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E c d y s i s SPRING 2017


ECDYSIS Journal for the artistic expression of science at Harvard College

Cover Art: Title, by Dennis Zhang ’18 Logo Design: Ariana Chaivaranon ’18 ecdysisjournal.org

Braintree Printing Braintree, MA 2017


Editor’s Note

Dear Ecdysozoans and Ecdysis readers: This third issue marks our year anniversary. We are back, still ablaze from our forging, but bigger. Welcome to our ripened community of art-scientists from the college and the medical, engineering, and design schools at Harvard. Though a motley crew, we are all dedicated to capturing and sharing the aesthetics of natural phenomena. We do not create beauty; it surprises us at all scales, anywhere, waiting for a form of expression, from the miniscule patterns that organize liver tissue to the light that fell against the staircase during a trip to lecture. We transport you to the decay of a Martian colonization, the cosmos inside the wrinkle of an elephant skin. Despite yourself, you may fall in love with the queenly toilette of an orchid mantis. We like our readers hungry – if you are so inclined, examine the QR codes, definitions and descriptions to better understand what you are seeing. Yet we hope you also indulge in the joys of doing what our eyes do best and just take it in. As Silvia puts it in magnolia bud, one does not “measure things that are blooming”. - Rebecca Greenberg ’18


Board Editor-in-Chief | Rebecca Greenberg ’18 Managing Editor | Silvia Golumbeanu ’17 Associate Editors Visual Art | Lily Lu ’19 Auditory Art | Vaibhav Mohanty ’19 Writing | Joy Li ’19 Technology Chair | Vaibhav Mohanty ’19 Publicity Chair | Trevor Chistolini ’18 Staff Colin Criss ’17 Katja Diaz-Granados ’20 Olivia McGinnis ’20 Nisarga Paul ’19 Vivian Qiang ’20 Dennis Zhang ’18


Meet the Team Trevor Chistolini is a junior concentrating in chemistry & physics and philosophy. He assists with seeking funding, scouring the campus for great submissions, and organizing talks. He enjoys exploring the links between the arts and sciences both indoors when drawing or outdoors when running amongst trees. Amazed at what Ecdysis has accomplished since its origin a year ago, he is excited for what lies in the future and hopes you agree.

Colin Criss is on the writing board. He is a native Adirondacker. At Harvard, Colin concentrates in sociology. After graduating in May, he will pursue a Master of Fine Arts degree in poetry at Washington University in St. Louis, matriculating in the fall.

Katja Diaz-Granados is a freshman and aspiring integrative biology concentrator. In her spare time, she loves illustrating birds and taking care of the adorable froglets in the O’Connell dart frog lab.

Silvia Golumbeanu is the managing editor. She was born in Romania, grew up in Ohio, and has no clue where the road leads next. She is a writer, musician, and will always prefer milk chocolate over dark.

Rebecca Greenberg is the editor-in-chief of Ecdysis. She is a junior from Providence, Rhode Island and an aspiring field biologist and writer. She runs everywhere, even when she’s not late, but will stop for a redtail hawk or a muskrat.

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Joy Li is an associate writing editor for Ecdysis. She is a sophomore from San Diego, California concentrating in visual and environmental studies. If you want to contact Joy, odds are you can find her scouring the Square for cheesecake or acai bowls (or where her next Asian American Dance Team practice is!)

Lily Lu is a sophomore concentrating in integrative biology and is currently the visual art editor of Ecdysis. Aside from assessing the visual art submissions to the magazine, Lily also does small jobs here and there ranging from designing posters to opening bank accounts. Outside of Ecdysis, Lily likes to spend her time drawing and being impressed by birds.

Olivia McGinnis is a freshman on the design board for Ecdysis from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Although she is undecided when it comes to concentration, Olivia hopes to work at the intersection of science and policy. Her favorite spot on campus is the sunken garden at Radcliffe Yard, and she misses her dog very much (hi Willow!).

Vaibhav Mohanty is the technology chair and associate auditory art editor for Ecdysis. He is a sophomore currently pursuing a concentration in chemistry & physics with a secondary field in music. Vaibhav is passionate about scientific research and composing classical and jazz music.

Nisarga Paul is a sophomore studying mathematics and physics. He joined Ecdysis last year and is on the writing board. Nisarga is interested in the philosophical and aesthetic aspects of physics and enjoys puzzling over how they can be captured in art forms such as poetry.

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Table of Contents

10 ...............................................................................................................................................

caravan

by Silvia Golumbeanu

11 .............................................................................................................. Hitchhiking on a Lanternfly by Christian Perez 12 ................................................................................................................................ Fungal Landscape by Scott Chimileski 13 ....................................................................................................................................................................... Osprey by Lily Lu 14 ........................................................................................................................................................ Regolith by Nisarga Paul 15 .................................................................................................................................. Chalk Dust by Elba Alonso-Monsalve 16 ............................................................................................................. Dichotomy of Engineered Tissues by João Ribas 18 ........................................................................................................................... A Metamorphic Puzzle by Christian Perez 20 ................................................................................................................. The Testimony of Trees by Silvia Golumbeanu 22 ............................................................................................................... Stairwell Projections by Elba Alonso-Monsalve 23 ................................................................................................................................................... Ant Mimic by Nina Sokolov 24 .............................................................................. Random Tilings, Sticky Tetris, and Coffee Stains by Nisarga Paul 26 ............................................................................................................................... Koji Conidiophore by Scott Chimileski 27 ............................................................................................................................................. Salticidae Faces by Javier Masís 28 ............................................................................................................................... Sediment Sculptures by Youngjin Song 32 ...................................................................................................................................... magnolia bud by Silvia Golumbeanu 33 .................................................................................................................................. Mantid Grooming by Christian Perez 34 ............................................................................................................................................ Life on Rice by Scott Chimileski 36 ......................................................................................................................................... Verdant Mood by Christian Perez 37 ............................................................................................................................................................ Albedo by Ellen Zhang


caravan

by Silvia Golumbeanu

elephant carries map of its elephant-life on its skin. here is elephant river where the rain comes down the dusty sky like a chariot, here is oxpecker’s perch, a shifting mountain on the horizon, here the hatchet-mark of living. elephant turns from the shade of morning; mites follow their ashy canyons to the sun.

This is a short meditation on symbiosis. We follow an elephant through the plain, where an oxpecker (bird) plucks lice and mites off of it – I’ve always found it astounding that animals carry entire universes and ecosystems just on and in themselves.

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Hitchhiking on a Lanternfly by Christian Perez

Lanternflies (Copidocephala guttata, family Fulgoridae), are a large and charismatic group of planthoppers, well known for their cephalic protrusions and waxy secretions. Initially I thought these flies (ceratopogonid midges) were feeding on honeydew-like excretions, but upon closer inspection I realized they were ectoparasites consuming the insect’s hemolymph (the blood-like fluid in most invertebrates). This photo was taken at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Canon PowerShot camera.

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Fungal Landscape by Scott Chimileski

These are the lamellae (gills) underneath a mature mushroom of the fungal species Agaricus bisporus, commonly known as a Portobello mushroom. The reproductive spores of this species are formed between the gills, where they are released, completing the lifecycle of the organism. Canon 5D mark III with macro lens. Image covers an area of approximately 0.5 cm.

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Osprey by Lily Lu

The osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a fish-eating bird of prey found in all continents except for Antarctica, making it the second most widely distributed raptor species after the peregrine falcon. Reversible outer toes and barbed pads on the soles of their feet allow a nimble grasp of slippery prey. Colored pencil, ink pen, and oil pastels, 16" x 20".

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Regolith

by Nisarga Paul one human season sets the land the artificial ever spring and from the dampened soil arose imaginings of hallowed green a monolithic redwood tree as if the tree, if slashed, would bare red granite grain or wounded stone the deep hush falls like death, like birth, or ghosts of birds in branches. Here it’s lone as rusty car wheels thrown by country roads on distant earth ** the winds are shrieks of poisoned blood or mother’s heaves. The laboring breeze will cover troy and regolith shrouds the far light of the sun and sweeps one rover stuck in sand in place, in time. Its tilted head is gentle wonder at the end of all its gentle wanderings and in the changing wind it stands as true as euclid resolute with the glow of forgotten things

Plans for colonizing Mars, such as the one detailed in the science nonfiction book, The Case for Mars, point to one remarkably feasible option: artificially inducing global warming on the planet. This involves thickening the atmosphere using hydrofluorocarbons and other greenhouse gases, trapping heat, and letting the soil release nitrogen and other native Martian nutrients. Eventually plants could be grown and settlements built. Additional notes: Troy is the final resting place of the Spirit rover. The rocky surface soil of planets, moons, and asteroids is known as regolith.

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Chalk Dust

by Elba Alonso-Monsalve

Chalk dust accumulates at the bottom of the blackboards in Jefferson Lab in a centimeter-wide strip that no one ever bothers to clean. Inside the strip lie fractal patterns widespread in natural phenomena, such as tree branches, bronchioles, and dendrites. Canon EOS Rebel T6i, 18-55 mm lens, 11" x 8.5".

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Dichotomy of Engineered Tissues by João Ribas

This series explores issues surrounding the artificial creation of human tissues in the laboratory. Nature and the human body have a natural organic fluidity, where boundaries, as well as cellular and molecular events, are far from binary. However, scientists and engineers alike often interpret the challenge of creating human tissues in a binary framework. The series explores this dichotomy: engineered kidney tissue (at right) sports colors of contrasting temperatures and juxtaposes a blurred background with hard-edged lines. The painting of engineered liver tissue (at left) brings patterns of micro and nano-scales to the macro-scale; its geometric patterns evoke the systematic aspect of an engineer’s design of an organic tissue. Liver: Acrylic on canvas, 18” x 24” Kidney: Acrylic and marker on canvas, 24” x 18”

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A Metamorphic Puzzle by Christian Perez

Before reaching the imago (adult) stage, lepidopteran larvae such as this brush-footed butterfly (Adelpha sp.) will metamorphose into a chrysalis, and imaginal discs (appendage precursors) will transform into specialized anatomical structures of the adult. These features are visible in the contours of the pupal exoskeleton, including compound eyes, antennae, a proboscis, wing buds with venation, legs, and thoracic and abdominal segments. This photo was taken in Bocas del Toro, Panama. Olympus digital camera, focus-stacked image with single LED light source, 2 cm x 1.5 cm.

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The Testimony of Trees: Reflections from the Field by Silvia Golumbeanu

Walking across the grounds of the Arnold Arboretum, equipped with nametag and field equipment, I was approached by an older woman one morning. She asked me, “How are the trees feeling today?” I wanted to correct her – that I was not a groundskeeper, but a researcher. But as I clipped, pruned, measured, weighed, read temperatures, I realized I did feel as if I were taking the earth’s pulse. It laid strewn out before me and said it did not feel well. But it looked fresher at 4.5 billion years than I did at 20, and the constant tugging at my sleeves and pant legs, the outrunning me, the answering of every reason with another Why? reminded me of the halfimmortality of childhood. Still, it felt a bit feverish. In the spring, everything with wings was dead or hidden. The mid-March snow shocked everything that had begun to bud. Several samples were lost, along with several hours of feeling in my improperly insulated toes. Smaller trees that had just begun to make their existence known, to house birds and insects and wonders of passersby, went gray as if choked. Larger trees that had seen generations of walkers, been relieved upon by centuries of dogs, housed springs upon springs of quivering chirruping throats, were cracked, parched and frozen, as if some soul had escaped them. My mentor removed the marking tape from the casualties, diligently and with a tinge of sorrow. In a few months, the remaining woods would heave themselves up again, exuberant and defiant. The summer of 2015 was, in one sensation, an extended prickle of the skin – sunlight crawling underneath layers of clothing, intimate brushes with ivy, encounters with many more legs than I could count. Ecology is a very itchy undertaking. It is impossible to study trees without becoming well-acquainted with their friends, enemies, and various housemates.

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Checking the temperature gauge one afternoon, I was met with the exquisitely grotesque coils of several millipedes that had made a home in the makeshift PVC pipegauge-cover. I, rather unmercifully, tossed the gauge across the forest floor as they began to drip from the pipe. What had been the temperature data atop that hill these past few months? I would have to wait, being quite unnerved by the tenants. The woods did not seem to care for me examining them much at all. One morning a horsefly followed me, attempting to make a meal of my neck, for about two miles. Every time I stopped at a gauge, he reminded me of my unbelonging with a sharp nip at the base of the hairline. The screws that held the case of the sensor together were so small they were difficult enough to maneuver even with full attention – being thrown across the forest floor at the request of my pursuer, they required nothing less than divine patience. Since the first two assailants were unsuccessful at preventing my return, one evening I was sent a plague of blood locusts – common name: mosquitoes. Reaching several feet above my head into Carya glabra (stage name: pignut

hickory) with a set of pole pruners, I began to feel something comparable to the thousand-fold prickle of sweat and worry combined. Anxiously pecking at my face, hands, neck, they demanded I leave at once. Up close, they were but frustrated specks of dust with wings. Stepping back, I saw I was actually in a peppery cloud. With branch, clipboard, pruners, and cooler somehow piled onto my person I made for the golf cart at the bottom of the hill. At the cart, I looked up and saw the cloud spinning itself like a thin veil about Carya. She seemed unfazed. Did I love my woods and all of its wailing, whirring ambassadors? I must have. I watched it live without me and beyond me like an aging child, day and month and year. But I also felt it hold me, larger than me, wiser than me like an ancient parent. And who was I, who never called after all these years? At the top of Bussey Hill, I stepped out of my golf cart, held my pruners like a staff. In the distance, the Boston skyline was but an anthill, small and gray and crawling with tiny life. Between us, vast tides of green. And centuries. And silence.

Two summers ago I worked on two different research projects at the Arnold Arboretum: one on a finer scale concerning plant physiology, and one on a larger scale concerning tree ecology. These are some reflections on my experiences. Title taken from a line from John Muir’s My First Summer in the Sierra (1911).

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Stairwell Projections by Elba Alonso-Monsalve

Parallel sun rays hit a staircase in Jefferson Labs. The shadow of the straight handrail bends into a repeating sawtooth pattern as it is projected onto the orthogonal plane of each step. Canon EOS Rebel T6i, 18-55 mm lens, 11" x 8.5".

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Ant Mimic by Nina Sokolov

This little creature (the ant-mimicking treehopper, Cyphonia clavata) caught my attention as I was rifling through a museum collection and stumbled upon the morphologically unique members of the family Membracidae. The projection off of its pronotum (dorsal thorax plate) imitates the form of a notoriously aggressive ant species and is just one of the many creative defensive adaptations in this group. Pen and ink, 8.5� x 11�.

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Random Tilings, Sticky Tetris, and Coffee Stains: The Mathematical Structure behind Different Phenomena by Nisarga Paul

The search for order in randomness is at the core of the study of probability. Mathematicians, like Dr. Alexei Borodin (pictured left), seek to uncover mathematical structures that lie at the root of the behavior of different mathematical and natural phenomena. This relates to a concept called universality, as Dr. Borodin explains: “in the context of models of statistical physics, universality is a broadly observed phenomenon. It basically says that large time and large scale properties of the model only depend on very few essential features. The best known example is that of the Gaussian universality class – the bell curve, which governs the fluctuations of almost any observed quantity in a large population, such as height and weight.” Dr. Borodin’s current work is related to a class called the KPZ (Kardar-ParisiZhang) universality class, which relates phenomena as disparate as random tilings and coffee stains. For any shape, like a hexagon or a heart (Fig. 5), we can imagine tiling it with small lozenges. Just as there are many ways to fill a chessboard with non-overlapping dominoes, there are an astronomical number of ways to do a tiling. Probabilists ask what one would find if one were to pick a tiling at random, as in Random Heart. The answer is — surprisingly — not at all random. These “random tilings” have well-studied behavior. As the shape gets larger and larger, a random tiling of the shape tends to “freeze” at the corners and remain “liquid” in the region enclosed by some sort of curve as seen in Fig. 2, a behavior known as the arctic circle theorem. How perfect is the arctic circle? That is, how much does the “liquid region” deviate from the boundary of the inscribed circle? Mathematicians puzzled over this, and 24

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Fig. 1 (top): Random tiling of a small hexagon. Fig. 2 (bottom): Random tiling of a large hexagon. The “arctic circle” takes shape.

determined this fluctuation to be of order N1/3 for a hexagon of side length N. That is, for a random tiling of a hexagon of side length 100, the liquid region would fall within ~5 units of the inscribed circle with high probability. This fluctuation exponent of 1/3 is a distinguishing feature of the class. In comparison, the fluctuation exponent for the Gaussian class is ½. Another model in the same universality class as the random tiling is known as the deposition


Fig. 3 (right): An example of the sticky deposition model after some time. Fig. 4 (top): A non-sticky deposition model after some time. The stripes correspond to different periods of time. William Casselman and Ivan Corwin for KardarParisi-Zhang Universality, AMS vol. 63)

model, in which blocks are dropped at random time intervals, and accumulate not just by piling up but also by sticking to whatever they touch first. This builds a structure riddled with gaps, like a terrible game of Tetris (Fig. 3). Mathematicians became interested in the fluctuation of the structure’s growth rate from steady, linear, upward growth, and found this to be of order T1/3, where T is the time the model has spent running. In comparison, if we consider the same deposition model without the “sticky” property, we find a structure like Figure 4, whose fluctuation from linear growth is of order T1/2 – the omnipresent Gaussian class. The fluctuation exponent of 1/3 is just one of the properties of the random tiling and deposition models which suggest that they are connected.

Motivated by these clues, mathematicians such as Dr. Borodin seek connections between models to better understand the whole class. “The field is rapidly developing, forging connections to a growing number of areas in mathematics and physics,” he says. “The key to making progress in the field is in investigating and utilizing deep algebraic structures, and that has been the main focus of my research in recent years.” The expansive class includes everyday phenomena as well, from burning paper and bacterial colony growth to coffee stains. In the case of coffee stains, miniscule coffee particles deposit along the edge of a stain, sticking to each other in the process — a microscopic game of “sticky Tetris” which obeys the same laws as the other phenomena in the KPZ class.

Fig. 5: Random Heart, by Alexei Borodin and Leonid Petrov. Displayed at the Art of Discovery exhibition at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study.

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Koji Conidiophore by Scott Chimileski

A microscopic view of a koji (Aspergillus oryzae) conidiophore structure, stained blue and purple. Conidiophores are branching hyphae filaments that produce small circular spores (conidia) in many species of fungi. Canon 5D Mark III camera, Nikon Eclipse microscope. The circular structure at the top of the conidiophore filament is called the vesicle. Including the released conidia, the vesicle is approximately 40 micrometers wide.

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Salticidae Faces by Javier MasĂ­s

In this project, I focused on arachnid neuroanatomy to discover why members of the jumping spider family (Salticidae) are so good at jumping. I generated 3D digital volumes of the heads (prosomata) of different species of spiders in order to examine their brains (synganglia). As a visual neuroscientist, I am also interested in our uncanny ability to detect certain classes of objects, especially when they are not there (ever thought the front of a car looked kind of like a face?). A set of slices from different genera of spiders (counterclockwise, from top: Sitticus, Sitticus, Myrmarachne) evoke this phenomenon. Created by placing spider heads in a microCT machine (Nikon Metrology X-Tek HMXST225 MicroCT). Spider heads are 2 mm3.

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Sediment Sculptures by Youngjin Song

The surface of our planet has been shaped by a spectrum of natural forces, among which running water is a key alternating agent.This piece resulted from a modeling of sedimentation, the deposition of particles carried by a fluid flow. A mixture of water, pigment and copper powder was poured onto a paper roll and the resulting trajectory captured with a photograph. The product of these artificial sedimentary records evoke the landscapes found today in bodies of water, from streams to oceans. copper powdered pigment on paper, 8.5" x 11".

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magnolia bud by Silvia Golumbeanu

downy green quiescence below the neck, girdled stripped of sugar, bark still bobs in wind next week, growth column empty — we do not measure things that are blooming

As a research assistant at the Arnold Arboretum, I monitored the flowering progress (or lack thereof ) of plants whose nutritive tissues (phloem) had been removed. This was an investigation into whether plants needed their phloem to flower in the spring - magnolias were among our samples. A plant removed of phloem is known as “girdled”.

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Mantid Grooming by Christian Perez

Mantises, order Mantodea, are voracious predators that rapidly strike prey with raptorial forelimbs. After consuming a meal or when water accumulates on the exoskeleton, mantises such as this Orchid mantis (Hymenopus coronatus) will use their labial palps to lap up particles and moisture to minimizing bacterial growth on their bodies. Olympus Digital Camera, single shot with ring LED light, 4 cm x 3 cm.

Get a glimpse of this mantis’ cleansing routine:

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Life on Rice by Scott Chimileski


Koji (Aspergillus oryzae) is one of several species of fungi domesticated for the production of food and drink. Aspergillus oryzae, seen here growing on kernels of rice, is the microbial species that we use to produce sake, miso, and soy sauce. The yellow stalk-like structures are conidiophores, which release spores and are visible to the naked eye. A second filamentous fungi (mold) also began growing on the rice, a green species of Penicillium. Canon 5D mark III with macro lens. Image covers an area of approximately 0.5 cm.


Verdant Mood by Christian Perez

Although toucans are one of the most iconic figures of the neotropics, most people are unaware of their ecological habits. Fruits compose the majority of their diet, but toucans will also raid nests of other birds and eat the nestlings. I once saw a persistent toucan continuously attempt to raid the nest of a great kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus) while two kiskadees valiantly defended their young. This photo was taken at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Canon PowerShot camera, 70 cm x 53 cm.

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Albedo

by Ellen Zhang

I. Silhouettes unzip, ossein and gossamer. Selene arches forward her neck, strands stars complementing milky ways cast and layered. II. In the palm of her hands she weighs lights eons heavy enough to sink. Waxing and waning she teases every darkening, piercing sliver. III. Calculations mental, quick you are allowed imperfect librations. Embodying penumbra that sways and sways—do not lean ladders. IV. The elastic splits, snaps as dawn's nimble raw fingers poke through perilune that shatters. She folds onto herself, opaque.

The lunar phases describe the shape of the sunlit portion of the moon seen from an observer on Earth; phase changes cyclically as the moon orbits Earth. Throughout the moon’s trajectory, one half of the planet consistently faces the earth (the nearside). However, it is believed earthlings see as much as 59% of the moon due to its slow oscillations in the horizontal and vertical plane as it orbits, deviations known as longitudinal and latitudinal libration. Additional notes: Perilune is the point at which a body in elliptical lunar orbit, such as a satellite or spaceship, is closest to the moon. Albedo is a measure of reflectance; materials that absorb light have low albedo while surfaces like snow have high albedo, reflecting much of the incident light.

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Contributors

Elba Alonso-Monsalve is a sophomore studying physics and math. She lives in a superposition of three states: singing in the University Choir, working on her problem sets, and scouting for chocolate muffins in the dining halls. Scott Chimileski is a microbiologist and photographer based in the Kolter Lab at Harvard Medical School, where his research activities are focused on imaging the social and multicellular behaviors of microbes. Scott spearheaded the Microbial Life exhibition set to open at the Harvard Museum of Natural History in August 2017 and co-wrote the book Life at the Edge of Sight (to be published by Harvard University Press in September 2017). Silvia Golumbeanu is a senior studying integrative biology and English. She can usually be found with a guitar, or sidetracked petting other people’s cats while walking to class. Lily Lu is a sophomore at the College studying integrative biology. She is currently pre-med until she finds something better to do, which may involve birds or illustration. Javier Masís is a PhD candidate at Harvard studying the neuroscience of vision in the Cox lab. His art is frequently inspired by his interest in perception and our inability to experience the world without it. Nisarga Paul is a sophomore in Quincy House studying mathematics and physics. Christian Perez conducted fieldwork in the Peruvian Amazon to investigate the dynamics of speciation in Heliconius butterflies. He continued research in Costa Rica, Panama, and Brazil, and after graduation he will study frilled lizard deimatic displays (threat behavior, such as bright coloring) in Australia. Through his photography, he strives to capture as much biodiversity as possible; in turn, each photo has a story to tell about the natural history of each organism. João Ribas is a PhD candidate researching ways to engineer hearts and blood vessels in the Khademhosseini lab at Harvard Medical School. He hopes to finish his thesis before he dies of cardiac arrest. His paintings are currently in exhibition at the Wyss Institute. Nina Sokolov is a research assistant in the Hoekstra lab and completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto with a specialization in ecology and evolutionary biology. She likes frolicking in the field, collecting bugs, and drawing them. Youngjin Song is a student at the Graduate School of Design, concentrating in art, design, and the public domain. She considers art an effective means of communication for addressing elusive concepts in the field of science and philosophy. Ellen Zhang is a sophomore living in Quincy concentrating in the life sciences. She is actively involved in other publications, including the Harvard Crimson, Tuesday Magazine, and Prescriptions.

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Acknowledgements

Dr. Brian Farrell, for his last lecture in OEB 10: Foundations of Biological Diversity, Spring 2016, which inspired the aim of this magazine. The Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, for their interest in the educational aspect of our mission and for their media support. The Elson Family Arts Initiative Fund, The COOP Public Service Grants Program, and the Office for the Arts for their generous gifts that made this publication possible. Dr. Robert lue, for his advice on exploring the interface between the arts and the sciences. Dr. David Edwards, for his mentorship and introduction to his inspiring art & design center Le Laboratoire Cambridge. Dr. Oliver Knill, for introducting us to the art of multivariable calculus and linear algebra and to the Elson Family Arts Initiative Fund. Dr. Andrew Berry, for knowing interesting people and pointing us towards them. Dr. Elena Kramer, for introducing us to the impressive arts initiative in her class OEB 52: Biology of Plants.

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Lily Lu, ’19

ecdysisjournal.org

Ecdysis Spring 2017  

Journal for the artistic expression of science at Harvard College.

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