Cascade crossing. When a major exposition encouraged tourists to come West by auto, they crossed the Columbia at Wenatchee and then were directed to the Blewett route. Traffic, such as we experience, was unknown. And it was not an all-weather route, but that became an issue as sawmills put in box-making factories to keep ahead of the fall demand for fruit boxes. When the Wright Mill ordered lumber and hauled it on auto-trucks to their mill, the first commercial activity began over Blewett Pass. Roads, once the expense of county taxpayers, were later aided by state funds and finally federal funds with the forestry paying for highways across their lands as they were a necessity during fire season. With year-round maintenance, the tourist picture was greatly changed.

Age should be small part of health decisions By Dr. David Lipschitz ©2010 Creators Syndicate Inc. At 67, I have never felt better. I work as hard as ever with a new and exciting job, and life continues to evolve. Two years past the “retirement age,” I feel nowhere near my prime. Unfortunately, the arbitrary cutoff age that defines 65 as elderly causes many of us problems. Although it is illegal to discriminate on the basis of age, it is more difficult for an older person to find employment, and the 65th birthday is often used as an arbitrary line indicating a person is too old to undertake certain activities or be eligible for certain medical procedures. The reality of age bias in medicine can have devastating consequences for healthy but older patients. Recently, I met an outstanding new patient. Truly fit, happy and beautiful, she was my contemporary -- a 1943 baby. Unfortunately, this patient had developed a life-threatening illness called interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, a disease in which the lung converts to scar tissue. The condition is untreatable, leads to increasing shortness of breath and eventual dependency on oxygen to breathe. She had been evaluated at one of the finest health care centers in America and was told that her treatment options were limited. Although a lung transplant could improve and even save her life, she was ineligible for the operation because she was over the age of 65. This is the worst form of age bias, which is defined as having a negative stereotype or discriminating against someone on the basis of age. Medically, age should never be the sole factor when deciding whether a patient should be considered for an aggressive procedure. More important than chronological age, the patient’s biological age and his or her ability to respond to a major stress should be the

major determinate in a physician’s assessment. Someone who has no medical problems, is physically fit and has normal cerebrovascular, cardiac, pulmonary, renal and liver function can handle virtually any major procedure. Just recently, one of my favorite patients, an active man well into his 90s, was in a car wreck. Despite having a broken neck and some neurological problems, he handled surgery with flying colors and was up and walking just a few days later. His rate of recovery has been slower than it would have been were he in his 50s, but recovery has been well within grasp. This beautiful woman with lung problems has a highly productive life expectancy of 20 years or longer. She should be an ideal candidate for surgery, but performing the procedure on another person with the same condition who is overweight, has diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and chronic renal disease would probably not be appropriate. In other words, age is not important; the presence of other illnesses, known as comorbid conditions, are most relevant. More than some fad catch phrase, 60 truly is the new 40! It is time to change our view about aging. Baby boomers will soon reach age 65 and must be treated equally to those decades younger. But we must also ask, why retire, why no longer learn, why no longer contribute and why not run for public office? In the field of medicine, age is merely one factor in a long list of health considerations. Even those in their 80s and beyond must be treated aggressively if warranted and appropriate. Medicine is an art and a science -- in some cases, the reasons to treat the “elderly” with certain procedures may change. Remember, age is only a number. Your health depends not on how many years you lived, but instead how well you lived them.

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advertise your health care service or specialty here! Call Carol at 548-5286 or Lindsay at 860-7301


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Sheriff

The Leavenworth Echo & Cashmere Valley Record • September 15, 2010

The sheriff’s report is compiled from public records as provided by the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office. The publisher cannot certify the complete accuracy of the information provided.

Continued from Page B6

respondent in a court order with caller was parked up the hill behind caller’s residence. Caller was very scared of him. Tannenbaum Shop reported that some customers just brought in a lost 8-year-old female with blonde hair. Safeway reported a male at the fuel station, walking towards the store, was acting strange. He was going through things at the station, and possibly drunk. Juvenile problem reported on West Street near Cherry Avenue. Police presence requested. Monday, September 6 Suspicious circumstances reported on Lynn Street. Non injury accident reported in the parking lot of BJ’s in Dryden. Assist agency call for a diabetic 45-year-old male on Motel Road. Traffic offense, possible DUI, reported on River Bend Drive. Female driver parked and went into Safeway. Caller reported a theft while parked the night before at Sleeping Lady Resort. A yellow Trek mountain bike was stolen off the back of the car. Caller reported that she believes her 16-year-old daughter, an at-risk youth and reported runaway, was at a location with a family. Caller reported a hazard in which a male was running into traffic near Dan’s Food Market, and acting like he was “on something.” Caller reported a hazard on U.S. Hwy. 2 at Mile 95 near the bridge in Tumwater where light was flashing from ditches into drivers’ eyes. Report of a white Chevrolet driving on Whitman Street throwing fireworks out of the truck. Three people in the cab, and two or three in the bed of the truck. Last seen in the area of Osborn Elementary. Tuesday, September 7 Caller reported receiving a harassing phone call from “C A P Contractor” on caller ID. Sleeping Lady Mountain Resort reported they fired an employee who was verbally abusive and threatened to “get” the chef (a co-worker). They were concerned because the fired employee has a history of violence. Caller reported their daughter had numerous order violations during the past week. Caller requested contact at the Leavenworth City Hall. She had been told by her uncle that the mother’s residence on Kinnikinick Drive had been burglarized twice. Fairbridge Inn and Suites reported finding a full gun clip in a room.

on U.S. Hwy. 2 at Mile 94 and advise if DOT needs to be called. Advised to use caution. A patrol vehicle had already struck one. Deputy sheriff requested case number for damage to his patrol vehicle by rocks. Caller reported a juvenile problem on Larch Drive where the 7 year old daughter is freaking out, flipped a table over, has ADHD, and is refusing to eat. BJ’s in Dryden reported two checks were returned from the bank as forged or altered. Civil call in which husband called from Main Street and said his wife stole the modem from the computer. They were getting a divorce, but he thought things were going well. The modem was in his name and he got billed for it. Animal problem reported on Lynn Street. A dog had been barking since 10 a.m. It was an ongoing problem. Injury bicycle accident on Front and 10th streets. Leavenworth Library reported that a homeless man was in the back room near the fireplace and asleep in a chair. They wanted to close and wanted a deputy to move him along. Thursday, September 9 Caller reported a male near the school on School Street who threatened the caller and ran after them. He threatened to beat her son. Caller said he threatened her and her children a few days before, but she did not report it. Theft reported on Chumstick Hwy. Caller caught someone stealing their mail. Caller’s girlfriend was “pursuing” the suspect in her car. Fraud or forgery reported from Cashmere Valley Bank. Littering reported on Chumstick Hwy. At least two truck loads of garbage was dumped. Cascade Ambulance Service reported that about eight motorcycles were stopped on a blind corner. Many of the riders were on cell phones and appeared to have vehicle problems. Caller nearly hit several while passing on the blind corner. Weapons violation reported on Fish Hatchery Road. It sounded like gunshots.

Cashmere

Friday, September 3 Caller reported finding two credit cards the day before at the bridge over Mission Creek Road Caller reported than an unknown person was using their Social Security card. Two or three months before, she began receiving phone calls from credit card companies about her account. Caller said she has no credit cards. Caller from Tigner Road reported that the tire just “blew off” of his vehicle. There were no injuries and it wan’t blocking traffic. Caller reported a barking dog problem on Binder Road. The dog was tied to the bumper of a pickup. It was an ongoing problem. Recovery Innovations reported a Wednesday, September 8 known person, with known menWashington State Patrol requested tal health problems, was in an orthat deputies check on rocks chard on Harnden Road howling.

refusing to show the caller any He has a history of such behavior. paperwork. They requested a welfare check Caller requested a welfare check on and return phone call. her 51-year-old son on Mission Traffic offense at U.S. Hwy. 2 and Creek Road. He lives alone and Hay Canyon Road. was not answering door. The car Saturday, September 4 was there, but mail had not been Non injury accident reported 305 picked up since Aug. 25. It had Sunset Hwy. been over a week since caller Traffic offense reported at Stine Hill last spoke to him. He has health and Pine Flats roads. problems, including drinking. Animal problem reported on Vine Welfare check call on Stine Hill Street. Road. Calling for someone who Sunday, September 5 was mad at him. Blue Star Growers Inc. reported that Wednesday, September 8 the windows on the north side of Hazard reported on Olalla Canyon the building were broken out. Road. A large rock, 2 or 3 feet DUI/traffic offense reported at around, was in the roadway. Mojo’s. Caller buys and sells antiques at DUI reported at Vale Elementary the Cashmere Antique Mall. He School and an arrest made. reported that two days before Juvenile problem reported from Sullivan Road. Caller said her 15-year-old daughter was missing from her room. Caller from Sand Creek Road reported that the day before a female in a black Honda told him his missing horse was dead up in the mountains. Caller went and looked, and couldn’t find it. Caller thought the female stole his horse. Non injury accident on Cotlets Road. ishin Epledalen Retirement reported a agician missing resident who had been gone about an hour. Someone saw her walking westbound on Dave Pioneer. Graybill Caller reported two females in their 30s standing next to a vehicle at U.S. Hwy. 2 and Aplets Way were Friday, Sept. 10 yelling for help. Martin’s Market Place reported a I attended an all-staff meeting female in a motor home who with the folks at the National was refusing to leave and she Fish Hatchery in Leavenworth, was caught trying to steal a case where the final details of The of water. Wenatchee River Salmon FestiMonday, September 6 val were being discussed. I have Possible DUI reported westbound been closer than usual to what on U.S. Hwy. 2 at Monitor, ap- takes place at Salmon Fest and proaching the Red Apple. am amazed at what the hatchery Merchant patrol reported graffiti to staff; their partners and volunthe PUD substation trailer on the teers are able to provide for the corner of Riverfront Drive and schools and the public. Over East Parkhill. 10,000 people are expected to visit Caller reported a hit and run to his van overnight on Mission Creek the hatchery grounds on Sept. 18 and 19 and what they can see and Road. Domestic disturbance reported on do while they are there is what River Street. A female could be keeps them coming back year heard screaming. A male was after year, just like me. There are on the line trying to report some- so many activities for the kids I thing, but there was a language just can’t list them all here, and barrier. there is a much expanded outCaller from Dorn Street reported door recreation area that adds to the theft of vegetables over the the list of things to do; like kayakprevious couple of weeks. ing, pellet gun shooting, archery, Tuesday, September 7 snowshoeing, fly casting and tyCaller reported getting fuel earlier in ing and more. Probably the most the day. He had pre-paid for his amazing thing about Salmon Fest fuel, went outside and a female is that it is free. That’s right, there was filling up her vehicle on the is no charge to enter the festival pump he paid for. Caller confront- grounds and no charge for the aced the store clerk about it and she tivities and stage presentations. said she would resolve it. You can learn more about what is Cashmere Middle School reported a seventh grader, who lives on Ion planned for this 20th Anniversary Creek Road, was running from of Salmon Fest by logging onto salmonfest.org. the principal. Anonymous caller reported that Monday, Sept. 13 someone was breaking into the The opening day of steelhome next door on River Street. head season was not terribly Civil complaint in which caller on Hagman Road reported a tow company was there attempting to take a truck. The driver was

who offered her money. Deputy a customer switched price tags met with the girl at the fair office on the caller’s items to pay a and another deputy was looking lesser prices. Caller has reported for the suspect. the problem to the antique mall manager who was refusing to Unknown caller from Crunch Pak reported there was person trying assist the caller with suspect to fight with caller in the parking information. lot. City worker found drug paraphernalia which was at Cashmere Caller reported that on Stine Hill Road his mother was threatening City Hall. to kill herself. She texted the caller Two vehicle, non injury accident at ten minutes before. There had Larson Street and Sunset Hwy. been previous attempts. Report of a possible DUI in the area Caller from Olalla Canyon Road of Cashmere. reported a prowler. A person Thursday, September 9 was seen looking into caller’s Unknown caller reported receiving mailbox. The person jumped in threatening messages on his cell to a sporty looking Subaru car phone. type vehicle, possibly occupied Lewd conduct reported at the by two people. Chelan County Fair. A young fe- Traffic offense reported on River male was approached by a male Street.

Outdoors

INSIDE INFORMATION ON THE OUTDOORS F M

exciting in the Wenatchee area. Heavy rain greeted anglers on the Wenatchee River, and not only that the river was very muddy from Cashmere on down to the mouth. I heard that only 30 anglers were checked on the Wenatchee and they had taken on five wild fish and one hatchery steelhead. Much better weather is in the forecast now, and I will be interested learning how anglers did over the weekend. One thing is for sure; the success rate will pick up as more fish enter the Wenatchee and other rivers on the upper Columbia. If you want to have the best chance at success, you’ll want to attend the seminar at Town Ford on Wednesday, Sept. 22, beginning at 6 p.m. Shane Magnuson will be there talking about his proven bobber and jig techniques, and we are lucky to get another great speaker at the seminar. Brian Nielson of BJs Guide Service. He has been featured on Fishing the West, Columbia Country and American Fisherman. He has also been featured in many newspaper and magazine articles and has been on the Pro Staff with Hyde Drift Boat for eight years. Nielson will describe his proven techniques for pulling plugs. It’s going to be great, I hope to see

you there.

Wednesday, Sept. 15 I’m sot sure if I shared with everyone my experience on the San Poil and Kettle rivers. My wife and I like to get up to the Republic area and fish these two streams in the fall. The San Poil flows south from Republic and enters the Colville Indian Reservation, and eventually flows in to the Lake Roosevelt at the San Poil Arm. It is a small stream and loaded with rainbow. My wife finally got a chance to put down the video camera and do some fly-fishing, and she had a blast. She caught and released over 30 small rainbow during out day on the San Poil. The Kettle River is a much larger stream and has larger fish. I have caught both rainbow and browns on the Kettle. On this last trip I caught only rainbow and up to 14 inches, but what keeps me coming back is that I have hooked and lost or been broken off by much larger fish. I am also looking forward to a float on the Yakima River to fly fish for rainbow with one of guys from the Yakima River fly shop in Cle Elum. I am hoping that all of this practice will help me catch a steelhead on a fly this fall and winter.

Breaking news for all anglers... The Wenatchee & Methow rivers are open for steelhead! This is the biggest and earliest opener in 30 years with a four-fish limit. Selective gear is needed. You will need knotless nets. Bait is allowed in the Columbia, but not in the Wenatchee or Methow. Get to Hooked On Toys... Get your line re-spooled. Get the proper gear including knotless nets, spoons, jigs and hooks. Don’t forget to pinch your barbs. Even with our huge inventory, gear is going fast!

NCW’S largest selection at everyday discount prices

509-663-0740 1444 North Wenatchee Ave. www.hookedontoys.com

Salmon art auction will benefit Salmon Festival

Leavenworth ad executive and ad Manager Carol Forhan • 509-548-5286 carol@leavenworthecho.com

Images submitted by Lori Aylesworth

Local artist, Lori Aylesworth, made a special salmon image titled “Journey’s End”, using oil pastels, that is being auctioned to benefit Salmon Festival. Proceeds will benefit the festival. Bids can be entered on the Web at www.salmonfest.org. Bidding is open until Sept. 18 at 5 p.m., with the winning bid to be announced at the festival on Sept. 19. Prints of the image will be available for sale, with procceds also going to the festival.

CashMere, CheLan and wenatChee ad executive Lindsay Timmermans • 509-860-7301 lindsay@cashmerevalleyrecord.com


Leavenworth Echo - Sept. 15, 2010