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School of Arts Management and Humanities School of Dance School of Drama School of Music School of Visual Arts TABLE OF CONTENTS i

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The information in this publication was current as of August 2014 when the text was compiled. Changes, including but not restricted to, tuition and fees, course descriptions, degree and programme requirements, policies and financial information, may have occured since. The College reserves the right to make any changes it finds necessary. Cover Design: Š Copyright 2014 Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, www.emc.edu.jm

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Why Study With Us Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (EMCVPA) is a one of a kind institution being the only college for the arts in the English-speaking Caribbean. This alone should be sufficient to indicate that your future is in great hands. But if you need more convincing here are 10 foolproof reasons why EMCVPA is the College to Be, Create and Inspire: 1. Teaching delivered using an effective mixture of theoretic and practical methods to develop well-rounded and well-educated students.

6. Vibrant campus life created by a diverse mix of artistic students of various disciplines cohabiting in one creative space.

2. EMCVPA graduates are the best in their fields across the Caribbean and the College boasts a host of distinguished alumni.

7. Tuition and other associated fees are reasonably packaged below industry standard with payment plan options and scholarships.

3. Internship programmes which allow students 8. EMCVPA is one of the major institutions of to work in their fields of study, gaining practical cultural development and preservation in the knowledge and developing important contacts Caribbean, with a wealth of knowledge on our and networking skills even before completing shared regional culture. studies. 9. Campus is centrally located in the heart of the 4. Large percentage of EMCVPA graduates are Kingston Metropolitan Area with easy access to gainfully employed in their field of choice. galleries, museums, art shops, restaurants and shopping centres. 5. The lecturers are a unique balance between local and international educators who are among 10. Programmes are internationally recognized and the best in the world. accredited by the University Council of Jamaica (UCJ).

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Careers in the Arts Entertainment Actor Casting Director Agent Comedian Disc Jockey Lighting Designer Music Bookseller Writer

Drama Dramatic/Literary Manager Set Designer Theatre Critic Theatre Director Drama Historian Theatre Historian Theatre Administrator

Media Broadcaster Press Agent Producer Television Producer Video/Television Editor Dance Recorder

Visual Arts Film Director Art Historian Fibre Arts Artist Book Illustrator Gallery Guide Animation Director Gallery Curator Art Critic Art Conservator Art Dealer Art Development Officer Art Teacher Art Gallery Operator Art Museum Curator Corporate Designer Industrial Designer Interior Designer Photographer Court Artist Colour Consultant Costume Designer Window Designer

Dance Choreographer Dancer Dance Critic Dance-Re-constructor Dance Administrator Dance Authographer Arts Management Company Manager Arts Management Specialist Entertainment Coordinator Music Contractor Stage Manager Publicist

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Layout Artist Magazine Artist Director Photo Journalist Children’s Book Designer Children’s Book Illustrator Graphic Designer Package Designer Video Games Designer Web Designer Music Lyricist Musician Session Musician Song Writer Studio Musician Vocalist Conductor Music Historian Music Arranger/Composer Music Copyist Instrument Tuner Recording Engineer


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Table of Contents GENERAL INFORMATION

About the EMCVPA 3 The Early Years 3 Cultural Training Centre 3 Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts 3 Schools Mission and Vision 5 Core Values 5 College Symbols 6 Our Motto: 6 College Logo 6 Crest 6 School Logos 6

Campus Facilities and Resources

Access to Campus Art Shop at the Edna Manley College (The) Automated Teller Machine (ATM) Computer Classrooms and Labs Copying, Printing and Binding Services Food Services Exhibition Spaces ID Cards

Library and Information Services

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Lost and Found 13 Multimedia Services 13 Parking and Registration of Vehicles 13 Schools and Departments 13 Student Services 18 Admissions and Orientation 18 Alumni 18 Athletics 18 Clubs and Societies 18 Counselling 18 Hall of Residence - Scarlet Hall 19 Health 19 International Students 19 Student Employment 21 Campus Directory 22 Campus Maps 29 Our Location 29 College Campus Map 30

ADMISSIONS AND FINANCE Undergraduate Admissions Requirements

1. Educational Background 32 2. Interview 32 3. Portfolio Assessment/Drawing 32 Examination/Audition 32 Admissions Process 33 Special Admission Requirements 34 Mature Students 34 International Students 34 Transfer from the School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes 35

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Transfer Admission 35 Transfer Admission for International 35 Students 35 Credits Earned as a Transient Student 35 Joint Admission 35 Classification of Students 35 Tuition, Fees and Expenses 38

Fee Schedule - Local Students 38 Tuition & Ancillary Fees 2014/2015

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Tuition & Ancillary Fees Schedule 2014/2015 Part-Time/Visiting Students’ Rate Accomodation Fees For 2014/2015

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Tuition and Fees Increase Fee Payment Policy

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Fee Schedule - International Students 40

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Special Fees

ACADEMIC POLICIES Student Responsibility Academic Resources Rules and Regulations General Conduct

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48 48 49 49

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Registration 49 Registration for International Students 50 Academic Advisement 51 Declaring a Major 51 Change of Programme 51 Declaring a Minor 51 Minor Studies Programme Requirement 51 Procedures for Minor Programme 52 Enrollment 52 Transfer Students & Credits 52 Transfer Process 52 Factors Which Determine the Acceptability of Transfer Credits 53 Transfer Credits for International Students 53 Required Documentation for Transfer Credit Consideration 53 Credits Earned in other Colleges as a Transient Student 53 Study Abroad Programme 53 Maximum Credits Per Semester 53 Attendance 54 Absence 54 Examination 54 Final Year Examinations 54 Independent Study (body of work/showcase/production) 54 Research Paper 54 Grade Scheme 55 Understanding your Grades and Transcript 56 Computing the Grade Point Average 56 Challenge Examinations 56 Supplemental Examinations 57

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Assessment 57 Aegrotat Policy for Word-Based Courses 58 Aegrotat Policy for Practical/Studio 58 Courses 58 Reporting Grades 59 Examination Grades 59 Change of Grade 59 Progression in Programmes 59 Course Grades 59 Promotion of Education Students 60 Teaching Practice/Practicum 60 Academic Honesty 60 Sanctions for Academic Dishonesty 60 Unsatisfactory Performance 61 Academic Probation 61 Academic Dismissal 61 Reinstatement Following Academic Dismissal 61 Withdrawal/Temporary Leave of Absence from School 61 Readmission 62 How to Apply for Readmission 62 Requirements for Readmission 62 Appeal 62 Adding/Dropping Courses 63 Coursework/Assignments 63 Tutorials 63 Cummulative Grade-Point Average 63 Internship 63 Graduation 64 Certificates Application for Graduation 64 Choice of Programme under which a Student Graduates 64 Re-Evaluation of Programme Requirements 64 Procedures Governing Student Misconduct 64 Academic Misconduct 65 Categories of Academic Misconduct 65 Major Offences 65 Minor Offences 65 General Misconduct 65 Classification of Penalties/Sanctions 66

Other Policies and Procedures

Dress Code 67 Accountability Policy for Information 68 Technology (IT) Resources 68 Purpose of the Policy 68 Procedures 68 Acquisition of I.T. Resources 69 Movement of I.T. Equipment 69 Maintenance 69 Loss of Equipment 69 Accountability Actions 69

Email Use Policy

Prohibited Use Personal Use Password Policy

Use of Lab Policy

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Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Policy 71 Guidelines on Anti-Virus Process Recommended processes to prevent virus propagation: 72

Glossary of Terms

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Equipment For Use In Class Loan of Equipment Services Provided by Department

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Emails Logo Use Brand Identity Website Policy Photo/Video Release Forms Social Media Guidelines

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Policy for the Provision of Emergency Hospital Services

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Multimedia Services

Security Regulations Student Communication Policy

Health Policy

SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES School of Arts Management and Humanities Bachelor of Arts in Arts Management Associate of Arts in Arts Management Arts Management Minor Option Arts Management Electives Humanities (General Studies Courses)

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Programmes 86 ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2008 Year One Year Two Year Three Year Four ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2009 Year One Year Two Year Three Year Four ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2010 Year One Year Two Year Three Year Four ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2011 Year One Year Two Year Three Year Four ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2012 Year One Year Two Year Three Year Four ARTS MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATE DEGREE 2012 Year One Year Two Arts Management Minor Compulsory Courses ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2013

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86 87 88 89 90 90 91 92 93 94 94 95 96 97 98 98 99 100 101 102 102 103 104 105 106 106 107 108 108 109

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Minor Drama in Education Minor: Theatre Arts For Majors in BFA Performance and Choreography) (For Majors in the BFA and BA - Schools of Music & Visual Arts) Mandatory Courses (electives transferable) Course Catalog BFA Theatre Arts: Acting Track Cohort 2012-2013 BFA Theatre Arts: Acting Track Cohort 2013/2014 BA Drama in Education Cohort 2012-2013 BA Drama in Education Cohort 2013/2014 Course Descriptions Faculty

Year One 109 Year Two 110 Year Three 111 Year Four 112 ARTS MANAGEMENT Associate degree 2013 113 Year One - MAJOR 13 credits 113 Year Two 114 Arts Management Minor 115 Compulsory Courses 115 Course Descriptions 116 BA Arts Management Programme 116 Humanities 119 Professional Education 123 Faculty 126

SCHOOL OF DANCE

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

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SCHOOL OF DRAMA

Programmes 176 BA in Drama In Education 176 BA in Drama In Education 178 Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade 178 BFA in Theatre Arts (Acting Track) 179 BFA in Theatre Arts 181 Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade 181 Bachelor of Arts in Drama (Emcvpa/Uwi) 183 Associate of Arts in Theatre Arts 184 Minor: Drama in Education 185

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187 187 188 189 190 191 192 198

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Policies Specific To Music Programmes Practical Examinations Concert Attendance Policy Lunch Hour Concert Third and Fourth Year Concerts Instrumental and Vocal Lesson Policy Principal Instrument Studies Second Instrument Studies (Optional) Applied Music (Optional) Independent Study Master Class & Performance Lab Teaching Practicum Honours Recital

202 202 202 202 202 202 202 202 203 203 203 203 203 204 205 206 208

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Bachelor of Music in Performance BM in Performance Contemporary Music Studies BM Contemporary Music Studies Diploma upgrade BM in Performance Piano, Voice, Guitar, Wind and Steel Pan BM in Performance Degree Completion Bachelor of Music Education (BME) Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade Associate of Arts In Music (AA) Certificate in Music (CM) Music Minor General Requirements for the UWI/EMC BA General Arts, Faculty of Humanities & Education UWI/EMC BA General Arts, Humanities & Education Music Major Elective Courses (Non-majors) Principal Instrument Second Instrument

Programmes 130 School of Dance Policies 130 Practical Classes 130 Submission Of Written Assignment 130 Dress Code For Dance Classes 131 Bachelor of Art Education in Dance Education 132 BAE in Dance Education - (Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade) 135 BFA in Performance & Choreography 136 BFA in Performance & Choreography (Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade) 139 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Traditional and Folk Dance Studies Associate of Arts in Dance Performance 142 Certificate in Dance Performance 143 Minor Studies: Dance Performance 144 Minor Studies: Dance Education 144 BAE Dance Education 2011-2012 145 BFA Performance and Choreography 2011-2012 147 Certificate in Dance Performance 2 Years 148 BA in Dance Education 2012-2014 149 BAE Degree completion/diploma upgrade 151 BFA Performance and Choreography 2012-2013 152 BFA Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade 153 Associate of Arts in Dance Performance 2 Years 154 Certificate in Dance Performance 2 Years 155 Dance Minor Programme Structure 156 Dance Performance Minor 156 Dance Education Minor 158 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 159 Faculty 171

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Bachelor of Music Education Associate of Arts - Music Certificate in Music Preliminary Qualifying Programme

209 212 213 216 218 220 221 222 222 222 223 224 228 232 233 234 234

BM, BME, AA, Cert. & PQ 2010/11 & 2011/12 230 BM In Jazz & Popular Music Studies 230 BM in Performance Piano, Voice, Percussion, Guitar 231

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BM, BME, AA, Cert. & PQ 2012 - 2013 BM in Jazz & Popular Music Studies BM in Performance Piano, Voice, Percussion, Guitar Bachelor of Music Education Associate of Arts - Music Certificate in Music Preliminary Qualifying Programme

235 235 236 237 238 239 239

BM, BME, AA, Cert. & PQ 2013 - 2014 BM in Jazz & Popular Music Studies BM in Performance Piano, Voice, Percussion, Guitar Bachelor of Music Education Associate of Arts - Music Certificate in Music

240 240 241 242 243 244

Minor in Jewellery 293 Textiles and Fibre Arts – Textile Design for Printing 293 Weaving Minor 293 Fashion Design Minor 294 Minor in Textiles and Fibre Arts – Mixed Option 294 Minor in Design 294 Minor in Visual Arts 294 Fine Arts – Sculpture Minor 294 Fine Arts – Painting Minor 295 Fine Arts – Printmaking Minor 295 Minor in Art History 295 UWI/EMC BA Humanities & Education Degree 298 UWI/EMC BA Humanities & Education Degree – Visual Arts Major 298 UWI/EMC Open Choices Courses 299 Post Graduate Certificate in Art Therapy 300 Post Graduate Certificate in Art Therapy 301 Course Descriptions 302 Bachelor of Fine Arts 302 Foundation Studies 302 Interdeciplinary Studies 303 Painting Department 303 Sculpture Department 304 Printmaking Department 306 Jewellery Department 307 Ceramics Department 308 Textile & Fibre Arts, Fashion Department 309 Design Studies 311 Visual Communications Department 312 Photography Department 314 Drawing Courses 316 Bachelor of Art Education (BAE) 318 Professional Education Courses 318 Post Graduate Certificate Program in Art Therapy 319 Art Therapy Courses 320 Post Graduate Certificate Program in Art Therapy Dual Enrollment Program 321 Bachelor’s Degree in Art Education/Graduate Certificate in Art Therapy 321 General Studies Courses 321 Art History 324 UWI/EMC Open Choice Courses 326 Level II 327 Electives 328 Faculty 329

BM, BME, AA, Cert. & PQ 2010/11 & 2011/12 245 BME in Performance Piano, Voice, Percussion, Guitar 246 Bachelor of Music Education 247 Associate of Arts - Music 249 Certificate in Music 250 Preliminary Qualifying Programme 250 Course Descriptions 251 Faculty 257

SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS

Programmes 262 General Information 262 Registration Procedures 262 Credit Requirements 262 Changes in Schedule: Add / Drop 263 Art Supply Shop 263 Programme Structure 263 Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 264 Associate of Arts In Visual Arts 265 SVA Minor Programmes 265 Bachelor in Art Education 266 Degree Completion /Diploma Upgrade JBTE - BAE 267 3 Year Fine Art Diploma to 4 Year BFA Degree 267 Certificate 268 Studio Certificate 268 Visual Arts Majors 269 Bachelor in Fine Arts / Associate of Arts 269 BFA Ceramics Major 270 BFA Jewellery Major 272 BFA Painting Major 274 BFA Printmaking Major 276 BFA Sculpture Major 278 Textile Design, Fibre Arts, Weaving & Fashion Major 280 BFA Visual Communication Major 282 BFA Photography 286 Photojournalism – Major 286 Commercial Photography – Major 287 BFA Design Studies 288 BFA Interdisciplinary Studies 290 Minor Programmes 292 Visual Communication – Graphic Design Minor 292 Visual Communication – Illustration Minor 292 Minor in Visual Communication 292 Minor in Ceramics 293

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Administration 331 Find EMCVPA on the web: 331 Highly Recommended Links 332

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Diverse Innovative Spirited Creative Passionate Bold No matter who you are or where you are from, the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts is a place where you can Create, Persevere and Achieve. It is the home where you can persue your passion. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Principal’s Welcome Thank you for choosing the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (EMCVPA) to hone your creativity and talent. We, EMCVPA Faculty and Staff, are aware of the enormous talent that you, artistes of unusual promise and eclectic passions, bring to the College and we welcome the privilege of nurturing your understanding, production and analysis of your art. You have discovered a one of a kind institution in the English-Speaking Caribbean that allows for aesthetic freedom and academic fulfillment.

“Whether its Music, Drama, Dance, Visual Arts or Arts Management, your best performance begins here at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (EMCVPA).”

Steeped in the rich cultural resources of the Caribbean, the EMCVPA has been developing and preserving the arts and culture, for over six decades, beginning with the establishment of the School of Visual Arts in 1950. More recently, the EMCVPA has repositioned itself to include Arts Management for the ownership, sustainability, self-discovery, scholarship and psychological transformation of arts and culture. To become the professional visual and performing artist(e), we challenge you to rise to the top of your craft, utilize your exceptional talent and strength of mind. We expect students to take full

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advantage of the opportunities that are provided for their development and growth as artistes or educators in the arts. Our challenge is to maintain the excellence that characterizes the teaching, learning and professional development for which our students are known. We will hone the quality of your work, artistic skills, and professionalism. Do not be frivolous about your success. Set your objectives early and be truthful to yourself as you accomplish your goals. This handbook is a guide to assist you in structuring your journey at the College. Information about policies, services and academic programmes are all provided, however should you need to speak with someone directly, specific names, responsibilities and contact information are also listed. Whether its Music, Drama, Dance, Visual Arts or Arts Management, your best performance begins here at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (EMCVPA). Create…Persevere…Achieve…Enjoy! Nicholeen DeGrasse-Johnson, Ph.D. Principal

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GENERAL INFORMATION

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About the EMCVPA The Early Years

The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts has been through several stages in its evolution. The four Schools—Drama, Music, Dance, and Visual Arts—started out at different locations in Kingston. Two of the Schools, namely the School of Art and the School of Music, are historic because of their establishment in 1951 and 1961 respectively, before the island gained its independence from Britain in 1962.

Cultural Training Centre

In 1976, all four Schools were brought together and became a full-time tertiary institution under the aegis of the Cultural Training Centre, an arm of the Institute of Jamaica. In 1979, the four Schools were identified by UNESCO as pivotal institutions, not merely in Jamaica, but in the Caribbean and have since developed as a prime agency for cultural development. In 1983, the Organization of American States (OAS) designated the institution the Inter-American Centre for Caribbean Cultural Development thus recognizing it as a regional cultural resource institution.

Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

However, though in proximity to each other, the Schools continued to operate autonomously until 1995 when the institution was renamed the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in honour of the Hon. Edna Manley, OM. This led to the consolidation of the College under one administrative structure with a Board of Directors, Principal and two Vice Principals. Today the College consists of the following Schools: • School of Visual Arts • School of Music • School of Dance • School of Drama • School of Arts Management and Humanities • School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes The College’s course offering ranges from Certificate to Master degree programmes. These are geared towards essential professional preparation to students in the Arts from the Caribbean, North America and Europe. The School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes also has part-time leisure courses and a thriving summer school. 3

School of Visual Arts

The earliest attempt at promoting visual arts was in 1889, when Miss Long held classes in the library at the Institute of Jamaica, a “certificated” teacher from the South Kensington Art School, London, who was visiting the island. Miss Long held both day and evening classes, in drawing and painting, for ladies and children. By 1942, when the nationalist art movement was in full swing, the Hon. Edna Manley, a co-opted member of the Art and Craft Committee, sought and received permission to hold adult classes in Art at the Junior Centre. These classes were a resounding success. The success of the art activities at the Junior Centre led to the establishment of the Jamaica School of Art and Craft in 1951. The Hon. Altamont DaCosta had bequeathed premises at 1 Central Avenue, Kingston Gardens, to the city, a former mayor of Kingston and it was decided that this building, known as the DaCosta Institute, should be used as the home of the new school, which would be under the administration of the Institute of Jamaica. The principal aim of the school was to provide instruction for persons who wished to make a career of art and craft. The School of Visual Arts now offers several courses across eight (8) departments—namely Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Jewellery, Ceramics, Textiles and Fibre Arts, Visual Communications and Art Education—and continues to expand its course offerings to meet the needs of the industry.

School of Drama

The School of Drama, formerly the Theatre School, was established in 1968 by Henry and Greta Fowler and operated as a part-time institution run by the Little Theatre Movement. The institution grew out of a need for a centre where the already native theatrical talents of the Caribbean people could be trained and directed into an art form; consequently the School provides opportunities for developing talent in performance. Intrinsic to the history of its formation, the School of Drama also trains teachers sensitive to the developing artist in a developing nation.

School of Dance

The School of Dance had its early roots in the Contemporary Dance Centre (CDC) established by Sheila Barnett, Barbara Requa and Bert Rose in the late 1960s. The CDC offered training in Dance for physical education teachers as well as a TABLE OF CONTENTS

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junior programme for children. In 1970, the National Dance Theatre Company, which was founded by Professor Rex Nettleford in collaboration with Barnett, Requa and Rose, formed the Jamaica School of Dance. Recognizing the need for appropriate training in the art form of Dance, the School offered professional training to performers, choreographers and dance educators. Some of the teaching staff included noted dance practitioners such as Barnett, Nettleford, Barry Moncrieffe and Yvonne Dacosta.

School of Music

The School of Music was established in 1961 as a statutory body supported by the Government under the leadership of the first Director and Registrar Peter Burges and Vera Moody respectively. The School was located at 50 Hope Road, Kingston, and was staffed by mainly British nationals engaged in the teaching of music of the European (Classical) tradition, offering tuition in practical and theoretical subjects. The training offered focused on instrumental and vocal lessons, which prepared students for entry into the Royal Schools of Music in the United Kingdom. In 1964 the Junior Department was founded and in 1966 a Folk Music Research Department was established on the recommendation of the Most Hon. Edward Seaga, then Minister of Culture. The department was headed by Dr. the Hon. Olive Lewin, OD OM, and she was responsible for collecting, arranging, editing, publishing and distributing Jamaican Folk Music. The School began training professional musicians in popular music, music education and Jamaican folk music in 1972. The teaching of Jazz was introduced for the first time in 1974 with the establishment of a new Department of African-American Studies under Melba Liston of the United States. A Music Education Division was established to train teachers in schools and the Folk Music Research Department established in 1976, under the direction of Marjorie Whylie. The School, for the first time, offered professional courses structured on the lines of the University of the West Indies courses. These included Diplomas in teaching and performance and music education, a Certificate in School Music Teaching and Certificate courses in African-American Studies.

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School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes

Established in 2005, the School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes’ main objective is to offer a wide range of courses in the visual and performing arts that provide opportunities for those who are desirous of pursuing careers and obtaining recreational benefits through the arts but are unable to access the full-time route. Some of these courses therefore are for credit while others are non-credited and have no entrance requirements other than the participant completing an application form, attending classes and receiving a certificate of Achievement or Participation on completion. It is the School’s responsibility to offer a wide range of learning experiences in addition to providing opportunities for workshops, seminars, conferences and professional development in all areas of the Arts.

School of Arts Management and Humanities

The School of Arts Management and Humanities has been in existence since 2007 and had its first set of four graduates in 2011. The programme aims to provide training for persons who wish to work in the area of arts management or administration and for persons already involved in the management and administration of arts and culture organizations. The aim is to offer a distinctive combination of theory; studio and project-based courses as well as hands on experience. The philosophy of the B.A. Arts Management programme is to create an environment which places the students’ academic development within a cultural, social, religious, ethical and artistic context facilitating synergy with creative industry stakeholders both formal and informal to steer programme quality and maintain relevance. The programme also aims to build a reserve of arts managers and administrators for the industry and business with the vision, foresight and creativity to move the arts forward in Jamaica and the Caribbean.


Mission

To enrich the aesthetic sensibilities and promote the cultural diversity of the Caribbean through the highest quality education and training in the Visual and Performing Arts.

Vision

To develop the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts as a centre in arts and culture, by creating a physical and an academic environment which will engender the highest quality study, research, scholarship and the pursuit of academic excellence. To strengthen and broaden relationships between the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts and its stakeholders by promoting partnership and collaboration to support the development of the arts and encourage networking. To ensure a sustained social and academic environment that develops graduates who are devoted to sound moral, social, spiritual and ethical principles in their professional lives and leaders in the practice of the arts. To create opportunities for economic enterprises that will support the development of the institution and the interest of the Edna Manley College of Visual and Performing Arts. To provide quality staff who will support the mission of the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, be devoted to lifelong learning and professional growth in their area of expertise.

Core Values

The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts is committed to the following core values as an essential part of its purpose as an institution of higher learning.

Innovation: We value innovation as the key to original thoughts and seek to bring new and innovative ideas to enhance the work of the College as well as to create new knowledge in the visual and performing arts. Transparency: We value transparency as essential to open and accountable governance by seeking to operate in an egalitarian environment that involves all stakeholders in our decision-making.

Commitment: We value commitment as vital to institutional and administrative loyalty and pledge to be committed to the ideals, mission and objectives of the College as well as to the services in which we are engaged.

Partnership: We value partnership as an important condition for stakeholders’ participation and seek to forge alliances to facilitate the development and progress of the College. Lifelong Learning: We value lifelong learning as a basic philosophy of self-renewal, scholarship and institutional growth and seek to encourage this as essential for all.

Integrity & Ethics: We value personal and institutional integrity, and are committed to consistent justifiable moral and ethical principles.

Truth: We value truth as the fundamental gateway to enlightenment and human dignity and seek to express this in our lives and imparting it to others. Respect: We value respect for self, others and the environment as a critical self-defining element, and a source for building and maintaining good relationships and achieving success, and seek to exercise this at all times.

Diversity: We value diversity as part of our commitment to academic and aesthetic freedom and respect diverse opinions among faculty, staff and students.

Service: We value service as a divine gift to humanity and seek to make it a natural part of our duty to offer the highest quality to all our clients.

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College Symbols

The following are College symbols which should only be used with permission from the Marketing and Public Relations Department. You may not freely use any of the images below as they are property of the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts and are subject to copyright.

Our Motto: Create Persevere Achieve College Logo

Crest

EMCVPA

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Logo for each School

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Campus Facilities and Resources School of Music Music Technology Lab: Music Composing, Recording and Editing (Macs & PCs)

Access to Campus

The EMCVPA campus attracts thousands of visitors throughout the year due to its various programmes and productions and the security guards cannot recognize everyone who enters the campus buildings. The security and safety of the campus is therefore a shared community responsibility.

School of Visual Arts Photography Lab Photography Editing (PCs) Lab 1: Graphic Design and Visual Communication Lab (IMACs) Lab 2: Graphic Design and Visual Communication Lab (MAC Pros) Lab 3: Toon Boom Animation Lab (PC) Lab 4: Illustration Lab (MAC)

For further information, you may contact the Assets and Facilities Management Department, ext. 2131 or email afd@emc.edu.jm.

Art Shop at the Edna Manley College (The) The Art Shop at the Edna Manley College provides a wide range of art materials needed by students. Where these are not in stock, students are advised to use commercial outlets to secure the materials. You may contact The Art Shop at 876-754-8915.

Automated Teller Machine (ATM)

A National Commercial Bank (NCB) ATM is located in the vicinity of the exit gate of the campus. The machine only dispenses Jamaican dollars and offers MultiLink services, which is a Jamaican shared Automated Banking Machine and Point of Sales terminal network providing electronic funds transfer. You may check with your financial institution to see if there are any charges that may apply with its use. For servicing, please report to the Assets and Facilities Management Department, ext. 2131 or email afd@emc.edu.jm.

Computer Classrooms and Labs

The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts’ computer facilities include the following:

For technical assistance please contact the Technician assigned to the Labs or the Information Technology Department, ext 2180 or email ithelpdesk@emc.edu.jm. For use of the labs please contact the School’s Director.

Copying, Printing and Binding Services

Photocopying and reprographic facilities are available at a cost at the Library Copy Centre on the Administrative Building. For further information, please contact the Copy Centre at ext. 2153.

Food Services

The main cafeteria, located close to the Hall of Residence, and a snack shop, located below the bridge close to the School of Dance, service the campus. Students can purchase cooked meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) from the main cafeteria, Mondays through Saturdays. Both providers are closed on Sundays. For further information, please contact the Assets and Facilities Management Department, ext. 2131 or email afd@emc.edu.jm.

Exhibition Spaces

Housed in the Multimedia Library, the College Art Gallery (CAG[e]), offers a programme of exhibitions annually. These are set out in the College’s activities calendar. The gallery host exhibitions that showcase the phenomenal works of students, lecturers and alumni. The School of Visual Arts also owns a small collection of artwork by graduates who are now among those listed as outstanding Jamaican artists. The collection spans five (5) decades and is available as a resource aid for students and visitors to the College.

Administrative Building Library: Information and Resource Centre (PCs) Multimedia Lab: Information and Resource Centre/Music Notation and Sequencing (PCs)

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with a unique collection the library is also haven for both the national and international communities of scholars, researchers, artists and art philanthropists.

Opening Hours Monday – Thursday: 8:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. / 3:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Friday: 8:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Saturday: 8:30 p.m. – 12 noon Faculty, students and visitors to the campus are not allowed to hang or place artwork in any of the campus spaces unless authorized. All exhibition and opening receptions are free and open to the public. For information about the CAG(e), call ext. 2152 or email cage.gallery@emc.edu.jm. For information about exhibitions in the School of Visual Arts, call ext. 2051.

ID Cards

ID Cards must be displayed at all times and must be shown upon request by the Security Personnel. Lost ID Cards must be reported immediately to the Registry and an arrangement for replacement be made. The fee for replacing the card is JMD$2500.00. For additional information on the ID Cards, please contact the registry Department, ext. 2171 or by email registry@ emc.edu.jm.

Library and Information Services Overview The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts Library is an Academic Library with a specialized collection in the visual and performing arts and other related areas. The Library’s mission statement is as follows:

To support the teaching and research needs of the institution’s students, faculty and other administrative staff, through its collections and services. To collect and preserve research materials which will increase and enhance knowledge of and appreciation of the region’s art forms and culture.

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Library Staff The library has staff complement of twelve persons who are committed to providing a service of excellence to its patrons. Ms. Erica Davis Ms. Beverly Campbell Mr. Lindel Edwards Ms. Juliet Facey

College Librarian Deputy College Librarian Librarian III {New} Librarian II

Areas of the Library The Multimedia Library is located in the Multimedia Building. The Reference and Circulation Services Area is on the ground floor. It includes the Reserved Books Collection (RBC) and Ready Reference Books. There is also a Computer Laboratory where students can do their assignments and research. The Technical Services area is also on the ground floor. This is where books are processed before they are placed in the various collections. On the Ground Floor Technical Services Area | Reserved Books Collection | Photocopy Centre | Baggage Room Deputy College Librarian’s Office ON THE UPPER FLOOR Music Collection | Librarian’s Office Open Shelves Collections | Periodicals Collection | Slides Collection |Librarian’s Office College Librarian’s Office

As an academic library the primary users of the library are students and staff of the institution. Nevertheless, TABLE OF CONTENTS

Summer Semesters: (June to July) Mondays to Thursdays: 8:30 a.m. – 7:15 p.m. Fridays: 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Saturdays: Closed During the Month of August: Mondays to Thursdays: 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Fridays: 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Saturdays: Closed

All EMCVPA faculty, staff and students must have an identification card. The ID is a single card that is used for identification, access to authorized campus buildings and spaces, access to funds deposited in the student’s account for photocopying and book, meal and other purchases provided by campus service providers.

Opening Hours During Semesters I and II: (January to May & September to December) Mondays to Thursdays: 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Fridays: 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Saturdays: 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

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The Collections The Library’s Collection houses a variety of materials. The collections are outlined below: Reserved Books Collection Reading Room/Reference only materials Ready-Reference sources such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks and manuals geared towards the visual and performing arts curricula Vertical Files Overnight Materials Open Shelf Collection Books Course Files Newspaper Clippings Periodicals Journals Slides Collection Photographs Music Collection Vinyl phonographic records CD-ROMs ,DVD-ROMs (inclusive of EMC produced recordings) VHS Audiocassettes Scores

Newspaper Archives of the Jamaica Gleaner The Newspaper Archives of the Jamaica Gleaner provides access to archived full text newspaper articles of the Jamaica Gleaner from as far back as 1834 and can be searched by keywords and dates. Authorized access is restricted to EMC students, staff and faculty only. Contact your Librarian for the username and password. {URL: gleaner. newspaperarchive.com} Open Access Journal AERA SIG Communication of Researchhttp://aera-cr.asu. edu/ejournals/ {See link http://aera-cr.asu.edu/ejournals/ } Online Libraries The Library now has one year subscription to two online libraries: Naxos Music Library and Naxos Music Library. Please click on the following links which will re-direct you to the website. Music Library and Naxos Music Library Jazz contain invaluable resources for staff and students of Music. These span a range of standard and specialist repertoire with over 40,150 CDs and over 574,500 tracks. Click on ‘Quick Tour’ tab for an overview of the service. Naxos Music Library [Available on EMC campus] {Hyperlink text: “Naxos Music Library” to go directly to website’s url : http://EMCVPA.NaxosMusicLibrary.com

Special Collections The Library has three special collections. These include the Wycliffe Bennett Collection, Rex Nettleford Collection and Vivian Virtue Collection.

Naxos Music Library Jazz [Available on EMC campus] {Hyperlink text: “Naxos Music Library Jazz” to go directly to website’s url : http://EMCVPA.NaxosMusicLibrary.com/Jazz

Databases Due to restrictions in licensing agreements, access to certain databases is restricted to registered students, staff and faculty at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts only. An indication will be given for such databases.

Ebooks COLLECTION - Ebrary (NEW) The Library now has access to College Complete eBooks collection. This is an arrangement with the College Libraries Information Network for access to eBooks which span a variety of subject areas.

Caribbean Artists Database: {http://emc.edu.jm/artlibrary/search An EMC internal database link needed for Caribbean Artists Database}

{Hyperlink text: “eBooks Collection” to go directly to the website’s url http://site.ebrary.com/lib/colinet/home.action

EBSCOhost Research Databases The Library has subscription to the following databases through Ebsco Publishing: Academic Search Elite International Bibliography of Theatre and Dance with Full Text Professional Development Collection Education Resource Information Centre Caribbean Search World Politics Review {URL: http:// search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?authtype=ip} 9

Catalogue The Jamaica Union Catalogue is hosted by the National Library of Jamaica. Through this means a search can be done to determine what is in the collection of contributing special libraries in the Jamaica Libraries and Information Network. A search can be done of the bibliographic records to find what is housed in the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts and other libraries that contribute their records. {URL: http://198.170.76.2/juc/} Searching the Jamaica Union Catalogue

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Introduction to the Jamaica Union Catalogue Please be advised that we now have access to the bibliographic records of the Library through the Jamaica Union Catalogue. The Jamaica Union Catalogue is hosted by the National Library of Jamaica and holds the bibliographic records of materials of special libraries that have contributed their records and who fall in the Jamaica Libraries and Information Network.  It presents a search interface that can be used to find titles, authors or subjects of your interest, in addition to information on where these materials are located in other libraries. 

Current awareness bulletins (Information on newly acquired books and journals are circulated via email to lecturers and staff. A list of new arrivals is placed on notice boards and a small display is done upon new arrivals of textbooks.) Internet access (Students and staff can access the Internet by visiting the computer laboratory at the Library or other locations on the campus such as the School of Visual Arts Graphic Laboratory, or the computer laboratory upstairs in the Multimedia Building. As well, students with laptops can gain access to the Internet at various hot spots across the campus.)

What does this mean? This means that you can search the online catalogue to find out where the materials are located; whether it is at the EMCVPA library, the National Library of Jamaica or other libraries in the network. You will also be able to search for materials 24 hours, 7 days a week, any where in the world, once you have Internet access. It is easy and convenient.  Once you know where to access the materials you can decide where you want to go to find the “physical” material.

Word processing and printing Word processing (the Library provides access to computers from which assignments may be printed at a cost) Referral Letters to other academic libraries (Students requiring access to other libraries off campus can pick up a letter from the College Librarian.)

How do I get to the Jamaica Union Catalogue? All you have to do is go to the following link at http://198.170.76.2/juc/. There you will see the search interface for the catalogue. How do I search the Catalogue? You can search the catalogue by typing in your terms in the box and use fields such as ‘Title’, ‘Author’, ‘Year’, ‘Descriptor’, ‘Subject’, or ‘Library code’; as well as you can select the display of your search results by “brief” or “detailed”.

Selective dissemination of information Periodically information may be packaged for educational and research purposes. Contact your Librarian.

Services Offered The Library offers a wide range of services, geared towards satisfying users. Reference and circulation services Reference services are aimed at matching the needs of users with the available resources within the library. To access Reference Services you may visit the Circulation Desk during the Library’s opening hours. Also available is our Personalized Research Consultation Service with our Librarians during specified office hours. Ask a Librarian via e-mail library@emc.edu.jm or telephone 1-876-968-0785. Renewals Open Shelf materials may be renewed for a further loan period provided these have not been previously reserved by another reader. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Reprography services Students have access to the printing and photocopying services at Copy Centre. They are able to send their assignments for printing at a cost to the Copy Centre. They will pick up their assignments at that location. Photocopy machines are also available at the Copy centre where they can submit their copy requests. Users are required to comply with the Jamaica Copyright Act. Reservation of books (Books on loan may be reserved by users and a notification will be sent to them once materials become available.)

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Information Literacy Sessions At the beginning of each academic year the library provides sessions on searching the Internet, databases and other online resources that are available within the library. Additionally, instructions are provided to help you improve your research skills in order successfully identify information for your research.) E-mail Notices Users are encouraged to submit their E-mail addresses at the Circulations Desk in order to receive email notices, bulletins, and happenings in the library. Audiovisual Usage Forms Persons interested in receiving extracts of EMCVPA recordings are encouraged to fill out the forms and submit them to the College Librarian’s office.


Book Orders Faculty, staff and students may submit recommendations for textbooks and other resources to support the curriculum. It is advised that these recommendations are to be submitted to the College Librarian in March of each academic year. Once these items are ordered they will be a part of the Library’s collection and will be available on various loan periods.

that will be deducted from the credit balance. A message will be shown based on the cost of the print job, and whether or not adequate funds are available on the account to complete the transaction. Once print is successful the amount will be deducted from the account. The balance on your account will be indicated in the balance bar, located on the desktop on initial logon. Details of print transactions may be found on the student portal in Ralston.

Printing Services

Establishing an Account for Printing All users are required to pay for prints using their epay ID Card or at the Accounts Department during the specified hours, where a receipt in triplicate will be generated. The receipt will consist of the ID number, name and other information including items being paid for. Of the three ply receipt students will be given, a yellow copy and a white copy. The yellow copy should be presented at the Photocopy Centre only and the amount is credited by the Office Clerk or Library personnel on duty.

Printing service is available at the Photocopy Centre in the Multimedia Building on the ground floor. By using the PaperCut Print Manager registered users will be able to print assignments or print a wide range of articles and documents directly from the networked computers around the campus. Registered EMC students can send their prints from any networked computers in the library or other computer laboratories across the campus. Once students are registered they will be able to use the library’s printing facility. Printouts must be picked up at the Photocopy Centre. Paying for Prints Payment for prints can be made using epay on your ID cards. Your card may be top-up during opening hours at the following areas and times: Accounts Department Mondays – Fridays: 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

All students are to ensure that once they have paid for prints that a copy of the receipt is kept and presented at the Photocopy Centre to library personnel for the account balance to be credited with the amount.

Rates : Printing rates are as follows: Type

Size

Cost $

Black and White

Letter

10 per page

Legal

15 per page

Ledger (11”x17”)

20 per page

12” x 18”

25 per page

Letter

30 per page

Legal

50 per page

Ledger (11”x17”)

80 per page

12” x18”

100 per page

Colour

Please note that payment for printing is at a minimum balance of $50.00. The Office Clerk will apply this credit to your account based on your identification number. When you proceed to log on with your username and password from a networked computer at the Library, the Multimedia Computer Lab or Visual Arts Lab the credit balance will be shown on the desktop screen. Once you send prints, the balance will be reduced by the cost for printing based on the rates outlined.

Computer Laboratories Location Computer workstations available to students are located at the Visual Arts computer laboratory, Computer laboratory upstairs in the Multimedia Building and Computer room in the Library.

Printing Procedures Access to Printing services via PaperCut will only be available to students who have logged into a workstation with their credentials, ID number and Password. Once the required document is ready for printing, the user must select the printer to send the documents. The need to select a colour option is vital, as it will be determined, whether or not the document is to be printed in colour or black and white and this will also determine the cost for printing and the amount 11

Students Students must present their IDs at the Photocopy Centre when payments are made for prints. The Office Clerk or Library personnel at the Photocopy Centre do the crediting of your accounts. Once your balance has been topped up you can send your prints from any computer workstation on the campus. Students will be required to login with their own identification number and password, then select the option to print and determine whether or not the document is to be printed in colour or black and white. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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The document will be queued for printing until it is released. Once the print is successful the amount will be deducted from your account. Staff 1. Personal prints and photocopies Administrative and Academic staff are required to pay for personal prints at the Accounts Department or Photocopy Centre at the scheduled rates during the hours mentioned above. The requests for prints and photocopies are made at the Photocopy Centre. 2. Official prints and photocopies All requests for official prints and photocopies are to be submitted at the Photocopy Centre. Where requests are made for copies of copyrighted materials these are recorded on the Licensee Digitrack Log Sheet. All official prints and photocopies requested are duly recorded in the applicable log books and the official bills are handed to the staff member (faculty and staff) who has requested the job. It is encouraged that photocopies or print outs are verified by the Directors of Schools, Managers or Heads of Departments to ensure that the request is legitimate. Photocopying Services Photocopying service is available at the Photocopy Centre in the Multimedia Building on the ground floor. There are two photocopiers. You may photocopy in colour and/or black and white. Paying for Photocopies Payment for photocopies can be made using epay on your ID cards. Your card may be topped-up during opening hours at the: Finance and Accounts Department (at the Cashier) Mondays – Fridays…...…. 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. The Photocopy rates are similar to that of printing rates and are as follows:

Photocopying Procedures Once it has been determined what is to be photocopied and the cost calculated the payment for photocopies are made at the Accounts Department. Once payment is made a receipt is given to the students and the request for photocopying is made at the photocopy centre. Please note that payment for photocopying is at a minimum balance of $50.00. The receipt is to be handed to the Office Clerk/Library personnel at the Photocopy Centre, who will photocopy based upon the request. The Office clerk/ Library personnel will check the receipts and complete the job based upon the charges presented. Please note that bibliographic information and usage information for photocopies from copyrighted materials are recorded on the Licensee Digitrack Log Sheet. The information is to be clearly written for auditing purposes. JAMCOPY The College signed the JAMCOPY Tertiary Institutions Licence on July 22, 2009 and as such is required to comply with the licence and the Copyright Act of 1993. All users are therefore required to comply with the requirements. Membership: All registered students, academic and senior administrative staff of the college have access to the library and its services. Students enrolled in other tertiary institutions such as the University of the West Indies, who are pursuing joint EMC courses, are registered students of the college and must display a valid identification card to access the services of the library. Researchers, students and staff of other colleges and other individuals may access the library at the discretion of the College Librarian and upon payment of the necessary fees if applicable. Loans: The loan periods and quantity of materials depend on the type of material being borrowed. Type of Materials

No. of Items

Loan Period

Reserved Books (Overnight)

2

Overnight

Type

Size

Cost $

Black and White

Letter

10 per page

Reserved Books Collection (Reading Room)

2

3 Hours

Legal

15 per page

Open Shelves materials

3

Ledger (11x17)

20 per page

7 working days

12 x 18

25 per page

Periodicals

3

Overnight

Letter

30 per page

Slides

No limitation

*

Legal

50 per page

Ledger (11x17)

80 per page

12 x18

100 per page

Colour

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* Slides are available for loan only for class presentations or seminars. The following materials are not available for external loans: DVDs and CD ROMs; Theses; Newspaper clippings; Audio and Videocassettes; and Vinyl records.

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Fines: Fines are charged for each day a circulating material is kept past its due date. Category of Material

Fines

Reserved Book Collection

$60.00 per day

Open Shelf Collection

$20.00 per day

Periodicals

$60.00 per day

times. The College accepts no responsibility for items that are lost, stolen, or damaged. Students must remove contents from lockers at the end of each Semester. If the contents are not removed by the last day of each Semester, students may lose both the lock on the locker and the locker’s content at no liability to the College.

The borrowing rights of users will be revoked when fines have reached a maximum of sixty dollars ($60.00). When fines are outstanding the College Librarian is authorized to advise the Registry and Bursary to charge the fine to the student’s personal account with the college. Subsequent penalties, such as the withholding of examination cards and results, as well as the deferral of the award of qualification upon graduation, will be administered.

Lost and Found

All possessions should be marked for identification purposes in case of their loss, theft or damage. Students may turn in articles that are lost by others to the Student Services Department or the offices of the individual Schools. The College accepts no responsibility and is not liable for articles, including student artwork, which are lost, stolen or damaged on campus.

Multimedia Services

Lost and stolen materials: The report of lost or stolen materials should be submitted promptly in writing to the College Librarian. Lost and Found: As a courtesy to our users, personal items found in the library are held for pick up at the Circulation desks in the library. Library Rules and Regulations: Use of the Library is subject to adherence to the following rules and regulations: • Students are required to carry their Student Identification Card and must produce this when required by authorized Library personnel. • The ID card may be used only by its legitimate holder. • The removal of any material from the Library must be duly authorized and recorded. • Bags, briefcase or parcels are not allowed in the Library. • Silence is required within the Library at all times. Users causing disruption will be required to leave the Library. • Users caught defacing Library materials will be barred from the Library for a specified period and caution fee will be withheld to cover all damages. • The following activities are prohibited within the Library: • Smoking is strictly prohibited within the Library. • Food and/or drink are not allowed in the Library. • The use of cellular phones is strictly prohibited. • The use of compact disk players or other musical devices is strictly prohibited.

Lockers Some lockers are available for student use within individual Schools and students are assigned locker by the School’s Director or designate to use them. Students must supply their own locks and are advised to keep lockers locked at all 13

Audio/Visual equipment is available for daily and overnight loans. Faculty, staff and students who are duly registered, in good financial standing and on recommendation of their School’s Director of Studies, may borrow for short-term periods, various pieces of audio-visual equipment which is to be used to assist with preparation of their College assignments. Equipment so loaned, is to be used on campus only. Faculty, staff and students must present a valid College ID to borrow equipment. Audio/Visual equipment and support is available at the Multimedia Services Department located downstairs the Administrative Block, ext. 2181 on campus.

Parking and Registration of Vehicles

Parking at the College is on a first-come, first-serve basis, except for marked reserved spaces. There should be no parking on the yellow-painted curbs. The parking lots are not attended, so cars should be locked. The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts is not responsible for damage to vehicles or for the theft of valuables left in vehicles. All residents on the Hall of Residence should register their vehicles with the Assets and Facilities Management Department.

Schools and Departments

The College operates six Schools—Visual Arts; Music; Dance; Drama; Arts Management and Humanities; and Continuing Education and Allied Programmes; which are supported by ten (10) administrative and academic Departments— Procurement; Finance and Accounts; Student Services; Assets and Facilities Management, Information Technology; Multimedia Services; Marketing, Human Resource; Library and Registry. The College also has an Internal Auditor. The following tables highlight the facilities available in each School and Department. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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School of Music

Facility

Description

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

Offices for Director, Assistant Director, two (2) secretaries; Staff Lounge; Faculty offices.

VERA MOODY CONCERT HALL

450-seat Concert Hall for productions, classes and rehearsals.

FIVE(5) PRACTICE ROOMS

Practice Rooms with one (1) upright piano.

ELEVEN (11) TEACHING STUDIOS/PRACTICE ROOMS

Seven(7) rooms with one (1) upright piano each and Four (4) rooms with one (1) baby grand piano and one (1) upright piano each.

BAND REHEARSAL ROOM

Soundproof room for band rehearsals.

MUSIC EDUCATION ROOM

Music Education Room that doubles as Steel Band teaching and practice studio.

PERCUSSION ROOM

Teaching and practice studio for percussion instruments.

MUSIC TECH LAB

Computer Lab, with music technology software and hardware, that accommodates approximately nine (9) students.

PIANO LAB

Teaching and practice studio with nine (9) electronic pianos.

STORAGE ROOM

Storage facilities for equipment.

Facility

Description

School of Dance

OFFICE SPACES/STAFF ROOM THREE (3) DANCE STUDIOS

Offices for Director, two (2) Secretaries and Assistant Director; Staff For classes and rehearsals for approximately twenty (25) students in two (2) studios and forty-five (45) in one (1) studio.

ONE (1) DANCE STUDIO THEATRE – STUDIO’76

120-seat dance studio theatre for productions, classes and rehearsals.

TWO (2) LECTURE ROOMS

For theory-based classes for approximately twenty (20) students each.

GYM

Can facilitate five (5) persons.

COSTUME ROOM

Storage facilities for costumes.

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Facility

Description

OFFICE SPACE 1

Offices for Director, Secretary, Stage Technician and two (2) Lecturers.

OFFICE SPACE 2

Offices for Assistant Director and two (2) Lecturers.

OFFICE SPACE 3

Offices for Technical Supervisor and Lighting Technician.

STAFF ROOM/LOUNGE

Offices and Lounge for Staff

School of Drama

STAFF LOUNGE THREE (3) STUDIOS

For theory-based and practical classes for approximately thirty (30) students each.

LECTURE ROOM

For theory-based classes for approximately thirty (30) students.

AFTER DARK THEATRE

For theory-based classes and small theatre space for approximately twenty (20) persons.

DENNIS SCOTT THEATRE

142-seat theatre that doubles as a classroom.

AMPHITHEATRE

440-seat outdoor theatre.

SCENE SHOP

Space to build sets.

COSTUME ROOM

Storage space.

DRESSING ROOM ARTISAN DRESSING ROOM

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School of Visual Arts

Facility

Description

OFFICE

Offices for Director, Assistant Director and two (2) Secretaries.

STAFF LOUNGE

Holds approximately ten (10) persons with two (2) computer workstations.

JEWELLERY DEPARTMENT

Staff Office; jewellery lecture room; and small work room

2D AND 3D STUDIOS

Two (2) studios that doubles as classes and exhibiting spaces for approximately forty (80) students.

LIFE DRAWING ROOM

One (1) large studio for approximately forty (40) students.

PAINTING STUDIO

One (1) large studio for approximately forty (40) students.

PAINTING DEPARTMENT

2-storey building with two (2) spaces that can be partitioned into approximately four (4) rooms each for lecturing and exhibiting.

TEXTILE DEPARTMENT

Small office for Head of Department; small inner room with sewing machine for approximately ten (10) students; outer studio for approximately thirty (30) students.

THREE (3) SCULPTURE STUDIOS

One (1) small and one (1) large room for lecture and studio work.

CERAMICS DEPARTMENT

One (1) large studio with partitions for three (3) sections for lecture and studio work.

SVA LECTURE ROOM

For theory-based classes for approximately forty (40) students.

SMART CLASSROOM

For Information Technology and Audiovisual classes for approximately thirty (30) students.

PRINTMAKING DEPARTMENT

One (1) large studio for lecture and studio work.

PHOTOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT

One (1) computer room with five (5) computer workstations; one (1) studio for lecture and studio work; one (1) dark room.

COMPUTER LABS

Four (4) computer labs with approximately fifteen (15) work stations each; small office for Information Technology Technician.

ART HISTORY

One (1) small office for Faculty.

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Facility

Description

PRINCIPAL’S OFFICE BLOCK

Houses the Office of the Principal with two (2) Secretaries, Two (2) Vice Principals with one (1) Secretary each, Internal Auditor Human Resource Director with Human Resource Management System (HRMS) HR Officer Secretary.

EMCVPA

?

?

? ?

?

?

??

?

Administration

? ? ?? ?

Multi-level building which houses; MULTIMEDIA BUILDING • Administration; • Library; • Gallery; • School of Arts Management and Humanities; • School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes

• • • • • • • • • • •

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Library Copy Centre; Finance and Accounts Department; Registry; Information Technology Department; Multimedia Department; Student Services Department; Procurement Department; Marketing Department; College Gallery (CAGE); School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes; School of Arts Management and Humanities.

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Student Services The Student Services Department is responsible for the general student welfare. Included under the Department are offices whose responsibilities differ widely from alumni and career advisement to health and social activities. Student complaints and/or queries regarding academic and disciplinary matters should be first directed to the Director of the School, and if not resolved, be forwarded to the Registrar. Student complaints and/or queries regarding financial matters should be directed to the Director, Finance and Accounts. The following offices and services are handled by the Student Services Department. For more information on any of the offices or services of the Student Services Department, please call ext. 2201 or email horace.prince@emc.edu.jm.

Admissions and Orientation

The Registry is the point of entry for all new and returning students to the EMCVPA and admissions information is available all year round in the Department. Refer to the Registry at ext. 2171 or by email registry@emc.edu.jm, for the most current admissions information. Orientation is normally held the week before the commencement of the Academic Year. Orientation is a week-long event which includes new parent orientation, general assembly, freshman’s breakfast, sessions on financial, spiritual, and health wellness, and a welcoming ceremony. Orientation is MANDATORY for all new incoming students.

Alumni

The graduates of the EMCVPA have excelled locally and internationally as arts educators and practitioners. Our graduates are teachers in primary, secondary and tertiary institution, particularly at the secondary level where they support the CXC and ROSE syllabi—Dance, Music, Drama, Visual Arts and Stage Craft. The graduates have formed popular bands including Roots Underground and Di Blueprint Band, Raging Fyah, C-Sharo and have also supported internationally-acclaimed musicians. The EMC Alumni Association invites graduates of the College to join in the effective networking of its graduates by supporting all its activities to enhance the quality of education and welfare of the College.

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Athletics

The sports department is managed by a Sports Director who is responsible for both inter-collegiate and inter-campus sports programme. Generally, there are three (3) intercollegiate sports team—football, netball and basketball. The EMCVPA football team was the proud Inter-collegiate Football League (2007) champion and the Inter-collegiate Knock-Out Competition (2006) champion. To be eligible to participate in any of the inter-collegiate sports teams, students must be registered full time with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Sports Day is held annually, generally in the second semester, and provides opportunity for the wide-spread participation in sporting competitions between houses. Other inter-campus competitions are planned throughout the school year. Students are encouraged to participate in the variety of sports programming offered.

Clubs and Societies

The following are the current active student clubs and societies on campus: • Next Generation Art (visual and performing arts) • Jamaica Teacher’s Association Professional Group (teacher/professional) • Rotoract (service) • Circle K (service) • Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship (UCCF) (religious) • Universities and Colleges Apostolic Ministry (UCAM) (religious)

Counselling

The Guidance Counsellor assists students with any challenges brought on by their adjustments to College life. We encourage students who are experiencing personal difficulties to seek assistance at the earliest possible time so that they have a better chance to regain a balance in their lives. The Guidance Counsellor provides psychological counselling for a variety of issues including depression, stress, interpersonal conflict, bereavement and crisis management. Individual consultations are preferably done by appointment.


The Counselling Unit also coordinates select programmes designed to assist students with financial needs. The Jamaica Values and Attitudes (JAMVAT) programme, coordinated by the Ministry of Education, and the National Youth Service, coordinated by the Ministry of Youth, is one such where students conduct 200 hours of community service in exchanged for 30% of their tuition. The Ministry of Education’s needy student fund is another but is open to a limited number of very needy students.

There is limited summer housing available. Students are required to apply for summer housing by the stipulated deadline date. Summer housing is not guaranteed. Returning students who have an outstanding balance on their housing fees are ineligible for housing the next academic year.

For assistance students may call ext. 2207, or visit the Guidance Counsellor’s Office located beside the Marketing Department. All services are confidential.

Conditions of Acceptance Upon acceptance, prospective residents are required to sign a contractual agreement for the FULL College academic year. Under the College’s Regulation, acceptance of a housing placement is for the FULL academic year. NO refund will be paid in the event of early departure. Residents are required and expected to abide by all the rules governing student housing. For further information on housing call ext. 2204 or email rudolf.rowe@emc.edu.jm.

Hall of Residence - Scarlet Hall

Health

Information about and application forms for some work and travel programmes can also be obtained at the Counselling Unit.

Housing is situated on campus and offers self-catering accommodation to students. Nestled in the heart of the Kingston metropolitan area, the College is in close proximity to major shopping areas, such as New Kingston, Half-WayTree, Cross Roads and Downtown. Because of its location, residents have easy access to supermarkets, restaurants, stores, banks, galleries, theatres and hospitals. The Hall of Residence comprises three blocks which accommodate approximately ninety (90) residents. Each block houses thirty (30) rooms. There are five (5) households on each block with six (6) rooms in each household. Accommodation on campus is usually single occupancy, designed with the concept of six residents forming a household, each having an individual bedroom while sharing bathroom and kitchen facilities. Each bedroom is furnished with a bed with drawers, a desk, chairs a closet and a night table. Housing fees are paid annually or per semester, plus a Caution Fee which is held against damage to the facilities. Eligibility for Housing Accommodation on the Hall of Residence is limited. Therefore housing is only available to full-time students (those who have registered for twelve (12) or more creditshours per semester). Housing is not guaranteed for either new or returning students. Each year, students are required to re-apply for housing (by the stipulated deadline date) and should know that housing for the next academic year is not guaranteed. Student housing closes at the end of the second semester (generally the weekend after the last final exam), at which time residents are expected to vacate housing.

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The Doctor’s office and the Sick Bay are located on the Halls of Residence adjoining Block Two and immediately to the right of the Halls of Residence Manager’s office. The sick bay has a two-bed capacity. A part-time doctor is on staff to cater to the medical needs of the campus community. Currently, the doctor is on campus two days per week. Students are required to complete medicals bi-annually. The medical questionnaire, copy of the immunization card and blood test results must be submitted prior to registration. School of Dance and Drama students must also complete and submit a physical fitness report. The College nurse is full-time and caters to the health needs of the college population in the following ways: • Health screening • Health education • Attending to the emergencies occurring on campus • Referring students to other health care personnel as necessary • Co-ordinating and assisting with the transportation of students to the hospital

International Students

The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts embraces diversity and welcomes students from different races, cultural backgrounds, countries and nationalities. The Student Services Department provides services and information to assist in a smooth transition to life at the College and in Jamaica.

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Entry and arrival in Jamaica The ports of entry by air are the Norman Manley International Airport in Kingston and the Donald Sangster International Airport in Montego Bay. Students are advised to make reservations to land in Kingston rather than Montego Bay.

• • • •

Transportation If prior arrangements have been made through the Student Services department, a representative of the College will meet overseas students upon their arrival at the Norman Manley International Airport. These arrangements must be made at least two weeks before scheduled arrival – full arrival details (student’s full name, airline, flight number, city/country of departing flight and time of arrival) must be provided in order to facilitate pick up. Students will be sent confirmation of airport pickup arrangements via email. This is a one-time, free service offered to new international students, when they first arrive.  Students who request airport pickup and fail to notify the Student Services Office of major delays/cancellations or change of plans in a timely manner, will be assessed a fee for failure to cancel.   There is also a reliable taxi service at the airport offered by the Jamaica Union of Travellers Association (JUTA) that can provide transportation to the campus.  Please note that students are responsible for all costs associated with the taxi service.   Immigration Policy As stipulated by the Immigration Laws of Jamaica, foreign nationals are required to hold a valid passport and entry visa. Visas are required for international students (regardless of the period of study).  Students from CARICOM or Commonwealth countries do not require a visa (except those from the Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Nigeria).  The student visa must be obtained from the nearest Jamaican Consulate or Mission, prior to arrival in Jamaica.   On arrival at the airport, the letter of acceptance, issued by the College, must be presented to the Immigration Officers, following which your passport will be stamped, granting entry for two weeks. Once you are enrolled, the Registry will issue you a letter confirming registration, which should be submitted to the Immigration Office for processing an Extension of Stay Approval.  Foreign students attending the College must report to the Immigration Department, 25c Constant Spring Road, Kingston 10, within this two-week period, and submit the following documents in order to extend their stay:

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A letter from the College (Registry) confirming his/ her programme, and the year for which the student is registered A valid passport (for the duration of studies) An Alien Registration card (for non-Commonwealth nationals) Two passport sized pictures (for non-Commonwealth nationals) An Extension of Stay fee (Information on fee available at www.pica.gov.jm)

Taxpayer Registration Number The Taxpayer Registration Number (TRN), while not necessary for admission to the College is required to carryout certain business transactions such as opening a local bank account etc. International students can apply for a TRN at the Tax Collectorate (Inland Revenue) Office.  There is no fee to apply for the TRN.  However, students will need to: • Complete and submit the “Application for Taxpayer Registration (Individuals)” form, available at the Tax Office. • Show their passport at the time of submitting the application form. The TRN is issued immediately and is valid for use right away.  Students are advised to store the TRN slip carefully.  A permanent TRN card will be issued by the Tax Office approximately one month after the application is submitted.  International students can check with the Office of Student Services if they need assistance with the TRN process. Student Council The College’s administration fully supports the Student Council by facilitating participation in several areas of college governance. Through the Council, students get a chance to hone the leadership skills and articulate their concerns at the highest level of College governance by way of representation on the College Board, the Academic Board and the Finance Committee of the College Board. The Student Council promotes awareness of life on campus and encourages students’ involvement in all campus activities. Student Council representatives are also encouraged to organize outreach activities and fund-raising schemes to support activities beneficial to the student body and the College. The Student Council Executive is selected through an annual election process, which usually takes place in April or the week immediately following the Easter break. Only students who are registered full-time, with a minimum GPA of 3.0, and have no disciplinary actions pending, are eligible to


Student Employment

run for Student Council Executive. Students should also be recommended by their Head of Department or Director of School and are expected to complete a mandatory leadership training post election.

Students are encouraged to register with the Student Services Department for part-time employment on Campus. Campus employment varies across the Departments on Campus, and is available on a needs basis. In the event of a vacancy, students’ current registration statuses are first verified. Eligible students should be registered full-time with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Eligible students are then selected on the specified skills set and the needs of the Department. Students are then interviewed by the Department requesting the student employee and the successful student/students are selected. Students can work up to twenty-two (22) hours per week on campus.

The leadership of the Student Council consists of: • President • Vice President • Secretary • Public Relations Officer • School Representatives (6 individuals) • Treasurer • Sports Representative

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Campus Directory SWITCHBOARD LINES

876-754-8830-1/4; 876-619-EDNA (3362) | TELEPHONE OPERATOR - EXT. 0/2134 SECURITY EXT.

NAME

POSITION

2222

Exit Gate

Security

2220

Entrance Gate

Security

2221

Hostel Gate

Security

2036

Dance

Security

2150

Security

STRAIGHT LINES TELEPHONE NUMBER

DEPARTMENT

876-754-8915

Art Shop

876-960-2892

Finance & Accounts Department

876-968-7973/507-7262

Hall of Residence - Scarlet Hall

876-926-9556

Human Resource Department

876-968-0785

Library

876-920-4633

Marketing and Public Relations Department

876-920-4051

Principal’s Office

876-920-5819

Procurement & Inventory Management Department

876-960-6171

Registry

876-968-0027

School of Dance

876-968-0028

School of Drama

876-920-8163

School of Music

876-968-0779

School of Visual Art

876-929-2581/920-1571

School of Arts Management and Humanities

876-960-3074

School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes

876-968-7509

Office of V.P. Academic & Technical Studies

876-926-7464

Office of V.P. Administration & Continuing Studies

876-926-2266

Information Technology Department

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876-929-0853

Office Services

876-920-0830

Assets and Facilities Management

ASSETS & FACILITIES MANAGEMENT 2130

Ryan Gayle

Director

2131

Karen Telfer

Secretary

2132

Maintenance Officer

2133

C. Elaine Hutchinson

Office Services Manager

2134

Jerome Lattimore

Telephone Operator/Receptionist

2139

Karen Gayle

Inventory Clerk/Stores Clerk (Acting)

PROCUREMENT 2100

Beverley Oliver-Cunningham

Purchasing & Inventory Manager (Acting)

2101

Andrea Anderson

Secretary

2030

Kerry-Ann Henry

Director

2031

Sharon McKinley

Senior Secretary

2032

Simone Reid

Receptionist

2033

Marlon Simms

Asst. Director

SCHOOL OF DANCE

2034

Lecturer’s Office

2035

Lunchroom

2036

Security

Entrance & Exit of Building

2010

Eugene Williams

Director

2011

Diana Duncan

Senior Secretary

2012

Dionne Henry-Ramsay

Receptionist

2013

Pierre LeMaire

Asst Director (Acting)

SCHOOL OF DRAMA

2014

Production Manager

2016

Elizabeth Montoya-Stemann

Lecturer

2017

Stacey-Ann Banton

Stage Technician

2018

Janet Muirhead-Stewart

Lecturer

2019

Calvin Mitchell

Lighting Technician

2020

Roger Steger

Senior Lecturer

2021

Lunchroom

23

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SCHOOL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION & ALLIED PROGRAMMES 2040

Cecele Dixon- Mattis

Director

2041

Secretary

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 2080

Roger Williams

Director

2081

Kerry- Ann Latham

Senior Secretary

2082

Alicia Duncan-Williams

Receptionist

2083

Michael Sean Harris

Asst. Director

2084

Stephen Shaw-Naar

2085

Lecturer’s Office

2086

Jeremy Moder/Donald McDowell

Music Room # 1

2087

Michael Dyke

Music Room # 2

2088

Ruth Royes

Music Room # 3

2089

Lori Burnett

Music Room # 4B

2090

Pauline Watson

Music Room # 5

2091

Allison Wallace

Music Room # 6

2093

Ann McNamee

Music Room # 8

2094

Maurice Gordon

Music Room # 10

2095

Orville Hammond

H.O.D.

2096

Rafael Salazar

Music Room # 14

2097

Teresita Ruiz

Music Room # 15

2098

Board Room

2099

Lunch Room

SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS 2050

Miriam Smith

Director

2051

Georgia Thompson

Senior Secretary

2052

Sophia Thomas

Secretary

2053

Paula Daley

Asst Director

2054

Lecturer’s Room

2055

Eugenio D’Melon

Senior Lecturer

2056

Maxine Gray

Ceramics Department

2057

Nicole Johnson

Senior Lecturer

2058

Necon Bailey

Jewellery Department

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2059

Donnette Zacca/Mark Samuels

Photography Department

2060

Laurie Lee Jones/Robert Hall

Lecturer

2061

Winston Campbell

Senior Lecturer

2062

Petrina Dacres

H.O.D.

2063

Jeff Menzies

Sculpture Department

2064

Oswald Mattis

Visual Communication Department

ARTS MANAGEMENT & HUMANITIES 2070

Phylis Drummond-Hemmings

Director

2071

Karen Jones

Senior Secretary

2072

Janice Gore

Senior Lecturer

2073

Senior Lecturer

2074

Lorna Ellis

Lecturer

2075

Keino Senior

Senior Lecturer

2076

Lecturer

2077

Melva Davis

Lecturer

2078

Simone Harris

Lecturer

FINANCE & ACCOUNTS 2110

Carlene Colville

Director, Finance

2111

Stephanie White

Senior Secretary

2112

Phillip Shaw

Budget Officer

2113

Lorraine Boothe-Small

Accounting Technician

2114

Andrea Reid

Senior Accountant

2115

Natasha Henry

Senior Accountant

2116

Owen Williams

Accounting Technician

2117

Marsha Smith Martin

Accounting Technician

2118 2119

Payroll Debeisha Smith

Cashier

LIBRARY 2140

Erica Davis

College Librarian

2142

Beverly Campbell

Deputy College Librarian

2143

Juliet Facey

Librarian II

2144

Lindel Edwards

Librarian II

2145

Technical Services

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2147

Open Shelf Collection

2146

Music Collection

2149

Library Assistant

2150

Mr. Anthony Pitter

Library Security

2152

Katrina Coombs

Cage Gallery

2153

Avryl Alvaranga

Copy Centre

MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT 2160

Coleen Douglas

Marketing/P.R. Manager

2161

Senior Secretary

2162

Elton Johnson

Publication/Research Officer

2163

Karel Smith

Publication/Research Officer

PRINCIPAL’S OFFICE BUILDING / HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 1990

Marcia Donaldson Thomas

Director of Human Resources

1992

Norda Dillon

HRMIS Officer

1991

Senior Secretary

2000

Nicholeen DeGrasse-Johnson

Principal

2001

Vashti Shaw Harris

Executive Secretary

2002

Wendy-Ann Brissett

Administrative Secretary

2003

Denise Salmon

Vice Principal Admininstration & Resource Development

2004

Donet Scott

Executive Secretary to VP, Admininstration

2005

Carol “Annie” Hamilton

Vice Principal Academic and Technical Studies

2006

Sonia Thorpe-Parkinson

Executive Secretary to VP, Academic

2007

Board Room

Boardroom

2008

Conference Room Downstairs

Conference Room

2009 2120

Lunchroom Marcia Ricketts

Internal Auditor

REGISTRY 2170

Claudia Woon Chin

Registrar

2171

Opal Wallace

Senior Secretary

2172

Cavel Jackson

Assistant Registrar

2173

Patrice Thomas-Cameron

Registry Assistant-Students Affairs

2174

Kay Thomas- Smith

Senior Registry Assistant (Acting)

2175

Tanya Gordon

Registry Assistant-Examination (Acting)

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2176

Lorraine Dixon

Registry Assistant-Students Affairs (Acting)

2177

Mauvalee Robinson

Students Records Officer

2178

Melody McDowell

Assistant Registrar Examination Officer

STUDENT SERVICES / HALL OF RESIDENCE EXT.

NAME

POSITION

2200

Horace Prince

Director (Acting)

2201

Charmaine Small

Student Services Secretary

2202

Tisha Wilson

Student Services Officer

2203

Hall of Residence Secretary

2204

Rudolf Rowe

Hall of Residence

2205

Tian Palmer-McKoy

Nurse

2206

Senni Onunuju

Doctor

2207

Sharon Hare

Guidance Counsellor

2208

Errol Williams

Caretaker

2210

Student`s Council President

Hostel,Blk 2

2211

Common Room 1

Block 1, Household 2

2212

Common Room 4

Block 1

2213

Common Room 3

Block 1

2214

Common Room 2

Block 1

2215

Common Room 5

Block 1

2216

Common Room 7

Block 2

2217

Students

Block 2

2218

Students

Block 2

2219

Common Room 6

Block 2

2220

Security

Entrance Gate

2221

Security

Hostel

2222

Security

Exit

2223

Common Room 8

Block 2

2224

Common Room 11

Block 3

2225

Common Room 12

Block 3

2226

Common Room 13

Block 3

2227

Common Room 14

Block 3

2228

Common Room 15

Block 3

27

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 2180

Winston Henry

I.T. Manager

2181

Susana Stewart

Secretary (Acting)

2182

Michael Walker

Systems Administrator

2183

Nyan Aung

Network Administrator

2184

Mark Green

I.T. Administrator / I.T.Lab

2185

Trudy-Ann Campbell

I.T. Administrator / I.T.Lab

2186

Jody-Ann Matthews

I.T. Administrator / SVA

2188

IT Administrators

I.T. Help Desk

2189

Michael Walker

Aeorion Help Desk

2187

MULTIMEDIA SERVICES DEPARTMENT 2190

Radcliffe Powell

Technical Coordinator

2191

Susana Stewart

Secretary (Acting)

2192

Albert Blackwood

Multimedia Services Technician

2193

Kamau Williams

Multimedia Services Technician

2194

Norman Chambers

Multimedia Services Technician

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Dep

LOCATION: WHERE WE ARE The Edna Manley College is located at 1 Arthur Wint Drive, Kingston 5, and is within easy reach of downtown and uptown shopping areas, banks, hospitals, galleries, theatres, supermarkets, sporting facilities such as the National Indoor Sports Centre and the National Stadium and Emancipation Park.

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Campus Maps

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Edna Manley College Location Map

Our Location

MISS

The De promot The de and co psycho

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College Campus Map

10

9

8

11 6 13

7

3

1 4 2 5

Key 1&2 School of Visual Arts 3 School of Dance 4 Amphitheatre 5 School of Drama 6 School of Music 7 Multimedia Building 8 Hostel 1

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9 Hostel 2 10 Hostel 3 11 Cafeteria 12 Principal’s Building 13 Facilities Department 14 Basketball Court Bookshop (Shading without number)

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ADMISSIONS and FINANCE

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Undergraduate Admissions Requirements The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (EMCVPA) provides the highest quality tertiary education in the Visual and Performing Arts. An education at the EMCVPA prepares students for creative and executive positions in the visual and performing arts and related industries, and as such the College firstly selects candidates who show an aptitude in these areas. All applicants must offer evidence of creative ability and ability to complete tertiary studies through the following requirements.

Grade V or equivalent and a minimum level of ABRSM Grade V Theory or equivalent, in addition to the matriculation requirements stated above. * English Language is mandatory for all applicants to the Certificate Programmes. Studio Certificate Programmes Studio Certificate Programmes in the Schools of Visual Arts and Dance do not require CXC subjects.

1. Educational Background Bachelor of Arts and Associate of Arts Programmes To pursue studies in the Degree Programmes at the Schools of the Visual Arts, Dance, Drama, Music and Arts Management and Humanities, (AA, BFA, BAE, BM, BME, BA Arts Management, BA Drama in Education and BA Dance Education), a minimum of five (5) subjects at the General Proficiency Level, comprising of a combination of at least two (2) CAPE subjects grades 1 to 5 and three (3) CXC/CSEC subjects grades 1, 2, or 3 (Grade 3 will be allowed after 1998) or three (3) or two (2) G. C. E. ‘A’ level subjects grades A to E, and three (3) ‘O’ Level subjects grades A, B or C or equivalent OR a minimum of five (5) subjects at CXC/CSEC grades 1, 2, or 3 (Grade 3 will be allowed after 1998) or five (5) subjects at G.C.E ‘O’ level grades A, B or C. * English Language is mandatory for all applicants to the Degree Programmes. ** English Literature at the CXC or CAPE Level is mandatory only for applicants to the School of Drama. *** Applicants to the AA, BM and BME Programmes must attain, on Principal Instrument, a minimum level of ABRSM Grade V or equivalent and a minimum level of ABRSM Grade V Theory or equivalent, in addition to the matriculation requirements stated above. Certificate Programmes To pursue Certificate Programmes in Visual Arts, Dance Performance and Music, a minimum of two (2) CXC/CSEC subjects at the General Proficiency Level grades 1, 2, or 3 (Grade 3 will be allowed after 1998).

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An interview is mandatory for all Programmes and is conducted to determine applicant’s study objectives, commitment and financial preparedness for the selected Programme of Study. In addition to the interview the following requirements apply to the specific Schools:

3. Portfolio Assessment/Drawing Examination/Audition School of Visual Arts Applicants for the School of the Visual Arts will be required to present a portfolio of a minimum of fifteen (15) pieces of artwork. The portfolio should represent the candidate’s ability to draw and his/her technical development, while providing the interview panel with an indication of interests, commitment and strengths. The work presented might include still-life, landscape, portraits and figure drawings and should demonstrate use of colours and sense of composition. Three-dimensional work, sculpture and applied arts (Decorative Arts) may also be presented. If succesful at the interview, applicants are also required to sit a Drawing Examination. The final decision for acceptance is based on the performance at the Drawing Examination, portfolio standard and performance at the interview. * Visual Arts at the CSEC or CAPE Levels is desirable for the School of Visual Art. However, where a candidate does not have a pass in CSEC Visual Arts or CAPE Art and Design,

Applicants to the Certificate in Music Programme must attain, on Principal Instrument, a minimum level of ABRSM

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his/her Portfolio should provide the assessment committee with unequivocal proof of his/her potential.School of Music Applicants to the School of Music are required to perform


an instrumental or vocal work of choice and take a short written oral/aural examination in basic ear training and sight singing and a written theoretical examination paper for the School’s placement test. * All instrumentalists (except pianists and drummers) are required to bring their own instrument. ** All drummers are expected to provide their own drum sticks. *** Singers and instrumentalist should provide their own accompanists/ accompaniment (track).

However, an accompanist will be available by prior arrangement at an additional cost. School of Dance Applicants to the School of Dance are required to perform a solo piece of choice and participate in two dance technique classes (Caribbean Traditional Folk and Modern). School of Drama Applicants to the School of Drama are required to prepare and present two dramatic monologues (one Dialect, the other Standard English) and take a test in comprehension, grammar and analytical skills.

Admissions Process Application: Application forms can be obtained online at www.emc.edu.jm or at the Registry Department. Application for admission to the EMCVPA should be completed in duplicate and returned, with the relevant supporting documents and application fee to: The Registry Department, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, 1 Arthur Wint Drive, Kingston 5.

College English Proficiency Test: All applicants are required to sit the EMCVPA’s English Proficiency Test as a part of the College requirement for entrance. The test is administered by the Registry and attracts a non-refundable fee. If an applicant fails the College English Proficiency Test, but meet the other requirements, they will be required to register for remedial English courses.

Application forms can also be submitted online, however all required documents must still be submitted to the Registry for verification.

Auditions/Interviews/Drawing Examination: After the sitting of the English Proficiency Test, applicants are then invited for their interviews and audition/portfolio assessment and drawing examination.

The application period commences October 1 and ends on January 31 of the following year. An extended registration runs to March 31 at a fee. Application forms are processed between January and June of each year. The assigned Registry Assistant checks the forms for completeness and consistency of responses and certification presented. After completing the applicationprocessing checklist, applicants are invited to sit the College English Proficiency Test. Application Forms are processed between January and April of each year. The assigned Registry Assistant checks the forms for completeness and consistency of responses and certification presented. After completing the applicationprocessing checklist, applicants are invited to sit the College’s English Proficiency Test.

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Selection: Selection will be made after the auditions are completed in the respective Schools. The information on the selected applicants is sent to the Registry from where letters of acceptance/rejection/pending are disseminated with the requisite information. Applicants who receive a pending letter, should submit their examination (CXC) results as soon as possible to the Registry Department, to facilitate further consideration of their application. Acceptance: Once applicants are accepted, they are sent an Acceptance Package consisting of the Acceptance Letter, Tuition and Ancillary Fee Schedule, an Application Form and bank Voucher for Student Housing, A Medical Form to be completed by a Physician, a Sagicor Medical Insurance Application Form and an Orientation Schedule.

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Special Admission Requirements Mature Students

Mature students with other qualifications and/or significant work experience are also welcome to apply. Every application is considered on a case-by-case basis and applicant’s life experiences are also taken into account. To be eligible for Mature Student Entry, applicants should satisfy the following requirements: 1. Be 25 years of age or older 2. Have at least five (5) years of experience in teaching or practicing in the art form 3. Be successful at the audition or portfolio interview 4. Be successful in the entry exam of the School to which application is made 5. Be successful in the English Proficiency Test 6. Demonstrate academic competence/readiness for Programme 7. Demonstrate professional competence The EMCVPA’s courses are tertiary-level, and all applicants, regardless of age, are required to demonstrate the ability to meet the full academic requirements.

International Students

The EMCVPA welcomes international students to its campus as they contribute to the social, cultural and intellectual diversity of the College community. International students must complete the same undergraduate application form, but it is also recommended that they liaise closely with the assigned Registry Assistant regarding the submission of the supporting documents and in the case of the Schools of Dance and Drama, a videotape of performance; the School of Music, a DVD/CD of their music; and the School of Visual Arts, a portfolio. Acceptance decisions are made only when all components of the application are on file and are based on academic record, English proficiency, acceptance of performance demonstrated on video, DVD/CD as well as the guarantee of sufficient finances to meet the attendance costs. English is the language of instruction at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts. Students must be able to understand rapid, idiomatic English to express themselves clearly in speech and in writing. Applicants whose native language is not English must take the test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Students should submit proof of results of the TOEFL before registration. Students should arrive at least one (1) week prior to the start of the semester to sit the College English Proficiency Test. After notification of acceptance a tuition deposit is required to confirm acceptance of the offer. The EMCVPA can provide no financial assistance for an undergraduate international student. Therefore it is imperative that the applicant have sufficient financial support available to meet both academic and living expenses for each year of study.

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Transfer from the School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes

Candidates must meet the academic entry requirements set by the UWI, Mona as well as the EMCVPA. See page no, for further information.

Students who are enrolled or successfully complete credits in the Studio Certificates (30-credit or 60-credit) or any other credit-bearing courses in the School of Visual Arts may have those credits transferred to the full-time degree programme. Students will need to follow the same application procedures for entry into the full-time programme.

Readmission

Transfer Admission

The EMCVPA will consider credit transfer for all courses taken through a recognized institution or accredited programme where evidence is given that each course under consideration has been satisfactorily completed with a grade of ‘C’ or higher and that the courses are comparable in content, nature and level of course(s) offered at the College. Grades transferred from another institution are not used in computation of the Grade Point Average (GPA) at the College but credits will be applied towards graduation requirement. See page no for the processes for requesting transfer credits.

Transfer Admission for International Students

The foreign government or state governmental agency of a foreign country must formally recognize the institution as offering post-secondary programmes comparable to that offered at the EMCVPA. Equity will be maintained between transferred credit and EMCVPA credit.

Credits Earned as a Transient Student

A student enrolled at the EMCVPA is not permitted to take credit work as a transient student at another institution to be applied toward a degree without prior permission from the Director of School. The permission must be in writing, specifying which courses are acceptable and their equivalence at the EMCVPA. A copy of this permission must be filed with the College Registrar. Students do not need transient approval if they have not been enrolled at the College for two or more consecutive semesters.

Joint Admission

The College currently offers a joint Bachelor of Arts, with a Major or Special in any of the visual and performing disciplines offered by the College, with the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona. The degree runs for three (3) years and students attend classes on the campus of both institutions.

35

Students who have previously attended EMCVPA (excluding summer semester) as matriculated students may apply for readmission. All previous academic records and achievements at the College, grades from studies pursued elsewhere, the reasons for which the student withdrew are all considered in the readmission process. Application for readmission must be done in advance of the semester for which they wish to return. Applicants with outstanding financial obligations to the College will not be eligible for readmission until such financial obligations are cleared. Students dismissed for academic reasons are eligible to apply for readmission after two (2) semesters. However, in the interview with the Director of School for readmission the student must demonstrate a readiness to successfully undertake College work at EMCVPA. If a student in good academic standing applied for Leave of Absence and is ready to return, such a student does not need to apply for readmission but must submit a letter to the Registrar and Director of School indicating their intention to return in the upcoming semester. However, if the Leave of Absence period for which the student had applied expires and the student did not return in the next regular semester such student must apply for readmission. Readmission Application Forms are available in the Registry and attracts an application fee.

Classification of Students

The number of credits for which a student is enrolled toward the degree, diploma or certificate determines a student’s classification. A student is classified as follows: Full-Time Student All full-time students are required to enroll a minimum of 12 credits per semester. Normal progress for full-time students enrolled at the EMCVPA shall mean the satisfactory completion 30 semester hours of work in each academic year from the date of first enrolment and the satisfactory completion of all degree requirements within 4½ calendar years from the date of first enrolment. No student will be allowed to repeat any year more than once in the overall four-year course.

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Students pursuing studies full time must complete the degree programme within five (5) academic years and Diploma programme within four (4) years. However, if a student fails to complete his/her programme within the specified time due to extenuating circumstances such as illness, the student is allowed one (1) additional year in which to do so. A student may also apply for leave of absence not exceeding one (1) year. Students must complete their programme within five (5) years after the initial duration of their programme.

Students pursuing studies on a part time basis must complete the degree programme within six (6) academic years, Diploma programme within five (5) years and Certificate programme within four (4) years. However, if a student fails to complete his/her programme within the specified time due to extenuating circumstances such as illness, the student is allowed one (1) additional year in which to do so. A student may also apply for leave of absence not exceeding one (1) year. Part-time students also have the option of transferring to full-time status at any time during his/her studies where conditions permit.

Part-Time Student The courses offered for credit in the part-time programmes are of the same content and semester credit hours to those in the full-time programmes. Courses are tailored to enrich any individual who seeks to gain knowledge for professional advancement or personal enrichment. The classes are held in the evenings and on week-ends for the convenience of the working professional. Continuing Education programmes are offered through the Schools of Visual Arts, Drama, Dance Music and Arts Management and Humanities. Summer sessions also give part-time students an opportunity to enroll in courses offered for credits during the day and/ or evening as well as full time students the opportunity to accelerate their programme. Courses are offered on a matriculated and non-matriculated basis. However, application to matriculated courses must be accepted through the formal admission process. Students pursuing part-time studies leading to a degree, diploma or certificate are considered part-time if they are enrolled in less than twelve (12) credits per year in the degree programme, nine (9) credits per year in the Diploma programme and six (6) credits per year in the Certificate programme. Part-time students may also enroll in not more than six (6) credits in the summer semester. While students are able to pursue an EMCVPA on a part-time basis, parttime classes are not offered exclusively during evening hours.

It should be noted that in accordance with the policies of the College, a student may not normally take courses which are more advanced than the programme year in which he is enrolled. However, the Director of School can grant special permission. Occasional Student An occasional student is one who has attained the competencies of a particular course(s), for which he/she wishes to register. Occasional students are also required to observe the part-time credit limit of a maximum of twelve (12) credits per annum. Specially Admitted Student Private individuals or government sponsored employees who wish to pursue ad hoc courses at the College are considered specially admitted students. It should be clearly understood that candidates must satisfy the normal prerequisites for each course. A specially admitted student may either audit courses, or pursue courses in full (inclusive of the examination process. He/she would be limited to a maximum of twenty-four (24) credits per year under this designation. The credits earned are transferable into the regular full-time, matriculated structured programmes. Specially admitted students must meet matriculation requirement if they wish to transfer to full-time student status.

Student must have matriculated into a programme and may be enrolled to complete a menu of additional courses that are not within the specific year of the programme for which he/she is registered observing pre-requisite requirement where applicable. Students must complete their programme within five (5) years after the initial duration of their programme.

Visitor A visitor is a person who is permitted to observe, free of cost, no more than a total of three (3) sessions of one class or studio activity (or group of classes or studios). Further observation or participation would necessitate enrolment and the payment of the appropriate fees.

Fees are charged per credit for part-time students in addition to ancillary charges according to courses offered. Part-time students are encouraged to take advantage of all services that will allow them to be fully immersed in the College’s artistic and academic community.

Visiting Scholar A visiting scholar is an individual manifesting the relevant competencies in research and in the relevant art form, who wishes to make use of the College’s facilities for the purpose of private study. Such a person might ultimately be

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preparing a paper for publication or thesis to be submitted for undergraduate or graduate studies, or may wish to acquire skills in aspects of the art form which are offered at the College and would not be enrolled in any other programme at the EMCVPA. Services to be made available to the Visiting Scholar would include: i. Library, archives and special collections with the prior permission of the relevant authorities. ii. Leave to attend and observe specified classes for a stated time period, usually one semester, or one academic year. (Renewal is subject to re-application) iii. Participation in practical classes in accordance with 1. & ll. above. iv. Fees payable should parallel the Post Graduate year’s fee. An application for permission must be lodged with the Office of the Vice Principal Academic and Technical Studies in the event that the scholar wishes to copy archival material or record, interview, and videotape lecturers/students or performances or exhibitions of the College. A copy of any paper, thesis, documentary or other print or audio-visual material published including research undertaken at the College, should also be lodged at the College Library. The use of the College’s material shall be acknowledged, and shall also be subject to the normal copyright regulations.

Visiting Student This refers to all students accepted to study, research or undertake practical and/or studios at the College under formal agreements for student exchange without a formal transfer. This also applies to overseas students who are not covered by such formal overseas student exchange agreement between their institution and the EMCVPA. Visiting students should normally have met the College’s matriculation requirements, and may also be required to sit an English proficiency test in the case of non-native speakers of English. Visiting students remain students of their sending institution and they have no automatic right to continue any programme beyond the period of the agreed attachment at the College. A visiting student must present a portfolio or audition CD or DVD for programmes in the visual and performing arts. Graduate Students The EMCVPA currently offers a Post-graduate Diploma in Art Education and Master of Arts in Art Education, in collaboration with the Ohio State University. The Post-graduate Diploma is offered through the School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes. Please contact continuinged@emc.edu.jm or 876-960-3074. Interested applicants for the Master of Arts may apply online to the Ohio State University and/or contact the Registry at 876-960-6171 for further information.

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Tuition, Fees and Expenses The following are approximate annual costs for attending the 2014-2015 academic year at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts. While certain charges such as tuition and fees are College costs, amounts for books, transportation and personal expenses are estimate. All fees are subject to change without notice.

Fee Schedule - Local Students

APPROVED BY THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, JA Tuition & Ancillary Fees Schedule for the 2014/2015 Academic Year for LOCAL STUDENTS, Notes: (1) Add relevant Ancillary Charges to Tuition Fee below 75% of Caution Fees are refundable at the end of the programme. Quotes are in $JA Dollars. FACULTY OF THE VISUAL ARTS (please add Ancillary Charges overleaf, Tuition & Ancillary Fees are quoted in US dollars) SCHOOLS School of the Visual Arts

PROGRAMMES

FOUNDATION/ YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

YEAR 4

Bachelor of Fine Arts

274,428.00

269,676.00

269,676.00

269,676.00

Bachelor of Art Education

274,428.00

269,676.00

269,676.00

269,676.00

Associate of Arts in Visual Arts*

274,428.00

269,676.00

-

-

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

YEAR 4

B.FA. in Dance & BA Dance Education 258,746.40

254,232.00

254,232.00

254,232.00

Associate of Arts in Performance*

258,746.40

254,232.00

-

-

Studio Certificate-Dance Technique*

106,920.00

106,920.00

-

-

Preliminary Qualifying-Dance

112,860.00

B.F.A in Drama & BA Drama Education 258,746.40

254,232.00

254,232.00

254,232.00

Associate of Arts in Theatre Arts*

258,746.40

254,232.00

-

-

Certificate

106,920.00

106,920.00

-

-

Bachelor of Music, Jazz Pop & Edu.

274,428.00

269,676.00

269,676.00

269,676.00

Associate of Arts in Music*

274,428.00

69,676.00

Performer Certificate in Music*

106,920.00

-

Fundamentals of Music Literacy & Performance. (Former PQ)

112,860.00

-

FACULTY OF THE PERFORMING ARTS (please add Ancillary Charges overleaf, Tuition & Ancillary Fees are quoted in US dollars PROGRAMMES School of Dance

YEAR 1

(please add Ancillary Charges overleaf) School of Drama

(please add Ancillary Charges overleaf)

School of Music

-

SCHOOL OF ARTS MANAGEMENT & HUMANITIES (please add Ancillary Charges overleaf) FOUNDATION/ YEAR 1

PROGRAMMES Arts Management & Humanities

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YEAR 2

YEAR 3

YEAR 4

Bachelor of Arts in Arts Management 258,746.40

254,232.00

254,232.00

254,232.00

Associate of Arts in Arts Management 258,746.40

254,232.00

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Tuition & Ancillary Fees Schedule for the 2014/2015 Academic Year ANCILLARY FEES FOR 2014-2015 ACADEMIC YEAR for LOCAL STUDENTS

OTHER COLLEGE RELATED FEES FOR 2014-2015 ACADEMIC YEAR

NEW & RETURNING STUDENTS

(Where applicable )

Library Fee

1,500.00

Late registration fees (students registering between August 25 – September 17)

1,500.00

Accident Insurance

1,000.00

Extended late registration (students registering after September 17)

3,000.00

Student ID Card

2,500.00

Graduation Fee

15,000.00

Student Union

400.00

Tuition Installment Fee (payable up-front)

1% of outstanding fees

Lab Fee (All Labs)

5,000.00

Late add/drop fee (per student request) (Max 2 subjects)

3,000.00

Locker (SVA, Dance & Drama)

500.00

External Examiner

5,000.00

Registration

500.00

Audit fees (per student request) Studio

70% Extra Course Fee

Final Year Show (All Schools)

6,000.00

Audit fees (per student request) Theory

50% Extra Course Fee

Caution Fee

8,500.00

SUB-TOTAL

33,900.00

Text Books (PQ Dance & Music)

12,000.00

EXTRA COURSE (PER CREDIT COST) DEGREE/DIPLOMA/CERTIFICATE

$9,000.00 (per credit)

Text Books (First year, all Schools)

35,000.00

Teaching Practice (2nd & 3rd years)

4,000.00

SUPPLEMENTAL EXAMINATION FEES FOR 2014-2015 ACADEMIC YEAR

Teaching Practice (4th years)

6,000.00

DEGREE $4,500.00 (per course)

DIPLOMA $4,500.00 (per course)

CERTIFICATE $4,500.00 (per course)

THE HOSTEL: ACCOMMODATION FEES FOR 2014-2015 ACADEMIC YEAR NEW RESIDENTS

RETURNING RESIDENTS

Accommodation Fee

J$180,000.00

Accommodation Fee

J$180,000.00

Shared Facilities

J$108,000.00

Shared Facilities

J$108,000.00

Caution Fee

J$7,500.00

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Fee Schedule - International Students APPROVED BY THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION Tuition & Ancillary Fees Schedule for the 2014/2015 Academic Year for INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS FACULTY OF THE VISUAL ARTS (Tuition & Ancillary Fees are quoted in US dollars) SCHOOLS

PROGRAMMES

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

YEAR 4

Degree (Caribbean Nationals)

9,983.00

9,983.00

9,983.00

9,983.00

11,979.00

11,979.00

11,979.00

11,979.00

7,260.00

7,260.00

Degree (USA & Others) School of Visual Arts & Music Preliminary Qualifying-PQ *Ancillary Fee

$900.00 (To be added to tuition)

Per Credit Rate

$488.00

FACULTIES OF THE PERFORMING ARTS & ARTS MANAGEMENT (Tuition & Ancillary Fees are quoted in US dollars) School of Dance, Drama, & Arts Management

PROGRAMMES

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

YEAR 4

Degree (Caribbean Nationals)

9,075.00

9,075.00

9,075.00

9,075.00

Degree (USA & Others)

9,999.00

9,999.00

9,999.00

9,999.00

Preliminary Qualifying-PQ

7,260.00

Ancillary Fees

$900.00

Per Credit Rate

$488.00

-

Part-Time/Visiting Students’ Rate PART-TIME/VISITING STUDENTS’ RATE All Schools

Charge per 45 contact hours/3 credits

$1,100.00

Accomodation Fees For 2014/2015 Academic Year NEW RESIDENTS

RETURNING RESIDENTS

Accommodation Fee

$2,750.00

Caution Fee

$ 175.00

Total

$2,925.00

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Accommodation Fee

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$2,750.00


Special Fees

The following Registry services attract a fee and fees are subject to change at any time. Please contact the Registry for the current fees.

Registry Services Transcript/ Statement Status Letter Application Fee – hardcopy or online (local residents, Caribbean Nationals, and residents of the USA & Other Countries) Late Application Fee (local residents)

Late Application Fee (Caribbean Nationals)

Late Application Fee (USA & Other Countries) Application for Re-Admission College English Entrance test Application for Re-mark of exam script

Replacement Student ID Card

• •

Replacement Degree/Diploma/Certificate

Tuition and Fees Increase

Tuition for the EMCVPA are set by the Ministry of Education, Jamaica. However, students should budget for an annual minimum 10% increase of tuition fees. Personal expenses are estimated. Therefore the costs listed under Expenses and Fees are the College’s best estimate at the time of publication. Tuition and fees are subject to change without notice.

Students will NOT be allowed to register for an academic year with outstanding fees from previous years. All fees may be paid by: • manager’s cheque or cash at any branch of the National Commercial Bank (NCB) island-wide. Absolutely NO personal cheques will be accepted. • online using Aeorion. • at the Finance & Accounts Department (FAD) Cashier if using a credit or debit card. The normal opening hours for the FAD Cashier are 8:30 am to 3:00 pm Monday – Friday. Your name and student identification number is to be used for all fee payment transactions. Students who have been awarded places at the Hall of Residence must show proof of payment of ALL ancillary fees and tuition fees for at least Semester One (1) before they will be allowed access to the Hall of Residence. Financial clearance is to be obtained from the FAD to facilitate registration. Students are required to register for each Semester. Students WILL NOT be allowed to sit exams, unless ALL fees are paid in full.

Fee Structure ALL students are required to pay fees indicated below. Tuition Fees Health & Accident Insurance Third & Fourth Year Concert/Independent Study Student Union Dues

Fee Payment Policy

Registration Fee

Any student who does not pay his/her fees in the prescribed time as set out in the fee policy will be de-registered unless alternative arrangements have been made for payment with the Registrar. The only exceptions to these rules are STUDENTS WITH SLB LOAN PENDING and STUDENTS SPONSORED BY CARIBBEAN GOVERNMENTS OR OTHER ORGANIZATIONS RECOGNIZED BY THE COLLEGE. All students of the EMCVPA have a responsibility to fulfill their financial obligations by adhering to the fee payment policy of the College approved by the College Board. General Guidelines • ALL tuition, ancillary and Hall of Residence fees are due and payable before or by the start of each academic year. 41

Caution fees (paid in Year 1) - 75% refundable at the end of the Programme if there is no damage to or loss of College property. First year students in ALL Schools (excluding Dance PQ and the Fundamentals of Music Literacy programme) are required to pay a book fee of $35,000. Hall of Residence Fees - due and payable before or by the start of the academic year. However, students may opt to pay by Semester. Some Schools will have fees that are applicable to those Schools only such as, locker, Teaching Practice (TP) and external examiner fees.

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Fee Payment Options ALL tuition, ancillary and Hall of Residence fees are due and payable before or by the start of the academic year. Students will be invoiced for the academic year. Each student is to review and select a payment option that is best suitable to him/her. Once selected, the student will be held liable for such fees.

• Below are the fee payment options available. A. Full Payment B. Semester Plan C. Student Loan Bureau (SLB) D. National Youth Service (NYS) / JAMVAT E. Full Scholarship F. Partial Scholarship G. International and Regional Students A. Full Payment • Full Payment must be made at any National Commercial Bank (NCB) island-wide (cash or manager’s cheque only); online using Aeorion or at the FAD Cashier if using a credit or debit card. • Take stamped voucher or receipt to the FAD to obtain financial clearance to register. B. Semester Plan • This plan attracts a one percent (1%) tuition installment fee and will be added to the total tuition. • Obtain Semester Plan Contract from the FAD and read carefully before completing in duplicate. • Complete contract and submit to FAD for approval. • SEMESTER ONE (1) - Fifty percent (50%) of the tuition fees must be paid and the total of the relevant ancillary fees prior to registration. ALL ancillary fees must be paid in full. • SEMESTER ONE (2) - The tuition installment fee and the remaining fifty percent (50%) tuition fees are due by February 15, prior to registration for Semester 2. • Take stamped voucher or receipt to the FAD to obtain financial clearance to register. • For students who will be residing at the Hall of Residence, the applicable fees for Semester One (1) must be paid in full before residence will be granted at the Hall of Residence. Students are encouraged to make ongoing payments and not wait until they have the full balance before making additional payments. C. Student Loan Bureau (SLB) • The SLB does not pay Hall of Residence and ancillary fees. • All student loan recipients will be allowed to register for Semester One (1) only provided ALL ancillary fees and Hall of Residence fees (where applicable) have been TABLE OF CONTENTS

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paid and communication has been received from the SLB indicating the APPROVAL of the loan. Students should ensure that they have complied with all the loan requirements stipulated by the SLB and paid their ancillary and Hall of Residence fees (where applicable) in order to obtain financial clearance from the FAD. Students with loan applications PENDING will be allowed to register only if they pay all ancillary fees, Hall of Residence fees (where applicable) and fifty percent (50%) of tuition fees.

D. National Youth Service (NYS) / JAMVAT • NYS/JAMVAT does not pay ancillary or Hall of Residence fees. • ALL ancillary fees and Hall of Residence fees (where applicable) must be paid to secure financial clearance from the FAD. • NYS pays twenty percent (20%) of the tuition fees; JAMVAT pays thirty percent (30%) of the tuition fees. • All NYS/JAMVAT recipients must submit to the FAD an approved status or letter of commitment from NYS/ JAMVAT. • NYS/JAMVAT students must pay fifty percent (50%) of tuition fees to obtain financial clearance. The one percent (1%) tuition installment fee will be applied to the difference of tuition fees and the amount to be received from NYS/JAMVAT. Take stamped voucher or receipt to the FAD to obtain financial clearance to register. E. Full Scholarship • All students receiving a full scholarship must proof of scholarship and amount to be covered by the donor/ sponsor to the FAD for their account to be updated and financial clearance granted. • Any sponsorship amount outstanding for prior year must be paid before the student is allowed to register for the new academic year. • The payments for scholarships/sponsorships should be received by the last working day in October. • Students should ensure that their sponsors with the stipulated payment deadline. • If the student fails to comply with the payment deadline, the student will not be allowed to sit Semester One (1) examinations. F. Partial Scholarship • All students receiving a partial scholarship must present proof of scholarship and amount to be covered by the donor/sponsor to the FAD for their account to be updated. • Any sponsorship amount outstanding for prior year


• •

must be paid before the student is allowed to register for the new academic year. The student must pay the difference in full at any NCB branch island-wide or online using Aeorion to secure financial clearance. If the partial scholarship plan is joined with the Semester Plan, the Semester Plan will be applicable.

G. International and Regional Students • All fees are payable in full in United States Dollars (US$) at the start of the academic year. • Where the student is sponsored by Caribbean Governments or other organizations (including the OAS) recognized by the College, a letter of commitment detailing the amount being paid, must be submitted to the College to permit registration prior to the receipt of payment. Such payments are to be received by the last working day in October. Students should ensure that their sponsors comply with the stipulated payment deadline. • Where the payment of ancillary fees is not covered, the student is required to pay such fees prior to registration. • Where fees are paid by telegraphic transfer, this information is to be copied to the FAD to facilitate prompt processing of the payment. • Financial clearance is to be obtained from the FAD. Allocation of Fee Payments The payment of fees to the College will be applied to the students’ accounts in the following order: • Outstanding balance brought forward from previous academic year(s) • Ancillary Fees • Tuition Fees – Semester One (1) • Halls of Residence Fees - Semester One (1) • Tuition Fees - Semester Two (2) • Halls of Residence Fees – Semester Two (2) Financial Penalties These will be applied where a student fails to meet the required payment deadlines. A late registration fee and extended late registration fee will be charged if the student fails to register by the stipulated time. There is also a late add/drop fee. A tuition installment fee of one percent (1%) is charged on all fees paid by installment.

processing after receipt of ALL documentation by the FAD. Refunds will be made by cheque in the name of the student unless the FAD is advised otherwise by the student or to the donor (if applicable).

Caution Fee Refund Seventy five percent (75%) of the caution fees paid is refundable at the end of the programme of study; graduation or the student withdrawing from a programme, provided no damage/loss has been done to College property. Students will be held liable for any damage/loss in excess of the caution fee and NO refund will be granted. • Obtain the Caution Fee Refund form from the Registry. • Complete and obtain ALL relevant signatures. • Submit the completed form to the Registrar. • Registrar indicates that the course of study is completed and degree awarded. • Registrar submits form to the FAD for payment. • Allow ten (10) to fifteen (15) working days for processing after receipt by the FAD. • Refunds will be made by cheque in the name of the student unless the FAD is advised otherwise by the student or to the donor (if applicable). Hall of Residence Fee Refund • Students who have paid Hall of Residence fees at the start of the Semester but do not take up residence within two weeks of the start of the Semester, will be given one hundred percent (100%) refund. • No refund will be made where students occupy the Hall of Residence for two months or more within a Semester. SLB Applicants • Students with loan applications PENDING will be allowed to register only if they pay all ancillary fees, Hall of Residence fees (where applicable) and fifty percent (50%) of tuition fees. • Refund of payment for fees will be made when SLB has approved the loan and at least payment for Semester 1 has been received. Scholarships/Grants Awardees • Refunds from scholarships and grants will be made only after verification of the receipt and clearance of such funds. Withdrawal • A student who seeks to withdraw from his/her course of study at the College MUST INFORM THE REGISTRAR IN WRITING stating (i) the reason for withdrawal and (ii) if he/she is desirous of re-admission in another academic year. This must accompany the form. A student

Fee Refund and Withdrawal Overpayment of Fees • Complete the Request for Refund Form. • Attach ALL receipts and submit to the Registrar. • Allow ten (10) to fifteen (15) working days for 43

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• • • •

who verbally informs a member of faculty of his/her non-attendance at classes or withdrawal will not be regarded as official notification or approval. Complete the Withdrawal/Deferral Form and submit to the Registrar. The date when the Registry receives a withdrawal request will be used as the date for refund computation. All withdrawals, excepting those on medical grounds, will attract a processing fee of Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000). Refunds will be made based on the following schedule:

Date of Submitting Request to Registrar

Percentage of Fee Refundable

Week 1-2 of Semester

80% refund

Week 3 of Semester

60% refund

Week 4 of Semester

40% refund

Week 5 of Semester

20% refund

Transcripts/Statements • Student pays at the FAD Cashier for transcript/ statement. • Student takes receipt to the Registrar and completes the relevant form. • Registrar will advise student when the transcript/ statement can be collected.

ABSOLUTELY NO REFUND WILL BE GRANTED AFTER FIVE (5) WEEKS OF THE START OF THE SEMESTER. • Any student who wishes to withdraw from the second semester of a programme must apply in writing to the Registrar within the first two weeks of the semester. There will be absolutely NO REFUND for persons who withdraw after the first two (2) weeks with or without permission. • Additionally, a student who withdraws on medical grounds is required to inform the College Nurse of the circumstances surrounding such withdrawal and MUST produce a Medical Certificate verified by a Medical Doctor, a copy of which should be sent to the Registrar, the respective Director of School and the Head of the Department concerned. The decision to re-admit such a student will be made by the Registrar in consultation with the Vice Principal for Academic and Technical Studies and/or Directors of Schools. • Students who withdraw without the approval of the Registrar will be considered to have abandoned his/ her studies and will be subject to the College’s formal re-admission process. Any outstanding fees for the year of withdrawal must be paid before the student will be readmitted to the College.

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Statement of Account • Statements of Account are available online on the Student Management System and are based on the student’s current profile. All charges appearing online are subject to change if there is a change in the student’s profile e.g. status, additional courses etc. Status Letters • Student pays at the FAD Cashier for status letter. • Student takes receipt to the Registrar and completes relevant form. • Registrar will advise student when the letter can be collected.

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Transfer of Programme Fees • A transfer fee will be charged for transfers from one programme to another. The application of transfer must reach the Registrar by the last working day in April. Failure to comply will result in a charge of Three Thousand Dollars ($3,000). • Please be advised that any student who does not pay his/her fees in the prescribed time given, or by the end of October (Semester 1) and by mid February (Semester 2) will be barred from sitting examinations unless alternative arrangements have been made for payment with the Director, Finance & Accounts. Students in arrears will NOT be granted normal student privileges such as access to the library, status letters or official transcript requests. • Individuals who attend classes without being registered are NOT students of the College. Financial Aid and Scholarships EMCVPA students benefit from scholarships from the following organizations: • Arts Foundation of the Edna Manley College • Restaurant Associates Ltd. (Burger King) • Carreras Ltd. • Institute of Jamaica-Rex Nettleford Scholarship • Mona Baptist Church-Douglas Samuels Memorial Scholarship • Jamaica Committee • Grace Kennedy Foundation • Louise Bennett Foundation • Jah Jerry Foundation


• • • • • •

JPENT Studios Bursary Mandeville Art Fair Roy Hall Memorial Scholarship PATH Bursary Cecil Boswell Facey Foundation All-Stars Initiative

National Youth Service (NYS) The National Youth Service through its JAMVAT programme provides the opportunity for students to participate in the development of the nation’s social capital through their contribution of 200 hours of public service. In response, the government undertakes 30% of the student’s tuition cost. You may visit their website at www.nysjamaica.org

Student Loan Bureau The Student Loan Bureau offers financing to students ensuring that qualified, needy Jamaican students have equal access to financial assistance to pursue tertiary education. You may visit their website at www.slbja.com

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

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Each student entering the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (EMCVPA) is responsible for reviewing and adhering to the academic procedures, policies and regulations of the College. The following information clarifies the EMCVPA student’s academic obligations. If there are any further questions, you may contact the Director of your School or the Registrar.

The College reserves the right to make changes, as required, in course offerings, curricula, academic policies, and other rules and regulations affecting students, to be effective whenever determined by the College. These changes will govern current and former students. The appropriate College authorities, keeping in mind the interests of the students and the College, will make interpretations of these policies.

Visual Arts *Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts (Ceramics; Painting; Sculpture; Jewellery; Textile and Fibre Arts including Fashion Design; Visual Communications and Illustration; Printmaking; Photography [new]; Design Studies [new]; Interdisciplinary Studies [new]) *Bachelor of Art Education *Associate of Arts in Visual Arts (Ceramics; Painting; Sculpture; Jewellery; Textile and Fibre Arts including Fashion Design; Visual Communications and Illustration; Printmaking; Photography [new]; Design Studies [new]) *Master of Arts in Art Education (in collaboration with Ohio State University, USA)

Student Responsibility

While the EMCVPA will endeavour to provide timely and accurate advisement, it is the responsibility of the student to know and satisfy the requirements of the academic programme in which he/she has enrolled. Students are responsible for: • knowing the requirements of the degree they are pursuing based on the date of entry into EMCVPA. • meeting with their advisor on a regular basis • keeping an active EMCVPA email account available and checking e mail regularly • using only EMCVPA email accounts for ALL course, programmes and College activities • keeping all contact information current and accurate with the Registry and their School • knowing the prerequisites to all classes • knowing and understanding all fees (tuition, health insurance, etc.) and resolving issues with the appropriate office (Finance & Accounts, Registry; etc.) • knowing and following all programme, course, and EMCVPA policies, regulations, and procedures • completing all reading and writing assignments on time, and as specified in each course • being responsive to the welfare of others, fostering a positive classroom climate based on trust and mutual responsibility, and exhibiting sensitivity to and respect for multiple socio-cultural realities, diversity and difference such as, but is not limited to, ability, class, race, gender, ethnicity, and age • participating in course discussions, paying attention and listening to others, asking questions of their peers and

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the lecturer, engaging their peers in conversation, and taking responsibility for keeping the dialogue active and relevant to class content.

Academic Resources

The EMCVPA is accredited by the University Council of Jamaica to offer the following degrees:

Music Bachelor of Music in Performance (Voice, Piano, Guitar, String, Wind, Percussion, Contemporary Music Studies [formerly *Bachelor of Music in Jazz and Popular Music Studies]) *Bachelor of Music Education *Associate of Arts in Music (Voice, Piano, Guitar, String, Wind, Percussion) Dance *Bachelor of Fine Arts in Performance and Choreography Bachelor of Fine Arts in Traditional and Folk Dance Studies *Bachelor of Arts in Dance Education *Associate of Arts in Dance Performance Drama Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Arts (Acting and Directing) *Bachelor of Arts in Drama in Education Associate of Arts in Theatre Arts (Acting) Arts Management *Bachelor of Arts in Arts Management *Associate of Arts in Arts Management (*) Denotes Accredited Programmes


The EMCVPA also offers Certificates and Studio Certificates in the following: Certificate in Visual Arts (Ceramics, Painting, Sculpture, Jewellery, Textile and Fibre Arts including Fashion Design, Visual Communications and Illustration, Printmaking, Photography) Certificate in Dance Performance Certificate in Music Studio Certificate in (Ceramics, Painting, Sculpture, Jewellery, Textile and Fibre Arts including Fashion Design, Visual Communications and Illustration, Printmaking, Photography) Studio Certificate in Dance

alcoholic beverages permitted on campus. Application and special permission must be made before alcoholic beverages are permitted for sale or use on the campus. Permission can be obtained from the Principal via written application.

Registration •

Students are to supply their current (temporary and permanent) address at registration and should notify the Registry immediately if there is any change in either their current (temporary or permanent) address.

No student will be allowed to register for more than one award at a time.

The courses and other requirements for these programmes are described under the section Academic Programmes.

Students are allowed to register in one Major or Minor programme only.

Students pursuing courses leading to the award of any certification must comply with the relevant regulations.

Rules and Regulations

Students are not permitted to enter any examination at the College unless they have registered with the College or made acceptable arrangements for the payment of tuition fees.

A student who has outstanding payments to the College will not be registered or entered into any examination until the sum owed has been paid in full or unless an alternative arrangement for payment has been made with the Finance and Accounts Department.

The College Rules and Regulations are applicable to all students admitted to study for a Degree or Certificate. Students enrolled in programmes will be furnished with the relevant regulations, but, if for any reason students are not, they are asked to collect copies from the Registry, relevant department or the College website. Additionally, students are subjected to the course regulations governing the award of certification, and should undertake to observe the regulations of the College. The College Board reserves the right to make changes to these regulations, as it may deem necessary. The College does not, at any time, take responsibility if information sent to a student’s last known address is not received. It is the responsibility of students to contact the College if a course, examination, entry or other details have not reached them by a due date. Students are responsible for informing the Registry if they have changed their address.

General Conduct

The EMCVPA’s registration takes place at the start of each semester: Semester 1 Registration – the third week in August Semester 2 Registration – the first week in January All new and returning students must be registered for programme courses and examinations during the stipulated period for registration. NB: Registration for courses is also considered registration for prescribed examinations. A student may be registered at the College when he/she has: • Financial clearance from the Finance and Accounts Department

Students are expected to conduct themselves respectfully and appropriately, and exercise a sense of responsibility as required by institutions of higher learning. The possession and use of alcoholic beverages, other illegal substances, weapons of any kind, tools and other equipment not in keeping with the course of studies on campus are strictly prohibited. The law strictly prohibits smoking in public spaces. Only under special circumstances is the consumption of 49

Completed academic advising with an Academic Advisor

Completed course selection on the Student Management System

Submitted signed registration form to the Registry

Proof of medical examination from his/her doctor

Tax Registration Number (TRN) TABLE OF CONTENTS

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All applicants to the College must register before the second week of September. Failure to comply with the above will result in the following: • Any student who registers after the scheduled period will be charged an additional late registration fee. •

Any student seeking to register after the second week of September must show good cause why he/she should be accommodated, and if so accommodated, he/she shall be required to pay an additional fee of $3,500.00 (representing an Extended Late Registration Fee) in addition to the other prescribed fees.

Registration for International Students

International/exchange students must abide by all registration procedures in order to ensure efficient registration. A brief guideline is outlined below: • Report to the Registry where a Registration Form will be provided. •

Students must take with them the first four (4) pages of their passport and a copy of their student visa.

Complete the Registration Form in consultation with the Director of School and/or Faculty Advisor assigned by the School, who will give advice on the selection of courses.

The Director of School or Faculty Advisor will then sign Registration Form indicating approval of your courses.

At the EMCVPA, students are required to assume the responsibility for their own education. To assist students in accepting this responsibility, faculty members are assigned as Faculty Advisors to a group of students. The purposes of academic advisement are: •

To help students to make appropriate decisions about academic programmes and courses.

To encourage students to achieve academic excellence.

To assist students to integrate career goals with the Programme of Study.

To help students overcome academic difficulties by making referrals to counselling and other appropriate services.

Immigration Checklist for International Students Thank you for your interest in EMCVPA. Along with fulfilling admissions requirements, there are immigration documentations and fees that are required.

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Acceptance letter from the College. Within 2 weeks of landing in Jamaica, must complete and submit Extension of Stay form and a J$10,000 fee (approx. US$116) to the Immigration Office. (Extension of Stay forms is available from the Student Services Office on-campus).

United States and Other Non-Commonwealth Citizens • A student visa is required (regardless of the period of study) and must be obtained prior to arrival in Jamaica, from the nearest Jamaican embassy or consulate. Students who arrive without the required visa will be denied entry into Jamaica by Immigration. Persons cannot pursue studies under visitor status. • Students in Europe and other parts of the world can check the following website for Jamaican Embassies: www.mfaft.gov.jm (click on Missions) • Non-Commonwealth Citizens are charged an additional fee for Multiply Entry Visa. This fee varies according to the country of residence. United States Citizens are charged a fee of J$2,000. • In the United States of America, the student visa can be obtained from the following: (Students should contact the embassy or consulate regarding processing time, fees and other details). 1. 1. The Jamaican Embassy in Washington DC http://www. embassyofjamaica.org/VISbusinessstudyrecreation.htm Tel: (202)-452-0660; Fax: (202)-452-0081 Email: firstsec@jamaicaembassy.org 2. The Jamaican Consulate in New York http://www.congenjamaica-ny.org/visas/#Students Tel: (212)-935-9000; Fax: (212)-935-7507 Email: passport@congenjamaica-ny.org or registry@ congenjamaica-ny.org 3. The Jamaican Consulate in Miami http://www. jamaicacgmiami.org/studentvisa.html Tel: (305)-374-8431; Fax: (305)-577-4970 • Within 2 weeks of landing, must also complete Alien Registration Card (available from the Student Services Office) and submit with 2 passport-sized pictures and a fee of J$2,000 (approx. US$23) to the Immigration Office. Alien Registration is applicable to students who staying for 6 months and longer. Multiply Entry Visa Fees (Non-Commonwealth Citizens) • United States of America $2,000 • Belgium $1,000 • Holland $1,000 • France $1,600 • Mexico $1,500 • Venezuela $1,200 • Spain $800

Commonwealth Citizens (most Caribbean students, UK, Australia, Canada, etc.) • No student visa required. • Valid passport required. TABLE OF CONTENTS

• •

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• • •

Israel Switzerland Others

minor. Pursuing a Minor may also place graduates in an advantageous position for graduate admission.

$600 $600 $500

Academic Advisement

Before entering the College, students should study the programme catalogue to determine the programme best suited to their interests and needs. Before registering, each student will select a Programme of Study. This decision will determine the academic courses in which the student will be advised. The designated academic advisor will counsel with the student regarding the proposed programme and choice of courses. This relationship continues as needed throughout the student’s stay in the College, unless another advisor is assigned or the student selects a new programme.

Declaring a Major

Full-time students normally declare their major upon admission and registration to facilitate the planning needed for an appropriate sequence of the courses required to complete the major within four years. Students in School of Visual Arts are expected to declare a major at the end of the first semester of their first year. However, students may be granted permission to change programmes.

Change of Programme

There is a Change of Programme form in the registry that students must complete. It requires that the student indicate the year they are in, list the courses already completed and list the courses they would be required to take to progress in the new programme. They must receive the approval of the Director of School and the VP Academic and Technical Studies to change programmes.

Declaring a Minor

Minor Studies is a coherent course of study that provides minor concentration in a chosen field of study outside of the Major. Unlike declaring a college major, choosing a college minor is optional, however, it is hoped that many students would avail themselves of this opportunity. Completing a minor degree programme may serve several purposes. Minors help to shape students’ future career path and will take or even open other career options. In addition, graduates having the right minor, in seeking employment may serve as a deciding factor between the EMCVPA graduate and another equally qualified candidate from another institution competing for the same job/project. It is likely that in the interview process, the person with a minor will be better prepared to answer a wider range of questions and offer wider skill sets than other candidates without a 51

A minor can broaden the content covered by the major. In these days, when college majors can be very specific, the minor can serve to develop another closely related area. For students with diverse talents or students not completely fulfilled by their major, a college minor is an opportunity for these students to engage in a totally different type of thought and exploration. For example, Visual Arts majors can develop their knowledge of literature or Theatre Arts using the College minor option. The minor can also be used to carry on what students may have started as an extracurricular activity at another institution, such as playing an instrument, acting, dancing or voice.

Minor Studies Programme Requirement

Students may choose to pursue a Minor Studies (MS) programme or may also choose Interdisciplinary studies called Minor in Alternative Studies (MAS). The MS Programme may be taken within or outside students’ Department/School. The credit requirement for MS ranges from a minimum of fifteen (15) to a maximum of twentythree (23) credits depending of the chosen programme. A maximum of nine (9) of the required credits may be used to fulfill the credit requirements for both the Minor and Major. However this is subject to the approval of the department(s) or School offering the Minor. The MAS programme allows students to select courses from all five (5) Schools to satisfy the minor studies credit requirement. Students who select the MAS are required to fulfill a minimum of eighteen (18) credits to a maximum of twenty (20) credits. A maximum of nine (9) credits of the twenty-three (23) required credits may be used to fulfill both major and minor requirement subject to the approval of the department/programme. In the case where a Minor is being pursued through two (2) Departments/Schools, at least twelve (12) credits or more than half the total credit requirement for the Minor must be from outside the student’s Major Study/Department. In the case where a Minor is offered by one (1) Department, at least sixteen (16) credits or at least one third if the totalcredit requirement must be from outside the student’s Major Study/Department. Courses prescribed in minor programmes may not be offered each semester. The College reserves the right to offer courses in any semester according to available resource and number of enrollment. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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The College reserves the right to approve or not to approve the application for enrolling in a minor programme.

Registry. No late registration will be processed after the said period.

Students who, upon graduation, successfully fulfilled the requirements specified in the curriculum of the Minor Programme for which he/she has registered will have the title of his/her Minor Programme indicated in his/her transcripts.

Students MUST satisfy any audition, portfolio assessment or pre-requisite requirements for the minor studies chosen.

Elective Courses taken to satisfy the requirements for a Major may also be used to satisfy the credit requirements for the MS and MAS. General Studies courses within a major are intended to give breadth to students’ programmes. Where General Studies courses are also within the list of courses approved for the minor they may be used to fulfill both the minor and General Studies requirements. If a student declares a minor and does not complete it there will be no penalty but it will not appear on their transcript unless they complete all requirements. There is no mandatory requirement for students opting to pursue minor studies to attend summer session, however summer sessions provide students with greater opportunity to pursue required minor courses.

Procedures for Minor Programme Enrollment

The EMCVPA will consider credit transfer for all courses taken through a recognized institution or accredited programme where evidence is given that each course under consideration has been satisfactorily completed with a grade of ‘C’ or higher and that the courses are comparable in content, nature and level of course(s) offered at the College. Grades transferred from another institution are not used in computation of the Grade Point Average (GPA) at the College but credits will be applied towards graduation requirement. The processes for requesting transfer credits are set out hereunder.

The Registry shall evaluate all undergraduate, postsecondary school education course(s) or programme(s) presented from outside the College for acceptance to the College. The Heads of Department or Academic Advisors determine the appropriateness and applicability of accepted courses specific to the programme. The Directors of Schools give the ultimate approval of applicability towards the programme requirement.

Students should seek approval from their Department/ School to pursue a MS or MAS before submitting the registration form with minor courses. Student must also meet with the advisor for the minor studies before registering for courses in the minor. Students must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or higher at the end of each semester in their major as well as a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher to be approved for minor studies by their Department/School. To earn a minor, students must attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher for the courses taken in the minor programme. Registration for Minor courses must be done in the normal registration period including the Add/Drop period set by FRONT

Transfer Students & Credits

Transfer Process

Students MUST declare their MS and MAS during the registration period of the first year of study. However, if a student chooses not to begin minor studies in their first year; it is advised that students MUST declare a minor by the registration period of the second year of study AT THE LATEST.

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Students are responsible for planning their own study schedules and fulfilling the course requirements in accordance with the academic structures and policies as set in the respective minor programmes. Students must complete all courses required in the minor programme before graduation. PLEASE NOTE that a longer study period of more than four (4) academic years may be required for fulfilling both the major and the minor course requirements before graduation.

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A formal application for credit transfer should be brought to the Registry. The Registrar in consultation with the faculty of the appropriate discipline will judge the comparability of the course for transfer credit in all reviews. A written response will be delivered to the student in a timely manner once the Registrar and the appropriate faculty has reviewed the course materials and the student’s specific circumstances.


All foreign transcripts, not issued in English, must have an accompanying translation certified by the original transcribing institution or a professional translation service approved by the EMCVPA.

An appeal of the decision should be sent in writing to the Vice Principal, Academic and Technical Studies setting out a complete account of the review and decisions up to this point. The Vice Prinicipal, Academic and Technical Studies will review the information and give the final decision.

Factors Which Determine the Acceptability of Transfer Credits

A regional, professional or national institutional accrediting body must accredit the programme from which course work is being considered for transfer credit. Credit is transferred on a course-by-course basis. Courses that are less rigorous than the minimum offering discipline at the EMCVPA will not be eligible for transfer. Course(s) must be comparable and appropriate to the discipline to be considered for credit transfer. Courses that must have specific topics to prepare students for particular function must contain two-thirds (â…”) of the material of a similar course at the EMCVPA to be judged comparable. Any course submitted for transfer credit must have been completed within five (5) years of the date that transfer application is submitted to the College. A maximum of sixty (60) credits will be transferred for those pursuing a Bachelor degree and a maximum of thirty (30) credits for those pursing an Associate degree at the College. The College will consider transfer credit to students who earned credits outside of the five (5) year limit if they can demonstrate proficiency in course material based on submission of a portfolio demonstrating competency in the objectives of the course and/or successfully pass an examination.

All foreign institutions that provide only one original document certifying attendance, course of instruction and achievement should be asked to mail the certifying documents directly to the College. The originals will be retained until credit transfer has been completed. Certified copies will be retained for the student’s record and the originals will be returned to the student. On completion of the course of study and prior to leaving Jamaica, exchange students must complete a Transcript Request Form and return it to the Registry. The transcript will be sent directly to the requesting institutions while a grade sheet will be sent directly to the student.

Credits Earned in other Colleges as a Transient Student

A student enrolled at the EMCVPA is not permitted to take credit work as a transient student at another institution to be applied toward a degree without prior permission from the Director of School. The permission must be in writing, specifying which courses are acceptable and their equivalence at the EMCVPA. A copy of this permission must be filed with the Registrar. Students do not need transient approval if they have not been enrolled at the College for two or more consecutive semesters.

Study Abroad Programme

Transfer Credits for International Students The foreign government or state governmental agency of a foreign country must formally recognize the institution as offering post-secondary programmes comparable to that offered at the EMCVPA. Equity will be maintained between transferred credit and EMCVPA credit.

Required Documentation for Transfer Credit Consideration

All course work presented for transfer must appear on an official transcript sent directly from the original institution to the Registrar at the EMCVPA. Copies, facsimiles or hand delivered transcripts by students will not be accepted. 53

The College has partnerships with the following institutions for exchange study programme: State University of New York (SUNY), Brockport; San Francisco State University; and Pointe Avent in France. The SUNY Brockport exchange programme is available to full-time Dance, Drama and SVA students (preference is given to Dance students) and is valid for one semester of study at Brockport. Information on the Brockport programme is available at the Student Services. The San Francisco State University exchange programme is eligible for all students and is valid for one semester of study at San Francisco State University. Information on the San Francisco State University exchange programme can be obtained from the Registry or Student Services Department. The Pointe Avent programme is for study during the summer in France and is open to SVA students. Information for the Pointe Avent in France programme is available at the School of Visual Arts.

Maximum Credits Per Semester

A full course load is a minimum of fifteen (15) to a maximum of eighteen(15) credits hours per semester. Permission TABLE OF CONTENTS

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of the Director of School is required to take more than eighteen credits. Students with cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 overall in the recently completed semester may be permitted to take an extra course. However, please note that students registered for courses in excess of the 15 or 18 credit (as applicable to your programme requirement) will be charged for the additional number of credits at the per credit rate.

Attendance

The purpose of the College attendance policy is to help students develop a professional attitude toward their studies during their college experience as well as to maximize their educational opportunities. Students are responsible for attending the classes in which they are officially enrolled and are required to attend all class meetings. At the beginning of each class, lecturers must within the perameter of the College policy on Absence define their policy on absences and assignments, and all cases of illness and emergency shall be promptly reported and verified by the lecturer. N.B. A semester comprises fifteen (15) weeks inclusive of one study week and thirteen (13) weeks of contact teaching hours. Examinations commence in week fifteen (15). To be eligible for sitting examination, a students must attend a minimum of ten (10) weeks or eighty percent (80%) of contact teaching hours and successfully complete all coursework assignments.

Absence

Each lecturer must maintain an attendance record. A student who is absent from College because of illness or any other unavoidable cause for more than ten percent (10%) of a course(s) or three (3) consecutive classes, should inform the Registry through the Director of School on the first day absence and immediately upon resumption. A student must supply a medical certificate or just evidence for absence of three (3) classes or more. If the student fails to do so, he/she will not be eligible to sit examinations. Students who absent themselves for more than three (3) weeks of a course and do not supply a medical certificate or other evidence acceptable to the College to cover such an absence shall be deemed to have withdrawn from the course and/or College and will not be allowed to sit examinations.

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All courses (written and studio/practical) are examined at the end of each semester. Failure to sit examination at the specified time will result in failing the course. Examination timetables are posted on the College’s official Notice Boards across the campus at least three (3) weeks prior to the start of the examination period. Three (3) draft Examination timetables and a final Examination timetable are posted. It is students’ responsibility to read the Notice Boards as this is the primary means of communicating examination timetables and other such important information with students. Students must inform their course lecturers and/or the Registry where examination clashes are identified on the draft examination schedules. The Examination, Assessment and Curriculum Committee ratify students’ grades at the end of each semester. Any student who fails the final examination will be given the chance to re-sit the examination once. Students will be allowed to repeat any year for which they hold a 1.0 average or less, but no student will be allowed to repeat a year more than once in the overall four year course.

Final Year Examinations

Students are required to present an Independent Study – a body of work (visual arts), showcase or production (dance/ drama/music); and write and present a research paper.

Independent Study (body of work/ showcase/production)

In the final year, all undergraduate students are required to complete an independent study project as their major studio requirement. This project or body of work is based on a theme chosen by the student and approved by the lecturer which allows the student to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists and educators. Tutorials are scheduled with the Heads of Department, to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent study forms part of the final examination and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners in front of the works and be able to put into concise language the concept and ideas involved.

Research Paper

Research Paper requirements must be fulfilled by all four (4) year degree students. The research should be related to the student’s particular area of study or otherwise approved area of study.

Absence notices will be sent to the School and to each lecturer notifying him/her of the reason for and the approximate length of the absence. TABLE OF CONTENTS

Examination

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Final Research Papers are to be limited to 3000 – 5000 words (15 - 25 pages) to be typed, double-spaced, paginated and appropriately bound using either the MLA style for humanities, fine art and performance programmes and APA style for education programmes. Titles must be submitted to the research lecturer for approval. Students are taught and guidance given for the writing of these papers beginning in the third year through research methods courses. Research papers are marked for quality of ideas, methodology, language and presentation.

Grade Scheme Grade / Point Percentage Equivalent Level of Pass

Students must receive approval from the course lecturer for an “I” grade. Students must submit a formal application for an extension of the due date for assignments using the AEA1 Form. If approved by the course lecturer the student will receive an “I” grade. The use of this form will assist in tracking and recording the status of the course. These forms are available in the Schools and a copy of the signed form must be sent to the Registry. Lecturers are required to complete the forms for students and ensure that the AEA1 Forms are attached to the grade sheets.

A 4.0

90 – 100

Honours

A- 3.7

80 – 89

Honours

B+ 3.3

75 – 79

Credits

B 3.0

70 – 74

Credits

B- 2.7

66– 69

Credits

C+ 2.3

60 – 65

Pass

C

2.0

55 – 59

Pass

C- 1.7

50 – 54

Acceptable Pass

D 1.3

45 – 49

Fail - Supplemental

F

44 – 0

Fail

0

Other Designations The following symbols are substitutes for grades. THEY ARE NOT GRADES. I

Incomplete

NR

Not reported

AB

Absent

W

Withdraw

WP

Withdraw passing in good standing

WF

Withdraw failing

P

Pass

F

Fail

EX

Exempt without credit

EC

Exempt with credit

Z

Course not offered

RE

Referred

DE

Deferred

AEG

Aegrotat

V

Course audited

NV

Course unsatisfactorily audited

I (INCOMPLETE) – indicates that the student has made progress in a course but at the end of the semester has not finished the course work required to receive a grade. An “I” designation is not counted in credit hours earned, or quality hours, until a letter grade is reported. If neither a letter grade nor notification of an extension time is received by the Registry from the Director of the School, the “I” designation is replaced by an “F” letter grade at the end of the first six (6) weeks into the next semester the student is registered. An extension of time may be granted but shall not normally extend beyond the end of the semester in which the extension is granted. Any remaining “I” symbol at the end of the period of extension will be deemed an “F”.

NR (NOT REPORTED) – indicates when a lecturer fails to submit grades by the published deadline through no fault of the student. AB (ABSENT) – indicates when a student is absent from an examination for medical or other acceptable reasons. In such cases he/she may re-sit the exam as a first sitting, at the next sitting of the supplemental examinations or at the regular sitting. All other students who are absent from examinations will be allowed to take the exams at the next regular sitting. WP (WITHDRAW PASSING IN GOOD STANDING) – indicates if a student, for whatever reason, ceases to attend a course but was gaining passing grades up to that point. WF (WITHDRAW FAILING) – indicates if a student, for whatever reason, ceased to attend a course but was gaining failing grades up to that point. PLEASE NOTE, WITH REGARDS TO WP & WF, REASONS FOR WITHDRAWING MUST BE STATED IN WRITING. STUDENTS WITH THE WP DESIGNATION HAVE ONE (1)YEAR TO COMPLETE THE COURSE(S). P (PASS) – indicates a pass obtained in a course taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

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F (FAIL) – indicates a failed grade obtained in a course taken on a pass/fail basis.

Grade Scheme

EX (EXEMPT WITHOUT CREDIT) – indicates cases where admissions is partially based on prior learning assessment, advanced placement, etc.

GRADE

GRADE POINT PERCENTAGE CLASS OF EQUIVALENT (GPE) RANGE AWARD

A

4.0

90-100

HONOURS

A-

3.7

80-89

HONOURS

B+

3.3

75-79

CREDIT

B

3.0

70-74

CREDIT

B-

2.7

65-69

CREDIT

C+

2.3

60-64

PASS

C

2.0

55-59

PASS

C-

1.7

50-54

PASS

D

1.0

45-49

D - Supp

F

0.0

0-44

FAIL

EC (EXEMPT WITH CREDIT) – indicates where courses being exempted were completed within five (5) years of completing the course and credit accepted Z (COURSE NOT OFFERED) – indicates the course is listed in the course menu but is temporarily not offered RE (REFERRED) – Faculty members are encouraged to refer students early in the semester who exhibit academic, social, or emotional difficulties that negatively impact their academic performance.

2009-Present

Computing the Grade Point Average

DE (DEFERRED) - unable to complete course requirements by end of semester. AEG (AEGROTAT) - notation to be added to grade indicating it was assigned under extenuating or exceptional circumstances. V (COURSE AUDITED) – indicates when the course has been taken in accordance with regulations governing course credit.

Grade Point Averages (GPA’s) are computed by multiplying the credits attempted by the grade point equivalent. The grade point average is then computed by dividing the total grade points by the total credits attempted. Below is an example of computing a GPA for 7 courses or 16-credits attempted in a semester. Course

Grade Credits GP

Drawing I

A-

3

x 3.7 = 11.1

NV (COURSE UNSATISFACTORILY AUDIT) – indicates when a student has been permitted to audit a course but has not done so satisfactorily.

Fundamentals of English

C+

2

x 2.3 = 4.6

Critical Analysis I

B-

2

x 2.7 = 5.4

Integrated 2D/3D

D

3

x 1.0 = 3.0

MINIMUM ACCEPTABLE CUMMULATIVE GRADE IS GPA 2.0 TO GRADUATE.

Time-Based Media

B

3

x 3.0 = 9.0

Vocal Skills

F

1

x 0.0 = 0.0

History of Art

A

2

x 4.0 = 8.0

Understanding your Grades and Transcript The following table shows the grade scheme applicable for all students entering the EMCVPA as of the 2011/2012 academic year. It also shows how the grades are calculated to determine the Grade Point Average (GPA). This is intended as a guide to help students determine their academic standing in the College.

TOTALS

= 16

QP’s

= 41.1

Total Quality Points (41.1) QP divided by Total Credits Attempted (16) = GPA Grade Point Average (GPA) =2.57

Challenge Examinations

All students may receive credit by special examination upon approval of the appropriate academic personnel (statement of application procedures may be obtained from the Registry). A fee will be charged for each examination. In addition, the student will be charged the current course per hour of credit fees. Credit hours attempted will be included in determining the student’s grade point average. Students are allowed to sit the challenge examination if they TABLE OF CONTENTS

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wish to register for a course that require a pre-requisite and they feel that they have the knowledge needed to pursue the course without doing the pre-requisite course. Although pre-requisites are to be enforced, students have the right to challenge pre-requisites based on very specific grounds. The student can challenge the pre-requisite for one or more of five (5) specified reasons: • The pre-requisite approval did not follow College Policy; or • It is not necessary for success in the course, or • It is unlawfully discriminatory; or • The pre-requisite course has not been made reasonably available and thus, if the student(s) has to wait to take it, she/he will be delayed in the completion of her/his official educational goal; or • The student can substantiate having knowledge or skills to be successful in the course despite not meeting the pre-requisite. A Faculty Advisor will help the student determine if she/he would benefit from the challenge process. The student can get a Prerequisite Challenge Form (PC110) from the Registry. If the student elects to complete the Prerequisite Challenge form then the form must be submitted along with any documentation needed, to the Registrar. Once the petition has been filed, the student will be allowed to provisionally enroll in the course, pending outcome of the challenge. If the challenge is not approved, the student will be administratively dropped from the course. The Prerequisite Challenge Form must be submitted to the Registrar at least two (2) weeks prior to the start of the course. Once the student files a challenge he or she is eligible to register in the course. If the student delays enrollment or if the desired section is closed, he or she must find another course or wait until the next time the course is offered. After the student submits the challenge application to the Registrar or to the appropriate Director, the challenge must be acted upon in a timely manner. Challenges must be filed at least two (2) weeks prior to the start of the class.

Supplemental Examinations

Supplemental are applicable to students who have failed lecture courses, studio courses and projects. A provisional pass list is to be sent to the Registry two (2) weeks after the exams so that students who need to do supplemental could be advised in time. If the final grades showed that the student who had provisionally failed had passed, then those students would be refunded fees paid for supplemental exams.

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Students who achieve scores 40 - 44 (D) prior to 2009/10 academic year or 45 - 49 (as of the 2009/2010 academic year) qualify to sit supplemental examinations. Supplemental for word-based examinations is held within the first two (2) weeks of February for Semester 1 examinations and within the first two (2) weeks in July for Semester 2 examinations. Supplemental examinations must be taken immediately following the failed examination. Failure to do so will result in students having to repeat for the course. Students who fail courses with scores 44 and below must re-register for the course at the next available time that the course is offered. A student who enters for a supplemental must take the examination on the scheduled date, otherwise, such a student will be deemed to have failed the course. Students failing an examination or course with grade D (45% – 49%) will be eligible to enter for a supplemental examination. Students with grade less than C- (50%) in the supplemental examination will be required to repeat the course. Students failing one (1) but not more than two (2) projects in any studio course may complete these in the supplemental exam until they achieve a passing grade of Cor higher. Supplemental exams must be taken as scheduled on the academic calendar immediately following the first sitting of the exam.

Assessment

General Assessment Procedures In order for a student to qualify for any award at the College, that student must have pursued the course of study approved by the Academic Board of the College, satisfied the course regulations and fulfilled the following requirements. • Satisfactory attendance and performance throughout the course of study. • Attainment of the specified number of credits. • Successful completion of all compulsory courses. • Achievement of the required standard in the examination and other forms of assessment prescribed for the award of the Degree. • Complete the course of study, unless special exemption is obtained from the Registrar through the Examination, Assessment and Curriculum Committee (EACC) or unless the course regulations deem otherwise. Students who are unable to complete the course or examinations either because they have been certified to be medically unfit or for other cause acceptable by the College Board shall immediately withdraw from the whole or any remaining parts of the final examination, and shall be permitted to re-enter these at the next sitting. (Or may TABLE OF CONTENTS

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apply for an aegrotat if they had sat fifty percent (50%) or more of the examinations for the period.) An alphabetical list of candidates who have satisfied the examiners shall be published on or before the date specified in the course regulations.

If a student becomes injured or ill in any other situation outside of those outlined in items 1 – 3 above, then he/ she is governed by the College’s general examination regulations.

A candidate receiving an Aegrotat award shall be granted the minimum pass of C-. An Aegrotat may be awarded for Teaching Practice provided the student has completed at least eight (8) weeks or seventy percent (70%) of the practice. An Aegrotat will only be awarded to students with good academic records and who maintained at least a passing grade in the course work. In no case will an Aegrotat be awarded for a course in which a student is referred. If a student wishes to subsequently sit the examination, having been granted an Aegrotat, he/she will be required to give up the Aegrotat status and the examination grade shall stand.

If a student has completed the last examination necessary to qualify for the award of the Degree but has not settled all outstanding accounts with the College, no report will be made on the result of his/her examination until payment has been made in full to the College. Students having outstanding academic requirements at the end of four (4) years will be given a maximum of five (5) additional years within which to complete all such requirements to receive certification.

Aegrotat Policy for Word-Based Courses

The course of action to be taken when students are injured or fall ill during or before the examination, is as follows: •

If a student becomes injured/ill early in the semester where the student has only completed 40% - 50% (4 – 6 classes) of coursework successfully, he/she is not eligible to participate in final examinations. In this case the student must withdraw passing (WP) and must repeat the course at the next available time that the course is offered. If a student becomes injured or ill for not more than fifty percent (50%) of the written examination and is unable to complete the examination, the student may apply to the Registrar for the course work grade to be used as the final grade for the course. The Registrar will investigate the circumstances and present a report to the Academic Board. The report must also include the course lecturer’s report on the student’s performance in course work, college tests, whether or not the student has satisfactorily covered the course content and any other evidence of the students’ academic ability for consideration. With the approval of the Academic Board the student’s coursework grade will become the final grade for the course. If a student becomes injured or ill a day or two before the examination and is unable to sit the examinations, she/he must immediately inform the Director of School or designate. In addition, the student must present a medical certificate to the Director of School or designate within twenty-four (24) hours of the injury or illness.

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The student has the option of accepting an aegrotat grade or to re-sit the course. The student must inform the Registry in writing of their decision.

Aegrotat Policy for Practical/Studio Courses

The course of action to be taken when students are injured or fall ill during or before the practical/studio examination, as follows: •

If a student becomes injured or ill early in the semester where the student has only completed percent 40% 50% (4 – 7 classes) of coursework successfully, he/she is not eligible to participate in final examinations. Is this case the student must withdraw passing (WP) and must repeat the course at the next available time that the course is offered.

If a student becomes injured or ill one (1) to three (3) weeks prior to the practical/studio examination period, have attended more than eighty percent (80%) of the course and is unable to participate in the final practical/ studio examination, the coursework grade will be lowered by one letter grade e.g. “B” to “B-“, “A” to “A-“. The student must be maintaining at least a “B” average in coursework to be illegible for an aegrotat. In this case the student’s coursework grade will become the final grade for the course.

If a student becomes injured during the practical/ studio examination period and is unable to participate in practical examinations, he/she must immediately inform the Director of School or designate. In addition, the student must present a Medical Certificate to the Director of School or designate within twenty-four (24) hours of the injury.


If a student becomes injured or ill in any other situation outside of those outlined previously, then he/she is governed by the College’s general examination regulations.

If a student becomes injured or ill during or prior to a practical/studio examination, he/she is governed by the College’s aegrotat policy for studio/practical courses. The Registrar will present the student’s case that must include the response from the course lecturer to the EACC for review. The EACC will determine whether or not the student is eligible for an aegrotat grade and present its recommendation to the Academic Board for final approval. The Registrar would inform the student of the Board’s decision.

5.

6. 7.

8.

9.

The student has the option of accepting an aegrotat grade or to re-sit the course. The student must inform the Registrar in writing of their decision.

10.

Reporting Grades

11.

Official Final grades are available only through the Registry at the completion of each semester.

12.

Examination Grades

Students are able to view their grades on the College Student Management System. Faculty members or administrative staff may not give grades verbally. Official notification of grades are sent via semester/annual student reports issued by the Registry (signed by the Registrar) or issued in the form of a transcript/statement signed by the Director of School and/or Registrar.

13.

14.

15.

Change of Grade

Grades posted by lecturer on the Student Management System or reported to the Registrar may not be changed except in case of error in recording or determined during ratification. Grade changes require the approval of the Director of School and access granted by the Registrar as well as the signature of the Head of Department and the Director of School in which the course is taught. Grades on record for one calendar year may not be changed for any reason.

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students who earn less than 1.7 but more than 1.00 will be required to repeat the year. Students with less than 1.00 GPA will be referred to the Director of Studies committee for a decision. Students in 2nd. and 3rd. year whose GPA is less than 2.00 but higher than 1.7 but whose cumulative GPA is 2.00 or higher will be issued an academic warning. Students whose first semester GPA is less than 2.00 but higher than 1.7 will be subject to academic warning. Students whose GPA is less than 2.00 but higher than 1.7 for two consecutive semesters will be subject to academic probation. Students whose overall cumulative GPA is less than 2.00 but higher than 1.7 will be subject to academic probation. Students receiving a semester GPA of less than 1.00 will be subject to academic probation. Students on academic probation who fail to acquire a 2.00 GPA in the consecutive semester will be academically dismissed. 2nd. and 3rd. year students whose cumulative GPA is less than 1.00 at the end of an academic year will be academically dismissed. Final year students on academic warning or probation must complete mid semester assessment and gain a grade of 2.00 or higher to progress to final examination. In order to graduate from the School of Visual Arts students must achieve an overall cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher. Students who receive a course grade of less than 1.7 but higher than 1.00 will be required to sit supplemental examination. Students who receive a course grade of less than 1.00 will be required to repeat the course or gain the credits from an approved list of courses. If in the case of financial problems or illness or any other extenuating circumstances a student misses a year’s courses or fails to complete a years’ credit requirements, he or she will be allowed the chance to repeat or complete outstanding credits.

Course Grades

Progression in Programmes

All students are issued a printout of their grades at the end of each semester and their academic standing is determined at the end of the academic year according to the following criteria: 4. Foundation students who earn less than a 2.00 GPA (Grade Point Average) but more than 1.7 will be allowed to progress with academic probation. Foundation 59

Students who receive a course grade point of less than 2.0 but higher than 1.3 will be required to sit supplemental examination. Students who receive a course grade point of less than 1.3 will be required to repeat the course or gain the credits from an approved list of courses. Should a student miss or fail a complete year’s course as a result of financial problems, illness or any other extenuating TABLE OF CONTENTS

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circumstances, he/she will be allowed the chance to repeat or complete outstanding credits when the courses are next offered.

Sheet MUST accompany all written assignments. Please note that you own the copyright of every piece of work you produce.

Promotion of Education Students

The examples and definitions given below are intended to clarify the standards by which academic honesty and acceptable academic conduct are to be judged. The following list is merely illustrative and is not intended to be exhaustive.

A qualitative evaluation instrument is used to assess students for promotion to determine the disposition, aptitude, attitudes and commitment necessary for success in the teaching profession. Students are required to attend an interview conducted by the Education Board of Studies prior to determine admission to the department. Students admitted to pursue studies in Education are required to attend a compulsory orientation seminar prior to the start of the academic year. Failure to attend the orientation without an acceptable reason may result in nonadmittance to the Education Department. Students must attain a minimum grade of ‘C’ to qualify for admittance to the Education Programme as well as to qualify for promotion annually. The procedures used for promoting students will be continuous and does not only rely on student’s GPA. A series of formative and summative instruments will be used to evaluate students to determine their eligibility for promotion at the end of each academic year. Where students do not display an appropriate disposition for the teaching profession but has a passing GPA they will be advised to select another area of specialization.

Teaching Practice/Practicum

This is a compulsory activity for third and fourth year students pursuing a degree in Education. Practicum consists of teaching practice in schools and other teaching projects within the College. Students doing the Education Programmes are required to cover a minimum of 405 hours in practicum. A minimum grade of C- is required to successful complete teaching practice (TP). Students must follow the Policies and Procedures as laid out in the Practicum Handbook/CD.

Plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty are considered very serious infractions; accordingly, no credit will be given for work in which they are involved. In addition, incidents of this nature may be reported to Examination, Assessments and Curriculum Commitee (EACC) and Academic Board for further disciplinary action. As members of the academic community of the EMCVPA, students are expected to recognize and uphold standards of intellectual and academic integrity. Plagiarism is unethical and will result in disciplinary action. The Plagiarism Cover FRONT

CHEATING—This involves giving or receiving unauthorized assistance before, during or after an examination. UNAUTHORIZED COLLABORATION—Submission of work/ assignment for grade/credit, product or a part thereof, represented as being one’s own effort that has been developed in substantial collaboration with or without assistance from another person or source is a violation. FALSIFICATION—It is a violation to misrepresent material or fabricate information in an academic exercise or assignment. MULTIPLE SUBMISSIONS—It is a violation of academic honesty to submit substantial portions of the same work for credit more than once without the explicit consent of the lecturer(s) to whom the material is submitted for additional credit. In cases where there is a natural development of research or knowledge in a sequence of courses, use of prior work may be desirable or even required. A student charged with academic misconduct may not change registration in the course (e.g., drop the course, change the grade) in which a charge is pending or in which a finding of academic misconduct has been made.

Academic Honesty

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PLAGIARISM—Plagiarism is presenting another person’s work as one’s own. It includes paraphrasing or summarizing the works of another person without acknowledgement, including submitting another student’s work as one’s own.

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Sanctions specified by the Director of School, by the lecturer, Board of Studies, EACC or Academic Board (if an appeal has been heard) shall take effect as specified in writing to the student.

Sanctions for Academic Dishonesty

If students plagiarize or are found guilty of any form of academic dishonesty, any of the sanctions below may apply. Sanctions that may be imposed include, but are not limited to: • a letter of reprimand • a defined period of disciplinary probation, with or without the attachment of conditions


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workshop attendance a defined period of suspension, with or without the attachment of conditions • notation on either the student’s unofficial or official transcript • withholding of a degree, or revoking the student’s degree. • giving a lower grade on the paper or course. • giving a failing grade on the paper or course.asking the student to rewrite the paper/assignment/examination. • set alternate/additional assignment(s). • suspending the student for a period of time. • expulsion of the student from the institution. • putting the offense of plagiarism on the student’s academic record. • any combination of the above listed sanctions. Any grade entered for a student in a course in which a complaint of academic misconduct is pending, whether for a specific course assignment, an examination, in-course test or the final course grade, is subject to modification after all proceedings and appeals are concluded. If the student is found responsible for academic misconduct, the course lecturer is free to determine the effect the violation will have on grades assigned to the student for specific course assignments, examination and/or the final course grade. Depending on the severity of academic misconduct the case is submitted to the Academic Board who will impose sanctions.

Unsatisfactory Performance

Each course lecturer is required to do mid-semester evaluations and recommendations for students taking their course. Such evaluations individually inform students of their status academically, in terms of attendance, preparations and practical performance. This evaluation is then forwarded in writing to the Director of School at least six (6) weeks before the final assessment. Should the students’ status be of grave concern the Director will provide the student with additional advisement in advance of the final assessment of the respective course.

Academic Probation

Students with a cumulative GPA below 2.0 but not less than 1.7 are having academic difficulties and are alerted to this fact by being placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation are restricted to taking not more than 15 credit hours per semester, unless exempted from this regulation by the Director of School. Students with GPA’s substantially below 1.7 are subject to academic dismissaL

Academic Dismissal

Academic dismissal for one calendar year will result if a student who has been reinstated following a previous academic probation or dismissal fails to make satisfactory progress.

Reinstatement Following Academic Dismissal

Students academically dismissed from EMCVPA may be considered for readmission on academic probation after a period of one calendar year has passed. Readmission requires Director’s approval. Students readmitted after dismissals are subject to a second dismissal if they do not make satisfactory progress. No student will be allowed to repeat any year more than once in the overall four (4)-year course. A student is considered to be making satisfactory progress as long as they maintain a GPA for each semester of 2.0 or above until their cumulative grade point average is above the minimum required GPA for dismissal as outlined above. Once a student achieves a GPA larger than the minimum required GPA, he is subject to the requirement to maintain his grade point average above the minimum value as listed above. Returning students will remain on probation until the cumulative grade point average is 2.0 or greater. Students intending to seek readmission after dismissal must first file a Readmission Form with the Registry by the official deadline and consult with their Academic Advisor.

Withdrawal/Temporary Leave of Absence from School Official withdrawal (dropping all courses in progress) from the College is initiated in the Director’s office. Complete withdrawal from the College must be submitted in person (not online) at the RegistrY. Clearance must be secured from the College Library, the Registry and student housing if applicable. The symbol “W” or “WF” or “WP” is recorded for all courses when the student completes the Withdrawal Form within the time limits listed in the official calendar. A grade of “F” or “I” is recorded when an enrolled student leaves the College without initiating and completing the Withdrawal Form. This Form is available in the Registry.

Students who officially withdraw from the College may do so for a period of one academic year. If they need to extend the time, then they need to write to the College for permission. Students who withdraw without informing the College may

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If a student in good academic standing applied for Leave of Absence and is ready to return, such a student does not need to apply for readmission but must submit a letter to the Registrar and Director of School indicating their intention to return in the upcoming semester. However, if the Leave of Absence period for which the student had applied expires and the student did not return in the next regular semester such student must apply for readmission.

apply for re-admission to the College within one academic year. Students who withdraw from the College for more than five (5) academic years MUST reapply to the College. Students will NOT be permitted to enter a Degree or Certificate programme without having satisfied the prescribed entry requirements and clear all financial obligations to the College. A student who seeks to withdraw from his/her course of study at the College must inform the Registry in writing stating the reason for withdrawal and if he/she will be desirous of re-admission in another academic year. This must accompany the Withdrawal Form.

How to Apply for Readmission

Please note that where a student withdraws from a course for valid reasons or where a recommendation from the course lecturer for a student’s withdrawal for non attendance or misconduct, this must be reported to the Student Records Officer through the Registrar so that the appropriate notation can be made on the Student Management System. This recommendation must be submitted in writing by the course lecturer, first to the Director of School for approval who will forward the recommendation to the Registrar in writing.  The reason(s) for withdrawal must be clearly stated. In cases where withdrawal is as a result of poor attendance or nonattendance, evidence of the student’s attendance record must be submitted with the report.  The course from which the student is withdrawn will not appear on his/her Examination Card however; the course will appear on the students’ transcript designated as ‘W’ ‘WP’ or ‘WF’.  In cases where withdrawal is no fault of the student and special permission is granted for the students’ withdrawal (Drop) from a course after the registration and Add/Drop periods the course would not appear on the student’s transcript.

Readmission

Students who have previously attended EMCVPA (excluding summer semester) as matriculated students may apply for readmission. All previous academic records and achievements at the College, grades from studies pursued elsewhere, the reasons for which the student withdrew are all considered in the readmission process. Application for readmission must be done in advance of the semester for which they wish to return. Applicants with outstanding financial obligations to the College will not be eligible for readmission until such financial obligations are cleared. Students dismissed for academic reasons are eligible to apply for readmission after two (2) semesters. However, in the interview with the Director of School for readmission the student must demonstrate a readiness to successfully undertake College work at EMCVPA. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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An applicant should request the appropriate forms from the Registry. The Readmission Application Form, including all required credentials, should be filed with the Registry by the end of the month of May prior to the start of Academic year you plan to resume studies.

Requirements for Readmission

An applicant will be deemed eligible to return to College on the basis of a previous EMCVPA academic record. If the student has attended any other college or university subsequent to last enrollment at the EMCVPA, the student must also have the required transfer average or higher (as computed by the EMCVPA) on work attempted, and must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last institution attended.

Appeal

If a student at anytime wishes to query his/her academic standing in a course then he/she shall have the right of appeal in writing to the Registrar who shall carry out a preliminary investigation and provide a written report to the VP, Academic and Technical Studies. Such an appeal must be submitted in writing on or before fourteen (14) days after the grades are published and must also set out the full grounds for the appeal. The Appeals Committee consisting of VP, Academic and Technical Studies, Directors of Schools and the Registrar reviews all appeals. The course lecturer may be consulted if necessary. If the VP, Academic and Technical Studies believe that additional evidence has now been deduced which may justify the reversal of the decision of the College, he/she may refer the case to the Academic Board through the EACC for consideration without prejudice to the right of appeal. In cases where grounds are established for appeal the College will appoint an independent marker to remark the assignment. The grade of the independent marker will become final even if it is lower. The decision of the Academic Board shall be final and the student will be informed in writing thereof as soon as possible.


Adding/Dropping Courses

Students may add or drop courses, without penalty provided the withdrawal occurs within the time limits listed in the official calendar. Courses dropped or added must be indicated on the prescribed Add/Drop Form signed by the Directors of School or Designate and submitted in person to the Registrar’s Office. The grade of “F” is recorded for a course abandoned without an official withdrawal. Students who drop courses after the last day for refunds may continue to attend class.

Coursework/Assignments

Each Department has required coursework which students complete. Students may be required to present coursework in a portfolio at the end of the course. Visual Arts studio courses coursework must be presented in a portfolio in support of the student’s specific specialist study. Two credit word-based courses are to be assessed on a maximum of three (3) in course assignments and a final examination/project, while three credit studio/practical courses are to be assessed on a maximum of three (3) assignments. One of these assignments may be divided into four (4) mini projects to allow for concentration on the technical components to be applied in two (2) of the other assignments. Two (2) credit studio courses are to be assessed on two (2) assignments.

Tutorials

A minimum of three (3) one-to-one meetings per semester will be held with the course lecturer to discuss with the individual students their development process and progress and to give guidance that would assist the student in the development of their work. These meetings provide the opportunity for the assessment of the student’s ability to work through their process of translating their thoughts and ideas.

Cummulative Grade-Point Average

A student must earn a minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (an average grade of “C”) based on all course work taken at the College. Grades in pass-fail courses do not carry quality points and are not used in determining the GPA.

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Internship

The Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts Internship Programme is designed to introduce students to the overall professional knowledge, skills and judgment necessary in the real world environment. Internships support and provide the opportunity for application of the curriculum to real world experience. Students are required to complete a minimum of three (3) credits (225 hours) up to a maximum of eight (8) credits (600 hours) of the one hundred and twenty (120) credits as determined by the programme of study for the internship Programme. Students may register for an internship during first, second, or summer semesters. Students must register for an internship at the beginning of the semester the internship will be completed. A student doing an internship during the summer that won’t finish until September can register for the internship in the second semester. The registrar will not allow students to register for an internship after they have totally completed the internship. However, the Head of Department or Director of School must approve the internship prior to commencing internships as set out below. Requirements and Procedures Arts Management and Humanities students are required to complete eight (8) internship credits while students in the other Schools are required to complete a minimum of three (3) internship credits. The internship may be completed all at once or in segments. Students will be allowed to bank internship hour, however the student must declare this intention. The internship site and internship hours to be achieved, must also receive approval from the Internship Coordinator prior to commencing the internship. Prior to registering for an internship, students are required to discuss the internship with the Internship Coordinator. Both the Internship Coordinator and the on-site supervisor need to approve the internship. After approval of the internship, the student is required to submit a completed and signed Internship Commitment Form (ICF) to the School’s office. All sections of the ICF must be filled out. Upon receipt of the completed and signed ICF, the Director of School/Head of Department signs an Internship Registration Form provided by the Registry for the student. The student must return the signed form to the Registry to be officially registered for going on the internship programme. The submission of this document must be done in accordance with College procedures and semester registration dates and deadlines.

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Unless advised otherwise, students should begin planning their search for internships half way through their programme. Students may not register for the internship until they have acquired at least eighteen (18) credit hours of satisfactory coursework, or as otherwise required by the School, without the expressed permission of the Internship Coordinator. Each student can choose from one of the pre-approved sites/organizations or may request obtaining an approval on a site/organization of their selection. The student must understand that coordinating the approval of the new site/ organization may take time and may not allow the student to register for the experience in that particular semester. Nonetheless, arrangements can be made to have a newly approved site/organization. The students’ faculty advisor may assist in their search for an appropriate placement. The key is to be creative and to plan ahead.

The College has graduation on the third Saturday in November each year. Students completing programmes in May – June are eligible to participate in the November graduation. Students completing credits in the summer programmes or December immediately after graduation may be considered to participate in the November graduation.

Re-Evaluation of Programme Requirements

Certificates

Certificates are issued each year; however, these will be held until all outstanding obligations to the College have been cleared.

Application for Graduation

Each final year student will have one official check of remaining programme requirements following filing of the application for graduation that includes the payment of the application fee. This evaluation will be available from the student’s Director of School. An additional fee will be charged for any additional programme check necessitated by a student’s subsequent change of Course Menu, Programme of Study, or failure to complete programme requirements by the prescribed term.

Procedures Governing Student Misconduct

Students planning to graduate must make applications according to the dates specified in the College Calendar. Failure to make applications will result in a delay in scheduled graduation dates.

The following conditions and procedures apply to academic misconduct. These specifically apply to: • College theory, oral or practical/studio examinations; Departmental examinations, which include all tests, assignments, oral and practical examinations related to coursework and projects at the School/Department level; • A student charged with academic misconduct may not change registration in the course (e.g., drop the course, change the grade) in which a charge is pending or in which a finding of academic misconduct has been made.

A student must file an application for graduation with the Registry the semester before expected degree completion. The Director of School must undertake the programme audit/official check and the VP, Academic and Technical Studies must approve.

Choice of Programme under which a Student Graduates

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If a student prolongs the completion of a programme, curricular or programmatic changes may occur to such an extent that the requirements for the programme as outlined in a Course Menu for which the student would otherwise be eligible can no longer be fulfilled. If in the judgment of the appropriate Director of School, such Course Menu cannot be used for meeting their programme requirements, the Director of School would designate the appropriate Course Menu for determination of the programme requirements. If a student changes programmes, the College may require the student to fulfil the requirements of the Course Menu in effect when the change of programme is approved.

Graduation

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the academic year of the student’s first matriculation as a student. Students may select a subsequent Course Menu during their matriculation with the approval of the appropriate academic advisor. If a student does not attend the College for a period of one (1) calendar year or longer, the student will be required to fulfil the requirements of their chosen programme as specified by the Course Menu in effect during the year of the student’s return.

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Academic Misconduct

Generally, academic misconduct consists of academic dishonesty or fraud. It includes acts that have the effect of unfairly promoting or enhancing one’s academic standing or assisting someone in the pursuit of such an end result. Acts of academic dishonesty are serious matters, which subvert the integrity and credibility of the educational process. The College will therefore initiate action against students who have engaged in acts of academic misconduct.

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Categories of Academic Misconduct

The College, through the Registrar, shall have right to classify offences. There are two (2) categories of Academic Misconduct - Major and Minor offences.

Major Offences

Examination cheating constitutes an attempt on the part of the student/candidate to undermine the College’s examination exercise; that is, any act carried out during an examination for the purpose of obtaining credit to which he/ she is not entitled. Irregularities in an examination include: • Presenting oneself for another candidate for the purpose of taking a test or examination; or by allowing oneself to be represented by another for the same. • Having prior knowledge of the content of an examination question paper and using same in the examination. • Possessing/using unauthorized examination aid devices/materials. • Copying from another candidate’s paper. • Knowingly allowing one’s work to be copied during an examination. • Collaborating with another candidate orally or in writing during the examination/test without permission. • Directly or indirectly giving assistance to another candidate during the examination. • Accepting unauthorized assistance whether directly or indirectly from another individual in the sitting of an examination. • Any other act that would serve to subvert the examination procedures and process and give unfair advantage to the perpetrator. Irregularities committed outside of an examination shall be subject to the same disciplinary procedures as if committed in an examination room, and include: • Collaboration with another person in obtaining un-administered examination papers prior to the examination.

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Selling or publishing un-administered examination papers, or other work assigned for purposes of academic credit. Altering examination work after it has been evaluated. Forging or altering or falsifying any academic record, or making use of any such altered, forged or falsified record for purposes of academic credit. Fabricating research results. This includes false claims regarding research results, interviews or procedures; the omission of statements regarding interviews, procedures or experiments, where the omission cannot be justified. Plagiarism: that is the offering of one’s own work, words, data, ideas, arguments, calculation, designs or productions of another, without appropriate citation. Representing as one’s individual writing and/or final product a jointly written or produced submission of any description, unless the instructor as approved a coauthorization submission. Submitting work for which credit has been previously obtained or is being sought in another course or programme of study in the College or elsewhere without authorization from the School concerned. Producing a paper, critique or other assignment for another student. Copying another person’s paper, critique or other assignment. Engaging in any other irregularity not specified in the above regulations, but from which an unfair advantage can be obtained.

Minor Offences

Minor offences include: • Commencing to answer the paper before the official “start” time of the Examination. • Non-observance of the official “stop” time for the Examination. • Other acts so deemed by the Academic Board.

General Misconduct

The following conditions and procedures apply to general misconduct that are categorized into gross misconduct, major and minor offences. Gross Misconduct • Gross misconduct shall be, but is not limited to the following: • Persistent commission of offences classified as major offences.

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Intentionally causing malicious damage to College property or property of an employee of the College or fellow student. Physical assault or battery of an individual on the College premises. Falsification of report, record, or any other document. Stealing College property. Proven sexual immorality on College property. Provoking or inciting students to riot. Unauthorized use or disclosure of confidential information. Sexual harassment of student, visitor or employee of the College. Unauthorized possession of firearm or any lethal weapon or instrument on the College property. Discharge of a firearm on College property. Commission or conviction of a criminal offence. Unauthorized access to records and databases of the College or any member of staff or student. Impersonation or unauthorized possession of the College’s identification cards. Non-compliance with punishment made under disciplinary procedure. Conduct aimed at putting the College in disrepute.

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Major Offences • Major offences shall be, but are not limited to the following: • Persistent commission of the offences classified as minor offences. • Causing damage or destruction to College property. • Causing damage to property or other person/s on College premises. • Failure to comply with a reasonable instruction given by an academic staff member or senior administrative staff member. • Fighting on College property. • Physical assault or battery of anyone on College property. • Threatening a College employee. • Coming to College/School under the influence of illegal drugs. • Indiscriminate use of alcohol and illegal drugs on College property. • Stealing College property. • Stealing from a fellow College student or third parties. • Provoking or inciting students to riot or to behave in a disorderly manner. • Verbal threats or assaults to fellow students or third parties on College property.

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Possession of dangerous substance or weapon on College property. Possession of College property without permission. Obstruction of teaching and learning. Malicious abuse (verbal or physical). Infringing safety regulations or disregarding notices concerning safety precautions in any part of the College. Impersonation or unauthorized possession of College Identification Card. Conduct aimed at putting the College in disrepute. Discrimination on grounds of sex, disability, race, religion or class. Non-payment of tuition or any other prescribed College fee. Use of illegal substances on campus.

Minor Offences Minor offences shall be, but are not limited to the following: Use of abusive, offensive or obscene language. • Coming to school under the influence of alcohol. • Failure to comply with a reasonable instruction given by an employee of the College. • Gambling on College property. • Any conduct likely to cause injury to person or property. • Disruption of legitimate College activities. • Loitering in a prohibited zone. • Playing of loud music on College property. • Use of College property without permission. • Parking in an un-authorized zone or area. • Non-observance of College traffic regulations. • Abuse of College internet facility. • Smoking on campus. • Refusal to provide identification when asked to do so by an employee of the College in connection with security or breach of discipline. • Display of sexually suggestive or degrading material in the classroom/studio/lecture theatre.

Classification of Penalties/Sanctions

The College, through the Registrar, shall have the right to categorize types of penalty/sanction for either Academic Misconduct or General Misconduct. Penalty/Sanction for Gross Misconduct For gross misconduct the College reserves the right to penalize offenders using one or a combination of the following: • Withdrawal of College Certification. • Suspension. • Expulsion. • Reimbursement to College/Employee/Student/Third


party for damage at replacement cost. Reimbursement of medical expenses resulting from physical injury.

Penalty/Sanction for Major Offences • For major offences the College reserves the right to penalize offenders using one or a combination of the following: • Exclusion from College property or activities. • Suspension not exceeding three years from the College. • Written warning. • Binding student over to good behaviour. • Order/instruction to write and publish letter of apology. • Withdrawal of College privileges. • Withdrawal from College representation or Student Union representation. • Reimbursement to College/Employee/Student/Third party for damage at replacement cost. • Reimbursement of medical expenses resulting from physical injury.

Penalty/Sanction for Minor Offences For minor offences the College reserves the right to penalize offenders using one or a combination of the following: • Exclusion from designated areas and/or activities of the College. • Suspension from the College not exceeding one week. • Oral reprimand. • Written warning. • Order/instruction to write and publish letter of apology. • Withdrawal of College privileges. • Withdrawal from College representation of Student Council representation. • Reimbursement to College/Employee/Student/Third party for damage at replacement cost.

Other Policies and Procedures

What can you learn by following our dress code?

This dress code helps to maintain an atmosphere conducive to study and work. You have the opportunity to dress according to your preferences, as long as they adhere to the conventions of good grooming. The following are examples of EMCVPA’s conventions:

Do-rags, stocking caps, skullcaps, bandanas and other full head/facial coverings are prohibited at all times in offices of EMCVPA.

No bare feet, unless in rehearsal or production.

No shorts/tights at functions dictating professional or formal attire, unless a part of production.

No clothing with general derogatory, offensive and/or lewd messages either in words or pictures.

No display of undergarments.

Staff, students and other users of the College will be denied admission to various departments and

Dress Code

The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (EMCVPA) is a creating, learning and doing space.

The college culture, in which high standards translate into good living and prepares students for the professional world where they will need to follow certain requirements and live up to certain expectations even in dress and behaviour.

Discovery of self and individual of worth beyond academic grades and financial status.

Expression of personal identity, attitude, passion, value to the job.

EMCVPA’s dress code is a challenge to dress and act as you are - ARTIST(E), PROFESSIONAL, MATURE.

functions if our dress code is not followed.

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Accountability Policy for Information Technology (IT) Resources Also relevant is the Jamaica Copyright Act 1993 available at http://www.wipo.int/clea/docs_new/pdf/en/jm/jm001en. pdf. Users are responsible for familiarizing themselves with these laws

Purpose of the Policy

The purpose of the policy is to encourage accountability and responsibility for use of the College’s Information Technology (IT) Resources. This policy applies to all registered students, employees and others who are authorized to use the College’s IT resources. IT Resources are provided to users for College-related activities. This document will be reviewed from time to time by a team comprising members of the IT Department and the Vice Principal for Administration and Resource Development.

Rules and User Responsibilities • •

Persons Accountable for Use of Equipment The Principal is ultimately accountable for the management and use of IT resources. Notwithstanding, persons who share responsibility for use and care of IT Resources include employees, students or any other person authorized by the College to use the equipment. These persons will stand the consequences for failing to observe the rules of this policy.

Definition of I.T. Resources IT Resources include computers, scanners, printers, laptops, web cameras, servers, telephone communication resources including cellular telephones, wireless network systems, software, computer microphones, computer speakers and any other hardware and software managed by or in the care of the IT Department. Users of the equipment include members of staff (academic and non-academic), registered students and any other person authorized to use the equipment. The general rules of this policy also apply to computer labs.

Procedures

• • • •

Legal Framework /Terms of Reference Users will comply with all applicable laws including the Cybercrimes Act 2010, available at http://www.japarliament. gov.jm/attachments/341_The%20Cybercrimes%20Act,%20 2010.pdf. The Cybercrimes Act provides legal guidance on the misuse of computer systems and data and seeks to address computer system sabotage. The law says it is an offence to make devices or data available for the commission of an offence under any law in Jamaica. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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• •

Users are responsible for any activity originating from their accounts. Computer passwords are provided to students and employees with varying access rights according to institutional role. Accounts and passwords must not be shared with others. Except in isolated or occasional circumstances, IT resources should be used only for purposes directly related to or in support of the academic, research or administrative activities of the College. Data of a personal nature is not to be stored on the College’s network drives. The College reserves the right to remove personal data from College’s network without notice. The College will not be liable for the loss or corruption of personal data stored on IT resources. Users are allowed free access to IT resources as necessary, to carry out their assigned responsibilities subject to the use of these resources as described in this policy. Users should not attempt to undermine the security or integrity of IT systems or telecommunications networks and should not attempt to gain unauthorized use of these resources. The IT Department will ensure that documentation is maintained to prove that all software installed on computer workstations have been legally obtained and installed in a manner that conforms to the applicable license. Excessive demands should not be made of IT resources to the extent that this limits access to other users. IT resources should be insured.


Acquisition of I.T. Resources

The head of the IT Department will ensure that the following steps to acquisition of IT Resources are observed:

documented. The I.T. staff should not offer repair services to computers, laptops or any similar electronic equipment owned by staff and students.

Loss of Equipment

The procurement of IT equipment should adhere to Government’s Procurement Policy which is available at: www.ncc.gov.jm. When IT Resources are purchased and delivered, the delivery should match the specifications of what was ordered. An inventory of all I.T. equipment must be documented and updated annually or as equipment is bought or made obsolete. The information should include version number, serial number and other related and relevant details. IT Resources must be kept in a safe and secure place.

Movement of I.T. Equipment

Requisition forms will be used for issuing I.T. equipment and should bear the appropriate signatures including that of the head of the department. Requisition forms must be properly filed and made available for inspection periodically. Computers, printers and scanners should not be moved from one Department to another without the knowledge of the I.T. Department. A request for movement should be done using a Change Request Form which is available from the Department.

Maintenance

Equipment should be inspected regularly for usability and defects and sent for repairs where necessary. The inspection and recommendation for repairs should be

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Loss or theft of equipment should be reported to the Head of the I.T. Department, the Assets and Facilities Manager the Vice Principal of Administration and Resource Development and the Principal within twenty four hours of the incident occurring. Reports should also be made to the Police and to the Ministry of Education. The report must have the following details: • • • • • • • • •

The date of theft or loss Location from which equipment was lost or stolen The type of equipment including the brand and model The condition of the equipment The age of the equipment The purchase price The replacement cost The last person who had custody of the equipment A copy of the requisition form used to issue the equipment

Accountability Actions

Where equipment has been lost or stolen through negligence, a committee of at least three senior members of staff will meet and make recommendations to the Principal who has the final say in the matter. Actions may be of a disciplinary nature and may include instructions for financial compensation, replacement or repair. External authorities may be consulted where there is a breach of applicable law.

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Email Use Policy Purpose

Personal Use

The aim of this policy is to govern the use general of the College’s email account and to outline the acceptable rule and standards.

Using the College email account is not restricted but it is advisable not to use it for personal use (e.g. signing up on social media sites).

Scope

Sending chain letters or joke emails from an EMCVPA email account is prohibited. These restrictions also apply to the forwarding of mail received by an ENCVPA employee.

This policy covers appropriate use of any email sent from an EMCVPA email address and applies to all employees, vendors, and agents operating on behalf of the EMCVPA.

EMCVPA email accounts may monitor/audit messages without prior notice.

Prohibited Use

The EMCVPA email system shall not to be used for the creation or distribution of any disruptive or offensive messages, including offensive comments about race, gender, hair color, disabilities, age, sexual orientation, pornography, political beliefs, or national origin. Employees who receive any emails with this content from any EMCVPA employee should report it to their supervisor or the human resource department

Upon resignation your email account will be disabled. NEVER open any files or macros attached to an email from an unknown, suspicious or untrustworthy source. Delete these attachments immediately.

Password Policy Overview / Purpose

Policy

The aim of this policy is maintain an acceptable standard logical security through the enterprise computer and network systems. The ICT department recognizes poor security architecture can lead unauthorized access of EMCVPA’s data\information. The purpose of this policy is to establish a standard for creation of strong passwords, the protection of those passwords, and the frequency of change.

All user-level passwords (e.g. desktop computer, etc.) must be changed at least once quarterly. User accounts that have system-level privileges granted through group memberships or programs such as “CDISIS” must have a unique password from all other accounts held by that user.

Scope

The scope of this policy includes all personnel (student, faculty and staff) who EMCVPA computing resources, access the EMCVPA’s network e.g. email, wireless, office365, computers any other system that resides at any Edna Manley College facility.

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Password should not be disclosed to any employees, students, faculty or any other individual unless written authorization is given. All user-level and system-level passwords must conform to the guidelines described below. • Passwords must be strong (uppercase, lowercase and special character). •

Passwords must eight (8) characters or longer.

New passwords must not be the same as recent old passwords.


Use of Lab Policy Overview

Computer labs are used to facilitate the educational development of the College. Labs may also be used for project-related purposes in partnership with other institutions. Lab monitors are assigned to classes to facilitate orderly functioning of labs.

Scope

This use of labs policy covers all authorized users of the computer labs these include registered students, lectures, staff and any other authorized persons. All users of the computer lab inherently accept the rules displays in the labs.

Policy • • •

• •

Food or Drink: There shall be NO food or drink nor any liquid in the computer labs. Smoking is strictly prohibit in the computer labs No tampering with computer and its peripherals; this includes switching of mouse or keyboard from one computer to another, removal of computer peripheral for use on personal equipment and the movement of computers from one are to another. Removal of furniture from the labs is strictly prohibited Data Storage: - Students will store their work on external media. Data stored on a College computer will be done at the student’s risk. ICT department do take responsibility for the loss of student data. Logging out: - It is recommended that students log out of the machine to prevent other persons from using their account. Password: - Students are urged to keep passwords secure to prevent unwanted users from gaining access to their account. Enforcement: - The College reserves the right to lock students’ accounts that are found in violation of lab rules. The student would then have to visit the IT Office in order to unlock his/her account and may face disciplinary action, which may include stipulations as to when the student will regain access to College IT resources.

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Policy Overview The ICT Department of EMCVPA is committed prepare all students and lecturers to maximize learning by fully integrating relevant technology into academic content to. The ICT see the value proposition of having student and staff to use their own device; it drives organizational efficiency in the College as well as it fosters media and technology literacy.

Purpose

BYOD policy seek govern how personal devices interfaces with ICT resources of the EMCVPA and the protection the organization data synchronized on an individual’s device. Due to budgetary constraints the ICT department is not able to provide adequate hardware for all student and staff campus wide. Additionally, the consumerization of technology (using of third-party cloud services and applications has cause a proliferation of personal devices in the organization.

Scope

The BYOD policy covers all student, staff, lecturers and any other authorized tenant (guest) of Edna Manley College. Device supported are Apple IOS 5.1 to newest release, Android 4.0 to newest release, Blackberry OS 7 to newest release, Apple Mac OSX and Windows. Student: Students may use their own devices in the classroom to access, interact and save information from the Internet, communicate with other learners and use productivity tools platform Office365 to create assignments/ projects or take classroom assessments. Faculty\ Staff: Faculty and staff may use their own devices in the classroom to access student management systems, Office 365 platform, access and synchronize EMCVPA’s mail, for presentation and general internet usage that is geared toward making job function more efficient and productive. Policy Accessibility- Access to the Wireless Internet is made available to the populace of the EMCVPA. To be granted access, students must confirm they accept the Terms and Conditions of the EMCVPA’s Wireless Access Security Policy

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(WASP). By accepting the Terms and Conditions, users will be expected to uphold the contents of the WASP as well as the Student Code of Conduct on their studentowned devices while on College property. Additionally, the Information Technology Department of the EMCVPA will filter all content for users connected to EMCVPA’s network. Theft, Loss or Damage - The EMCVPA is not liable or responsible for any theft, damage or loss of any personal device or the information on any such device. It is the responsibility of the owner of the device to ensure that the device is safe and secure. Electrical outlet is provided for the charging of these devices. It is recommended that tenant update their anti-virus software before bringing their device(s) onto school property. The EMCVPA will not provide antivirus solution for personal devices. End user support for tenant-owned devices is the responsibility of the owner. EMCVPA IT staff members are not responsible for technical issues. IT staff will only aid in the wireless authentication of the device against the college network. Tenants are asked to visit the IT helpdesk should this need arises. Device Specific Instructions for Configuring Wireless Access can be had from IT helpdesk.

Internet traffic will be filtered. Anyone connecting to the EMCVPA’s network (students, staff) will be filtered just as they would be using EMC-owned devices. Approved BYOD (Cloud) platforms of EMCVPA are Office365, EMC mail, Aeorion student management systems, approved library eBook and archive subscriptions, EMCstudent mail and EMC’s-Virtual Private Network.

Guidelines on Anti-Virus Process

Recommended processes to prevent virus propagation: • •

• • • •

Edna Manley College reserves the right to repeal all rights given to sync data on personal device.

Passwords must be enabled on all devices used to sync organization’s data. The devices will be scanned upon the connection with the network.

Glossary of Terms Term

Definition

Email

The electronic transmission of information through a mail protocol such as SMTP or IMAP.

Forwarded email

Email resent from an internal network to an outside point.

Chain email or letter

Email sent to successive people. Typically the body of the note has direction to send out multiple copies of the note and promises good luck or money if the direction is followed.

Sensitive information

Information is considered sensitive if it can be damaging to The Edna Manley College or its customers’ reputation or market standing.

Always run the supported anti-virus software that is available on all EMC I.T managed computers. NEVER open any files or macros attached to an email from an unknown, suspicious or untrustworthy source. Delete these attachments immediately, then “double delete” them by emptying your Trash. Delete spam, chain, and other junk email without forwarding. Never download files from unknown or suspicious sources. Avoid direct disk sharing with read/write access unless there is absolutely a business requirement to do so. Always scan a Thumb drive from an unknown source for viruses before using it. Back-up critical data and system configurations on a regular basis and store the data in your personalized shared space on the EMC server (‘G’ or ‘H’ drive). New viruses are discovered almost every day. If user suspects that their school owed thumb drive is infected with a virus; user should use the Anti- Virus software provided to scan the storage device.

Virus warning

Email containing warnings about virus or malware. The overwhelming majority of these emails turn out to be a hoax and contain bogus information usually intent only on frightening or misleading users.

Unauthorized Disclosure

The intentional or unintentional revealing of restricted information to people, both inside and outside The Edna Manley College who do not have a need to know that information.

Application Administration

Any account that is for the administration of an application Account (e.g., Peachtree administrator, CDISIS administrator).

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Multimedia Services Equipment For Use In Class

Services Provided by Department

All requests for services and equipment for classes are to be done through the class lecturer and on the appropriate form. Requests from students will not be honoured.

The Multimedia Services Department does not assist students with preparation of assignments or with other services unless such a request comes from the respective lecturer.

Loan of Equipment

Employment in Department The Multimedia Services Department invites students who are at least in the second year of their studies and who are in good academic standing to apply for part-time employment. Skilled audio visual producers are especially welcome.

Students who are duly registered and are in good financial standing may be allowed, on the recommendation of their school’s director of studies, to borrow for short-term periods, various pieces of audio-visual equipment which is to be used to assist with preparation of their Edna Manley College’s assignments. Equipment so loaned, is to be used on campus only. Application must be made on the appropriate form. (See attached). All terms and conditions apply.

Security Regulations 1. These Regulations may be cited as the Edna Manley College (Security) Regulations 2014. 2. In these Regulations – 3. “campus” means all that land known as the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in the parish of Saint Andrew. 4. “security personnel” means – 5. an employee who performs security duties; or 6. a person assigned to the Campus to perform security duties by the security company to which he is employed, being a company contracted by the College to carry out security services on the Campus. 7. “student” means a person who is registered as a student of the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (whether full-time or part-time) during a current year for a first or higher degree, diploma, Certificate or such other qualification or courses of the College as may be approved. 8. (1) Unauthorized personnel are NOT allowed on the campus at ANY TIME. Unauthorized personnel include individuals who do not have legitimate business with the College. 9. (2) All visitors to the College must declare their intentions to the security personnel at the gates. If visiting a staff, student or Department, said individual or 73

10.

11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Department must be notified by the security personnel before the visitor is allowed to proceed on campus. All use of space on campus (for meetings, games practice, clubs or get-togethers) must be authorized by the Office Services Manager, Director of School/ Department and Principal. Property belonging to the College should not be taken from the campus without written authorization from the Director of School/Department, and Director of Assets and/or Facilities Management designate or the Principal. (1) The operating hours of the administrative offices are:Mondays–Thursdays, 8:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Fridays, 8:30a.m.– 4:00p.m. Except the School of Continuing Education and Allied Programmes which operates:Monday–Fridays, 8:00a.m.–8:30p.m. Saturdays, 9:00a.m.–3:00p.m. (2) Classes are generally scheduled between 8:00a.m. and 8:30p.m., Mondays to Fridays. All registered students and staff have access to the College twentyfour (24) hours a day, however there is limited access to spaces and facilities which require special or supervised TABLE OF CONTENTS

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access outside of operating hours. 19. (1) All registered students and staff are assigned identification cards (ID) which must be shown to the security personnel on entry to and exit from the campus. IDs must be displayed at all times while on campus and be shown upon request by security personnel. Failure to comply will be in violation of campus rules. 20. (2) Registered students and staff who do not have their IDs will be issued temporary access cards for the period of time that they are on campus. All temporary access cards must be submitted to the security personnel when exiting the campus. There is a fee applicable for lost IDs or access cards. 21. (1) There should be no visitors on campus between 12:00a.m. and 6:00a.m., except in the case of an event where written authorization and notification is given by the Assets and Facilities Management Department. 22. All persons seeking entry to the campus will be duly processed before they are allowed on campus. For registered students and staff, this involves the verification of identification cards and declaration of possessions. For visitors, this involves the verification of identification and purpose of visit, and declaration of possessions. 23. All incoming and outgoing vehicles are logged by the security personnel at the gate. The log includes information on make of vehicle, registration number, name of driver, ticket number assigned and date and time of entry. Drivers are given a ticket on entrance and must submit the ticket to the security personnel on exit. Failure to produce ticket on exit will result in a fine and verification of ownership of vehicle. 24. After processing at entrance, all vehicles are directed to the designated parking, delivery or pick-up areas. 25. Random inspections will be conducted, including search of bags or other parcels, pockets, and vehicles, leaving the campus to determine if College property is being illegally removed. 26. EMCVPA students, who commute or live on Hall, must register their vehicles with the Assets and Facilities Department upon registration. 27. All residents must display IDs when entering the Hall of Residence. If residents are not in possession of their IDs, verification of residency by the security personnel at the Hall gate must be determined from the Hall Manager or Block or Student Representative. 28. Residents are not to leave any access pass, ID, or room key with the security personnel. 29. Visiting hours to the Halls of Residence is 7:00a.m. to 12:00a.m. No visitor, with the exception of the service staff assigned to the Hall, the College doctor, College TABLE OF CONTENTS

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nurse and the Student Council Executive, must enter before 7:00 a.m., and leave after 12:00a.m. Overnight visitors to the Hall must be granted permission in writing by the Hall Manager. Visitors to the Hall of Residence must first check with the security personnel at the Hall gate, who will make a log and issue a visitor’s pass. This process also applies to persons going to the Doctor and the Student Council office. However, in the event an emergency, persons must be allowed to enter and particulars obtained after. In the case of visitors to the Hall Manager, residents and the Student Council office, the security personnel must notify the respective individual before the visitor is allowed to proceed on to the Hall. All visitors to residents of the Hall must be received by the respective resident at the Hall’s gate. Unless the resident comes to the gate to accept the visitor, the visitor will not be allowed on the Hall. The visitor’s pass must be returned to the security personnel on departure from the Hall. If the visitor is planning to re-enter the Hall, a new log must be made and a visitor’s pass re-issued. In the case of emergencies, (the Hall Manager and) the security supervisor on shift have access to all the spaces on the Hall. Residents and visitors are expected to follow the procedures and observe necessary precautions to ensure the safety of themselves and other individuals on the Hall. Incidents on the Hall must be reported first verbally then in writing to the Hall Manager within twenty-four (24) hours. The security personnel are on duty twenty-four (24) hours a day, seven (7) days a week. The security personnel will follow these regulations, those in the student handbook and the regulations under the laws of Jamaica, in regards to College violations and resulting actions. The security personnel should patrol all areas on campus and should be given access when requested. The security personnel are stationed at the entrance and exit gate to the College, the Hall of Residence gate and the entrance to the Library. To contact the security personnel, call Ext. 2222 for exit or Ext. 2220 entrance gates and Ext. 2221 for the Hall of Residence gate.


Student Communication Policy

The Marketing and Public Relations Department maintains several policies and forms that help maintain the consistency of the College’s communications efforts and overall brand. The College commits to communicate in clear and simple language utilizing traditional and new media formats. We will always speak respectfully to students and establish procedures for complaints or queries. Students are expected to respect and adhere to the following guidelines.

Emails

All students must activate their College emails upon registering at EMCVPA. The College email will be your official communication channel with all departments and lecturers. Students must check College mail frequently to keep updated on important College information from time to time.

Any individuals whose name or image is used for publicity purposes must sign a photo release before the College can use, reproduce and circulate their information.

Social Media Guidelines

The College recognizes that the creation and administering of College-affiliated social media profiles or pages are important for social networking, sharing information and promotion of the college. ​ Students are not allowed to create pages using the College’s name on social media network without prior permission from the Marketing & Public Relations Department. Students may from time to time post content on college managed social media properties but must clearly identify themselves with name and affiliation. Copyright laws must be observed when posting. Posts must be respectful. Content with profanity, obscenity, personal insults or attacks are prohibited.

Logo Use

Any use of the College logo must be authorized through the Marketing Department by means of the Logo Use Agreement. Permission is granted solely for the designated project and students must request a new permission for additional projects.

Brand Identity

The College has a standard for branding in order to ensure that messages and designs are consistent. Students are asked to adhere to the branding guidelines which are available on the College’s website or by request from the Marketing & Public Relations Department. The Branding Guidelines are to be observed by all students who create newsletters, brochures or any other publication materials.

Website Policy

The information provided on the college’s Web site is provided for information purposes only and does not constitute a legal contract between the College and any person or entity unless otherwise specified. Information on the official College Web site is subject to change without prior notices.

Photo/Video Release Forms

The college will from time to time use names and images in various publications, including print, radio, television, and the Web, to help convey promotional messaging of our College. 

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Health Policy Hospitalization

Policy for the Provision of Emergency Hospital Services Objective of the Policy This policy governs the College’s procedures for the Corporate Contract with Andrew’s Memorial Hospital. Periodic reviews, where necessary, will be the responsibility of the Vice Principal, Administration and Resource Development. The Contract The College remains committed to the health of the campus community and has entered into a Corporate Contract with the Andrew’s Memorial Hospital to facilitate emergency services in urgent situations and in instances where students are injured while representing the College off-campus. The College will maintain a monthly credit of $50,000 at the Andrew’s Memorial Hospital for the purpose and will require students who use the service to repay all expenses billed to the College’s Corporate Account. Students will reimburse the College within thirty (30) days of the service for payments made on their behalf, a payment plan will be arranged if required. Students should be advised that notwithstanding the foregoing the College will not pay for imaging services such as Cat. Scans. Students are expected to pay for imaging services up-front. Students will use Health Cards to access services. Definitions Emergency is defined as a situation where someone is incapacitated or likely to become incapacitated, a situation where someone is having a severe asthmatic attack and needs to be nebulized, a situation in which there is obvious physical harm which has led to bleeding or broken limbs or any condition which may lead to death. Injury is defined as damage or harm done to or suffered by a person. This includes evidence of wounds, severe cuts, bruises and lacerations. Services Provided Under the Contract • Emergency & Outpatient Medical Service • Laboratory • Imaging (X-ray, Ultrasound, Cat. Scan – student to pay upfront for this service) • Pharmacy TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Eligibility for Service Registered students of the College (both full-time and part-time) are eligible for service under the contract. Visitors to the campus can be transported to the Andrew’s Memorial Hospital in an emergency however the contractual agreement will not cover them and they will be required to pay directly for all expenses incurred. Scope of Coverage The corporate contract is designed to facilitate emergency services only. The College will not provide authorization for follow-up treatment, on-going doctor’s visits or medical reviews. The scope of coverage ends with the initial emergency visit or hospitalization. Subsequent appointments and follow-up visits to the doctor or after discharge from hospitalization will not be covered under the agreement and students will cover these costs directly. Use of Medical Insurance Cards Andrew’s Memorial Hospital accepts the following health insurance cards: • Sagicor • Medecus Persons authorized to give verbal or written permission for service The following persons are authorized to give verbal or written permission: • Principal • Vice-Principal, Administration & Resource Development • Vice-Principal, Academic • Director, Finance & Accounts Transportation to Hospital Critical cases, or those requiring monitoring during transport, will be taken by ambulance to the hospital based on an agreement the College has with Ambucare Ambulance Service. An emergency situation may arise where there is no need for transport by ambulance, in such a case transport will be provided by one of the following means: • College Vehicle • Taxi • Personal Motor Vehicle (of staff member or possibly a fellow-student)


Petty cash will be in place at each of the following places to facilitate transportation of students by taxi: • Cashier in the accounts department • Health Office • Office of the Halls of Residence • School of Continuing Education and Allied Studies Person to Accompany Student to Hospital The person(s) expected to accompany a student to the hospital or stay with the student through the process of receiving care will vary according to the situation these include: • The College Nurse • Halls Manager • Lecturer/Staff • Fellow student(s)

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Duty to Inform In the case where a student is unconscious or unable to speak the emergency contact on file will be notified. Otherwise, students will contact family themselves. Choice of Hospital Ultimately the student can decide which hospital they want to use if they do not wish to receive care from the Andrew’s Memorial Hospital they should be advised that the College does not have an agreement with any other hospital and must be prepared to cover all expenses incurred for services received elsewhere.

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SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES

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BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ARTS MANAGEMENT GENERAL INFORMATION The aim of the School of Arts Management and Humanities is to prepare students for professional careers in education and arts management in collaboration with the Schools of Visual Arts, Dance, Drama and Music and the Arts Management Department. The School is responsible for the delivery of the Bachelor of Arts in Arts Management, joint delivery of education foundation and professional studies courses as well as the delivery of the College’s Core Courses. The durations of the degree and diploma courses are as follows: • Bachelor of Arts in Arts Management – Four(4) years • Associate of Arts in Arts Management – Two (2) years Students are challenged and supported at the same time, to excel in the extremely demanding and incredibly rewarding careers as teachers and arts administrators and managers. To qualify for the BA Arts Management degree students must successfully complete 123 Credits for over four (4) years.

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Philosophical Statement The programme aims to provide training for persons who wish to work in the area of arts management or administration and for persons already involved in the management and administration of arts and culture organizations. The aim is to offer a distinctive combination of theory, studio and project based courses as well as hands on experience. The Philosophy of the BA Arts Management programme is to create an environment that places the students’ academic development within a cultural, social, religious, ethical and artistic context facilitating synergy with creative industry stakeholders both formal and informal to steer programme quality and maintain relevance The programme also aims to build a reserve of trained arts managers and administrators with the vision, foresight and creativity to move the arts forward in Jamaica and the Caribbean.


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ARTS MANAGEMENT To qualify for the B.A. Arts Management, full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of one hundred and twenty-four (124) Credits over four (4) years, as set out below. AM214A

CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

Credits

Major General Adjunct Electives: Studio Rotation Total

12 11 3 4 30

YEAR 2 Major General Adjunct Electives: Studio Rotation Total

Credits 20 5 6 2 33

YEAR 3 Major General Adjunct Electives: Studio Rotation Total

Credits 21 0 7 3 31

YEAR 4 Major General Adjunct Electives: Studio Rotation Total

Credits 22 2 3 3 30

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 2 Code Course Credits AM226B Organizations and Human Resource Management II AM222B Business and Professional Communication AM215B Fundamentals of Event Planning AM217B Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework of Business AM220B Business & Strategic Planning for the Arts AE207B Museum and Art Education Elective

SEMESTER 1 Course Introduction to the Visual and Performing Arts Practice I Introduction to Arts Management I Principles of Accounting l Fundamentals of English Introduction to Spanish I The Self: Ethics and Creativity Elective

YEAR 1 Code AM101B AM115B AM105B GS100B GS102B GS114B

SEMESTER 2 Course Introduction to the Visual and Performing Arts Practice II Introduction to Arts Management II Principles of Accounting ll Critical Thinking and Expository Writing Introduction to Spanish II Caribbean Culture & Identity Elective

3

2 3 2 3 3 3 2

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 1 Code Course Credits AM302A Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean 3 AM315A Event Management and Media Strategies l 3 AM307A Contemporary Issues in the Creative Industries 3 AM313A Project Management 3 AM318A Arts Management Forum: 1 Creative Yaad 1 Elective 3

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 2 Code Course Credits

COURSE MENU YEAR 1 Code AM101A AM115A AM104A GS100A GS102A GS115A

Managing Our Resources: Libraries, Museums, Theatres and Art Galleries

Credits 2 2 2 2 2 3 2

AM304B AM316B AM305B AM301B AM317B

Entrepreneurship and the Arts 3 Event Management and Media Strategies ll 3 Quality in Arts Management 3 Arts and Culture: Policy Development 3 Issues In Community Arts Management 3

YEAR 4 SEMESTER 1 Code Course Credits AM414A AM408A GS300A AM303A

Arts Management Seminar l Independent Study l Research Methods lA Product Design Elective

3 3 3 3 3

Credits

YEAR 4 SEMESTER 2 Code Course Credits

2 2 2

AM414B Arts Management Seminar ll AM408B Independent Study ll GS300B Research Methods lB AM406B Internship

2 2 3 2

3 3 2 8

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1 Code Course Credits AM202A Introduction to Arts Marketing 3 AM225A Organizations and Human Resource Management I 2 AM219A Financial Management for Arts Managers 2 AM218A Facilities Management for Arts Managers 3 AM216A Technical Writing 2

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ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN ARTS MANAGEMENT CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1 Major General Adjunct Electives: Studio Rotation Total

Credits 12 11 3 4 30

YEAR 2 Major General Adjunct Electives: Studio Rotation Total

Credits 20 5 6 2 33

COURSE MENU YEAR 1 SEMESTER 1 Code Course AM101A Introduction to the Visual and Performing Arts Practice I AM115A Introduction to Arts Management I AM104A Principles of Accounting l GS100A Fundamentals of English GS102A Introduction to Spanish I GS115A The Self: Ethics and Creativity Elective YEAR 1 Code AM101B AM115B AM105B GS100B GS102B GS114B

SEMESTER 2 Course Introduction to the Visual and Performing Arts Practice II Introduction to Arts Management II Principles of Accounting ll Critical Thinking and Expository Writing Introduction to Spanish II Caribbean Culture & Identity Elective

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Credits 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 Credits 2 2 2 2 2 3 2

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YEAR 2 Code AM202A AM225A AM219A AM218A AM216A AM214A

SEMESTER 1 Course Credits Introduction to Arts Marketing 3 Organizations and Human Resource Management I 2 Financial Management for Arts Managers 2 Facilities Management for Arts Managers 3 Technical Writing 2 Managing Our Resources: Libraries, Museums, Theatres and Art Galleries

YEAR 2 Code AM226B AM222B AM217B AM215B AM220B AE207B

SEMESTER 2 Course Organizations and Human Resource Management II 2 Business and Professional Communication Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework of Business Fundamentals of Event Planning Business & Strategic Planning for the Arts Museum in Art Education Elective

Credits 3 3 2 3 3 2

3


ARTS MANAGEMENT MINOR OPTION

HUMANITIES (GENERAL STUDIES COURSES)

COURSE MENU CODE COURSE Credits AM104A Principles of Accounting l AM115A Introduction to Arts Management I AM115B Introduction to Arts Management II AM202A Introduction to Arts Marketing AM215A Fundamentals of Event Planning AM216A Technical Writing 2 AM217B Intellectual Property and the Legal framework of Business AM218A Facilities Management for Arts Managers AM315A Event Management and Media Strategies I AM316B Event Management and Media Strategies II

COURSE MENU

2 2 2 3 2

CODE GS100A GS100B GS101A GS101B GS102A GS102B GS105 GS110 GS111 GS114B GS115A GS200A GS200B GS201A GS201B GS202A GS202B GS231 GS203 GS205A GS206A GS 210 GS212A GS212B GS305 GS300A GS300B GS300Y GS302A GS302B GS303 GS313 GS314 GS400A GS400B GS404B

3 3 3 3

ARTS MANAGEMENT ELECTIVES COURSE MENU CODE AM104A AM105A AM219A AM202A AM225A AM226B AM215A AM217B AM218A AM302A AM303B AM304B AM305A AM313A AM317B AM220B GS115A AM224A

COURSE Credits Principles of Accounting l 2 Principles of Accounting l 2 Financial Management for Arts Managers 2 Introduction to Arts Marketing 3 Organizations and Human Resource Management I 2 Organizations and Human Resource Management II 2 Fundamentals of Event Planning 2 Intellectual Property and the Legal 3 Facilities Management for Arts Managers 3 Arts Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean 3 Product Design 3 Entrepreneurship and the Arts 3 Quality in Arts Management 3 Project Management 3 Issues in Community Arts Management 3 Business and Strategic Planning for the Arts 3 The Self: Ethics and Creativity 3 Artiste Management 3

85

COURSE Fundamentals of English Critical Thinking and Expository Writing Introduction to Critical Analysis I Introduction to Critical Analysis II Introduction to Spanish I Introduction to Spanish II Critical Thinking & Creative Insights English for Living Information Technology for Artists and Entrepreneurs Caribbean Culture & Identity The Self: Ethics and Creativity Business of Art and Design I Business of Art and Design II Psychology I Psychology II 2 Caribbean Literature I 2 Caribbean Literature II 2 College Math 3 Academic and Professional Writing 3 Exploring Philosophies of Art 2 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Conversational Spanish 3 Conservation Theory I 3 Conservation Theory I I 3 Gender in Society: Issues & Theoretical Considerations 3 Research Methods IA 2 Research Methods IB 2 Research Methods I 2 World Literature I 2 World Literature II 2 Performance Research Forum 2 Collections Management Care 3 Caribbean Dress Studies I: Survey of Caribbean Textiles & Fashion Design 3 Research Methods IIA 2 Research Methods IIB 2 Introduction to Caribbean Studies 2

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Programmes ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2008 Year One CREDIT STRUCTURE MAJOR

12 Credits

ADJUNCT

4 Credits

Introduction To Marketing

2 credits

Ethics Creativity and the Self

2 credits

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts

4 credits

Psychology

2 credits

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin

4 credits

Basic Accounting

2 credits

GENERAL 8 credits

8 Credits

ELECTIVES 6 credits

College English

4 credits

Music Media

Spanish

4 credits

Beginners Studio course taken from Cont. Ed. Programme: Dance, Drama, Music or Visual Arts

2 credits

ELECTIVES 6 credits If you want to keep BOTH Ethics and Psychology, then that is 4 credits towards Electives. COURSE MENU SEMESTER I

Cr

SEMESTER II

Cr

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts

4

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin.

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin.

4

Basic Accounting

2

College English

College English

4

Spanish

Spanish

4

Psychology

Psychology

4

Elective - Ethics Creativity and the Self

2

Introduction To Marketing

2

Elective - Ethics Creativity and the Self

2

Elective - Music Media

2

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2008 Year Two COURSE MENU MAJOR

12 Credits

ADJUNCT

4 Credits

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin.

4 credits

Principles of Marketing

2 credits

Managing Our Resources

4 credits

Financial Management and Accounting

2 credits

National Identity and the Arts

2 credits

Arts and Social Development

2 credits

GENERAL

8 Credits

ELECTIVES

6 Credits

Communication Skills I

2 credits

Introduction to Event Planning

2 credits

Communication Skills II

2 credits

Facilities Management

2 credits

Technical Writing

2 credits

Introduction to Museum Studies

3 credits

Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework

2 credits

Performing Arts Electives

2 credits

SEMESTER ONE

Cr

SEMESTER TWO

Cr

Introduction to Arts Management

2

Introduction to Arts Management

2

Managing Our Resources

2

Managing Our Resources

2

Communication Skills I

2

Communication Skills II

2

Arts and Social Development

2

Technical Writing

2

Intro. to Event Planning

2

Intell. Property & the Legal Framework

2

Principles of Marketing

2

National Identity & the Arts

2

Financial Mgt & Acct’g

2

Elective - Intro. to Museum Stud.

3

2

Elective- Facilities &Site Management

2

Elective Salsa Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2008 Year Three MAJOR - 13 credits Entrepreneurship and the Arts

3 credits

Arts and Culture Policy Development

3 credits

Events Management/Managing Community Arts/ Media Relations

4 credits

Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean

3 credits

GENERAL 6 credits Quality in Arts Management

3 credits

Photography and Multimedia Applications/ Multimedia for Museums

3 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Research Methods I

2 credits

Product Design or Curatorial Studies or Multimedia Applications

3 credits

ELECTIVES 6 credits Box Office Management/Market Research/ Marketing Tools & Application

4 credits

Project Management

2 credits

Art Education for Museums

3 credits

Collections Management and Archiving

3 credits

Performing Arts Electives (i.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light)

2 credits

19 Jan. ’09 SEMESTER ONE

Credits SEMESTER TWO

Credits

Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean 3

Entrepreneurship & the Arts

3

Events Mgt/Managing Community Arts/ Media Relations

2

Events Management/ Community Arts/Media Relations

2

Arts and Culture Policy Dev.

3

Photo’hy & Multimedia for Museums

3

Research Methods I

2

Elective /Resrh

4

Quality in Arts Mgt. Product Design or Curatorial Studies or Multimedia Applications Elective

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3

2 2


ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2008 Year Four MAJOR - 12 credits Arts Management Seminar Independent Study

6 credits 6 credits

GENERAL 8 credits Internship

8 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Research Paper

4 credits

ELECTIVES 6 credits Managing Negotiations in the Cultural Industries Performing Arts Electives (i.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light) SEMESTER ONE

CR

2 credits 2 credits

SEMESTER TWO

CR

Arts Management Seminar

Arts Management Seminar

6

Independent Study

Independent Study

6

Res. Met’d. I/Research Paper

2

Research Paper

2

Electives:

2

Elective:

2

Elective

2

Internship (Summer)

8

Total 30 Credits

89

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2009 Year One MAJOR - 14 credits Introduction to Arts Management Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts Organizational Structure and Arts Administration Basic Accounting

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 2 credits

GENERAL - 8 credits College English Spanish

4 credits 4 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Ethics Creativity and the Self or Psychology

4 credits 4 credits

ELECTIVES 4 credits Music Media Beginners Studio course taken from Cont. Ed. Programme: Dance, Drama, Music or Visual Arts

4 credits

If you want to keep BOTH Ethics and Psychology, then that is 4 credits towards Electives. SEMESTER ONE

SEMESTER TWO

CR

CR

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts

4

Intro. to Arts Management

Intro. to Arts Management

4

College English I

College English II

4

Introduction to Spanish I

Introduction to Spanish II

4

Psychology I

Psychology II

4

or

Ethics Creativity and the Self I Introduction To Marketing

2

Elective

2

Total 30 Credits

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or

Ethics Creativity & the Self II

4

Elective

2


ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2009 Year Two MAJOR - 11 credits Organizational Structure and Arts Administration - Managing Our Resources National Identity and the Arts Introduction to Event Planning

4 credits 3 credits 2 credits 2 credits

GENERAL – 8 credits Communication Skills Technical Writing Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework

3 credits 2 credits 2 credits

ADJUNCT – 5 credits Introduction to Arts Marketing Financial Management and Accounting

3 credits 2 credits

ELECTIVES – 6 credits Facilities Management 2 credits Introduction to Museum Studies Performing Arts Electives

3 credits 2 credits

SEMESTER ONE

CR

SEMESTER TWO

CR

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin.

2

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin.

2

Managing Our Resources

3

Intel. Property & the Legal Framework

2

Communication Skills I

3

National Identity & the Arts

2

Technical Writing

2

Intro. to Arts Marketing

3

Intro. to Event Planning

2

Financial Mgt & Basic Acct’g

2

Elective Facilities &Site Management

2

Elective

3

Elective

2

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2009 Year Three MAJOR – 15 credits Entrepreneurship and the Arts Arts and Culture Policy Development Events Management/Managing Community Arts/ Media Relations Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries

3 credits 3 credits

6 credits 3 credits

GENERAL 3 credits Quality in Arts Management

3 credits

ADJUNCT 6 credits Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean Product Design

3 credits 3 credits

ELECTIVES 6 credits Photography and Multimedia Applications/ Project Management Museum in Art Education Performing Arts Electives (i.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light) The Business of Music

3 credits 3 credits 2 credits

SEMESTER ONE

CR

SEMESTER TWO

CR

Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean

3

Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries

3

Events Mgt/Managing Community Arts/Media Relations I

3

Events Management/Community Arts/Media Relations II

3

Product Design

3

Quality in Arts Management

3

Entrepreneurship & the Arts

3

Arts and Culture Policy Dev.

3

Elective

3

Elective

3

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2009 Year Four MAJOR 12 credits Arts Management Seminar Independent Study

6 credits 6 credits

GENERAL 8 credits Internship

8 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Research Method I Research Paper

2 credits 2 credits

ELECTIVES 6 credits Performing Arts Electives (i.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light)

6 credits

SEMESTER ONE

SEMESTER TWO

Arts Management Seminar

Arts Management Seminar

Independent Study

Independent Study

Electives: Elective T otal 30 Credits

6 credits

6 credits

Research Paper

2 credits

2 credits

Elective:

2credits

2 credits

Internship (Summer)

93

8 credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2010 Year One MAJOR 10 credits Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts I & II Introduction to Arts Management I & II Basic Accounting

4 credits 4 credits 2 credits

GENERAL 8 credits College English Introduction to Spanish I & II

4 credits 4 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Psychology I & II

4 credits

Ethics Creativity and the Self I & II

4 credits

ELECTIVES – 8 credits Introduction to Computer as a Tool Information Technology

or

3 credits 2 credits

Beginners Studio course taken from Cont. Ed. Programme: Dance Drama Music or Visual Arts Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM101A

Introduction to Practice of Visual & Performing Arts 1 2 credits

AM 101B

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts II 2 credits

AM115A

Intro. to Arts Management I 2 credits

AM115B

Intro. to Arts Management II 2 credits

GS100A

College English I 2 credits

GS100B

College English II 2 credits

GS102A

Introduction to Spanish I 2 credits

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II 2 credits

GS106A

Ethics Creativity and the Self II credits

GS106B

Ethics Creativity & the Self II 2 credits

AM103A

Basic Accounting 2 credits

GS103A

Information Technology or other Elective 2 credits

EL244E

Elective: Computer Aided Design for Artists or other Computer Course 3 credits

2

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2010 Year Two MAJOR 13 credits Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. I & II Managing Our Resources National Identity and the Arts Introduction to Event Planning Facilities Management for Arts Managers

4 credits 3 credits 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits

GENERAL 8 credits Communication Skills Technical Writing Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework

3 credits 2 credits 3 credits

ADJUNCT 5 credits Introduction to Arts Marketing Financial Management and Accounting

3 credits 2 credits

ELECTIVES 5 credits Museum in Arts Education Performing Arts Electives

3 credits 2 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM204A

Organizational Structure & Arts Admin. I 2 credits

AM204B

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. II 2 credits

AM214A

Managing Our Resources 3 credits

AM217B

Intel. Property & the Legal Framework 3 credits

AM215E

Intro. to Event Planning 2 credits

AM213B

Financial Mgt & Accounting 2 credits

AM216A

Technical Writing 2 credits

AE207A

Elective Museums & Arts Education 3 credits

AM223A AM202A AM212A AM218E

Communication Skills 3 credits Intro. to Arts Marketing 3 credits National Identity & the Arts 2 credits Facilities Management for Arts Managers 2 credits Elective 2 credits

Total 31 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2010 Year Three MAJOR – 12 credits Events Management and Media Relations Entrepreneurship and the Arts Arts and Culture: Policy Development

6 credits 3 credits 3 credits

GENERAL 6 credits Quality in Arts Management Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries

3 credits 3 credits

ADJUNCT 6 credits Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean Product Design

3 credits 3 credits

ELECTIVES – 6 credits Performing Arts Electives (i.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light) The Business of Music

6 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM302A

Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean 3 credits Events Mgt and Media Relations I 3credits Product Design 3 credits

AM304B

Entrepreneurship & the Arts 3 credits

AM306B

Events Mgt and Media Relations II 3 credits Quality in Arts Mgt 3 credits

Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries 3 credits Elective 3 credits

AM301B

Arts and Culture: Policy Dev. 3 credits

AM312B

Elective Exhibition Management 3 credits

AM306A AM303A AM307A

AM305B

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2010 Year Four MAJOR 12 credits Arts Management Seminar Independent Study

6 credits 6 credits

GENERAL 11credits Internship Managing Community Arts

8 credits 3 credits

ADJUNCT 4c redits Research Paper

4 credits

ELECTIVES 3 credits Performing Arts Electives (i.e.Stage Management, Sound, Light)

3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM414A

Arts Management Seminar I 3 credits

AM414B

Arts Management 3 credits

Seminar II

AM408A

Independent Study I 3 credits

AM408B

Independent Study 3 credits

II

AM409A

Res. Method I 2credits

AM409B

Research Paper 2 credits

AM410A

Managing Community Arts 3 credits Elective 1 credit

Elective: 2 credits AM406B

Internship (Summer) 8 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2011 Year One MAJOR - 13 credits Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts I & II Introduction to Arts Management I & II Basic Accounting Beginners Studio course taken from Cont. Ed. Programme: Dance Drama Music or Visual Arts GENERAL - 8 credits College English I & II Introduction to Spanish I & II

4 credits 4 credits 2 credits 3 credits

4 credits 4 credits

ADJUNCT - 4 credits Ethics Creativity and the Self I & II 4 credits ELECTIVES – 5 credits Introduction to Computer as a Tool Information Technology

3 credits 2 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM101A

Introduction to Practice of Visual & Performing Arts I 2 credits

AM 101B

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts II 2 credits

AM115A

Intro. to Arts Management I 2 credits

AM115B

Intro. to Arts Management II 2 credits

GS100A

College English I 2 credits

GS100B

College English II 2 credits

GS102A

Introduction to Spanish I 2 credits

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II 2 credits

GS106A

Ethics Creativity and the Self II 2 credits

GS106B

Ethics Creativity & the Self II 2 credits

AM103A

Basic Accounting 2 credits

Elective Information Technology or 2 credits

Elective: Computer Aided Design for Artists or other Computer Course 3 credits

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2011 Year Two MAJOR 22 credits Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. I & II Managing Our Resources National Identity and the Arts Introduction to Event Planning Facilities Management Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework Introduction to Arts Marketing Financial Management and Accounting

4 credits 3 credits 2 credits 2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits

GENERAL 5credits Communication Skills Technical Writing

3 credits 2 credits

ADJUNCT 3 credits Museum in Art Education I

3 credits

ELECTIVES 2 credits Performing Arts Electives

2 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM204A

Organizational Structure & Arts Admin. I 2 credits

AM204B

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. II 2 credits

AM223A

Communication Skills 3 credits

AM217B

Intel. Property & the Legal Framework 3 credits

AM215A

Intro. to Event Planning 2 credits

AM202A

Intro. to Arts Marketing 3 credits

AM212A

National Identity & the Arts 2 credits

AM213B

Financial Mgt & Accounting 2 credits

AM218E

Facilities Management for Arts Managers 3 credits

AM216A

Technical Writing 2 credits

Elective 2 credits

AE207A

Museum in Art Education 3 credits

AM214A

Managing Our Resources 3 credits

Total 32 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2011 Year Three MAJOR 18 credits Events Management and Media Relations I & II Entrepreneurship and the Arts Arts and Culture: Policy Development Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean GENERAL 3 credits Quality in Arts Management ADJUNCT 3 credits Product Design

6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

3 credits

ELECTIVES 6 credits Performing Arts Electives (I.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light) The Business of Music

3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM302A

Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean 3 credits

AM304B

Entrepreneurship & the Arts 3 credits

AM306A

Events Mgt and Media Relations I 3 credits

AM306B

Events Mgt and Media Relations II 3 credits

AM303A

Product Design 3 credits

AM305B

Quality in Arts Mgt 3 credits

AM307A

Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries 3 credits

AM301B

Arts and Culture: Policy Dev. 3 credits

Elective 3 credits

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2011 Year Four MAJOR - 20 credits Arts Management Seminar I & II Independent Study Project Development I & II Internship

6 credits 6 credits 8 credits

GENERAL - 3 credits Managing Community Arts

3 credits

ADJUNCT - 4 credits Research Paper

4 credits

ELECTIVES - 3 credits Performing Arts Electives (i.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light)

3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM414A

Arts Management Seminar I 3 credits

AM414B

Arts Management 3 credits

AM408A

Independent Study I 3 credits

AM408B

Independent Study 3 credits

AM409A

Res. Method I 2credits

AM409B

Research Paper 2 credits

AM410A

Managing Community Arts 3 credits

AM406B

Internship (Summer) 8 credits

Seminar II II

Elective 3credit Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2012 Year One MAJOR - 13 credits Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts Introduction to Arts Management Basic Accounting Beginners Studio course taken from Cont. Ed. Programme: Dance Drama Music or Visual Arts

- 4 credits - 4 credits - 2 credits - 3 credits

GENERAL - 8 credits College English Introduction to Spanish I & II

- 4 credits - 4 credits

ADJUNCT - 4 credits Ethics Creativity and the Self

- 4 credits

ELECTIVES – 5 credits Introduction to Computer as a Tool Information Technology

- 3 credits - 2 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM101A

Introduction to Practice of Visual & Performing Arts 1 2 credits

AM 101B

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts II 2 credits

AM115A

Intro. to Arts Management I 2 credits

AM115B

Intro. to Arts Management II 2 credits

GS100A

Fundamentals of English 2 credits

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing Skills 2 credits

GS102A

Introduction to Spanish I 2 credits

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II 2 credits

GS106A

Ethics Creativity and the Self II 2 credits

GS106B

Ethics Creativity & the Self II 2 credits

AM103A

Basic Accounting 2 credits

Elective or Information Technology 2 credits

Elective: Computer Aided Design for Artists or other Computer Course 3 credits

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2012 Year Two MAJOR - 22 credits Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. I & II Managing Our Resources National Identity and the Arts Introduction to Event Planning Facilities Management for Arts Management Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework Introduction to Arts Marketing Financial Management and Accounting

- 4 credits - 3 credits - 2 credits - 2 credits - 3 credits - 3 credits - 3 credits - 2 credits

GENERAL - 5credits Communication Skills Technical Writing

- 3 credits - 2 credits

ADJUNCT - 3 credits Museum in Art Education

- 3 credits

ELECTIVES - 2 credits Performing Arts Electives

- 2 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM204A

Organizational Structure & Arts Admin. I AM204B 2 credits

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. II 2 credits

AM223A

Communication Skills 3 credits

AM217B

Intel. Property & the Legal Framework 3 credits

AM215A

Intro. to Event Planning 2 credits

AM202B

Intro. to Arts Marketing 3 credits

AM212A

National Identity & the Arts 2 credits

AM213B

Financial Mgt & Accounting 2 credits

AM218E

Facilities Management for Arts Managers 3 credits

AM216A

Technical Writing 2 credits

Elective 2 credits

AE207A

Museum in Art Education 3 credits

AM214B

Managing Our Resources 3 credits

Total 32 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2012 Year Three MAJOR 18 credits Events Management and Media Relations I & II Entrepreneurship and the Arts Arts and Culture: Policy Development Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean GENERAL 3 credits Quality in Arts Management ADJUNCT 3 credits Product Design

6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

ELECTIVES 6 credits Performing Arts Electives (I.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light) The Business of Music

3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM302A

Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean 3 credits

AM304B

Entrepreneurship & the Arts 3 credits

AM306A

Events Mgt and Media Relations I 3 credits

AM306B

Events Mgt and Media Relations II 3 credits

AM303A

Product Design 3 credits

AM305B

Quality in Arts Management 3 credits

AM307A

Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries 3 credits

AM301B

Arts and Culture: Policy Dev. 3 credits

Elective 3 credits

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2012 Year Four MAJOR 20 credits Arts Management Seminar I & II Independent Study I & II Internship

6 credits 6 credits 8 credits

GENERAL 3 credits Managing Community Arts

3 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Research Method Research Paper

2 credits 4 credits

ELECTIVES 3 credits Performing Arts Electives (i.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light)

3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM414A

Arts Management Seminar I 3 credits

AM414B

Arts Management Seminar II 3 credits

AM408A

Independent Study I 3 credits

AM408B

Independent Study II 3 credits

AM409A

Research Method 2credits

AM409B

Research Paper 2 credits

AM410A

Managing Community Arts 3 credits

AM406B

Internship (Summer) 8 credits

Elective 3 credits Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATE DEGREE 2012 Year One MAJOR 13 credits Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts/Popular Culture Introduction to Arts Management Basic Accounting

4 credits 4 credits 2 credits

GENERAL 8 credits College English Spanish

4 credits 4 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Psychology 4 credits Ethics Creativity and the Self 4 credits

or

ELECTIVES – 5 credits Introduction to Computer as a Tool 3 credits Information Technology 2 credits Beginners Studio course taken from Cont. Ed. Programme: Dance, Drama Music or Visual Arts

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM101A

Introduction to Practice of Visual & Performing Arts I 2 credits

AM 101B

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts II 2 credits

AM115A

Intro. to Arts Management I 2 credits

AM115B

Intro. to Arts Management II 2 credits

GS100A

College English I 2 credits

GS100B

College English II 2 credits

GS102A

Introduction to Spanish I 2 credits

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II 2 credits

GS106A

Ethics Creativity and the Self II 2 credits

GS106B

Ethics Creativity & the Self II 2 credits

AM103A

Basic Accounting 2 credits

GS103A

Information Technology or other Elective 2 credits

EL244E

Elective: Computer Aided Design for Artists 3 credits

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATE DEGREE 2012 Year Two MAJOR 28 credits Organizational Structure & Arts Admin. Managing Our Resources National Identity and the Arts Introduction to Event Planning Events Management and Media Relations Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework Financial Management and Accounting Facilities/Site Management Introduction to Arts Marketing

4 credits 3 credits 2 credits 2 credits 6 credits 3 credits 2 credits 2 credits 3 credits

GENERAL 5 credits Communication Skills Technical Writing

3 credits 2 credits

ADJUNCT 3 credits Museums & Arts Education I

3 credits

ELECTIVES 2 credits Performing Arts Electives

2 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM204A

Organizational Structure & Arts Admin. I 2 credits

AM204B

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. II 2 credits

AM214A

Managing Our Resources 3 credits

AM217B

Intel. Property & the Legal Framework 3 credits

AM223A

Communication Skills 3 credits

AM215E

Intro. to Event Planning 2 credits

AM202A

Intro. to Arts Marketing 3 credits

AM213B

Financial Mgt & Accounting 2 credits

AM212A

National Identity & the Arts credits

AM216A

Technical Writing 2 credits

AM218

Facilities Management for Arts Managers 3 credits

AE207A

Museums & Arts Education 3 credits

AM306A

Events Mgt and Media Relations I 3credits

AM306B

Events Mgt and Media Relations II 3 credits

Elective

2

2 credits

Total 38 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT MINOR Compulsory Courses Course Code Course Name

Credits

Semester Offered

AM 215A/ AM215B

Introduction to Arts Management

4

Two

AM216A

Technical Writing

2

One

AM218E

Facilities Management for Arts Managers

3

One

AM217B

Intellectual Property and the Legal framework of Business

3

One

AM215B

Introduction to Event Planning

2

One

AM202B

Introduction to Arts Marketing

3

One

AM306A/ AM306B

Event Management and Media Relations

6

Two

AM103A Basic Accounting 2 One Total 25 Credits Elective – a minimum of two credits from any other course on the BA Arts Management programme including Internship.

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2013 Year One MAJOR 13 credits Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts I & II Introduction to Arts Management I & II Basic Accounting Beginners Studio course 3 credits Dance Drama Music or Visual Arts

4 credits 4 credits 2 credits

GENERAL 8 credits Fundamentals of English Critical Analysis and Expository Writing Introduction to Spanish I & II

2 credits 2 credits 4 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Ethics Creativity and the Self I & II

4 credits

ELECTIVES – 5 credits Introduction to Computer as a Tool Information Technology Computer Aided Design for Artists Graduation Production Performing Arts Electives

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM101A

Introduction to Practice of Visual & Performing Arts I 2 credits

AM 101B

Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts II 2 credits

AM115A

Intro. to Arts Management I 2 credits

AM115B

Intro. to Arts Management II 2 credits

GS100A

Fundamentals of English 2 credits

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing Skills 2 credits

GS102A

Introduction to Spanish I 2 credits

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II 2 credits

GS106A

Ethics Creativity and the Self I 2 credits

GS106B

Ethics Creativity & the Self II 2 credits

Beginner’s Studio Course Elective AM103A 3 credits

Basic Accounting 2 credits

Elective 2 credits

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2013 Year Two MAJOR 22 credits Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. I & II Managing Our Resources National Identity and the Arts Introduction to Event Planning 2 credits Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework Introduction to Arts Marketing Facilities Management for Arts Managers Financial Management and Accounting GENERAL 5credits Communication Skills Technical Writing

4 credits 3 credits 2 credits

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits

3 credits 2 credits

ADJUNCT 3 credits Museum in Art Education

3 credits

ELECTIVES 2 credits Performing Arts Electives

2 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM204A

Organizational Structure & Arts Admin. I 2 credits

AM204B

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. II 2 credits

AM202A

Intro. to Arts Marketing 3 credits

AM217B

Intel. Property & the Legal Framework 3 credits

GS103A

Financial Management and Accounting 2 credits

AM223B

Communication Skills 3 credits

AM212A

National Identity & the Arts 2 credits

AM215B

Intro. to Event Planning 2 credits

AM218A

Facilities Management for Arts Managers 3 credits

AM216B

Technical Writing 2 credits

Elective 2 credits

AM214B

Managing Our Resources 3 credits

AE207B

Museum in Art Education 3 credits

Total 32 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2013 Year Three MAJOR 18 credits Events Management and Media Relations I & II Entrepreneurship and the Arts Arts and Culture: Policy Development Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean GENERAL 3 credits Quality in Arts Management ADJUNCT 6 credits Product Design Project Management

ELECTIVES 3 credits Performing Arts Electives (I.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light) The Business of Music

6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM302A

Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean 3 credits

AM304B

Entrepreneurship & the Arts 3 credits

AM306A

Events Mgt. and Media Relations I 3 credits

AM306B

Events Mgt. and Media Relations II 3 credits

AM305B

Quality in Arts Management 3 credits

AM303A

Product Design 3 credits

AM307A

Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries 3 credits

AM301B

Arts and Culture: Policy Dev. 3 credits

AM313A

Project Management 3 credits

AM312B

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE 2013 Year Four MAJOR 20 credits Arts Management Seminar Independent Study Internship

6 credits 6 credits 8 credits

GENERAL 3 credits Managing Community Arts

3 credits

2 credits 2 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Research Method I Research Paper

ELECTIVES 3 credits Performing Arts Electives (i.e. Stage Management, Sound, Light)

3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM414A

Arts Management Seminar I 3 credits

AM414B

Arts Management Seminar II 3 credits

AM408A

Independent Study I 3 credits

AM408B

Independent Study 3 credits

AM410A

Managing Community Arts 3 credits

AM406B

Internship 8 credits

AM409A

Research Method I 2 credits

AM409B

Research Paper 2 credits

Elective 3 credits Total 30 Credits

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II


ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE ASSOCIATE DGREE 2013 Year One MAJOR 13 credits Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts Introduction to Arts Management Basic Accounting Beginners Studio course Dance Drama Music or Visual Arts

4 credits 4 credits 2 credits 3 credits

GENERAL 8 credits College English Spanish

4 credits 4 credits

ADJUNCT 4 credits Ethics Creativity and the Self

4 credits

ELECTIVES – 5 credits Introduction to Computer as a Tool Information Technology Computer Aided Design for Artists Graduation Production Performing Arts Electives

3 credits or 3 credits or 3 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM101A

Introduction to Practice of Visual & Performing Arts 1 2 credits

AM 101B Introduction to Practice of Visual and Performing Arts II 2 credits

AM115A

Intro. to Arts Management I 2 credits

AM115B

Intro. to Arts Management II 2 credits

GS100A

Fundamentals of English 2 credits

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing Skills 2 credits

GS102A

Introduction to Spanish I 2 credits

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II 2 credits

GS106A

Ethics Creativity and the Self II 2 credits

GS106B

Ethics Creativity & the Self II 2 credits

Beginner’s Studio Course Elective 3 credits

AM103A

Basic Accounting 2 credits

Elective 2 credits

Elective 3 credits

Total 30 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT DEGREE ASSOCIATE DGREE 2013 Year Two MAJOR 22 credits Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. Managing Our Resources 3 credits National Identity and the Arts Introduction to Event Planning Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework Introduction to Arts Marketing Facilities Management for Arts Managers Financial Management and Accounting

4 credits 2 credits 2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits

GENERAL 5credits Communication Skills Technical Writing

3 credits 2 credits

ADJUNCT 3 credits Museum & Art Education

3 credits

ELECTIVES 2 credits Performing Arts Electives

2 credits

Code

SEMESTER ONE

Code

SEMESTER TWO

AM204A

Organizational Structure & Arts Admin. I 2 credits

AM204B

Organizational Structure and Arts Admin. II 2 credits

AM202A

Intro. to Arts Marketing 3 credits

AM217B

Intel. Property & the Legal Framework 3 credits

GS103A

Financial Management and Accounting 2 credits

AM223B

Communication Skills 3 credits

AM212A

National Identity & the Arts 2 credits

AM215B

Intro. to Event Planning 2 credits

AM218A

Facilities Management for Arts Managers AM216B 3 credits

Technical Writing 2 credits

Elective 2 credits

AM214B

Managing Our Resources 3 credits

AE207B

Museum & Art Education or Elective 3 credits

Total 32 Credits

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ARTS MANAGEMENT MINOR Compulsory Courses Course Code Course Name

Credits

Semester Offered

AM 215A/ AM215B

Introduction to Arts Management I & II

4

Two

AM216A

Technical Writing

2

One

AM218E

Facilities Management for Arts Managers

3

One

AM217B

Intellectual Property and the Legal framework of Business

3

One

AM215B

Introduction to Event Planning

2

One

AM202B

Introduction to Arts Marketing

3

One

AM306A/ AM306B

Event Management and Media Relations I & II

6

Two

AM103A

Basic Accounting

2

One

Total 25 Credits Elective – a minimum of two credits from any other course on the BA Arts Management programme including Internship.

BA ARTS MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1 Credits Major 13 General 8 Adjunct 4 Electives Studio Rotation 5 Total 30 YEAR 11 Major General Adjunct Elective Studio Rotation Total 32

Credits 22 5 3 2

YEAR 111 Major General Adjunct Electives Studio Rotation Total 30 YEAR IV Major General Adjunct Electives Studio Rotation Total 30

Credits 18 3 6 3

Credits 20 3 4 3

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Course Descriptions AM115A 2 Credits Introduction to Arts Management I This course introduces students to the scope of Arts Management and the Arts and Entertainment industry. Students will develop an understanding of management theories and skills and will be introduced to issues and challenges for creative producers, copyright laws and the challenges that Arts Managers are facing in the twenty first century.

Bachelor of Art – Arts Management Programme YEAR I

AM101A 2 Credits Introduction to the Visual and Performing Arts Practice I The course will help students understand and become familiar with artistic processes and issues surrounding the evolution of the practice of the visual and performing arts. The relevance of these issues must be understood by arts managers. AM101B 2 Credits Introduction to the Visual and Performing Arts Practice II (Pre-Requisite: AM101A) This course is a continuation of Introduction to the Visual and Performing Arts Practice I and further helps to sensitize students to the practice of the visual and performing arts. Students are exposed to the offerings of each School which is designed to stimulate interest in and appreciation of the practice of the arts. AM104A 2 Credits Principles of Accounting I This course provides an introductory study of the fundamental principles, concepts and techniques of accounting. Students are introduced to the Peachtree accounting software and will learn to use this software to execute bookkeeping and accrual accounting processes, prepare and interpret financial statements that summarize balance sheets, and income statements, and the statement of cash flows. AM105B 2 Credits Principles of Accounting II (Pre-Requisite: AM104A)

YEAR II AM202A 3 Credits Introduction to Arts Marketing Introduction to Arts Marketing introduces students to marketing essentials specific to audience and management techniques for both for profit and not for profit arts ventures while highlighting the role of marketing as a functional component of management in the arts. AM214B

The course is designed for students who have successfully completed Principles of Accounting I and expands on the basic framework covered in the first course. Emphasis is placed on specific areas of accounting: internal control, receivables, long-term assets and liabilities, debt and equity financing, and the statement of cash flows.

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AM115B 2 Credits Introduction to Arts Management II (Pre-Requisite: AM115A) This course is a continuation of Introduction to Arts Management I and further seeks to identify what is arts management and its relevance for the development of arts in relation to leisure pursuits. The course will examine the process, best practices and standards associated with Production Management. This course focuses on topics and issues in Leadership, the Functions of Management and Theatre Arts Production. Students will gain handson experience through the creation of a Theatre Arts production and gain valuable insight about conflict, task and team management.

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3 Credits Managing Our Resources: Libraries, Museums, Theatres and Art Galleries This course sensitizes students to the importance of and the wealth of resources in libraries, museums, theatres and art galleries as educational facilities, leisure and recreational centres and repositories. It also involves an introduction to media storage that captures information such as books, films, photography, art, maps and plans.


AM215B 2 Credits Fundamentals of Event Planning

Arts Organizations. This will involve understanding and applying concepts such as financial statement analysis, profit planning, sources and forms of financing, cost of capital, time value of money, capital budgeting and business valuation.AM220B 3 Credits Business and Strategic Planning For The Arts This is primarily a theoretical course which provides an opportunity for students to understand the concepts of business and strategic planning for development of the arts organization. The course provides an understanding of and hands- on development of the business plan through group work and use of the software, business plan pro premier.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the theories and best practices for planning, organizing and coordinating an event; including strategic planning, task identification and coordination, document design, marketing, sponsorship, and post-event evaluation. Topics covered will challenge students to apply theory in creating and presenting a mock event proposal. AM216A 2 Credits Technical Writing This course focuses on a practical approach to technical writing, such as proposals, project reports, abstracts, technical correspondence delivered in both hard copy and electronic media and gives students the opportunity to practice writing technical documents.

AM222B 3 Credits Business and Professional Communication This course is designed to introduce and expose students to the fundamentals of academic and professional communication skills to allow them to more effectively apply communication theories and best practices to meet their academic and corporate communication needs.

AM217B 3 Credits Intellectual Property and the Legal Framework of Business This course introduces students to issues involving Intellectual Property (IP) including copyright, patents, and trademarks and examines how these issues relate to the business practices of artistic expression. In addition, the course provides an overview of the legal, regulatory and ethical environment in which business decisions must be made with particular attention to Jamaica’s role in the promotion of intellectual property rights. AM218A 2 Credits Facilities Management for Arts Managers The course Facilities Management for Arts Managers is geared towards equipping the learner with the skills to manage facilities of any type but especially those engaged in the visual and performing arts. It is structured to address the three main concerns of facilities management – safety, customer service and legality. Teaching units comprise: facilities management as a business and management function; tools and mechanisms necessary to achieve and sustain quality facilities and adherence to Jamaican laws. AM219A 2 Credits Financial Management For Arts Managers (Pre-Requisite: AM105B) This course will help students learn fundamental concepts of financial theory and apply these to management of 117

AM224A 3 Credits Artiste Management This course examines the way in which the arts are represented in the development of Tourism and seeks to evaluate whether its impact could be enhanced in an effort to reinvent the Caribbean Tourism Product. To examine the contribution of arts and culture to tourism in the Caribbean and address issues of quality in terms of the way this is AM225A 2 Credits Organization and Human Resource Management I This is primarily a theoretical course which provides an opportunity for students to understand the concepts and theories of organizational structures in arts organizations; it introduces students to the process of administering the arts and techniques for managing this process. AM226B 2 Credits Organization And HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I (Pre-Requisite: AM225A) This course provides an opportunity for students to understand human resource theorists, Jamaican labor laws, employer/employee relations, unions, grievance procedures and industrial relations. The importance of contracts and how they function in the organization is an important aspect of this course.

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YEAR III

AM307A 3 Credits Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries This course identifies, delineates and maps cultural industries and explores the roles and impact these industries have on society within a cultural policy framework.

AM301B 3 Credits Arts and Culture: Policy Development This course explores the impact of arts and cultural policy development and implementation, both locally and regionally and sensitizes students to the issues involved in policy development and planning and its impact on implementation. AM302A 3 Credits Arts, Culture and Tourism in the Caribbean This course examines the way in which the arts are represented in the development of Tourism and seeks to evaluate whether its impact could be enhanced in an effort to reinvent the Caribbean Tourism Product. AM303B 3 Credits Product Design This course looks at the process of interpreting the arts in commercial ways, making it commercially viable and income generating. It also examines the commercialization of sector development and the economic development of the industrial sector in the Caribbean and addresses issues of quality. AM304B 3 Credits Entrepreneurship and the Arts This course examines the Arts under the banner of the cultural and creative industries, as a commodity that can be sold. It will explore policies, the supportive framework for entrepreneurs, as well as the financial provisions available to entrepreneurs and their creative start-ups. It aims to explore the possibility of enterprising arts practitioners and entrepreneurs developing new arts products and stimulating new arts consumers. AM305A 3 Credits Quality in Arts Management Exploring quality as an element of the creative product and its effect or lack thereof on the creative experience is critical to the success of the creative process. As such developing an awareness of quality management and its positive impact on arts development is necessary to any practice in arts management.

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AM315A 3 Credits Event Management and Media Strategies I This course builds on information presented in the second year course, Introduction to Event Planning. It focuses on the application of project management strategies to the creation and execution of arts and cultural events including specific knowledge areas of Administration, Operations Marketing and Risk Management. The course will expose students to best practices and monitoring of returns on investment, sustainable event and media management, as well as staff management. Students will be required to start the thought process in the planning of their event, involving industry professionals and selected students from the schools of music, dance, drama and visual arts. This event will be executed during the Event Management and Media Relations II component of the programme. AM316B 3 Credits Event Management and Media Strategies II (Pre-Requisite: AM315A) This course builds on the event management framework introduced in Events Management and Media Strategies I. Topics in this component will include integrated marketing and communication, operations and risk assessment management, applications to their planned and check listed event. Students will examine the final sets of knowledge areas and have opportunities to engage in the application of these areas through field trips, hands on experience in College and outside events, observation and the planning of their own. Students will collaborate as a team on the type of event that they want to present, design same and manage all aspects of the planning and production under supervision. AM313A 3 Credits Project Management This course introduces students to the project management framework and explores the application of project management tools in arts management. Topics covered include project integration management, scope, time, cost, risk and quality management and evaluation.


AM317B 3 Credits Issues In Community Arts Management This course will involve an examination of issues concerned with community arts management. It will provide an overview of relevant management, policy, cultural, and community issues while examining various community based art models and processes that have been used to tangibly transform communities through art. AM318A 1 CREDIT Arts Management Forum: 1 Creative Yaad 1 Creative Yaad – Arts Management Forum is a student run; faculty supervised Arts Management Company that has been designed to provide Arts Management majors with practical experience in areas such as event production, marketing, and project management. The company selects a specific number of projects (on and off campus) each school year and meets once per week to organize and execute plans. This is a mandatory requirement of each student in the School of Arts Management and Humanities. Students will be awarded one credit for 3 units of work done across the first three years of the programme.

YEAR IV

AM406B 8 Credits Internship This course allows students to secure attachment with arts and culture organizations for a period of 3months to one year (part-time.) or 520 hours. This will enable students to secure valuable work experience that will enable them to identify issues that arise within the process of managing and administering the arts. AM408A 3 Credits Independent Study – PROJECT Development I (Pre-Requisite: AM313A) This course allows students to conceptualize and document ideas for an arts-based project which forms the basis/ background against which students can develop their own projects. It involves, among other things, testing, research and determining the financial viability of implementing the project. AM408B 3 Credits Independent Study – Project Development II (Pre-Requisite: AM408A) This course allows students to execute an arts based project from idea through to implementation. It involves organizing 119

and implementing a project within a given timeframe. It involves project evaluation strategies, networking and interacting with industry personnel. AM414A 3 Credits Arts Management Seminar I This course explores ideas which impact on the process of arts development by examining current trends and issues within the Arts, Culture, Entertainment and Hospitality sectors. It explores strategies for developing the arts product, looking at the cultural context and the human resource development, financing and marketing issues. AM414B 3 Credits Arts Management Seminar II (Pre-Requisite: AM414A) This course is a continuation of Arts Management Seminar I, which allows students to implement the seminar ideas conceptualized in Semester 1. It involves planning, organizing and executing a seminar within a given timeframe and involves marketing, evaluation techniques and interacting with experts. This course presents an arena for audience and presenters to exchange views and ideas around issues affecting art development.

HUMANITIES YEAR I

GS100A 2 Credits Fundamentals of English This course seeks to secure full tertiary-level English competence to ensure success in all areas of academic and social lives of students. The aim is to harness all human, technical and on-line resources at the College to provide individual and whole group support to all learners. This course is designed to help students become skilled in reading for meaning, speaking fluently and writing confidently and coherently in any context. GS100B 2 Credits Critical Thinking and Expository Writing This course seeks to further develop students’ competencies in writing freely and efficiently on any topic while being guided by sound principles of efficient expository writing skills as well as applying the appropriate linguistic resources of vocabulary, mechanics and grammatical and syntactic skills. As critical readers, they will thoughtfully assess the TABLE OF CONTENTS

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effectiveness of a text by evaluating the author’s strategies and intention. Students will, in time, become efficient and independent readers and authors in their own rights. GS102A 2 Credits Introduction to Spanish I This course will introduce students to the rudiments of simple sentences in Spanish that will provide basic survival skills in a Spanish environment. The course will facilitate students’ awareness of the social function of the language and how to converse in specific contexts. Underlying the delivery of the course will be the language skills: listening, speaking and to a lesser extent reading and writing. GS102B 2 Credits Introduction to Spanish II (Pre-Requisite: GS102A) This course further develops skills in understanding and speaking Spanish through practice in using more complex sentences. The course continues to facilitate students’ awareness of the social function of the language and the use of appropriate gesture and grammar in specific contexts. GS105 2 Credits CRITICAL THINKING AND CREATIVE INSIGHT This course introduces students to argument analysis, definition, art theories and role of critical thinking and analysis in the arts. Students are encouraged to develop a system of reference and theoretical framework that informs the understanding of their craft and its relationship to factors that impact on their creative imagination. The sessions are conducted within a laboratory environment through which the artist is faced with contemporary issues, theories and experiences, which inform, influence and enhance art creation. The relationship among the arts and the individuals understanding self, culture, religion, economy and society are also emphasized. GS101A 2 Credits INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL ANALYSIS I This course introduces students to critical thinking and analysis, and encourages students to develop independent theoretical points of view. Through lectures, class discussions, video screenings and gallery visits, students will be exposed to a broad range of visual culture as well as basic concepts and vocabulary. Emphasis will be placed on discussing and interpreting art in relation to its historical, social, political, cultural and personal context.

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GS114A 3 Credits CARIBBEAN CULTURE AND IDENTITY This course seeks to introduce students to theories of “Caribbeanness” through the framework of Caribbean Cultural Studies. By engaging this multidisciplinary approach the course highlights major historical, cultural and aesthetical occurrences in the Caribbean. Students are expected to analyse race, class and gender as frames of reference for understanding cultural practices and subsequent power relations. As such, the course also offers students a platform from which to interpret cultural expressions in its broadest political sense. GS115A 3 Credits The Self: Ethics and Creativity This course seeks to facilitate the process of self development and create awareness of the synergistic relationship between the creative process and personal development of the student. The emphasis is on holistic development incorporating ethical and moral development, the process of decision-making and choices, values clarification and identity. GS110 2 Credits English for Living This course will immerse students in a variety of experiences designed to facilitate opportunities to communicate effectively in oral or written communication. Each student will be assessed at the beginning of the course, and a careful note of progress recorded in a range of skills including listening, speaking, reading, writing, thinking and researching. Attention will be given to vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation. Activity will take into account culturally relevant themes and experiences. GS111 2 Credits Information Technology for artists and Entrepreneurs This course is designed to meet students’ practical and educational needs within the College, their personal use and within the wider society. It explores productivity software such as: Microsoft Office Suite 2007 and their uses and applications to the student within the education system as well as for future job applications with the aim of gaining proficiency in the above software.


YEAR II

foundation of Caribbean writing.

GS200A 2 Credits BUSINESS OF ART AND DESIGN I This course introduces the concepts, ideas and practices of business and commerce to students of Art.

GS203 3 Credits ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING This course is a consolidation of the literacy, critical thinking and communication skills of students. It places an important focus on understanding academic language and using it coherently and confidentially in discussions and arguments in an exploration of non-fiction texts and context.

GS200B 2 Credits BUSINESS OF ART AND DESIGN II (Pre-Requisite: GS200A) This course introduces the concepts, ideas and practices of business and commerce to students of Art and guides them to successfully manage a small business. GS201A 2 Credits Psychology I This course introduces students to general behavioural psychology as it relates to personality, growth and development. This course provides information on a broad range of topics that illustrate how and why we think, feel and act by introducing students to topics within the areas of development, abnormal and social psychology. GS201B 2 Credits Psychology II (Pre-Requisite: GS201A) This course introduces students to general behavioural psychology as it relates to personality, growth and development. This course provides information on a broad range of topics that illustrate how and why we think, feel and act by introducing students to topics within the areas of development, abnormal and social psychology. GS202A 2 Credits CARIBBEAN LITERATURE I This course exposes students to an overview of writers in the Caribbean, knowledge and appreciation of Caribbean authors, dramatists and poets. Students will compare and contrast different themes and the development of literary traditions across different islands.

GS205A 2 Credits EXPLORING PHILOSOPHIES OF ART This course examines the way in which the arts are represented in the development of Tourism and seeks to evaluate whether its impact could be enhanced in an effort to reinvent the Caribbean Tourism Product. To examine the contribution of arts and culture to tourism in the Caribbean and address issues of quality in terms of the way this is being presented. GS206E 3 Credits INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY This course introduces beginners to three definitions of philosophy, and to examples of these definitions in practice. It covers issues in logic, aesthetics, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and Caribbean philosophy. Designed for students of the arts, the emphasis is on the critical analysis of life issues from the perspective of the aspiring artist. GS210 3 Credits CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH This course is designed for persons with little or no knowledge of Spanish, who wish to be able to communicate in the language about everyday matters at a basic level. GS 212A 3 Credits Conservation Theory I    This course provides an introduction to the basic theoretical knowledge on which the field of conservation is based. Students will explore the history of the field; the decisionmaking processes and ethical considerations involved in conservation and basic preventative interventions and treatments.  

GS202B 2 Credits CARIBBEAN LITERATURE II (PRE-REQUISITE: GS202A) This course exposes students to an overview of writers from the Caribbean who create in the different genres of literature, and explores the culture of orality which is a 121

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GS 212B 3 Credits Conservation Theory II Prerequisite: Conservation Theory1   212A This course follows on from Conservation Theory I. Students will be introduced to a range of materials found in historic objects and works of art, encountered by conservators. Methods of manufacture and how they inform conservation practices is a core component in understanding applicable conservation practices. Students will also be exposed to issues related to methods of examination and documentation of objects based material as well as their processes of deterioration and the conservation processes and tools used to preserve them.  GS231 3 Credits COLLEGE MATH This course will expose students to set theory, fundamental concepts of algebra, relations, functions and graphs, equations, matrices and systems of linear equations.

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GS300A 3 Credits RESEARCH METHODS IA This course offers exposure to research methods and outlines procedures for conducting research in the arts. It exposes students to various aspects of visual arts and visual culture through qualitative research. GS300B 2 Credits RESEARCH METHODS lB Visual Arts practice through research presents the premise that this discipline is a theoretically robust area of enquiry and a transformative approach to creating and critiquing knowledge. This course describes a range of strategies for planning and conducting research in the Visual Arts. GS300Y 2 Credits Research Methods I This course offers exposure to Research Methods and procedures for conducting original research projects. Research types and formats, language and terminology, measurements and instruments are studied. Also explored are the problems of validity and reliability and the procedures and methods available for establishing these. Planning, conducting and presentation of an original research or thesis are studied through student seminars based on preliminary research in selected topics. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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A practical and uniform method to be followed in the writing and presentation of the research paper is introduced. GS302A 2 Credits WORLD LITERATURE I This course provides an opportunity for students to read and analyze international literary works by writers from Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. This course can be taken at levels 2 and 3. GS302B 2 Credits WORLD LITERATURE II (PRE-REQUISITE: GS302A) This course is a continuation of World Literature 1 with a broadened scope of narratives representing diverse regions. The human condition becomes a focal interest in the course with close textual analysis on the different aspects affecting and shaping the life of the main characters. Consideration is therefore given to the underpinnings of political, cultural or psycho-social, gender, class, ethnicity or race issues which shape and inform the narrative and which provides the framework for analysis and interpretation. GS303 3 Credits PERFORMANCE RESEARCH FORUM This course aims to articulate the various methods used in collecting data-the quantitative and qualitative as well as different sampling methods, such as random sampling- are the key elements to defining the validity and characteristics of effective research and analysis. As these methods are taught and explored students will seek to critically analyze and utilize primary and secondary sources in their own research to bring depth, authoritative support and validity to their own dance research. GS305 3 Credits Gender in Society: Issues and Theoretical Considerations This course aims to familiarize students in the field of Gender Studies and across a range of disciplines. Students will encounter a number of different ways in which sex, gender and sexuality have been, and can be understood within the different cultures, especially the Caribbean culture. Masculinities and femininities and the ways in which these interact with other markers of difference such as ‘race’, ‘class’, ‘ethnicity’ and ‘nationality’ will be central themes in this course. Culture, in this context, refers to the inherited ideas, beliefs, values and knowledge about gender that constitutes and contributes to the shared bases of social action and activities of Caribbean peoples.


GS313 3 Credits Collections Management Care This course introduces students to the various aspects of managing collections of historic objects or works of art; collections care practices, handling, packaging & transporting objects, methods of preventive conservation, including pest management and disaster planning. An introduction to factors, such as light, incorrect temperature and relative humidity and pollutants that cause deterioration of museum objects will be provided. Assessment of the environment and generating methods for minimizing the decay of artefacts by controlling environmental factors will be explored, along with aspects of the museum building, building services and management that affect collections care.

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problems assist students with the research, writing and presentation of the research paper.

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PE201 Theory and Practice in Education 3 Credits This course is structured around 3 units which allow the student teacher to think about and develop some principles of and approaches to teaching, learning, and creating classroom environments, and to engage in planning and teaching in different curricular and learning environments. Additionally, the course provides an introduction to principles of and approaches to integration, to alternative approaches to managing classroom environments and specific approaches to dealing with students’ behaviour.

GS404B 2 Credits CARIBBEAN STUDIES This course is designed to expose students to a range of forms from the psychological to the global, past to present, elite to popular, everyday life to the city, and consumption to production through methods of inquiry using a systematic approach. Given out permanent place within cultural forms of one kind or another, the Caribbean needs to stay abreast of other manifestations within the wider disciplinary field and students must stay interested in understanding these forms and their interrelations.

PE202 Understanding the Learner 3 Credits This is an introductory course that focuses primarily on understanding primary and secondary students as learners in the teaching and learning environment, and as children from different communities. This course is arranged in units that examine the characteristics of students at different age levels, the student and learner in classrooms, their various socio-cultural settings and communities from which they come, and characteristics of the exceptional students.

AM400A 2 Credits RESEARCH METHODS IlA This course offers exposure to Research Methods and procedures for conducting original research projects. Research types and formats, language and terminology, measurements and instruments are studied. Also explored are the problems of validity and reliability and the procedures and methods available for establishing these. Planning, conducting and presentation of an original research or thesis are studied through student seminars based on preliminary research in selected topics. A practical and uniform method to be followed in the writing and presentation of the research paper is introduced.

PE203 Technology and Learning 3 Credits This course is designed to develop theoretical and practical applications in the knowledge, design, development, implementation, utilization, management and evaluation of education technology and technologies for learning thus increasing the opportunities for enhancing teaching and learning experiences and improving instructional communication strategies. The course also focuses on the above specifically in an arts related lesson or context. The course covers three components: Instructional technologies, media and computers, multimedia tools and e-learning in education and; Integrated Communication Technologies

AM400B 2 Credits RESEARCH METHODS IIB This course introduces students to the rudiments of writing a research paper from data gathering through to preliminary analysis and finalization of the research. Individual tutorials and occasional seminars on specific methodological 123

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PE204 Emergent Teacher 2 Credits This course seeks to provide opportunities for student teachers to examine their beliefs, assumptions and expectations about teaching and how these influence their practice. PE205 Teacher, School and Society 2 Credits This course examines the obligations and responsibilities that teachers have towards students and society, and the relationships that exist and ought to exist among teachers, students, and society. Student teachers will gain an understanding of the culture of schools, and an understanding of the historical, social, cultural, and economic factors that affect school cultures. PE206 Assessment in the Classroom 3 Credits In this course, student teachers will critically examine the teacher’s role as assessor, decision-maker and evaluator. They will develop a better understanding of assessment-related terms, concepts and principles. They will gain practice in the rudiments of assessment procedures, conduct evaluation and prepare reports about the performance of students. PE302 Introduction to Educational Administration 3 Credits This educational administration course emphasizes the importance of leadership practices. Prospective school administrators are expected to develop inclusive decision making processes and continually reflect on the effectiveness of these procedures. The participants in this course will be exposed to a wide range of knowledge and skills which will enable them to function, not only as the heads of institutions, but as better classroom managers, coordinators and heads of departments

PE402 Reflective Practice and Action Research 3 Credits Reflective Practicum requires student teachers to participate in a variety of activities in a school in addition to observing contextual elements and forces at work in this context. It requires the participants to work as a learning community while integrating professional, specialized, pedagogical and collaborative research knowledge and skills to examine/address issues related to (a) Curriculum (b) The Process of Learning in the school assigned or chosen. During the practicum, the participants will assume full responsibility for the outcome of the process although there will be formal supervision. As part of taking responsibility, they should seek the advice of their department on matters of concern to them

PE303 Trends Issues and Perspectives in Education 3 Credits This course seeks to develop your understanding for the dynamic interplay of forces that revolve around the five main themes. This should result in a heightened appreciation of the critical and dynamic role played by teachers as the educators of the citizens of tomorrow.

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PE401 Practical Researcher 3 Credits This course provides the opportunity for student-teachers to examine their attitude towards research and any misconceptions about research. In addition, learners are allowed to assess their level of competence in applying the principles of research in a variety of educational contexts with emphasis on the classroom; the intention being to influence their professional development as teacher-researchers. It requires participants to apply relevant research knowledge, skills and disposition to allow them to address in practical ways, educational problems affecting them and learners in their specialized fields. The general vision is that the participants will begin to adopt a culture of researching to guide their decisions. In light of this, the course is organized around three main themes: 1. The Field of Educational Research and the Fundamental Principles of Educational Research 2. The Teacher as Researcher: Practical Approach to Educational Problems 3. The Teacher as Researcher Facilitator: Meeting the learners needs as beginning researchers especially in their acquisition of appropriate attitudes and skills for this information driven era.

PE305 Technology and Learning in the Classroom 3 credits This course is designed to develop theoretical and practical applications in the knowledge, design, development, implementation, utilization, management and evaluation of education technology and technologies for learning, 124


thus increasing the opportunities for enhancing teaching and learning experiences and improving instructional communication strategies. The course also focuses on the above specifically in an arts related lesson or context. The course will cover four components: Instructional technologies, media and methods; Computers, Multimedia tools and e-learning in education; Integrated Communication Technologies and; Apps and Mobile devices in the Classroom. PE 207 Psychology and Education 3 credits This course will address a range of topics in Psychology and Education, which will enhance students’ understanding, and application in illustrating what motivates how human beings think, feel and act. Students will also be introduced to developmental, abnormal, social and other areas of the science and art of Psychology, while also being exposed to the tenets of proper application and expectations of professional impartation and conduct. Students will also be exposed to current trends in and perspectives of Psychology and Education. PE304 Assessment and the Classroom 3 Credits The Classroom Assessment course provides the opportunity for student-teachers to understand both the assessment emphasis of the constructivist and that of the behaviourist which is normally associated with accountability in education. The examination of various assessment concepts that are relevant to classroom assessment forms an important part of the course. So too are the critical technical requirements of assessment instruments and procedures. The course provides opportunities to explore various instruments and procedures that are frequently used and associated with constructivist assessment on the one hand and accountability assessment on the other. It places as much importance on the acquisition of skills in developing and using assessment instruments and procedures as it does on a good grasp of conceptual and theoretical issues. Students are provided with the opportunity through their coursework to apply the skills that they learn to authentic situations.

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PE403 Fundamentals of Educational Administration 3 credits This educational administration course emphasizes the importance of leadership practices. Prospective school administrators are expected to develop inclusive decision making processes and continually reflect on the effectiveness of these procedures. The participants in this course will be exposed to a wide range of knowledge and skills which will enable them to function, not only as the heads of institutions, but as better classroom managers, coordinators and heads of departments. PE400 Teaching Practice 15 credits This course enables the pre-service artist teacher to gain practice and confidence as well as develop educational units and lessons for imple¬mentation in assigned schools. Throughout the pro¬cess, students are guided by assigned supervisors to conduct school observation exercises; to complete behavioral, supervisory and material inventories; to develop lessons and to teach them. The course provides an opportunity for students to explore developmental, behavioural, teaching and learning theories in a practical setting. Within such a setting students have a chance to see how theory is translated into practice and the op¬portunities and challenges that this entails. Students also have the opportunity to see how teachers pro¬vide professional development for each other in the area of the Visual and Performing Art. PE203 Technology and Learning 3 credits This course is designed to develop theoretical and practical applications in the knowledge, design, development, implementation, utilization, management and evaluation of education technology and technologies for learning, thus increasing the opportunities for enhancing teaching and learning experiences and improving instructional communication strategies. The course also focuses on the above specifically in an arts related lesson or context. The course will cover three components: Instructional technologies, media and methods; Computers, multimedia tools and e-learning in education and; Integrated Communication Technologies..

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FACULTY Phylis Hemmings Director Master of Arts in Education, University of the West Indies; 1996 Bachelor of Education, University of the West Indies; 1986

Kaydian Smith MA in Law, Intellectual Property Law, George Washington Univ. 2008 LLB; UWI, Mona Vilya Thomas BA Communications, UWI, 1984

Janice Gore Programme Coordinator M.A. in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy, Goldsmiths College, University of London, 2007; M.A. in Publishing Studies, City University, London, 2008; B.A University of the West Indies, 1989; Dip. Ed., Mico University College, 2004

Keino Senior PhD Candidate, UWI Master of Philosophy and Bachelor of Arts, UWI Lorna Ellis MA, BA, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica

Simone Harris Bachelor of Science in Psychology, University of the West Indies; 2004 Master of Science in Music Business Administration, Florida Atlantic University; 2004 Master of Business Administration, General Management, Everest University; 2008

Kay Anderson Master of Business Administration, University of West Indies; 2000 M.A. in Art Education Rhode Island, School of Design 1992 Shawna-Kae Burns Bachelor of Arts - Linguistics, University of the West Indies 2005

Melva Davids Master of Education , University of the West Indies; 2006 Post Graduate Diploma in Learning and Teaching of English and Literacy, University of London; 2005 Diploma in Sociology, University of West Indies; 1999 Bachelor of Education, University of the West Indies; 1996 Diploma in Teaching (Primary Education), Mico Teachers College; 1992

Marisa Benain Master of Arts - Education, London Metropolitan; 2009 Iris Mutiz BA Education, Felix Varela Higher Pedagogical Institute, Santa Clara, Cuba; Diploma in Spanish, Higher Education Institute of Arts, Havana, Cuba

Cislyn McLennon EMBA Barry University,. B.Sc. University of the West Indies. Dip. Ed. Mico University College

Nijer Henry Bachelor of Engineering; University of Technology, Jamaica 2004 Diploma; University of Technology, Jamaica 1995

Kericee Fletcher M.F.A. Washington University

Sylvia Green Master of Education; University of Technology, Jamaica 2011 Bachelor of Arts; University of the West Indies 1997 Diploma in Teaching; University of the West Indies 1989 Diploma in Sociology; University of the West Indies 1999

Denise Salmon MBA., BSc UWI, Mona, Dip in Art EMCVPA Radcliffe Powell B.B.A. U Tech. 1997 MA. Mount St .Vincent University Canada, Dip. Ed. VDTI Porter, Colin Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, UWI 1989

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Programmes The School of Dance offers a number of Bachelor, Associate and Certificate programmes: Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Performance and Choreography (4 years and Traditional and Folk Dance Studies, Bachelor of Arts in Dance Education (BAE) (4 years), Associate of Arts (AA) in Dance Performance (2 years) and a Certificate in Dance Performance (2 years). These developments were fuelled by the School’s mandate to continually provide quality training in all aspects of dance theatre and production (performance, choreography and production), as well as the need to provide young people in Jamaica and the Caribbean region with higher and more globally recognized qualifications. Further focus on cultural identity and folk forms and an increased fervor of the artist as a cultural agent, particularly in indigenous genres that have a significant sense of identity, unique branding and cultural presence, saw the development of the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Traditional and Folk Dance Studies at the School of Dance which will commence September 2014. Programmes are designed to create the ‘well-rounded and informed artist’ and offer a strong balance between academic and practical studies. Graduates are equipped to pursue careers as professional dancers, choreographers, teachers, dance administrators, dance advocates, community dance practitioners, production managers, events coordinators and writers and researchers in a variety of organizations and sectors such as: corporate, government agencies, media houses, tourism and entertainment industries, Musicals, professional dance companies and educational institutions.

ATTENDANCE POLICY 1. All students must be registered before attending classes. 2. No student should be involved in dance productions outside the School which may take away from their studies (unless permission is granted by the Director of the School).

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All students are required to be punctual for all classes.

4. Students have a ten (10)-minute grace period in which they will be allowed to participate in class but will be marked late. After ten (10) minutes, students will be marked as absent but will be allowed in class to sit and observe.

PRACTICAL CLASSES If students are late and/or absent for twenty percent (20%) of the course, five percent (5%) will be deducted from their final grade. If students are absent for forty percent (40%) or more of classes, they will not be allowed to take the final exam and will be given an F for the course. Please note that late/absent penalties will be pro-rated; for example, if late and/or absent for fifteen percent (15%) of the course, three point seven five percent (3.75%) will be deducted from their final grade and similarly if late and/or absent for twenty five percent (25%) of the course, six point two five percent (6.25%) will be deducted from their final grade.

SUBMISSION OF WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT 1. All assignments are to be submitted on or before the specified due date and before the time (e.g. 4 p.m.) noted. Written assignments must be handed in with a Coursework Cover Sheet. These sheets are available in the School’s Administration Office. 2. If you submit after the due date (but before the hard deadline), your submission will be penalized by five percent (5%) for each day after the due date. Work submitted after the hard deadline will not be accepted.

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3. Students must ensure that they collect a receipt for all written assignments when it is submitted.


DRESS CODE FOR DANCE CLASSES

Males • •

Please note: Incorrect attire may result in students being asked to sit-out or leave the class.

FOLK Females • Black leotard • Full-length black tights • A wrap/lapa

BALLET Females • Black leotard • Pink/flesh-coloured tights • Pink ballet shoes Males • • • •

Fitted black tank top or black leotard Full-length black tights

Males • •

White tank top or leotard Full-length black tights White socks White/Black ballet shoes

Fitted black tank top or black leotard Folk/bongo pants

NOT ALLOWED • Shorts • T-shirts • Baggy sweat pants • Jewelry (with the exception of small ear/nose-studs)

MODERN TECHNIQUE Females • Black leotard • Full-length black tights

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BACHELOR OF ART EDUCATION IN DANCE EDUCATION To qualify for the BAE Dance Education, full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of one hundred and forty (140) credits over four (4) years, inclusive of 6 credits of electives over four (4) years, as set out below. CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

CREDITS

Major

22

General

12

Adjunct

2

Total

36

YEAR 2

CREDITS

Major

14

General

9

Adjunct

5

Professional Education

9

Total

37

YEAR 3

CREDITS

Major

20

General

3

Adjunct

0

Professional Education

9

Total

32

YEAR 4

CREDITS

Major

0

General

0

Adjunct

0

Professional Education

14

Teaching Practicum

15

Electives

6

Total

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COURSE MENU YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DE107B

Movement Theory and Analysis I

3

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

Technique and Theory I

3

DP104A

Kinesiology

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS105

DP108B GS100B

2

GS115

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

3

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

DP201A

Modern Technique III

DP202A

Ballet Technique lll

DP209A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

2

Critical Thinking and 2

GS114

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

3

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

1

DP202B

Ballet Technique IV

1

DP224

Traditional and Folk Technique

3

DE202

Methods in Dance Pedagogy

3

DH212

Dance Histories and Perspectives 3

GS203

Academic Writing

and Performance I

3

DP205B

Drumming and Chanting

2

PE207

Psychology and Education

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

GS210

Conversational Spanish

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 2

DP301A

Modern Technique V

3

DP301B

Modern Technique VI

3

DP311A

Jazz Technique 1

2

DE307B

Movement Theory and Analysis II

3

DP324

Traditional and Folk Technique

DE302

Movement Teaching

DP320

Traditional Dance

Professional 3

and Performance II

Introduction to Dance Injury,

Expository Writing

Technique and Theory III

and

3

Prevention and Care

Critical Thinking and Creative Insight

DE304

Technique and Theory II

3

3 3

DP306

Art of Creating Dance

3

PE304

Assessment and the Classroom

3

in

the

of Dance as Art and Education

Methods in Dance Pedagogy and Practicum

Technique

and Culture of the Caribbean I PE305

3

Technology & Learning in the Classroom

133

3

3

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YEAR 4

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 4

SEMESTER 2

DE401

Current Issues and Trends in

CODE

COURSE

DE403

Methods in Dance Pedagogy

Dance Education

3

DE402

Dance Education Lab

2

PE403

Fundamentals of Educational

PE400

Administration

3

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

Elective

---------------------------

6

CREDITS

and Action Research

3

Teaching Practicum

15

As of August 2010, Reflective Practice and Action Research (PE402) was integrated into the Methods for Teaching Dance III (DE332B) (now Methods in Dance Pedagogy and Action Research (DE403)). Therefore persons who have completed Methods for Teaching Dance III prior to August 2010 would not have completed this component and are required to do DE03.

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BACHELOR OF ART EDUCATION IN DANCE EDUCATION (Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade) Graduates who have successfully completed the Joint Board of Teacher Education (JBTE) Diploma in Dance Education programme for the period 2004 to present will be required to complete a minimum of forty-four (44) credits towards the BAE Dance Education. This Diploma upgrade is offered as a one-year programme full-time programme but may be longer based on courses needed, entry competencies and/or required course fulfillment. The programme can also be completed on a part-time basis for a period not exceeding two (2) years. JBTE Diploma in Dance Education graduates will be required to submit their academic transcript for assessment. Each case will be treated individually for equivalences and applicants will be advised on their credit requirement for completion. Transfer credits will be granted for all courses on their equivalents which were done in the JBTE Diploma Programme and are in the BAE Dance Education.

CREDIT STRUCTURE (* May vary according to courses needed/entry competencies and/or required course fulfillment) ONE YEAR

CREDITS

Major

7*

Adjunct

0*

General Studies

11*

Professional Education

20*

Teaching Practicum

6

Electives

2*

Total

46*

COURSE MENU SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

GS105

Critical Thinking and Creative Insight

2

DP202B

Ballet Technique IV

1

DP202A

Ballet Technique III

1

PE207

Psychology and Education

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

DE302

Movement Technique in the

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

DE401

Current Issues and Trends in Dance Education

Art and Education DE307B

Movement Analysis II

DE403

Methods in Dance Pedagogy

DE402

Dance Education Lab

2

Practical Researcher

3

PE403

Fundamentals of

PE400B

Theory

3

3

PE401

Educational Administration

Teaching of Dance as and 3

and Action Research

3

Teaching Practicum

6

3

The two-credit Elective can be taken in any either Semester 1 or 2.

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BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN PERFORMANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY To qualify for the B.F.A. Performance and Choreography full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 132 credits inclusive of 3 credits of electives over four (4) years, as set out below.

CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

CREDITS

YEAR 3

CREDITS

Major

19

Major

24

General

15

General

0

Adjunct

3

Adjunct

11

Total

37

Total

5

YEAR 2

CREDITS

YEAR 4

CREDITS

Major

23

Major

18

General

9

General

0

Adjunct

2

Adjunct

5

Total

34

Electives

3

Total

26

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COURSE MENU

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 2

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

DP104A

Kinesiology

3

DE107B

Movement Analysis I

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

Technique and Theory I

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS105

Critical Thinking and Creative

GS115

Theory

1 and 3

Technique and Theory II GS100B

Critical Thinking and Expository Writing

Insight

2

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

3

GS111

3 2

Information Technology for Artists and Entrepreneurs

3

GS114

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

DP201A

Modern Technique III

3

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

DP202A

Ballet Technique III

1

DP202B

Ballet Technique IV

1

DP210

Traditional &Folk Technique

DP207

Folk Technique and

and Theory III

2

Performance I

DD230A

Dance Performance Techniques

2

DH212

Dance Histories and Perspectives

3

Repertory Ensemble I

3

GS206E

Introduction to Philosophy

3

DP213

Music in Dance

2

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

DH213

Dance Histories: Evolution in Artistic

DD210

Performance and

Practice and Education

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 1

DP301A

Modern Technique V

3

DP301B

Modern Technique VI

DP302A

Ballet Technique V

1

DP302B

Ballet Technique VI1

DP325

Folk Technique and

DP317

Folk Fusion1

DP307

Composition and

Performance II

1

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

DP304

Performance and Repertory Ensemble II

3

DP306A

Art of Creating Dance

3

DE305

Teaching Methods for Studio Dance

Creative Framework

3

3

DD301

Fundamentals of Movement 2 and Body Therapies

DP308

The Craft of Theatre

GS305

Gender in Society: Issues

3 GS303

137

2

3

and Theoretical Framework

3

Performance Research Forum

3

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YEAR 4

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 4

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

DP401A

Modern Technique VII

3

DP401B

Modern Technique VIII

3

DD403

Musical Theatre

2

DD402

DanceWorks Repertory

DD405

Internship

3

DD407A

Independent Study in

Elective

DD407B

Performance/Choreography I

2

------------------------------

3

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Ensemble: Design for Dance Independent Study in Performance/Choreography II DD404B

138

3 4

Dance Production Planning 3 and Management


BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN PERFORMANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY (Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade) Graduates with a minimum of a C average in Diploma in Theatre Arts will be required to do a minimum of forty-three (43) credits inclusive of specialization and electives. Students with less than a C average in core dance courses may be required to repeat said courses (but are evaluated individually).

CREDIT STRUCTURE (* May vary according to courses needed/entry competencies and/or required course fulfillment) ONE YEAR

CREDITS

Major

35*

Adjunct

7*

General Studies

11*

Electives

2*

Total

55*

COURSE MENU SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CR

CODE

COURSE

CR

GS115

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

3

GS105

Critical Thinking and Creative Insight

2

DP301A

Modern Technique V

3

DH213

Dance Histories: Evolution in

DP302A

Ballet Technique V

1

DP304

Performance and Repertory Ensemble II

3

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

DP401A

Modern Technique VII

3

DD403

Musical Theatre

DD406

Internship

DD407A

Independent Study in Performance/Choreography I

DP404

Artistic Practice and Education

3

DP307

Composition and Creative Framework

3

DD301

Fundamentals of Movement and Body Therapies

2

DP301B

Modern Technique VI

3

2

DP401B

Modern Technique VIII

3

3

DD402

DanceWorks Repertory Ensemble: Design for Dance

2

DD407B

Independent Study in Performance

3

GS305

Gender in Society: Issues

Dance Production Planning and Management

and Choreography II

3 4

and Theoretical Framework

3

GS231

College Mathematics

3

DP308

The Craft of Theatre3

DP317

Folk Fusion1

DP302B

Ballet Technique VI1

139

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BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN TRADITIONAL AND FOLK DANCE STUDIES To qualify for the BFA Traditional and Folk Dance Studies full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of one hundred and twenty-eight (128) credits over four (4) years, including eight (8) elective credits, as set out below.

CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

CREDITS

YEAR 3

CREDITS

Major

22

Major

24

General

12

General

2

Adjunct

3

Adjunct

6

Total

37

Total

32

YEAR 2

CREDITS

YEAR 4

CREDITS

Major

20

Major

17

General

14

General

0

Adjunct

0

Adjunct

0

Electives

3

Electives

5

Total

37

Total

22

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140


COURSE MENU YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CR

CODE

COURSE

CR

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DE107B

Movement Theory and Analysis I

3

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

Technique and Theory I

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

DP104A

Kinesiology

GS115

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

GS105

Critical Thinking and Creative Insight

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

DP201A

Modern Technique III

DP209A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

Technique and Theory II

3

GS100B

Critical Thinking and Expository Writing

2

3

GS114

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

3

GS111

Information Technology for Artists and Entrepreneurs

3

2 3

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

DH202B

Introduction to Folk Philosophy

3

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

DP224

Traditional and Folk

Technique and Theory III

3

DD230A

Dance Performance Techniques

2

DH212

Dance Histories and Perspectives

3

DP2O5B

Drumming and Chanting 2

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

GS231

College Mathematics

3

GS206E

Introduction to Philosophy

3

Elective

---

3

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 2

DE305

Teaching Methods for Studio Dance

3

DE303

Movement Technique in the

DE306

Art of Creating Dance

3

DP320

Traditional Dance and Culture of the Caribbean I

DP324 TT304B

3

Traditional and Folk Technique and Performance II

3

Critiquing Performance

3

Technique and Performance I

Teaching of Dance as Art and Education

3

DP316B

Folk and Contemporary Fusion

3

DP321

Traditional Dance and Culture of the Caribbean II

DD301 GS305

and Theoretical Framework

3

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 4

SEMESTER 2

DP313B

Groundings Folk

DP403B

Urban Folk: Traditional and

3

African-Caribbean Rhythm 2

DD406

Internship

3

DD407A

Independent Study in

Elective

Popular Dance Expressions DD407B

and Percussion

Performance/Choreography I

2

---

3

2

Gender in Society: Issues

YEAR 4

DP402A

3

Fundamentals of Movement and Body Therapies

Repertory Ensemble

3

Elective

141

3

Independent Study in Performance/Choreography II

4

---

2

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ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN DANCE PERFORMANCE To qualify for the AA Dance Performance, full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of seventyfive (75) credits over two (2) years, including two (2) elective credits, as set out below.

CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

CREDITS

YEAR 2

CREDITS

Major

19

Major

20

General

13

General

9

Adjunct

3

Adjunct

9

Electives

2

Total

40

Total

35

COURSE MENU YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 1

CODE

COURSE

CR CODE

COURSE

CR

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DE107B

Movement Theory and Analysis I

3

DP104A

Kinesiology

3

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk

Technique and Theory II

Technique and Theory I

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS115

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

3

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

DP201A

Modern Technique III

DP209A

Caribbean Traditional and

SEMESTER 2

3

Folk Technique and Theory III

3

DD230A

Dance Performance Techniques

2

GS210

Conversational Spanish

GS206E DE305 DE320

Traditional Dance and

GS100B

Critical Thinking and Expository Writing

GS111

3 2

Information Technology for Artists and Entrepreneurs

3

GS114

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

DD210

Performance and

3

Repertory Ensemble I

3

DH212

Dance Histories and Perspectives

3

3

GS231

College Mathematics

3

Introduction to Philosophy

3

DP308

The Craft of Theatre

3

Teaching Methods for Studio Dance

3

DP404

Dance Production Planning

Culture of the Caribbean I

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3

Elective

142

and Management

3

---

2


CERTIFICATE IN DANCE PERFORMANCE To qualify for the Certificate Dance Performance, full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of sixty-three (63) credits and a maximum of sixty-five (65) credits over two (2) years, as set out below.

CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

CREDITS

YEAR 2 CREDITS

Major

19

Major 24

24

General

6

General

3

Adjunct

2

Adjunct

6

Total

27

Electives

3

Total

6

COURSE MENU YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CR

CODE

COURSE

CR

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DE107B

Movement Theory and Analysis I

3

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk 3 Technique and Theory I

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional and Folk 3 Technique and Theory II

GS110

English for Living

DP110

Community Dance

GS111

Information Technology for Artists 3 and Entrepreneurs Credits

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

CODE

CREDITS

3

CR

2

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

CODE

COURSE

DD230A

Dance Performance Techniques

2

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

DP201A

Modern Technique III

3

DP202B

Ballet Technique IV

1

DP202A

Ballet Technique III

1

DP224

Traditional and Folk Technique and 3 Performance I

DP209A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk 3 Technique and Theory III

DP210

Performance Ensemble I

and

Repertory 3

DP225A

Community Dance Internship I

1

DP308

The Craft of Theatre

3

DP306

Art of Creating Dance

3

DP225B

Community Dance Internship II

2

Elective

3

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

GS206E

Introduction to Philosophy

3

143

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MINOR STUDIES: Dance Performance The Dance Performance minor is comprised of eighteen (18) credits to be divided in eight (8) credit hours of technique and ten (10) credit hours of other required courses. Students may choose between Modern and Traditional Folk technique or may opt to take one semester of Modern technique and one semester of Traditional Folk Technique in fulfillment of the requisite credit hours for technique.

COURSE MENU TECHNIQUE COURSES CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory I

3

DP 109B

Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory II

3

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

DD403

Musical Theatre

2

REQUIRED COURSES CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

DH212

Dance Histories and Perspectives

3

DP103

AImprovisation I

2

DD210

Performance and Repertory Ensemble I

3

DD230A

Dance Performance Techniques

2

MINOR STUDIES: Dance Education The Dance Education minor is comprised of twenty- three (23) credits in the following courses.

COURSE MENU CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

DE202

Methods in Dance Pedagogy

3

DE304

Methods in Dance Pedagogy and Practicum

3

DE303

Movement Technique in the Teaching of Dance as 3 Art and Education

DE307B

Movement Theory and Analysis II

3

DE403

Methods in Dance Pedagogy and Action Research

3

DE401

Current Issues and Trends in Dance Education

3

DE402

Dance Education Lab

2

PE 207

Psychology and Education

3

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144


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN DANCE EDUCATION 2011-2012

(140 CREDITS: 6 ELECTIVES AND 134 REQUIRED COURSES) YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

YEAR I SEMESTER II

CR

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & 3 Theory I

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

GS106E

Ethics, Creativity and Self I

2

GS107E

Ethics, Creativity and Self II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture II

2

DP104A

Kinesiology

3

DP108B

Introduction to Dance Injury, Prevention and Care

2

Total

18

Total

18

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 2

DP209A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & 3 Theory III

DP209B

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory IV

3

PE204

Emergent Teacher

2

PE205

Teacher, School and Society

2

GS203

Academic Writing

3

GS201A

Introduction to Psychology

2

DE107B

Movement Theory & Analysis I

3

DE307B

Movement Theory and Analysis II

3

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

DH101B

Dance History I

3

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

PE202

Understanding the Learner

3

PE203

Technology & Learning

3

Total

20

Total

16

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 2

DP201A

Modern Technique III

3

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

DP223A

Caribbean Traditional Dance and Culture I

3

DE301

Applied Movement Technique for the Classroom

2

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

DP212A

Dance Composition I

3

PE303

Trends, Issues & Perspectives in Education

3

DE207A

Methods for Teaching Dance I (Observation)

2

DE207B

Methods for Teaching Dance II (2-week Episode)

2

DP309A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & 3 Theory V

DP2O5B

Drumming and Chanting OR African/ Caribbean Rhythms

2

Total

12

Total

17

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YEAR 4 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 4 SEMESTER 2

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

PE301

Philosophies and Practice in Arts Education

3

PE400

Teaching Practicum (Easter & Summer Terms)

15

PE302

Intro. To Educational Admin.

3

DE332B

Methods for Teaching Dance III (Reflective Practice and Action Research)

2

DE401

Current Issues and Trends in Dance Education

3

DE402

Dance Education Lab

2

PE401

The Practical Researcher

3

Total

16

Total

17

The minimum elective requirement for this programme is 6 credits.

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146


BFA PERFORMANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY 2011-2012

(120 CREDITS: 114 REQUIRED CREDITS AND 6 ELECTIVES) YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

YEAR I SEMESTER 2

CR

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory I

3

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DE107B

Movement Theory & Analysis I

3

GS106E

Ethics, Creativity and Self I

2

GS107E

Ethics, Creativity and Self II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture II

2

Total

15

Total

16

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 2

CR

DP201A

Modern Technique III

3

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

DP202A

Ballet Technique III

1

DP202B

Ballet Technique IV

1

DD230A

Dance Performance Techniques

2

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

DP104A

Kinesiology

3

GS102A

*Introduction to Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II

2

GS206E

Introduction to Philosophy

3

DP211A

Performance and Repertory I

3

DE201A

Methods for Teaching Studio Dance

3

DD241B

Introduction to Movement and Body Therapies

2

GS103A

*Information Technology I

0

GS103B

Information Technology II

2

Total

17

Total

16

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 2

CR

DP301A

Modern Technique V

3

DP301B

Modern Technique VI

3

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

GS107

Sex, Gender and Caribbean Culture

3

DP211B

Performance and Repertory II

3

DP212B

Dance Composition II

3

DP212A

Dance Composition I

3

DH201B

Dance History II

3

DH101B

Dance History I

3

GS203E

Performance Research Forum

3

Elective

Elective

Total

14

Total

15

YEAR 4 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 4 SEMESTER 2

CR

DP401A

Modern Technique VII

3

DP401B

Modern Technique VIII

3

DD403

Musical Theatre

2

DD402

Danceworks

3

DD405

Internship

4

DD404

Independent Study in Performance/ Choreography

6

Elective Total

Elective 9

Total

12

The minimum elective requirement for this programme is 6 credits.* Students with passes in Spanish at the CXC level or above may write for exemption from Introduction to Spanish I (GS102A). Students with passes in Information Technology at the CXC level or above may write to the registry for exemption from Information Technology I (GS103A).

147

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CERTIFICATE in DANCE PERFORMANCE 2 YEARS (60 CREDITS MINIMUM, 65 CREDITS MAXIMUM)

DP109A DP102A DP101A GS110 DP103A DD230A

DP201A DP202A DP209A GS103A DP225A GS206E DP311A

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

YEAR I SEMESTER 2

CR

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory I Ballet Technique I Modern Technique I English for Living Improvisation I Dance Performance Techniques Elective

3

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II Ballet Technique II Modern Technique II Community Dance Movement Theory & Analysis I Performance and Repertory I

3

1 3 3 2 2

DP102B DP101B DP110

Total

14

Total

15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 2

CR

Modern Technique III Ballet Technique III Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory III Information Technology I Community Dance Internship I Introduction to Philosophy Jazz Technique I Elective

3 1 3

DP201B DP202B DP224

Modern Technique IV Ballet Technique IV Traditional and Folk Technique and Performance I

3 1 3

DP225B

Community Dance Internship II Theatre Craft I Dance Composition II

2 3 3

Total

15

Total

DE107B DD211A

2 1 3 2

DP222A DP212B

15

Electives Code Course Title Credits DE201A Methods for Teaching Studio Dance 2 credits DD403 Musical Theatre 2 credits DP211A Performance and Repertory II 3 credits

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148

1 3 2 3 3


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN DANCE EDUCATION 2012-2014

(140 CREDITS: 6 ELECTIVES AND 134 REQUIRED COURSES)

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

YEAR I SEMESTER II

CR

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory I

3

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing

2

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DE107B

Movement Theory & Analysis I

3

GS106E

Ethics, Creativity and Self I

2

GS107E

Ethics, Creativity and Self II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture II

2

DP104A

Kinesiology

3

DP108B

Introduction to Dance Injury, Prevention and Care

2

Total

18

Total

18

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 2

DP209A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory III

3

DP224

Traditional Folk Technique and Performance I

3

PE204

Emergent Teacher

2

PE205

Teacher, School and Society

2

GS203

Academic Writing

3

GS208A

Fundamentals of Psychology

2

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

DH101B

Dance History I

3

PE203

Technology & Learning

3

PE202

Understanding the Learner

3

Total

20

Total

16

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 2

DP201A

Modern Technique III

3

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

DP223A

Caribbean Traditional Dance and Culture I

3

DE301

Applied Movement Technique for the Classroom

2

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

DE307B

Movement Theory and Analysis II

3

DP212A

Dance Composition I

3

PE303

Trends, Issues & Perspectives in Education

3

DE207A

Methods for Teaching Dance I (Observation)

2

DE207B

Methods for Teaching Dance II (2-week Episode)

2

DP309A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory V

3

DP2O5B

Drumming and Chanting OR African/ Caribbean Rhythms

2

DP324

Traditional Folk Technique and Performance II

3

Total

17

Total

12

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YEAR 4 SEMESTER 1

CR

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

PE301

Philosophies and Practice in Arts Education

3

PE400

Teaching Practicum (Easter & Summer Terms)

15

PE302

Intro. To Educational Admin.

3

DE332B

Methods for Teaching Dance III (Reflective Practice and Action Research)

2

DE401

Current Issues and Trends in Dance Education

3

DE402

Dance Education Lab

2

PE401

The Practical Researcher

3

Total

16

Total

17

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150

YEAR 4 SEMESTER 2


BAE DEGREE COMPLETION/DIPLOMA UPGRADE

(45 credits: 44 required credits and 1 elective)

SEMESTER 2

CR

GS231B GS208A

College Mathematics Fundamentals of Psychology

3 2

3 3

DE307B DE301

Movement Theory and Analysis II Applied Movement Technique for the Classroom

3 2

3 3

PE303

2

PE402

PE401

The Practical Researcher

3

PE400B

Trends, Issues & Perspectives in Education Reflective Practice and Action Research* Teaching Practicum (Christmas or Easter Term)

3

DE402

Academic Writing Current Issues and Trends in Dance Education Dance Education Lab

Total

22

Total

22

DP311A PE301 PE302 GS210 GS203 DE401

SEMESTER 1

CR

Jazz Technique I Philosophies and Practice in Arts Education Intro. To Educational Admin. Conversational Spanish

2 3

3 6

The minimum elective requirement for this programme is 1credit *The Reflective Practice and Action Research course is required only for candidates of the Degree Completion programme. This course has been integrated into the Methods for Teaching Dance III course in the BA in Dance Education degree. Therefore, persons who have completed Methods for Teaching Dance III prior to August 2010 would not have completed this component and is required to do the course.

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BFA PERFORMANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY 2012-2013

(120 CREDITS: 115 REQUIRED CREDITS AND 5 ELECTIVES) YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

YEAR I SEMESTER 2

CR

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory I

3

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing

2

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DE107B

Movement Theory & Analysis I

3

GS106E

Ethics, Creativity and Self I

2

GS107E

Ethics, Creativity and Self II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Aesthetics & Culture I 2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture II

2 16

Total

15

Total

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 2

DP201A

Modern Technique III

3

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

DP202A

Ballet Technique III

1

DP202B

Ballet Technique IV

1

DD230A

Dance Performance Techniques

2

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

DP104A

Kinesiology

3

GS102A

*Introduction to Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II

2

GS206E

Introduction to Philosophy

3

DD211A

Performance and Repertory I

3

DE201A

Methods for Teaching Studio Dance

3

DD241B

Introduction to Movement and Body Therapies 2

GS111

Information Technology for Artist and Entrepreneurs

3 19

Total

17

Total

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 3 SEMESTER 2

DP301A

Modern Technique V

2

DP301B

Modern Technique VI

2

DP209A

Caribbean Traditional &Folk Technique and Theory III

2

DP209B

Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory IV

2

DP311A

Jazz Technique I

2

GS107

Gender and Caribbean Culture

3

DP211B

Performance and Repertory II

3

DP212B

Dance Composition II

3

DP212A

Dance Composition I

3

DH201B

Dance History II

3

DH101B

Dance History I

3

GS203E

Performance Research Forum

3

Elective

Elective

Total

15

Total

YEAR 4 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 4 SEMESTER 2

DP401A

Modern Technique VII

3

DP401B

Modern Technique VIII

3

DD403

Musical Theatre

2

DD402

BFA DanceWorks: Repertory Ensemble/ Design for Dance

3

DD405

Internship

3

DD404A

Independent Study in Performance/ Choreography

2

DD404B

Independent Study in Performance/ Choreography

4

Elective

16

Elective

Total 10 Total 10 The minimum elective requirement for this programme is 5 credits.* Students with passes in Spanish at the CXC level or above may write for exemption from Introduction to Spanish I (GS102A). Students with passes in Information Technology at the CXC level or above may write to the registry for exemption from Information Technology I (GS103A). TABLE OF CONTENTS

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152


BFA DEGREE COMPLETION/DIPLOMA UPGRADE

(34 credits minimum for 2005 to present graduates) Graduates for the Period 2005 to Present

Graduates who have successfully completed the Diploma in Dance Theatre and Production programme between the periods 2005 to present will be required to complete a minimum of 34 credits towards the BFA in Performance and Choreography. This cohort will benefit from critical thinking and writing discourse intended to further their intellectual capacity and fulfill critical components of the BFA degree outcome. Graduates Prior to 2005 Graduates who have successfully completed the Diploma in Dance Theatre and Production programme prior to 2005 (revised diploma) will submit their academic transcript for assessment. Each case will be treated individually for equivalences and applicants will be advised on their credit requirement for completion. Courses to choose from for the BFA degree completion

Code Course Credits GS 106E Ethics, Creativity and Self I 2 GS 107E Ethics, Creativity and Self II 2 DP 311A Jazz Technique I 2 GS 231B College Mathematics 3 DP 211B Performance and Repertory II 3 DD 241B Intro. To Movement and Body Therapies 2 DP 301B Modern Technique VI 2 DP 401A Modern Technique VII 3 DP 401B Modern Technique VIII 3 DD 403 Musical Theatre 2 GS 107 Gender and Caribbean Culture 3 DD 405 Internship (as of academic year 2011-2012; prior to the credits =4) 3 DP 212B Dance Composition II 3 DH 201B Dance History II (Theatre Elective) 3 DD 402 BFA DanceWorks: Repertory Ensemble/ Design for Dance 3 DD 404A Independent Study in Perf/Choreography I 2 DD 404B Independent Study in Perf/Choreography II 4 N.B. Students with a minimum of a C average in the Diploma in Theatre Arts will be required to do a minimum of 34 credits inclusive of specialization and electives. Students with less than a C average in core dance courses may be required to repeat said courses (but are evaluated individually).

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ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN DANCE PERFORMANCE 2 YEARS

(70 CREDITS minimum: 69 REQUIRED CREDITS AND 1 ELECTIVE CREDIT) ONLY 64 CREDITS ARE TRANSFERABLE INTO THE BFA DEGREE

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

YEAR I SEMESTER 2

CR

DP109A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory I

3

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II

3

DP102A

Ballet Technique I

1

DP102B

Ballet Technique II

1

DP101A

Modern Technique I

3

DP101B

Modern Technique II

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

DP103A

Improvisation I

2

DE107B

Movement Theory & Analysis I

3

DP104A

Kinesiology

3

DH101B

Dance History I

3

GS106E

Ethics, Creativity and Self I

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture I

2

Total

18

Total

15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 2

CR

DP201A

Modern Technique III

3

DP201B

Modern Technique IV

3

DP209A

Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory III

3

DP315A

Theatre Arts Management

2

DD230A

Dance Performance Techniques

2

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

DP223A

Caribbean Traditional Dance and Culture I

3

DD211A

Performance and Repertory I

3

GS102A

*Introduction to Spanish I

2

DP222A

Theatre Craft I

3

GS206E

Introduction to Philosophy

3

GS111

Information Technology for Artists and Entrepreneurs

3

DE201A

Methods for Teaching Studio Dance

3

Total

19

Total

17

The current BFA in Performance and Choreography degree is 64 credits in the first two years of the programme. With this in mind, the AA degree in Dance Performance consists of a large number of these 64 credits and includes other courses (Theatre Craft I, Theatre Arts Management) which are not transferable, but which will support and strengthen the individual who exits with the Associate Degree in Dance Performance. NB. Student may attain an Associate of Arts Degree after successful completion of two years (70 credits) of the BFA in Performance and Choreography. Students’ attainment of this degree will be contingent upon discussions with their advisors and the Director of the School of Dance regarding required credits that fulfil the Associates of Arts in Dance Performance degree.

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CERTIFICATE IN DANCE PERFORMANCE 2 YEARS

(60 CREDITS MINIMUM, 65 CREDITS MAXIMUM)

DP109A DP102A DP101A GS110 DP103A

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory I Ballet Technique I Modern Technique I English for Living Improvisation I

3

DP109B

1 3 3 2

DP102B DP101B DP110 DE107B GS111

YEAR I SEMESTER 2

CR

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II Ballet Technique II Modern Technique II Community Dance Movement Theory & Analysis I Information Technology for Artists and Entrepreneurs

3 1 3 2 3 3

Elective Total

12

Total

15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1

CR

YEAR 2 SEMESTER 2

CR

3 1 3

DP201B DP202B DP224

2

DD211A

Modern Technique IV Ballet Technique IV Traditional and Folk Technique and Performance I Performance and Repertory I

3 1 3

DD230A

Modern Technique III Ballet Technique III Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory III Dance Performance Techniques

3

DP225A DP212A GS206E

Community Dance Internship I Dance Composition I Introduction to Philosophy

1 3 3

DP225B

Community Dance Internship II

2

DP222A

Theatre Craft I

3

DP311A

Jazz Technique I Elective Total

2 Total

15

DP201A DP202A DP209A

18

Electives Code Course Title Credits DE201A DD403 DP211A DP212B

Methods for Teaching Studio Dance Musical Theatre Performance and Repertory II Dance Composition II

155

2 2 3 3

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DANCE MINOR PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

DANCE PERFORMANCE MINOR Programme Description and Requirements

As mentioned earlier the four year degree programme also allows for students to pursue minor studies in an area of choice outside of their major. There are two opportunities for minor studies as follows: Minor Studies (MS) where students can focus on a particular area of study and Minor Alternative Studies (MAS) where students may select courses from all five (5) schools to satisfy the minor studies credit requirement. Students who select the Minor Alternative Studies are required to fulfill a maximum of 20 credits. A maximum of 9 credits of the 20 required credits may be used to meet the requirements for both the Minor and Major, subject to the approval of the department/ programme. The School of dance offers two dance minor programmes: Dance Performance Minor and Dance Education Minor each requiring 18 credit hours for completion. Also listed in this section are the dance courses available for the Minor Alternative.

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The Dance Minor offers a holistic treatment of the needs of the interested student, spanning the practical, theoretical, technical and performative elements of training in Dance. A minimum of eighteen (18) credits drawn from both the academic and practical courses are required for the completion of the minor. Students pursuing a Dance Minor are held to all programme regulations concerning interviews, prerequisites, and auditions for classes. Designated dance faculty members must, therefore, advise students regularly before registering for courses. Programme approval is required. All students interested in the Minor in Dance Performance are to participate in the scheduled placement audition/s, and subsequently are expected to attain and/or maintain the high intermediate level of the chosen Dance Techniques - Modern, Caribbean Traditional Folk, Ballet, and Jazz. Twenty (20) documented hours total of Crew and/or Performance work are required of each student who has declared a Dance Minor. This may be completed at any time during the four-year undergraduate experience. Additionally, a student will be able to transfer 9 approved credits from her/his Major after evaluation of relevance to the Dance Minor’s objectives and content offerings. Students must maintain a GPA of at least 2.00 each semester in the minor.


DANCE PERFORMANCE MINOR

18 credits:

The dance minor is comprised of 18 to be divided as follows in the courses listed below: 8 credit hours of technique and 10 credit hours of other required courses. Students may choose between Modern and Folk technique OR may opt to take one semester of Modern technique and one semester of Traditional Folk technique in fulfillment of the requisite credit hours for technique. TECHNIQUE 9 CREDITS DP109A DP 109B DP102A DP101A DP101B DP311A OR DD403

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory I Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II Ballet Technique I Modern Technique I Modern Technique II

3 3 1 3 3

Jazz Technique I OR Musical Theatre

2

REQUIRED COURSES 9 CREDITS DP103A Improvisation I 2 DH101B Dance History I 3 DD230A Dance Performance Techniques 2 DD211A Performance and Repertory I 2 *Dance Education majors choosing a performance minor may include other dance courses not listed here to fulfill the minor requirements

CODE

SEMESTER I COURSES

CR

DP109A

3

DP102A DP101A DP103A DD230A DP311A

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory I Ballet Technique I Modern Technique I Improvisation I Dance Performance Techniques Jazz Technique I

1 3 2 2 2

DD403

Musical Theatre

2

SEMESTER 2 COURSES

CR

DP109B

Caribbean Traditional & Folk Tech. & Theory II

3

DP101B DH101B DD211A

Modern Technique II Dance History I Performance and Repertory I

3 3 3

`

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DANCE EDUCATION MINOR Rationale

The primary purpose of the Dance Education Minor is to broaden the students learning and to equip them with foundational and necessary pedagogical knowledge and skills that are frequently demanded of dance graduates. It is also to satisfy the general interest of undergraduate students in Dance, and to supplement the academic and professional requirements of several Majors throughout the College. It strives to support the College’s multitalented students in channelling their enthusiasm for and aptitude in Dance into a specific training programme while still focusing on their chosen Majors. Programme Requirements and Objectives

A minimum of eighteen (18) credits drawn from both the academic and practical courses are required for the completion of the minor. Students pursuing a Dance Education Minor must be dance majors in the BFA Performance and Choreography programme. Students are held to all programme regulations concerning interviews, prerequisites, and auditions for classes where applicable. Designated dance faculty members must, therefore, advise students regularly before registering for courses. Programme approval is required. Students must maintain a GPA of at least 2.00 each semester in the minor. Additionally a maximum of 9 credits may be used to meet the requirements for both the Minor and Major.

DANCE EDUCATION MINOR (for BFA Performance and Choreography Majors) 18 credits

Code Course Credits PE 204 The Emergent Teacher PE 205 Teacher, School and Society DE207B Methods of Teaching Dance II DE332B Methods for Teaching Dance III DE307B Movement Theory and Analysis II DE301 Applied Movement Technique for the Classroom DE401 Current Issues and Trends in Dance Education DE402 Dance Education Lab CODE PE 204 DE401 DE402

SEMESTER I COURSES The Emergent Teacher Current Issues and Trends in Dance Education Dance Education Lab

CR 2 3 2

2 2 2 2 3 2 3 2

PE 205 DE207B

SEMESTER 2 COURSES Teacher, School and Society Methods for Teaching Dance II

CR 2 2

DE332B

Methods for Teaching Dance III

2

DE307B DE301

Movement Theory and Analysis II 3 Applied Movement Technique for the 2 Classroom

Students must maintain a GPA of at least 2.00 each semester in the minor. A maximum of 9 credits may be used to meet the requirements for both the Minor and Major.

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Course Descriptions DP100 2 Credits Introduction to Dance (Elective for Non-Dance Majors) This course is designed to offer non-dance majors a better understanding of their bodies through the execution of a wide array of Dance-related movement activities. It is also meant to encourage an appreciation of the connections between Dance and their own majors. Studio classes expose students to fundamentals of movement through an introductory treatment of Modern Dance technique, Jamaican and Caribbean Folk Techniques, Improvisation, Performance and beginning Dance Composition. Students will also hone problem-solving skills through individual and group activities. DH101B 3 Credits Dance History I This course is designed to provide students of dance with an understanding of the history of dance from the beginning of the Stone Age to the 19th century. It allows students to place historical events in logical order, which will assist them to better understand how dance has evolved from its early beginnings. Students will also be able to examine dance across eras and cultures. DP101A 3 Credits Modern Dance Technique I (Pre-Requisite: PQ and Jnr. Level Dance Skills) This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and training in the area of Modern Dance. The course is Graham-based but exposes the students to an integral set of skills essential to the effective performance of the fundamental movements found in a range of Modern Dance techniques and styles. Classes comprise floorwork, centrework and progressions, which develop the technical and performance skills of the dance student. 3 CREDITS DP101B 3 Credits Modern Dance Technique II (Pre-Requisite: DP101A) This course provides students with intermediary knowledge and training in the area of Modern Dance. The core component is Graham-based and is designed to build upon the fundamental movement skills and principles learned in DP101A. Classes are similar in design and structure to DP101A but new principles are introduced in the floorwork, centrework and progressions, which aim at strengthening the dancer’s technical and performance competence. 159

DP102A Ballet Technique I 1 Credit (Pre-Requisite: PQ and Jnr. level dance skills) This course is designed to give the Level 1 student an introduction to the fundamental principles of classical ballet technique and vocabulary. Specific attention is given to attaining accurate alignment and placement of the body with emphasis upon understanding the principles of turn-out, transference of weight, stance, efficient core engagement and the classical positions of the feet, arms, hands and body. Through studio classes, lecturer and student demonstrations, student-centred discussions and printed documentation, students will engage the preparatory work needed to establish their sound technical foundation. DP102B Ballet Technique II 1 Credit (Pre-Requisite: DP102A) In this course, the level 1 student continues the introduction to fundamental principles of classical ballet technique and vocabulary, maintaining emphasis on accurate alignment and placement of the body, understanding the principles of turn-out, transference of weight, stance, efficient core engagement and the classical positions of the feet, arms, hands and body. Studio classes, lecturer and student demonstrations, student-centred discussions and printed documentation continue to be used to allow students to solidify the preparatory work needed to establish their sound technical foundation. DP103A Improvisation I 2 Credits This course is designed to give the dance student an experience of self-discovery and self-expression through movement exploration and movement interaction within small and large groups. It allows the student to arrange movement creatively, impulsively, spontaneously, and in a generally unplanned manner, responding to an internal or external stimulus. The dance student is encouraged to break through stylistic barriers and movement so as to increase expressive range and to experiment with new and exciting approaches to communicating ideas through movement.

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DP104A 3 Credits Kinesiology This course is designed as a source for basic understanding of motor skills in relation to ‘the body as a machine’ to produce work. It introduces Kinesiology principles: anatomical (form), physiological (function) and biomechanical (mechanic), which afford student teachers the opportunity to understand larger Kinesiology concepts and human motion, demonstrating how laws of movement are related to other subject matter content, namely Dance Technique. It also exposes students to simple movement analysis. DE107B 3 Credits Movement Theory and Analysis I (Pre-Requisite: DP103A) This course provides students with a vocabulary for describing and analyzing human movement and creates opportunities for developing and refining their skills of observation and articulation. Emphasis is also placed on creative movement development using the theories and principles set out by Rudolf von Laban. The methodology provides links between improvisation skills, the science of movement and the abstract elements of dance, thus allowing students to make important connections that will help them to be better performers, teachers and choreographers. DP106A 2 Credits Movement i (Offered to DRAMA students) (Pre-Requisite: TT107A) This course is designed to establish the mind and body connection through the exploration of the integrated body’s movement through space. Through experiencing, exploring and visualizing movement the student will develop strength, stamina and skill of using the body as an instrument of expression in space. DP107 2 Credits Capoeira I (Elective for Dance Majors and Non-majors) This course is designed to introduce students to the art of Capoeira and to expose participants to the fundamental aspects of this multifaceted art. Basic movements of attack and defence, acrobatic techniques as well as musical skills (chanting, playing of traditional Capoeira instruments) along with the essential history of the art will be presented. The course features basic skills of both traditional Capoeira styles ‘Capoeira Angola’ and ‘Capoeira Regional’ and also includes an introduction to ‘Samba de Roda’ (a form of the Brazilian Samba dance) and Maculelê (an Afro-Brazilian stick fight/dance) – both part of the wider cultural environment of Capoeira. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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DP108B 2 Credits Introduction to Dance Injury Prevention and Care (Pre-Requisite: DP104A) This course addresses the critical need to inform students about the epidemiology of dance injuries. It is designed to assist them in becoming knowledgeable about the functioning of anatomy and the prevention and rehabilitation of dance injuries, and also to be conversant with methods for maintaining a healthy and fit instrument (body). In addition, students are encouraged to take conscious control of their bodies and develop increased awareness of other influential factors – including nutritional, psychological and environmental concepts – as they relate to dance injuries, attitude and quality of performance. Various techniques, such as conditioning for strength, endurance, flexibility, strategies for overcoming unsafe habits, motor imagery, weight and resistance training will be introduced as corrective measures. DP109A 3 Credits Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory I (Pre-Requisite: PQ and Jnr. Level Dance Skills) This course develops practical studies and theoretical knowledge of traditional/folk dance cultures as an art form, for professional and personal objectives with emphasis on Dance, its artistry, and cultural relevance. It is an introductory course in Jamaican and Caribbean Folk Dance Forms and is geared at equipping students with knowledge on African-Caribbean dance and culture, and the technical foundation for efficient execution of traditional movement. DP109B 3 Credits Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory II (Pre-Requisite: DP109A) This course further develops practice and understanding of the tenets of Jamaican and Caribbean Folk Forms introduced in DP109A. The aim is to develop further awareness of the African retentions and European influences within our Jamaican Traditional Folk culture. The general principles of folk technique, vocabulary, style, characteristic, music, performance, and other elements specific to selected dance forms are central to studio work and are further enhanced through lectures, viewing of videos and engagement with in the field practitioners. DP110 2 Credits Community Dance This course will offer the Community Dance student a basic understanding of the history of dance globally and locally in order to approach the rudiments of communal physical expressions and the basis of this expression being an integral part of the fabric of the psyche of the Jamaican community both locally and internationally. Students will


also explore processes of conceptualization and completion of community dance initiatives. Support structures such as funding agencies, partnership organisations and initiatives for funding and structuring community dance projects will also be explored. DE201A 3 Credits Methods for Teaching Studio Dance (Pre-Requisite: DE107B) This course is theoretical and practical and provides students with a historical survey of the role of dance in the general education environment in Jamaica and other parts of the World, specifically the USA, and the Caribbean. The course also focuses on current philosophies and strategies for teaching dance in the formal setting of a studio. Students will identify and explore basic concepts of teaching and learning, and apply these principles to the development of lesson plans for studio dance. DH201B 3 Credits Dance History II (Pre-Requisite: DH101B) This course will allow students to review certain historical events in dance from the end of the 19th century to present. Students will record the works and contributions of dance artists within the Caribbean and the world. The course will also provide a medium through which Caribbean students of dance can examine and analyze events in Caribbean dance through critical thinking processes, thus providing the students with adequate historical dance knowledge and an informed outlook on the evolution of dance. DH212 3 Credits Dance Histories and Perspectives This course is designed to provide students of dance with an understanding of the history of dance from the beginning of the Stone Age to the 19th century. It allows students to place historical events in logical order, which will assist them to better understand how dance has evolved from its early beginnings. Students will also be able to examine dance across eras and cultures. DH213 3 Credits Dance Histories: Evolution in Artistic Practice and Education (Pre-Requisite: DH212) This course will allow students to review certain historical events in dance from the end of the 19th century to present. Students will record the works and contributions of dance artists within the Caribbean and the world. The course will also provide a medium through which Caribbean students of dance can examine and analyze events in Caribbean dance through critical thinking processes, thus providing the 161

students with adequate historical dance knowledge and an informed outlook on the evolution of dance. DP201A 3 Credits Modern Dance Technique III (Pre-Requisite: DP101B) This course is designed to build upon DP101B and students’ introductory knowledge and practical training in the fundamental principles and movements found in a range of Modern Dance techniques and styles. Classes comprise of experiential anatomy labs, floor-based warm-up, centrework and progressions, which is used to introduce and highlight patterns of total body connectivity, efficiency and organization (influenced by the discoveries of Irmgard Bartenieff and Bonnie Bainbridge-Cohen—the creators of Bartenieff Fundamentals™ and Body-Mind Centering ® systems, respectively). DP201B Modern Dance Technique IV (Pre-Requisite: DP201A) This course is designed to build upon the knowledge and practical training in the fundamental principles and movements found in a range of Modern Dance technique and styles introduced in DP201A. Classes continue to comprise of experiential anatomy labs, floor-based warmup and progressions, which will make use of the total body connectivity skills encountered in the previous semester. Through modes of demonstration and discovery, students will train and engage in barre and centrework intended to develop a more aware, fearless and connected dancing body/mind while increasing skills of virtuosity and technical proficiency. DH202B 3 Credits Introduction to Folk Philosophy (Pre-Requisite: GS206E) This course constitutes an academic tradition tailored to our landscape and embodies the traditional African ‘Folk’ thought and dynamics tuned with the pulse of the people in the midst of other influences (English, Indian, Chinese, Jewish etc.). It is restricted to the African presence, aesthetics and other cultural and artistic manifestations in select contexts e.g. Jamaica, Haiti, and Cuba and gives students a context in which to frame identity, resilience and survival strategies that are peculiar to Caribbean experiences and environment, coming from middle passage, plantation society, and since emancipation. It deemphasises how Art serves people, functions to the life of society, makes folkloric expressions classical, affects the psyche of people, and helps people to move forward.

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DP202A 1 Credit Ballet Technique III (Pre-Requisite: DP102B) This course is designed to provide the DP102B student with further development in the knowledge and practice of classical ballet technique and vocabulary. At this level, students will be required to make use of their previous year’s study of accurate alignment and placement, principles of turn-out, transference of weight, stance, efficient core engagement and the classical positions of the feet, arms, hands and body while learning more complex classical ballet vocabulary. DP202B 1 Credit Ballet Technique IV (Pre-Requisite: DP202A) This course continues to provide the DP202A student with opportunities for development in the knowledge and practice of classical ballet technique and vocabulary. Students will be required to intelligently assimilate their previous training with the more complex classical ballet technique skills taught at this level. 1 CREDIT DP205B 2 Credits Drumming and Chanting In this course students will study Caribbean rhythms, associated verbal utterances, songs and chants. It is designed to provide students training as dancers, teachers and choreographers with experiential knowledge of music as an intrinsic partner in Caribbean dances and as such, their personal skills. This is a practical course that demands recognition of particular rhythmic patterns, melodic lines, songs, breaks etc., and demonstration of basic voice and percussion skills on drums. DP206A 2 Credits Movement ii (Offered to DRAMA students) (Pre-Requisite: DP106A) This course is designed to develop physical skills, versatility and aesthetic awareness through exposure to a variety of Folk forms. The student is encouraged to perform and demonstrate knowledge of both pure and stylised Folk dances which may be applied in theatre productions. Activities will include the principles and vocabulary of the Folk dance genre as applied to body awareness, and, stylistic nuances, communication, musicality, performance skills and other dance elements.

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DE202 3 Credits Methods in Dance Pedagogy (Pre-Requisite: DE107B) This course focuses on current philosophies, methodologies and strategies for teaching dance. It also provides students with a historical survey of the role of dance in education in general and in Jamaica in particular. Students will identify and explore basic concepts of teaching and apply these principles to the development of lesson plans for educational (classroom and studio) dance. DE207A 2 Credits Methods for Teaching Dance I (Pre-Requisite: DE107B) This course focuses on current philosophies, methodologies and strategies for teaching dance. It also provides students with a historical survey of the role of dance in education in general and in Jamaica in particular. Students will identify and explore basic concepts of teaching and apply these principles to the development of lesson plans for educational (classroom and studio) dance. DE 207B 2 Credits Methods for Teaching Dance II (Pre-Requisite: DE207A) This course is a theory and practical course, which continues the processes that students experienced in DE207A, that is, history, philosophies, and methods for teaching dance. Issues reflecting contemporary education will also be discussed, for example, dance and gender and Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Theory. Students will identify and explore concepts of teaching and learning and apply these principles to the development of curricula for educational (classroom and studio) dance. Students will also have three (3) weeks of full-time practice in a formal primary or secondary institution. DP207 Folk Technique and Performance I (Pre-Requisite: DP210) The course moves the intermediate folk dancer into the study of artistry in traditional dance contexts reinforced through Jamaican wake complex dances and other Caribbean parallels, while conceptualizing, analysing and integrating the dance styles and techniques for performance. It also exposes dance artists, educators and cultural agents to the Traditional technique and vocabulary of folk dances from other cultures. Fundamental skills of specified ritualistic and social dances, particularly through improvisation/versatility as manifested in traditional performance in the yard’ space and origins of Jamaican/ Caribbean Dance Theatre, is emphasised. 2 CREDITS


DP208 3 Credits Jamaican Popular Dance Culture in the New Millennium (Elective) This course consists of lively dance practical, vibrant discussions and other exchanges. Popular dance movements from the 1980s through 2000s will be taught by some of the culture’s most known and respected practitioners, allowing for first hand encounters with some of the genre’s originators. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the new Millennium dance steps that have captivated and cultivated new generations of Jamaican Urban/Street Dance practitioners locally and internationally. This course is supported by field trips to observe and participate in this enriched socio-cultural space. Participants will experiment with creating their own fusion Jamaican Street Dance steps and techniques, similar to that which has manifested locally, as well as witnessed among Europe’s Dancehall practitioners. DP209A 3 Credits Caribbean Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory III (Pre-Requisite: DP109B) This course provides the opportunity through which the individual student/dancer will explore and experience Jamaican/Caribbean wake dances within scopes of traditional technique and vocabulary, music, and as an art form. It will further equip Dance artists, educators and cultural agents with comprehensive knowledge of Jamaican and Caribbean religio-dance-music tradition. It also serves to make theoretical links with dance and culture and provides critical practical experiences through abstraction of authentic material for creative and artistic explorations of these forms. DP210 2 Credits Traditional and Folk Technique and Theory III (Pre-Requisite: DP109B) This course provides the opportunity through which the individual student/dancer will explore and experience Jamaican/Caribbean wake dances within scopes of traditional technique and vocabulary, music, and as an art form. It will further equip Dance artists, educators and cultural agents with comprehensive knowledge of Jamaican and Caribbean religio-dance-music tradition. It also serves to make theoretical links with dance and culture and provides critical practical experiences through abstraction of authentic material for creative and artistic explorations of these forms.

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DP211A 3 Credits Performance and Repertory I (Pre-Requisite: DD230A) This course furthers the systematic study of performance introduced in DD230A and asks students to become ever more conscious of those with whom their performance space is shared, i.e. other dancers and the audience. Through the learning of selected dance repertory, practical exercises, discussions, journaling/portfolio creation and contextual research, students continue to investigate practical ways in which small group and ensemble synergy can be strengthened and supported, while still exploring their personal contributions to the stage. DD210 3 Credits Performance and Repertory Ensemble I (Pre-Requisite: DD230A) This course furthers the systematic study of performance introduced in DD230A and asks students to become ever more conscious of those with whom their performance space is shared, i.e. other dancers and the audience. Through the learning of selected dance repertory, practical exercises, discussions, journaling/portfolio creation and contextual research, students continue to investigate practical ways in which small group and ensemble synergy can be strengthened and supported, while still exploring their personal contributions to the stage. DP 211B 3 Credits Performance and Repertory II (Pre-Requisite: DP211A) This course builds upon the students’ understanding of the dance performance tools, strategies and aptitudes honed in DP211A. Through the learning of selected dance repertory, discussion, portfolio creation and guided research, students focus on the application of personal, preparatory and stage skills to the kind of solo and small ensemble dance performance that is rich in emotional depth and clarity. Sensitivity to the relationship between performer and audience will also be garnered, so that communicative aptitudes are further strengthened. In this leg of study, focus will be placed on performance skills specific to auditioning for dance employment locally and abroad. DP212A 3 Credits Dance Composition I (Pre-Requisite: DE107B) This course is designed to introduce the principles of form and structure that inform all artistic/aesthetic development. Students will participate in lectures and practical activities (including the creation of short dance studies), observe and evaluate their work and that of their peers, and view the TABLE OF CONTENTS

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works of local and international choreographers, in order to gain knowledge of and insights into the composition process.

of folk dances from other cultures. Fundamental skills of specified ritualistic and social dances, particularly through improvisation/versatility as manifested in traditional performance in the yard’ space and origins of Jamaican/ Caribbean Dance Theatre, is emphasised.

DP212B 3 Credits Dance Composition II (Pre-Requisite: DP212A) This course examines and evaluates the creative process through exploration of movement improvisation skills and critical study of the form and structure related to dance composition. Various approaches to choreography will be introduced through lectures, video and performance viewing, discussion, critique and practical work. Students are expected to apply movement analysis skills gained in previous courses and will be required to choreograph solo and group dances for presentation and assessment. DP222A 3 Credits Theatre Craft I This course is designed to give the dance artist and teacher the technical confidence and skill training as they visit and study the theatre space and vital technical aspects therein. They will develop the skill to manage people, things and events and will gain practice in communicating clearly, preparing work sheets and production cue sheets. They should grasp the concepts of design in general, and that of lighting and costume design in particular, and acquire handson experience in managing audio equipment. 3 CREDITS DP223A 3 Credits Caribbean Traditional Dance and Culture I The course is lecture-based, drawing on old and new scholarship on Caribbean dance and culture, with an experiential component through studio work, video and field trips. It provides students an exciting, in-depth study of traditional dance forms of the Caribbean, its people, cosmologies and behavioural practices - rooted in the aesthetics and shared historical experiences of Caribbean ambit. Through exposure to traditional folk beliefs and practices; social function, structural and performance, this course offers comprehensive study of selected traditional / folk dance forms of the Caribbean. DP224 3 Credits Traditional and Folk Technique and Performance I (Pre-Requisite: DP209A) The course moves the intermediate folk dancer into the study of artistry in traditional dance contexts reinforced through Jamaican wake complex dances and other Caribbean parallels, while conceptualizing, analysing and integrating the dance styles and techniques for performance. It also exposes dance artists, educators and cultural agents to the Traditional technique and vocabulary TABLE OF CONTENTS

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DP225A 1 Credit Community Dance Internship I (Pre-Requisite: DP110) Within the Internship component of the Community Dance course, students will be exposed to actual communities for a period of four to six (4-6) weeks. Students will explore their idea of a project they would like to embark upon, scope which communities they propose to impact and execute their projects on a trial basis. Students will also visit at least two communities within the semester as a field trip. Students will be assigned to said communities and are expected to write a proposal for a small project which they would be responsible for executing from conceptualization through to execution. This aspect will be executed in partnership with another student. DP225B 2 Credits Community Dance Internship II (Pre-Requisite: DP225A) This course follows on from work completed in DP225A creating a platform for students to work independently on the full scale execution of a solo project within their selected communities. Students will see the full scale execution of said project for observation and evaluation. 2 CREDITS DD230A 3 Credits Dance Performance Techniques (Pre-Requisite: DP103A) An intimate knowledge of the performing self is essential to every dancer who aspires to not only perform, but to also transform. This course begins the dance student’s journey towards this vital inner awareness, with a view to nurturing individual habits of focus, mindfulness and presence in the dance space. Through writing and practical studio-based classes, students will spend time exploring and becoming comfortable with their performing selves while critically observing and considering the more physical performance skills introduced. 3 CREDITS DD241B 2 Credits Introduction to Movement and Body Therapies (Pre-Requisite: DP104A) This course introduces dance students to the knowledge and skills necessary to use dance in a therapeutic setting. It incorporates, through creative explorations technique, theory, improvisation, somatic-derived approaches and other interdisciplinary modes that harness the power of


movement as a visual communication form to further the physical, emotional, cognitive and social skills of the individual and ultimately personal growth, health and wellbeing are promoted. DE301 2 Credits Applied Movement Technique for the Classroom (Pre-Requisite: DE207A or DE207B) This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skill necessary to apply movement technique in the classroom. Students will continue to explore natural movements of the body with an understanding of the development of dance skills/technique. Students will gain practical experience in deconstructing various types of movement structures (Jamaican traditional dance forms e.g. Kumina; Popular dance forms e.g. Dancehall; and Modern dance), and reconstructing for teaching. Movement will be observed primarily from a physicality of the technique perspective, focusing specifically on fundamental principles, the root or the essence of movement. DP301A 3 Credits Modern Dance Technique V (Pre-Requisite: DP201B) This course is designed to build upon the DP201B knowledge and practical training in the intermediate movements found in a range of Modern dance techniques and styles. Students continue to focus on the total embodiment of the mind/ body connection through movement experiences on the floor, at the barre, and through exercises across the floor. DP301B 3 Credits Modern Technique VI (Pre-Requisite: DP301A) This course is designed to build upon the DP301A knowledge and practical training in the intermediate movements found in a range of Modern dance techniques and styles. Classes continue to comprise floorwork, barre, centrework and progressions, with special emphasis on developing strong memory skills, deep kinaesthetic understanding and a strong professional approach to movement studies, analysis, performance and technique. DP302A 1 Credit Ballet Technique V (Pre-Requisite: DP202B) This course is an introduction to RAD Intermediate Foundation Syllabus, which provides the Level III student with opportunities for development in the knowledge and practice of classical ballet technique and vocabulary towards sitting RAD Intermediate Foundation vocational exams. Students will be required to intelligently assimilate their previous training with the more complex classical ballet 165

technique skills taught at this level. Through studio classes, lecturer and student demonstrations, student-centred discussions, videos and printed documentation, students will be guided towards mastery of the vocational work needed to cultivate the dancers’ solid technical foundation. DP302B 1 Credit Ballet Technique VI (Pre-Requisite: DP302A) This course continues the RAD Intermediate Foundation Syllabus, focusing on detail and mastery in preparation for the knowledge and practice of classical ballet technique and vocabulary required for eligibility for sitting RAD Intermediate Foundation vocational examinations. Through studio classes, lecturer and student demonstrations, student-centred discussions, videos and printed documentation, students will be guided towards mastery of the vocational work needed to cultivate the dancers’ solid technical foundation. DP 304 3 Credits Performance and Repertory Ensemble II (Pre-Requisite: DD210) This course builds upon the students’ understanding of the dance performance tools, strategies and aptitudes honed in DP211A. Through the learning of selected dance repertory, discussion, portfolio creation and guided research, students focus on the application of personal, preparatory and stage skills to the kind of solo and small ensemble dance performance that is rich in emotional depth and clarity. Sensitivity to the relationship between performer and audience will also be garnered, so that communicative aptitudes are further strengthened. In this leg of study, focus will be placed on performance skills specific to auditioning for dance employment locally and abroad. DP306 3 Credits Art of Creating Dance (Pre-Requisite: DE107B) This course is designed to introduce the principles of form and structure that inform all artistic/aesthetic development. Students will participate in lectures and practical activities (including the creation of short dance studies), observe and evaluate their work and that of their peers, and view the works of local and international choreographers, in order to gain knowledge of and insights into the composition process.

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DP307 3 Credits Composition and Creative Framework (Pre-Requisite: DP306) This course examines and evaluates the creative process through exploration of movement improvisation skills and critical study of the form and structure related to dance composition. Various approaches to choreography will be introduced through lectures, video and performance viewing, discussion, critique and practical work. Students are expected to apply movement analysis skills gained in previous courses and will be required to choreograph solo and group dances for presentation and assessment.

(classroom and studio) dance. Students will also have three (3) weeks of full-time practice in a formal primary or secondary institution.

DP308 3 Credits The Craft of Theatre This course is designed to give the dance artist and teacher the technical confidence and skill training as they visit and study the theatre space and vital technical aspects therein. They will develop the skill to manage people, things and events and will gain practice in communicating clearly, preparing work sheets and production cue sheets. They should grasp the concepts of design in general, and that of lighting and costume design in particular, and acquire handson experience in managing audio equipment.

DE307B 3 Credits Movement Theory and Analysis II (Pre-Requisite: DE107B) This course continues the movement exploration process, working further with Rudolf von Laban’s principles and theories of movement. In this course, greater emphasis is placed on the body-mind connection as a means for experiential learning, through the use of feelings, expression and communication. Students will engage in deeper study of the analytical process and of the Language of Dance together with Labanotation techniques as a source of creating and recording dance phrases, sequences and studies.

DE305 Teaching Methods for Studio Dance (Pre-Requisite: DE107B) This course is theoretical and practical and provides students with a historical survey of the role of dance in the general education environment in Jamaica and other parts of the World, specifically the USA, and the Caribbean. The course also focuses on current philosophies and strategies for teaching dance in the formal setting of a studio. Students will identify and explore basic concepts of teaching

DE301 3 Credits Movement Technique in the Teaching of Dance as Art and Education (Pre-Requisite: DE202 or DE304) This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skill necessary to apply movement technique in the classroom. Students will continue to explore natural movements of the body with an understanding of the development of dance skills/technique. Students will gain practical experience in deconstructing various types of movement structures (Jamaican traditional dance forms e.g. Kumina; Popular dance forms e.g. Dancehall; and Modern dance), and reconstructing for teaching. Movement will be observed primarily from a physicality of the technique perspective, focusing specifically on fundamental principles, the root or the essence of movement. DE 304 3 Credits Methods in Dance Pedagogy and Practicum (Pre-Requisite: DE202) This course is a theory and practical course, which continues the processes that students experienced in DE202, that is, history, philosophies, and methods for teaching dance. Issues reflecting contemporary education will also be discussed, for example, dance and gender and Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Theory. Students will identify and explore concepts of teaching and learning and apply these principles to the development of curricula for educational TABLE OF CONTENTS

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DP311A 2 Credits Jazz Technique I (Elective) This course introduces dancers to the principles and skills fundamental to beginning/intermediate jazz dance technique. There is shared emphasis on the development of technical and expressive skills. The course provides students with the opportunity to develop both a historical and kinaesthetic understanding of the jazz idiom. 2 CREDITS DP311B 2 Credits Jazz Technique II (Elective) (Pre-requisite: DP311A) This course continues the development of jazz dance technique at the beginning/intermediate level. Emphasis is on increased coordination, strength, control, flexibility, performance qualities and improvisation in the jazz dance vocabulary, which includes more challenging combinations. 2 CREDITS DP313B 3 Credits Groundings Folk Repertory Ensemble II (Pre-Requisite: DP324) This is a performance workshop and ensemble course in which students will be required to learn repertory from faculty and guest artists. Groundings will present a full


concert each semester, of choreographies representative of Africa and the Diaspora. Students in Groundings (Repertory and Workshop Ensemble) will also perform a minimum of two outreach performances to include but not limited to lecture demonstrations in selected Jamaican public schools, host on and off campus workshops and mini concerts. DP 315A 2 Credtis Theatre Arts Management This course focuses on the principles of management related to the operation of Dance and Dance Theatre. Such topics as planning, marketing, budgeting, budgetary control, entrepreneurship, and self-management and promotion are explored. Students are given hands-on experience in the various specialised areas related to the development of administration skills. DP316B 3 Credits Folk and Contemporary Fusion (Pre-Requisite: DP324) In this course students will experience traditional work in contemporary spaces (hybrid choreographies) and will additionally learn and perform creolised movement vocabularies from the Caribbean (of non-African and nonEuropean origins). This course focuses on the technique and performance of these and other variances as important to the understanding of the Caribbean performer as the resulting synthesis of all these cultures. The course also introduces contemporary fusions developed out of traditional movement as source. DP317 1 Credit Folk Fusion (Pre-Requisite: DP325) In this course students will experience traditional work in contemporary spaces (hybrid choreographies) and will additionally learn and perform creolised movement vocabularies from the Caribbean (of non-African and nonEuropean origins). This course focuses on the technique and performance of these and other variances as important to the understanding of the Caribbean performer as the resulting synthesis of all these cultures. The course also introduces contemporary fusions developed out of traditional movement as source.

aesthetics and shared historical experiences of Caribbean ambit. Through exposure to traditional folk beliefs and practices; social function, structural and performance, this course offers comprehensive study of selected traditional / folk dance forms of the Caribbean. DP321 3 Credits Traditional Dance and Culture of the Caribbean II (Pre-Requisite: DP320) This course builds on DP320 in further exploration of the perception and reality of folk and traditional practices across this diverse Diaspora. It revises and reinforces forms already studied in DP320, and gives particular focus to Rastafari, Spiritual Baptist, among other religious forms to include the Revival complex, and Pentecostalism. The development of the Masquerade Complex and Caribbean Carnival, particularly in the case of Trinidad, as well as other social forms of the region, will also be explored. DP323B 3 Credits Caribbean Traditional Dance and Culture II (Pre-Requisite: DP223A) This course builds on DP223A in further exploration of the perception and reality of folk and traditional practices across this diverse Diaspora. It revises and reinforces forms already studied in DP223A, and gives particular focus to Rastafari, Spiritual Baptist, among other religious forms to include the Revival complex, and Pentecostalism. The development of the Masquerade Complex and Caribbean Carnival, particularly in the case of Trinidad, as well as other social forms of the region, will also be explored. DP324 3 Credits Traditional and Folk Technique and Performance II (Pre-Requisite: DP224) In this course students will continue technical training in Caribbean movement, augmented by the study of West African dances, from which many Caribbean traditional dances are derived. The course also focuses on an advanced study of the strongest African retentions in the Caribbean with in-depth research and artistic presentation of songs and dances of these aspects of African cultures, retained in a diverse Caribbean space and culture. DP324 1 Credit Folk Technique and Performance II (Pre-Requisite: DP207) In this course students will continue technical training in Caribbean movement, augmented by the study of West African dances, from which many Caribbean traditional dances are derived. The course also focuses on an advanced study of the strongest

DP320 3 Credits Traditional Dance and Culture of the Caribbean I The course is lecture-based, drawing on old and new scholarship on Caribbean dance and culture, with an experiential component through studio work, video and field trips. It provides students an exciting, in-depth study of traditional dance forms of the Caribbean, its people, cosmologies and behavioural practices - rooted in the 167

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African retentions in the Caribbean with in-depth research and artistic presentation of songs and dances of these aspects of African cultures, retained in a diverse Caribbean space and culture. DP326 3 Credits Worl’ Dance: Jamaica’s Street Dance Culture and Global Transformations (Elective) This course will expose participants to several cultural studies thoughts and theories namely Identity, Globalisation-‘Boundarylessness’, ‘Territoriality’ and ‘(In)visibility’. The lifestyles of the culture’s most noted practitioners inclusive of the dance steps; fashion; and music among other aesthetics will be interrogated. Earlier Dancehall eras of 1980s and 1990s will be explored providing an introductory platform from which to reference, scrutinize and compare the identified transformations that manifest during the 2000s. The course is complemented by an experiential component allowing participants to gain personal experiences from immersing themselves among the actual street dance space. Students will engage physically with the dance form’s movements throughout the eras 1980-2000s, while experimenting with new cultural influences from other genres. DE332B 2 Credits Methods for Teaching Dance III (Pre-Requisite: DE207B) This is a seminar type course where student teachers reflect on their teaching practice experiences and knowledge gained over the course of their educational program and probe a particular topic/question about the practice of teaching and learning dance and dance education. The aim of which is to find answers to pedagogical issues of interest or concern to the student teacher that further illuminates the daily practice of dance education in Jamaica, and in general. This course continues the research process from the Practical Researcher’s course. A summary of the findings is presented in a lecture demonstration format and the research documented as a standard research document. The topics offered in the units are suggested topics and are by no means exhaustive. DE401 3 Credits Current Issues and Trends in Dance Education (Pre-Requisite: DE207B) This course, through theory, deals with further development of knowledge gained in DE207A and DE207B. Philosophies, methodologies and curriculum development related to dance education are reviewed from a broader framework. Current issues such as dance and socio-cultural and technological changes affecting contemporary dance education will also be addressed. Students will identify and explore issues and trends in teaching and learning and apply TABLE OF CONTENTS

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these principles to the development of inclusive curricula for dance in secondary education in Jamaica. DE403 2 Credits Methods in Dance Pedagogy and Action Research (Pre-Requisite: DE304) This is a seminar type course where student teachers reflect on their teaching practice experiences and knowledge gained over the course of their educational program and probe a particular topic/question about the practice of teaching and learning dance and dance education. The aim of which is to find answers to pedagogical issues of interest or concern to the student teacher that further illuminates the daily practice of dance education in Jamaica, and in general. This course continues the research process from the Practical Researcher’s course. A summary of the findings is presented in a lecture demonstration format and the research documented as a standard research document. The topics offered in the units are suggested topics and are by no means exhaustive. DP401A 3 Credits Modern Technique VII (Pre-Requisite: DP301B) The dance techniques and movement principles imparted in DP301B provide the foundation on which this course is built. Knowledge and practical training in intermediate and advanced movements found in a range of Modern Dance techniques and styles, including Modern Contemporary Cuban Dance technique, are given primary focus. Classes, which continue to comprise floorwork, barre, centrework and progressions, help to shape the student as performer and artist who will, at the end of process, be competent technicians with rich performance intelligence. S DP401B 3 Credits Modern Technique VIII (Pre-Requisite: DP401A) The student as an intelligent and competent performer, artist and technician is moulded throughout the content and focus of this course. Bolstered by Modern Contemporary Cuban Dance Technique and supported by previous knowledge from DP401A the student will experience a range of advanced movement principles and experimental concepts reflective of the global movement in Modern Dance technique and performance. The course also continues to build on the acrobatic and partnering skills explored in DP401A. DD402 3 Credits DanceWorks Repertory ensemble: design for dance (Pre-Requisite: DP211B) In this course, students are introduced to technical theatre


concepts and skills necessary for fleshing out and presenting choreographic works. Through the study of selected repertory, they explore the essential relationships between choreography, basic design elements and principles, and the various dimensions of craft in the theatre. The rudiments of stage management, costume design and lighting design, as well as practice in clear communication, worksheet preparation and production cue sheet preparation are therefore introduced in view of their particular application to design for dance. The course seeks to have students gain technical insight, confidence and skill training by using repertory as a point of reference for understanding dancemaking from a technical support perspective. DE402 2 Credits Dance Education Lab This course is a teacher development course for dance student teachers in training and artists interested in developing their dance teaching skills. Students will be engaged in teaching practice experiences in a laboratory setting with experienced dance educators and students from partnering schools. The course will enable students to reflect on their teaching skills and together with the facilitator to address individual weaknesses and challenges in their pedagogy. The course will therefore require student teachers full commitment to the learning process. DP402A 2 Credits African-Caribbean Rhythm and Percussion (Pre-Requisite: DP205) This course offers an exciting, introductory study of selected African-based folk forms of the Caribbean while primarily focusing on West African rhythms. Students will have the opportunity to read about, discuss, view and play select West African rhythms. This is a practical course that demands recognition of particular rhythmic patterns, melodic lines, songs, breaks etc., and demonstration of basic voice and percussion skills on drums and other instruments. DD403 2 Credits Musical Theatre This course will explore the techniques required for understanding and performing in musical theatre through the exploration of character work, voice and movement and how to apply these disciplines equally and simultaneously, culminating in the wonderful multifaceted experience that is Musical Theatre. This will be done within the context of a journey through the history of musical theatre and paying particular attention to specific Musicals in the Caribbean and internationally. Coursework will include techniques of and performance in singing, acting and dance and culminate with an integrated performance musical.

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DP403B 3 Credits Urban Folk: Traditional and Popular Dance Expressions (Pre-Requisite: DP224) This course is central to the practices and production of shared meanings the people engage in urban folk. Students will be engaged in articulating the distinct Jamaican style of dance expression; pose, mannerism, vitality, and other characteristic features of urban traditional and urban popular dances and a continuous dialogue between these dance forms. The source of urban and the correlation between the traditional and popular/contemporary beginning with earlier roots such as Mento to present popular dancehall will be explored as representations of dance theatre. It also examines artistic cues that facilitate the expressions of Urban Folk philosophy, aesthetics, sense of identity, and how the folk form facilitates the creation of celebrity in Jamaica’s urban centres. DP404 3 Credits Dance Production Planning and Management This course focuses on the principles of management related to the operation of Dance and Dance Theatre. Such topics as planning, marketing, budgeting, budgetary control, entrepreneurship, and self-management and promotion are explored. Students are given hands-on experience in the various specialised areas related to the development of administration skills. DD406 3 Credits Internship Internship is a significant component of the BFA programme, which will involve observation and practice while being assigned to professional, private or public organizations. Within the organization, the prospective graduate will be assigned particular administrative and technical functions aimed at expanding his or her broader understanding of a professional environment. The supervisor, who is keen on the responsibilities of the student, will serve as his or her mentor and assessor and will provide key support and guidance in the student’s application of relevant skills to complete assigned tasks. At the end of the work period, an assessment sheet will be completed by the supervisor who will include in their final report an overall assessment grade, which is in partial fulfillment of the final course grade. DD407A 2 Credits Independent Study in performance/choreography i (Pre-Requisite: GS303) This first leg of the Independent Study course will give final year BFA Performance and Choreography student the opportunity to transfer the research information and skill sets gathered in Performance Research Forum into a TABLE OF CONTENTS

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choreographic and production-related context. Students will be asked to conduct the necessary research that will inform the creative works which will be performed at the end of the second semester as part of their Independent Study II showcases. This research-based course will also have practical applications as students will be expected to submit a completed paper/proposal and a presentation on their research at the end of the semester. Formal research methodologies will have to be declared, investigative approaches specific to the field of dance articulated and as an extension of their inquiry, students will be required to create several movement studies as derived and inspired by their findings.

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DD407B 4 Credits Independent Study in performance/choreography ii (Pre-Requisite: DD404A) DD407B is designed to guide the final year BFA Performance and Choreography student in the completion of an Independent Study project of their choice. This project has two components, a practical project (which can be a solo or small group dance performance project/ solo or small group choreography project/ multimedia, physical theatre project/ performance art, live installation type project) related to her/ his major and a research proposal out of which the project evolved, which also reflects, evaluates and documents the process. The project should be based on themes, style, content and location, chosen by the student and must reflect the type of innovative, individual thinking and creative treatment required of professional artists. The project will be showcased and students will mount, market and produce the showcase, while creating necessary artefacts such as posters, tickets etc.


Faculty Lorna Ellis MA, BA, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica

Nicholeen Degrasse-Johnson Phd., Temple University; LASPAU/OAS Fellowship 2002-2004 Masters of Art (M.A.) in Dance Education, State University of New York; 1993 Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Dance, SUNY Brockport Diploma in Dance Teacher Education, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

Keino Senior PhD Candidate, UWI Master of Philosophy and Bachelor of Arts, UWI Barbara Requa Certificate in Education – London University Institute of Education Diploma in Physical Education Dartford College of Physical Education Kent, United Kingdom; 1958

Kerry-Ann Henry Director Master Education Technology (MET), University of British Columbia, Vancouver Canada, 2012 Master of Arts (MA) in Theatre and Development, University of East Anglia, UK, 2003 Diploma Dance Education, Edna Manley College, 2009 Bachelor of Science (BSc), UWI, Mona, 1998

Barry Moncrieffe Martha Graham School of Dance, USA; Diploma in Dance Education, Edna Manley College Coretta Brown-Johnson PhD Candidate Clinical Psychology, Walden University, Minnesota, USA; Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology, Walden University, Minnesota USA Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Psychology, International University of the Caribbean Diploma in Dance Education, Edna Manley College

Marlon Simms Assistant Director Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Southern Methodist University, Texas, USA; 2005 Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), University of the West Indies;1998 Post Graduate Diploma in Education, University of Technology; 2003 Neila Ebanks Masters of Art (M.A.) in Physical Theatre (Merit), University of Surrey; 2003 Bachelors of Science (B.Sc.) University of the West Indies; 1997 Certificate Dance Theatre and Production, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

Elizabeth Vickers-Samuda Royal Academy of Dance (RAD) Teacher Certification; 2002 Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing (ISTD) certification

Oniel Pryce Master of Arts (MA) , Laban Centre, UK; 2008 Diploma in Dance Education, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts; 2001

Kevin Moore Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Dance, SUNY College at Brockport, Rochester, USA Diploma in Dance Theatre and Production and Teacher Education, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

Neisha-Yen Jones Professional Diploma in Performance, Millenium Performing Arts; 2002

Alice Berry-Gayle Master of Arts in Dance, State University of New York; 2003 Diploma in Dance Education, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts Bachelor of science in Dance, State University of New York; 1995

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Abeldo Gonzales Diploma, Consejo provincial Des Las Artes Escenias, Cuba; 2003

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Dennis Eckart Diploma, Republic of Brasil; 2003

Asha Giwa-Agbomereile Bachelor of Arts in Education (BAE) in Dance, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, 2008

Kay Anderson Master of Business Administration, University of West Indies; 2000 M.A. in Art Education Rhode Island, School of Design 1992

Henry Miller, Master Drummer

Shawna-Kae Burns Bachelor of Arts - Linguistics, University of the West Indies 2005

Sophia McKain Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Performance and Choreography in Dance, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, 2011; Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.), University of the West Indies, Mona, 2004

Marisa Benain Master of Arts - Education, London Metropolitan; 2009

Nadia Roxburgh Master of Arts (MA) in Theatre Practices, University of Manchester, UK, 2009

Melva Davids Master of Education , University of the West Indies; 2006 Post Graduate Diploma in Learning and Teaching of English and Literacy, University of London; 2005 Diploma in Sociology, University of West Indies; 1999 Bachelor of Education, University of the West Indies; 1996 Diploma in Teaching (Primary Education), Mico Teachers College; 1992

ACCOMPANISTS Sean Anderson Aesriah Barnett Kevan Douglas Oneil Green Jordache Jones Henry Miller Michael Morgan Kemoy Outar

Phylis Hemmings Master of Arts in Education, University of the West Indies; 1996 Bachelor of Education, University of the West Indies; 1986 Iris Mutiz BA Education, Felix Varela Higher Pedagogical Institute, Santa Clara, Cuba; Diploma in Spanish, Higher Education Institute of Arts, Havana, Cuba Nijer Henry Bachelor of Engineering; university of Technology, Jamaica 2004 Diploma; University of Technology, Jamaica 1995 Sylvia Green Master of Education; University of Technology, Jamaica 2011 Bachelor of Arts; University of the West Indies 1997 Diploma in Teaching; University of the West Indies 1989 Diploma in Sociology; University of the West Indies 1999

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Programmes BACHELOR OF ARTS IN DRAMA IN EDUCATION To qualify for the B.A. Drama in Education, full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 139 credits over four (4) years, as set out below.

CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

CREDITS

YEAR 2

CREDITS

Major

16

Major

19

General

12

General

9

Adjunct

2

Professional Education

7

Total

30

Electives -------------------Total

35

YEAR 3

CREDITS

YEAR 4

CREDITS

Major

22

Major

9

General

0

General

0

Professional Education

12

Professional Education

12

Teaching Practicum

15

Electives --------Total

34

Electives ---------------Total

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36


COURSE MENU YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TH101A

Western Theatre History I (Survey)

2

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

TT101A

Acting IA

3

TT202A

Voice & Speech IIA

2

TT102A

Voice & Speech IA

2

TE241A

Drama in Education IA

3

TT107A

Improvisation

2

GS203

Academic & Professional Writing

3

TT108A

Foundation of Dramatic Literature

0

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

TT203B

Production I

3

GS115

The Self: Ethics & Creativity

3

Electives

---------------------------

Electives

---------------------------------

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 2

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT101B

Acting IB

3

TT201B

Acting IIB

3

TT102B

Voice and Speech IB

2

TT202B

Voice & Speech IIB

2

TT109B

Textual Studies I

3

TE241B

Drama in Education IB

3

DP106B

Movement I

2

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

GS100B

Critical Thinking and

PE207

Psychology and Education

3

Expository Writing

2

PE203

Technology and Learning

3

GS114

Caribbean Culture & Identity

3

TT203B

Production I

3

GS105

Critical Thinking & Creative Insight

2

Electives

---------------------------------

Electives

---------------------------------

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT308A

Playwriting I

3

TE303B

Literature for Children

3

TT306A

Directing I

4

TE320B

Children’s Theatre Workshop

3

TE341A

Drama in Education IIA

3

TE341B

Drama in Education IIB

3

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

TE301A

The Professional Drama Teacher

3

TE243B

Theatre Crafts for the

TT311A

Caribbean Culture in Performance I

3

Electives

---------------------------------

3

School Production

3

TE311B

Caribbean Culture in Performance II

3

Electives

---------------------------------

YEAR 4

SEMESTER 2

YEAR 4

SEMESTER 1

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TE404A

Story Drama

3

PE400

Teaching Practice (Practicum)

15

PE403

Fundamentals of

PE402

Reflective Practice and

Education Administration

3

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

TE401A

Teaching CSEC Theatre Arts - Drama

3

Electives

---------------------------------

177

Action Research

3

TT407B

Cooperative Learning

1

Electives

---------------------------------

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BACHELOR OF ARTS IN DRAMA IN EDUCATION Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade Graduates who have successfully completed the Joint Board of Teacher Education (JBTE) Diploma in Drama in Education programme for the period 2004 to present will be required to complete a minimum of 42 credits towards the B.A. Drama in Education. Graduates who have successfully completed the JBTE Diploma in Drama in Education programme prior to 2004 will be required to submit their academic transcript for assessment. Each case will be treated individually for equivalences and applicants will be advised on their credit requirement for completion.

CREDIT STRUCTURE ONE YEAR

CREDITS

Specialisation

18

General Education

9

Professional Education

9

Electives

6

Total

42

COURSE MENU SEMESTER 1 CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT107A

Improvisation

2

TT306A

Directing I

4

TE401A

Teaching CSEC Theatre Arts -Drama

3

TE404A

Story Drama

3

GS203

Academic & Professional Writing

3

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

PE403

Fundamentals of Education Administration

3

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

Electives

---------------------------

6

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TE303B

Literature for Children

3

TT311A

Caribbean Culture in Performance II

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

PE402

Reflective Practices

3

SEMESTER 2

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BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS (ACTING TRACK) To qualify for the B.F. A. Theatre Arts full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 122 credits including 9 credits of electives over four (4) years, as set out below.

CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

CREDITS

YEAR 2

CREDITS

Major

18

Major

16

General

8

General

12

Adjunct

4

Adjunct

5

Electives ---------------------

Electives --------------

Total

30

Total

33

YEAR 3

CREDITS

YEAR 4

CREDITS

Major

21

Major

18

General

6

General

0

Adjunct

5

Adjunt

0

Electives --------------------Total

Electives 32

Total

18

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COURSE MENU YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

TH101A

Western Theatre History I (Survey)

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

2

TH101B

Western Theatre History II 2 (Survey)

TT101A

Acting IA

3

TT101B

Acting IB

3

TT102A

Voice and Speech IA

2

TT102B

Voice and Speech IB

2

TT107A

Improvisation

2

TT109B

Textual Studies I

3

TT108A

Foundations of Dramatic Literature

0

DP106B

Movement I

2

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Thinking & Expository 2 Writing

GS115

The Self: Ethics & Creativity

3

GS114

Caribbean Culture & Identity

GS105

Critical Thinking & Creative Insight

2

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

TT201B

Acting IIB

3

TT202A

Voice and Speech IIA

2

TT202B

Voice & Speech IIB

2

TT203A

Movement for Actors

2

TT204B

Theatre Society

TT209A

Textual Studies II

2

GS111

Information Technology

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

for Artist and Entrepreneurs

3

GS206E

Introduction to Philosophy

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

TT203B

Production I

3

TT208B

Movement for Actors II

2

TT203B

Production I

3

Electives

CREDITS

and

West

3

Indian 2

Electives YEAR 3

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT301A

Acting IIIA

3

TT203B

Production I

3

TT306A

Directing I

4

TT301B

Acting IIIB

3

TT311A

Caribbean Culture in Performance I

3

TT302B

Theatre & Development

3

One Design Course

2

TT311B

Caribbean Culture in Performance II

3

TT312A

Applied Drama and Theatre

2

GS107

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

Electives

---------------------------------

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

Electives

---------------------------------

YEAR 4

SEMESTER 2

YEAR 4

SEMESTER 1

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT403A

Musical Theatre

2

TT303B

Production II

3

TT404A

Internship-

TT410B

Independent Study II

3

TT410A

Independent Study I

3

TT407B

Cooperative Learning

1

TT304A

Devising Theatre

2

TT404A

Internship

4

Electives

---------------------------------

Electives

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180


BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade Graduates who have successfully completed the revised Diploma in Theatre Arts of 2005/2006 will be required to complete a minimum of 45 credits towards the B.F.A. Theatre Arts (Acting Track). Graduates who have successfully completed the Diploma in Theatre programme prior to 2005 will be required to submit their academic transcript for assessment. Each case will be treated individually for equivalences and applicants will be advised on their credit requirement for completion. This upgrade will take a minimum of three semesters. If a student begins this upgrade in the January – April Semester with a cohort of students (4 minimum) the earliest completion of the Independent Study can be achieved by the end of May of the following academic year (3 semester duration). If a student begins the upgrade in the August – December semester with a cohort of students (4 minimum) the earliest completion can be achieved by the end of May of the following academic year (4 Semester duration).

CREDIT STRUCTURE Three semesters

CREDITS

Major

18

General Education

9

Adjunct

9

Electives

9

Total

45

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COURSE MENU SEMESTER (Jan - May) CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

GS231B

College Math

3

GS111

Information Technology for Artists and Entrepreneurs

3

GS107

Gender and Caribbean Culture

3

TT204B

Theatre and West Indian Society

2

Electives

---------------------------

SEMESTER (Aug - Dec) CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT312A

Applied Drama and Theatre

2

TT403A

Musical Theatre

2

TT304A

Devising Theatre

2

TT404A

Internship

4

TT410A

Independent Study I

3

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy

3

Electives

---------------------------

SEMESTER (Jan - May) CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT302B

Theatre and Development

3

TT410B

Independent Study II

3

Electives

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BACHELOR OF ARTS IN DRAMA (EMCVPA/UWI) Students are provided with two options: 1. The Special in Drama which requires 18 credits In Drama/Theatre at EMCVPA per year/level(total 54 credits) or 2. The General in Drama/Theatre which requires 12 credits the completion in Drama/Theatre at EMCVPA per year/level(total 36 credits). COURSE MENU YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CR

CODE

COURSE

CR

THEA1006

Theatre History I

3

THEA1007

Theatre History II

3

THEA1110

Drama in Education I

3

THEA1107

Production I

3

THEA1301

Basic Acting Technique I

3

THEA1302

Basic Acting Technique II

3

THEA1401

Vocal Awareness & Deportment 3

THEA1402

Vocal Interpretation

3

THEA1501

Introduction to Set Design

THEA1502

Introduction to Costume

3

3

THEA 1200 Movement I YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

CODE

COURSE

THEA2206

3

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CR

Movement in Caribbean Folk 3 Forms

THEA2106

Production II

3

THEA2301

Acting Styles I

3

THEA2302

Acting Styles II

3

THEA2401

Vocal Performance I

3

THEA2402

Vocal Performance II

3

THEA2901

Writing Scenes, Skits and

THEA2902

Writing the Full Length Play

3

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CR

CR

One – Act Plays

3

YEAR 3

SEMESTER 1

CODE

COURSE

CR

THEA3101

Production III

3

THEA3301

Professional Acting I

3

THEA3302

Professional Acting II

3

THEA3303

Directing from Text to Stage

3

THEA3304

Directing the Actor

3

THEA3305

Community Drama I

3

THEA3306

Community Drama II

3

THEA3719

Caribbean Culture

Performance

in 3

THEA 3701 Independent Study

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ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS To qualify for the A.A. Theatre Arts full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 66 credits over two (2) years, as set out below.

CREDIT STRUCTURE YEAR 1

CREDITS

Major

18

General

8

Adjunct

4

Total

33

YEAR 2

CREDITS

Major

16

General

17

Total

33

COURSE MENU YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1

YEAR 1

SEMESTER 2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TH101A

Western Theatre History I

2

TH101B

Western Theatre History II

2

TT101A

Acting IA

3

TT101B

Acting IB

3

TT102A

Voice and Speech IA

2

TT102B

Voice and Speech IB

2

TT107A

Improvisation

2

TT109B

Textual Studies I

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

DP106B

Movement I

2

GS115

The Self: Ethics & Creativity

3

GS100B

Critical Thinking and

GS105

Critical Thinking & Creative Insight

2

TT108A

Foundations of Dramatic Literature

Expository Writing

2

GS114

Caribbean Culture & Identity

3

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 2

0

YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT201A

Acting IIB

3

TT201B

Acting IIB

3

TT202A

Voice and Speech IIB

2

TT202B

Voice and Speech IIB

2

TT203A

Movement for Actors I

2

TT204B

Theatre and West Indian Society 2

TT209B

Textual Studies II

2

GS111

Information Technology for

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy

3

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Artists and Entrepreneurs

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

TT208B

Movement for Actors II

2

TT203B

Production I

3


MINOR: DRAMA IN EDUCATION 18 credits (minimum) The minor in Drama in Education will involve theoretical instruction and practical exploration of methods of teaching drama and using drama as a teaching tool across the high school curriculum. Students will also be exposed to foundational professional education courses. In addition students will be required to select courses from a menu of specialized child drama courses that are geared to develop skills in creating material and productions for children.

The minor in Drama in Education will involve theoretical instruction and practical exploration of methods of teaching drama and using drama as a teaching tool across the high school curriculum. Students will also be exposed to foundational professional education courses. In addition students will be required to select courses from a menu of specialized child drama courses that are geared to develop skills in creating material and productions for children.

Minor - Drama in Education (For Majors BFA theatre Arts, BFA Performance and Choreography and BA Dance Education) a). Mandatory courses[electives transferable]: 18 credits CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TE241A

Drama in Education IA

3

TE241B

Drama in Education IB

3

TE341A

Drama in Education IIA

3

TE341B

Drama In Education IIB

3

TE320B

Children Theatre Workshop

3

TE303B

Literature for Children

3

Practicum: 60 hrs 1. Observation: [Linked to Drama in Education IB] 2. Team Teaching: 60 hrs [Linked to Drama in Education IIA and IIB]

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MINOR: THEATRE ARTS 18 credits (minimum) The Minor in Theatre Arts will provide exposure to some of the basic theoretical and practical demands of the process of creating theatre. This minor concentration will include courses that will treat the expressiveness of the student’s instrument, fundamentals of textual analysis and interpretation for stage as well as the ensemble process(on and off stage) from text to production.

FOR MAJORS IN BFA PERFORMANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY)

COURSE MENU

a).Major Courses in School of Dance that may be b). Other Mandatory courses [electives transferable] 10 credits transferred from major [4 Credits ] CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

DD403

Musical Theatre

4

TT101A

Acting IA

2

DP103A

Improvisation

4

TT101B

Acting IB

3

TT102A

Voice and Speech IA

2

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

c). Additional courses [electives transferable] to be selected from: CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT102B

Voice and Speech IB

2

TT202A

Voice and Speech IIA

2

TT202B

Voice and Speech IIB

2

TT203B

Production I

3

TT306

Directing I

4

TT201B

Acting IIB

3

TT401B

Acting for Screen and TV

3

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(For Majors in the BFA and BA - Schools of Music & Visual Arts) Mandatory Courses (electives transferable) CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT101A

Acting IA

3

TT101B

Acting IB

3

TT106A

Voice and Speech IA

2

CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT102B

Voice and Speech IB

2

TT107A

Improvisation

2

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

TT202A

Voice and Speech IIA

2

TT202B

Voice and Speech IIB

2

TT203A

Movement for Actors I

3

TT203B

Production I

3

TT403A

Musical Theatre

3

TT401B

Acting for Screen and TV

3

Other mandatory courses (electives transferable) TO be selected from: CODE

COURSE

CREDITS

TT102B

Voice and Speech IB

2

TT107A

Improvisation

2

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

TT202A

Voice and Speech IIA

2

TT202B

Voice and Speech IIB

2

TT203A

Movement for Actors I

3

TT203B

Production I

3

TT403A

Musical Theatre

3

TT401B

Acting for Screen and TV

3

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Course Catalog

BFA Theatre Arts: Acting Track Cohort starting (2012-2013) Yr

CODE

COURSE

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing 2 Skills

TT101A

Acting IA

3

TT101B

Acting IB

3

TH101A

Western Theatre History I (Survey)

2

TH101B

Western Theatre History II (Survey)

2

GS104A

Caribbean History Culture & Aesthetics I 2

GS104B

Caribbean History Culture & Aesthetics 2 II

TT102A

Voice & Speech IA

2

TT102B

Voice & Speech IB

2

DP106A

Movement I

2

DP206B

Movement II

2

TT107A

Improvisation

2

TT109B

Textual Studies I (Dramatic Literature)

2

TT108A

Foundations of Dramatic Literature

0

1

15 Yr

2

CR

TOTAL 30

15

CODE

COURSE

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

TOTAL

TT209A

Textual Studies II

2

TT202B

Voice & Speech IIB

2

33

GS102A

Introduction to Spanish I

2

TT204B

Theatre & West Indian Society

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy

3

TT201B

Acting IIB

3

GS106A

Ethics Creativity & Self I

2

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II

2

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

GS231B

College Math

3

TT202A

Voice & Speech IIA

2

GS106B

Ethics Creativity & Self II

2

TT203A

Movement for Actors

2

GS103B

Information Technology for Artist & 3 Entrepreneurs

ELECTIVE 16 Yr

17

CODE

COURSE

SEMESTER II

CR

TOTAL

TT207A

Culture & Community Development or 2 Managing Community Arts

CR CODE TT309B

Intro to Cultural Studies or Intro to Performance Studies or Gender and Caribbean Culture

3

31

TT306A

Directing I

4

TT305B TT311B

Intro to West Indian Drama or Caribbean Culture in Perfor. II

2 3

TT301A

Acting IIIA

3

TT203B

Production I

3

One Design Course

2

GS203E

Performance Research Forum

3

Caribbean Culture in Performance I

3

TT301B

Acting IIIB

3

TT204B

Theatre & Development

3

3

TT311A

ELECTIVE 14

17

Yr

CODE

COURSE

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

TOTAL

4

TT402A

Independent Study I

-

TT402B

Independent Study II

6

18

TT403A

Musical Theatre

2

TT303B

Production II

3

TT404A

Internship

4

TT401B

Acting for Screen & Television

3

ELECTIVE

ELECTIVE 6

12

Electives: 9 credits

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BFA Theatre Arts: Acting Track Cohort Starting (2013/2014) Yr

CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

TOTAL CR

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing

2

32

TT101A

Acting IA

3

TT101B

Acting IB

3

TH101A

Western Theatre History I (Survey)

2

TH101B

Western Theatre History II (Survey)

2

GS104A

Caribbean History Culture & Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History Culture & Aesthetics II

2

TT102A

Voice & Speech IA

2

TT102B

Voice & Speech IB

2

TT107A

Improvisation

2

DP106A Movement I

2

TT108A

Foundations of Dramatic Literature

0

TT109B

Text. Stud. I (Dram Lit)

2

GS106A

Ethics Creativity and Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics Creativity and Self II

2

15

17

Yr

CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

TOTAL CR

2

TT209A

Textual Studies II

2

TT202B

Voice & Speech IIB

2

29

GS102A

Introduction to Spanish I

2

TT204B

Theatre & West Indian Society

2

GS206E

Introduction to Philosophy

3

TT201B

Acting IIB

3

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

GS102B

Introduction to Spanish II

2

TT202A

Voice & Speech IIA

2

GS231B

College Math

3

TT203A

Movement for Actors I

2

GS111

Information Technology for Artist & Entrepreneurs

3

ELECTIVE 14

15

Yr

CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

TOTAL CR

3

TT207A

Culture & Comm. Development

2

GS107

Gender and Caribbean Culture

3

31

TT306A

Directing I

4

TT311B

Carib. Culture in Perfor. II

3

TT301A TT311A

Acting IIIA

3

TT203B

Production I

3

One Design Course

2

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

Caribbean Culture in Performance I

3

TT301B

Acting IIIB

3

TT302B

Theatre & Development

3

ELECTIVE 14

1718

Yr

CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

TOTAL CR

4

TT410A

Independent Study I

3

TT410B

Independent Study II

3

18

TT403A

Musical Theatre

2

TT303B

Production II

3

Internship

4

TT401B

Acting for Screen & Television

3

TT404A

ELECTIVE

ELECTIVE 9

Electives: 9 credits

9

Minor: 18 credits (ARTS)

189

23 credits (DIE)

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BA Drama in Education Cohort Starting(2012-2013) CODE

Year I: Semester I

CR

CODE

Year I: Semester II

CR

TT102A

Voice & Speech IA

2

TT102B

Voice & Speech IB

2

TT101A

Acting IA

3

TT101A

Acting I B

3

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing Skills

2

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture II

2

LA141GE Fundamentals of English GS104A

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture I

2

GS104B

TH101A

Western Theatre History I

2

TT109B

Textual Studies I

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity & Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity & Self II

2

TT106A

Movement I

2

TT107A

Improvisation

2

Total Cr.

17

Total Cr.

13

Year II: Semester I

Year II: Semester II

TE241A

Drama in Education IA

3

TE241B

Drama in Education IB

3

TT202A

Voice & Speech IIA

2

TT202B

Voice & Speech IIB

2

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

TT201B

Acting IIB

3

ED243GE Technology and Learning

3

PE205

Teacher School and Society

2

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

PE204

Emergent Teacher

2

TE242B

Designing The School Production

3

GS203

Academic Writing

3

Total Cr.

19

ELECTIVE Total Cr.

Year III: Semester I

16 Year III: Semester II

TE341A

Drama in Education IIA

3

TE341B

Drama in Education IIB

3

TT308A

Playwriting I

3

TE303B

Literature for Children

3

TT306A

Directing I

4

PE303

Trend, Issues & Perspectives in Ed.

3

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

PE202

Understanding the Learner

3

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

TE320B

Children Theatre Workshop

3

TT203B

Production I

3

ELECTIVE Total Cr.

ELECTIVE

16

Total Cr.

Year IV: Semester I

18 Year IV: Semester II

PE401

The Practical Researcher

3

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research

3

PE301

Philosophies and Prac in Arts Ed.

3

PE400

Teaching Practice [Practicum]

15

PE302

Introduction to Ed. Administration

3

TT311B

Caribbean Culture in Performance II

3

TT311A

Caribbean Culture in Performance I

3

TE404A

Story Drama

3

ELECTIVE

ELECTIVE Total Cr.

15

Total Cr.

Electives: 6 credits

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21


BA Drama in Education Cohort Starting [2013/2014] CODE

Year I: Semester I

CR

CODE

Year I: Semester II

CR

TT102A

Voice & Speech IA

2

TT102B

Voice & Speech IB

2

TT101A

Acting IA

3

TT101B

Acting I B

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing

2

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Aesthetics and Culture II

2

GS104A TH101A

Western Theatre History I

2

TT109B

Textual Studies I

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity & Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity & Self II

2

TT107A

Improvisation

2

DP106B

Movement I

2

TT108A

Foundations of Dramatic Literature

0

Total Cr.

15

Total Cr.

15

Year II: Semester I

Year II: Semester II

TE241A

Drama in Education IA

3

TE241B

Drama in Education IB

3

TT202A

Voice & Speech IIA

2

TT202B

Voice & Speech IIB

2

TT201A

Acting IIA

3

TT201B

Acting IIB

3

PE203

Technology and Learning

3

PE205

Teacher School and Society

2

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

GS231B

College Mathematics

3

PE204

Emergent Teacher

2

TE242B

Designing The School Production

3

GS203

Academic Writing

3

Total Cr.

19

ELECTIVE Total Cr.

Year III: Semester I

16 Year III: Semester II

TE341A

Drama in Education IIA

3

TE341B

Drama in Education IIB

3

TT308A

Playwriting I

3

TE303B

Literature for Children

3

TT306A

Directing I

4

PE303

Trend, Issues & Perspectives in Ed.

3

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

PE202

Understanding the Learner

3

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

TE320B

Children Theatre Workshop

3

TT203B

Production I

3

ELECTIVE

ELECTIVE

Total Cr.

16

Total Cr.

PE401

The Practical Researcher

3

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research

3

PE301

Philosophies and Prac in Arts Ed.

3

PE400

Teaching Practice [Practicum]

15

PE302

Introduction to Ed. Administration

3

TT311B

Caribbean Culture in Performance II

3

TT311A

Caribbean Culture in Performance I

3

TE404A

Story Drama

3

Year IV: Semester I

18 Year IV: Semester II

ELECTIVE

ELECTIVE Total Credit Electives: Minor:

15

Total Credit

21

6 credits 18 credits (ARTS) 23 credits (DIE)

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Course Descriptions TH101A 2 Credits Western Theatre History I (Survey) In this course students will be engaged in a survey of the philosophical, historical and political developments of the evolving movements of western theatre tradition, and how these have informed the aesthetic manifestation of the play, the production and the performance.

practical exercises and games the student will work on developing the quality of voice production and listening skills focusing on strengthening the use of voice and language. This semester will go more deeply into the work with connected speech and will focus on practical elements in order to enhance the sense of the words.

TT104A 2 Credits Introduction to Set Design TH101B This course will introduce students to general skills and 2 Credits approaches in Set Design. They will develop creative Western Theatre History II (Survey) (Pre-Requisite: TH101A) processes and design concepts through text analysis and Through a survey of the significant philosophical, political and visual metaphors. Visual communication of concepts will be historical movements/developments that have influenced developed through visual tools of model-making, technical western theatre from the renaissance to the nineteenth rendering, storyboard production and drawings. century this course provides an over-view of the manifestation of these essential ideas in theatrical representation. TT105A 2 Credits TT101A Acting for Non-Majors I 3 Credits This course will introduce students to general skills and Acting 1A This course is designed to enable liberation of the students’ approaches in Set Design. They will develop creative instrument and spontaneous expressivity through processes and design concepts through text analysis and improvisation and theatre games. The course will take the visual metaphors. Visual communication of concepts will be students through a progressive process of exploration and developed through visual tools of model-making, technical discovery while building trust and group dynamics. rendering, storyboard production and drawings. TT101B 3 Credits Acting IB (Pre-Requisite:TT101A) This course develops on the work done on liberation, spontaneity and awareness in the previous semester and introduces the student to the fundamentals of approaching a character. Students are introduced to basics of transferring spontaneous impulse into a scripted role. TT102A 2 Credits Voice and Speech 1A The course explores the richness of spoken language in both the dialect and standard forms without prejudice. It recognizes that students whose first language is West Indian Creole (WIC) have particular difficulty in attempting to speak effectively in Standard English (SE), because of differences between the two forms of communication. In view of the importance, however, in the West Indian situation, of being bi-lingual, the course aims to address this difficulty. TT102B 2 Credits Voice and Speech IB (Pre-Requisite:TT102A) This course continues with the regular exercises to strengthen and enrich vocal energy connected with text work. Through TABLE OF CONTENTS

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TT105B 2 Credits Acting for Non-Majors II This course will introduce students to general skills and approaches in Set Design. They will develop creative processes and design concepts through text analysis and visual metaphors. Visual communication of concepts will be developed through visual tools of model-making, technical rendering, storyboard production and drawings. TT106A 2 Credits Voice and Speech for Non-Majors I This course will introduce students to general skills and approaches in Set Design. They will develop creative processes and design concepts through text analysis and visual metaphors. Visual communication of concepts will be developed through visual tools of model-making, technical rendering, storyboard production and drawings. TT106B 2 Credits Voice and Speech for Non-Majors II This course will introduce students to general skills and approaches in Set Design. They will develop creative


processes and design concepts through text analysis and visual metaphors. Visual communication of concepts will be developed through visual tools of model-making, technical rendering, storyboard production and drawings. TT107A 2 Credits Improvisation This course will be centred on exploring the internal resources of performance. Students explore through theatrical games how to interact with a partner and to solve alone and ingroup, different dramatic situations. They will be asked to solve on the spot and in action scenarios that convey different conflicts between: characters- space, space-objects, physical obstacles-space, objects-situations, etc. TT107B 2 Credits Introduction to Costume Design This course will examine the psychology of clothes in everyday life in relation to the character in performance. Creative processes and design concepts will develop through text analysis, character analysis and visual metaphors. TT108A 0 Credit Foundations of Dramatic Literature In this course students will learn to use their critical thinking to ascertain meaning and understanding from text at the literal and inferential levels. They will become familiar with basic literary terms and be able to identify and comment on their impact in given scripts. TT108B 2 Credits Introduction to Lighting Design This involves lectures, visits to theatres and hands-on activity in which students will be exposed to the basic mechanisms of electricity, the aesthetic elements of lighting, basic equipment and processes of interpreting lighting from a dramatic text. They will also examine possibilities of using inexpensive and available materials. TT109B 3 Credits Textual Studies I In this course, students will focus on how to read, comprehend and critically analyze a literary/artistic text for its aesthetic and dramatic value. Becoming familiar, understanding and using important literary terms and concepts will be part of the discipline of the analytical process being developed. TT110B 2 Credits Graduation Production In this course, students will focus on how to read, comprehend and critically analyze a literary/artistic text for its aesthetic 193

and dramatic value. Becoming familiar, understanding and using important literary terms and concepts will be part of the discipline of the analytical process being developed. TT201A 3 Credits Acting IIA (Pre-Requisite:TT101B) In this course instrumental liberation and nurturing of spontaneity is continued, while focusing on the shift to interpretation of role. Through continued use of theatre games, improvisation and the application of the techniques of the Stanislavsky’s Method, students will be engaged in the transformative process of delineating character in realistic/ naturalistic drama. TT201B 3 Credits Acting IIB (Pre-Requisite: TT201A) This course develops on the principles established in the previous semester--The Stanislavsky method for acting realism/naturalism, along with ‘outside in’ approaches to building a character. Much emphasis will be placed on rigorous physical dilation and imaginative expressiveness of the body. This will be integrated with work on the discovery and use of energy through structured breathing techniques. Students will be exposed to more challenging texts from among the modern classics of the genre with an intensified focus on playing the complexity of inner action, space/ environment, use of objects and the aesthetic corporeal demands of a role. TT202A 2 Credits Voice and Speech IIA (Pre-Requisite:TT102B) This course is designed to give students of theatre a fundamental grasp of how the human voice may be manipulated for use in performance and presentation. It advances the knowledge and skill acquired in voice and speech IA and IB. The exploration of various linguistic patterns and the dynamics of language use in social, professional and creative contests will take major focus. Additionally students will be exposed to the process of engaging and developing the voice as a communicative tool, from a personal as well as instructional perspective. TT202B 2 Credits Voice and Speech IIB (Pre-Requisite:TT202A) This course will consolidate and advance the techniques (the art and science) of vocal presentation. Specific attention will be paid to analysis of texts, the use of the voice as a motivational tool and the management of teaching strategies. Students will be guided through the process of recognizing TABLE OF CONTENTS

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and executing particular genres of vocal performance and the diversity of speech styles. TT203B 3 Credits Production I This course involves the mounting of a major student production process directed by a member of the faculty or a guest director. Students registered for the course are engaged as members of the cast, stage manager or senior member of the technical crew. The education process begins with auditions and continues through the process of rehearsals and performances, culminating with the summary evaluation where the relevant course lecturers in acting, voice and speech and movement are required to participate. TT204A 2 Credits Stage Management This course is designed to help students to become aware of the dramatic uses of the body, and to understand the body’s limitations and possibilities. TT204B 2 Credits Theatre and West Indian Society This course is designed to help students to become aware of the dramatic uses of the body, and to understand the body’s limitations and possibilities. TT209A 2 Credits Textual Studies II This course will involve critical examination of the philosophies, movements and aesthetic principles that have characterised significant 20th Century theatre styles and how they have been realised through the idiosyncratic perspectives of some of the leading playwrights and directors of the period.

develop their skills as Drama in Education Specialists. It will enable them to use drama as a method of integration across the curriculum through process drama. It will also prepare them to teach the theatre arts based curriculum, use drama to teach literary text and understand the role that drama plays in developing the total individual. TT203A 2 Credits MOVEMENT FOR ACTORS I This course is designed to help students to become aware of the dramatic uses of the body, to understand the body’s limitations and possibilities, to develop the actor’s physical expressivity, and to develop a consciousness of the relationships between the actor and the playing space and the other members of the ensemble TT203B 2 Credits MOVEMENT FOR ACTORS II This course is designed to help students to focus and tune the general movement vocabulary and skills sets learned in the previous course into clear physical dramaturgy to be used to clarify the actors’ expressivity on the stage, or in any other theatrical constructs. . TT301A 3 Credits Acting IIIA (Pre-Requisite:TT201B) Realism/naturalism is exposed in this course to the more demanding techniques of classic poetic drama with specific focus on the demands of working in a choral ensemble. Using classic Greek texts, other cultural texts as well as contemporary Caribbean classic ritualistic texts, the course will focus on the generative source of the ritual action that is manifested through the chorus and the protagonists and the technique of ensemble playing that is being demanded.

TE241A 3 Credits Drama in Education IA This course is fundamental to the development of all students of Theatre Arts who may elect to teach drama in a studio, community or classroom. It will introduce students to a variety of drama strategies and the philosophies and practices of well known drama advocates. It will also provide the opportunity for students to examine the philosophies and practices of well known educator and show how their beliefs underpin the teaching and learning of Drama.

TT301B 3 Credits Acting IIIB (Pre-Requisite: TT301A) This course serves to extend the exploration of Caribbean performance signifiers while consolidating and diversifying the students’ grasp of the demands of postcolonial circumAtlantic drama, using the Brechtian model of performance as a launching pad and theoretical base for a culturally affirming method of acting.

TE241B 3 Credits Drama in Education IB (Pre-Requisite:TE241A) This course will provide the opportunity for students to

TT302B 3 Credits Theatre and Development (PREREQUISITE: TT312A) This course is conceptualized on the basis of a perceived need for an approach that integrally involves the arts as a tool to

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promote social development. Theatre as an art that examines the human and social condition is aptly poised to play such a role. The course approaches this concept from an analysis of political and social structures in Jamaica and related concepts of citizenship and community development. It investigates how theatre can be used as a practical tool to empower individuals and achieve social change. The course requires the creation and conduction of a final project incorporating these concepts. TE303B 3 Credits Literature for Children This course has been developed to give teachers the opportunity to analyze, explore, create and understand various elements of literature and apply these when developing and teaching literature at different levels of education. TT303B 3 Credits Production II (PRE-REQUISITE TT203B) This course involves the mounting of a major student production process directed by a member of the faculty or a guest director. Students registered for the course are engaged as members of the cast, stage manager or senior member of the technical crew. The education process begins with auditions and continues through the process of rehearsals and performances, culminating with the summary evaluation where the relevant course lecturers in acting, voice and speech and movement are required to participate.

innovations and reforms through the use of drama strategies and conventions that will create and sustain participatory, student centred school cultures. TE243B 3 Credits THEATRE CRAFTS FOR THE SCHOOL PRODUCTION Each 3 hour class period is broken down into two segments. The first hour or segment is devoted to a lecture/discussion of various internationally approved stage technology procedures and practices. The remaining two hours or second segment is devoted to reinforcing the topic of the day by “hands on” projects relating to the implementation of design aspects for Drama School productions completed in Drama School shops and labs. Students must come to class dresses appropriately for the work being done on that day. TT305B 3 Credits Introduction to West Indian Drama This course has been developed to give teachers the opportunity to analyze, explore, create and understand various elements of literature and apply these when developing and teaching literature at different levels of education.

TT306A 4 Credits Directing I (PRE-REQUISITE: TT109B) This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of the theatre directors’ art. Students will be provided with a TE301A model for approaching textual analysis as director, as well as 3 Credits some basic techniques in director –actor communication. In THE PROFESSIONAL DRAMA TEACHER the process of doing scene work, basic stage composition and PRE-REQUISITE TE214A &B) the function of the floor plan as a creative instrument will Today’s school face numerous challenges as the society also be dealt with. becomes increasingly complex and technologically based. In addition drama teachers are being asked to use their craft TT306B to educate diverse students. This course therefore seeks to 4 Credits examine the obligations and responsibilities that teachers Directing II have toward students and society and the relationships that (PRE-REQUISITE: TT306A) exist and ought to exist among teachers on a whole, the This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of school and society. the theatre directors’ art. Students will be provided with a model for approaching textual analysis as director, as well as It will furnish Student teachers with an understanding of the some basic techniques in director –actor communication. In culture of schools and the varying factors that affect school the process of doing scene work, basic stage composition and cultures. It will help student teachers of Drama to develop the function of the floor plan as a creative instrument will an understanding of the major roles and responsibilities also be dealt with. they are expected to assume in carrying out their duty as a teacher. They will also be encouraged to envisage the roles they can play as agents of change and how best they can become involved in the implementation of curriculum

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TT308A 3 Credits Playwriting I This course Introduces students to the fundamentals of playwriting, and teaching the writing of skits and short plays (10 - 20 minutes long.) TT308B 3 Credits Playwriting II (Pre-Requisite: TT308A) In this course students build on fundamentals of playwriting taught In Playwriting I and learn how to write the long play (60 minutes to full length). TT311A 3 Credits Caribbean Culture in Performance i This course involves the mounting of a major student production process directed by a member of the faculty or a guest director. Students registered for the course are engaged as members of the cast, stage manager or senior member of the technical crew. The education process begins with auditions and continues through the process of rehearsals and performances, culminating with the summary evaluation where the relevant course lecturers in acting, voice and speech and movement are required to participate. TT311B 3 Credits Caribbean Culture in Performance II (Pre-Requisite:TT311A)
In this course students will explore theoretically and practically three models for employing selected cultural forms of the region to generate playmaking, playwriting and production concepts as playwrights and directors. TE320B 3 Credits Children Theatre Workshop This course is a laboratory type experience in which student teachers will be exposed to two types of theatrical opportunities geared toward Educating and Entertaining children at all levels. In the first opportunity the teacher will be required to “put on the shoes” of the children as they experiment, explore, imagine and create theatre in a casual way. The second opportunity will be more challenging as they will be working at developing and improving valuable skills and strategies necessary for production of theatre of a high standard. TE341A 3 Credits Drama in Education IIA (Pre-Requisite: TE241B) This course is regarded as the major component of the education core course for the Drama in Education Specialist, TABLE OF CONTENTS

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therefore, it is specifically designed to further equip teachers with the knowledge, attitude and skills required to plan and teach drama as a subject in its own rights, drawing from its own body of knowledge which is obtained from theatre and theatre arts. TE341B 3 Credits Drama in Education IIB (Pre-Requisite: TE341A) This course will enable students to focus on understanding the roles and responsibilities of the Drama Educator in the changing society. They will be afforded the opportunity to develop their own theory and practice of Drama teaching. It will also provide the opportunity for students to obtain vicarious or hands on experiences. TT401B 3 Credits Acting for Screen and Television This course introduces students to specific film and television acting techniques including script analysis techniques, practical scene study while working from their own reality and personal history. Students will begin applying themselves to interpretation of produced texts- reaching into a world outside of their personal experiences. They will also be introduced to working with the microphone and camera TT310 3 Credits Production III (Pre-Requisite: TT101B) This course involves the mounting of a major student production process directed by a member of the faculty or a guest director. Students registered for the course are engaged as members of the cast, stage manager or senior member of the technical crew. The education process begins with auditions and continues through the process of rehearsals and performances, culminating with the summary evaluation where the relevant course lecturers in acting, voice and speech and movement are required to participate. TT403A 2 Credits Musical Theatre This course will explore the techniques required for understanding and performing in musical theatre through the exploration of characters in musical theatre scenes. This will be done within the context of a survey of the history of musical theatre in the Caribbean and elsewhere, examination of song and the relationship to the singer, the demand on the musical theatre actor as well as text and verse analysis. TE404A 3 Credits Story Drama This course will provide the opportunity for students at the


undergrad level to employ the use of one of the world’s oldest art form in their teaching. The course is divided into four units which are geared towards providing hands on experience for students.

Students will be required to research, create and perform an original solo-dramatic piece (Duration 50-60 minutes)based on issues and a statement that the student wants to address as an artist; through critical research. Students will have to create or develop literary/plastic, etc. materials that they will TT407B work on through the process. The completed project /study 1 Credit will include a written research component and an audiovisual recording of the performance. COOPERATIVE LEARNING Cooperative learning is a production related category of training in which students will be exposed to supplementary TT304A processes and develop necessary support skills for the 2 Credits mounting and presentation of a production. This is a DEVISING THEATRE mandatory requirement of each student of the School of Students will be engaged in the process of researching, devising, writing and staging a performance piece that gives political credence Drama. Students will be awarded one credit for 3 units of to the notion that each individual is a thinking creative being able work done across the following areas during their four years to bring maximum benefits to the collective. The intention is to of study: encourage a democratised model of perspectives and dramaturgical PE400 15 Credits TEACHING PRACTICE (PRACTICUM) (Pre-Requisite: TE241B) This course is regarded as the major component of the education core course for the Drama in Education Specialist, therefore, it is specifically designed to further equip teachers with the knowledge, attitude and skills required to plan and teach drama as a subject in its own rights, drawing from its own body of knowledge which is obtained from theatre and theatre arts.

options that challenge the conventional model of the illustrious playwright as the voice of the people and to spotlight contemporary issues from the point of view of the student and the audience.

TE401A 3 CREDITS TEACHING CSEC THEATRE ARTS- DRAMA The course is designed to provide the fourth year Drama in Education student with the laboratory and frame-work to aid in the effective delivery of CSEC Theatre Arts with focus on Drama. The student will be given the opportunity to participate in various practical demonstration of methodology used by experienced teacher of this examination. Field trips to schools to observed best practices, observing an episode of the school base assessment and scheme of grading will also be in cooperated in the course.

TT404A 4 Credits INTERNSHIP Internship is a significant component of the BFA programme, which will involve observation and practice while being assigned to a professional private or public organization. In practice the student is expected to be engaged in theatre related activity that enhances their appreciation of the professional environment and allows for personal ethical development. TT402A 3 Credits INDEPENDENT STUDY I Students will be required to research, create and perform an original solo-dramatic piece based on issues and a statement that the student wants to address as an artist; through critical research. Duration 50-60 Minutes.Students will have to create or develop literary/plastic, etc. materials that they will work on through the process. The completed project /study will include a written research component and an audiovisual recording of the performance. TT402B 3 Credits INDEPENDENT STUDY II (PRE-REQUISITE: TT402A) 197

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Faculty Elizabeth Montoya Stemann Bachelor of Science, Libre Theatre of Bogota Foundation; 1973 Post Graduate Diploma in Voice Studies, Central School of Speech and Drama; 1998

Eugene Williams Director Master of Fine Arts in Television Production, Brooklyn College; 1990 Master of Arts in Performance Studies, New York University; 2003 Diploma in Drama in Education and Theatre Arts, School of Drama; 1981 Pierre Lemaire Assistant Director Bachelor of Arts in Language and Literature (Teaching Level), University of Paris; 1977

Carolyn Allen Master of Arts, University of the West Indies; 89

Janet Muirhead Stewart Bachelor of Science in Theatre, State University of New York; 2001 Diploma in Education, Edna Manley College; 1997

Robert Clarke Diploma, Jamaica School of Drama; 1983 Trevor Nairne Diploma – Mico Teacher’s College Diploma – School of Drama, Edna Manley College (Cultural Training Centre)

Cecile Dixon Mattis Master of Arts in Drama in Education, University of Central England; 1998 Diploma in Drama in Education, School of Drama; 1989 Diploma in Primary Education, Shortwood Teachers’ College; 1978 Bachelor of Education, University of the West Indies; 1994

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Alude Mahali PhD Performance/Cultural Studies University of Cape Town 2014 Master of Arts Theatre Making University of Cape Town 2009 Bachelor of Arts with Honours- Rhodes University 2007

Coretta Brown-Johnson PhD Clinical Psychology, Walden University, Minnesota, USA; Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology, Walden University, Minnesota USA Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Psychology, International University of the Caribbean Diploma in Dance Education, Edna Manley College

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Policies Specific To Music Programmes PRACTICAL EXAMINATIONS

Students enrolled in performance and music education programmes are required to do a performance examination (jury) on their principal instrument and second instrument at the end of each semester. The jury panel will determine the level of performance, grade the performance, and submit a written evaluation that will be included in the student’s file. Students who fail the juried examination will be placed on probation. Students who fail two consecutive juries will be suspended from the programme. On their return after the suspension, if the student fails the jury on their next attempt, they will be dismissed from the programme of study. Students are required to perform at the appropriate level of competence as established by the Music faculty, and may perform required recitals/concerts only after attaining the appropriate jury levels.

CONCERT ATTENDANCE POLICY

All music majors are required to attend a number of professional concerts and recitals each semester in order to maintain good standing in the School. Failure to meet the requirements of this policy can result in probation and suspension.

LUNCH HOUR CONCERT

All music majors are required to perform on his/her principal instrument in a Lunch Hour Concert once per semester. First year students will be exempt from performing in their first semester only. The student’s attendance, stage deportment and performance will factor in the grade awarded for the principal instrument study each semester.

THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR CONCERTS

Music Education Majors are required to successfully perform a short solo recital (20 - 30 minutes of music) when registered for Principal Instrument VI (Semester 6). Performance Majors must satisfactorily complete a short recital (30 - 40 minutes) in the third year (Semester 6) and a full recital in the final year (Semester 8). The final recital, 50 minutes of music, must include at least 40 minutes of solo performance. All recitals must show a range of performance pieces demonstrating a variety of historical styles, technical competence and strong musicianship. If a student fails the performance, he/she will be allowed to repeat the course only once. The student is required to change the entire repertoire used in the previous recital/concert. A student will be dismissed from the programme if he/she fails the same recital level twice. Refer to the Principal Instrument curricula for the full requirements and scheme of assessment. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Performance majors who specialize in Contemporary Music Studies must also take a contemporary music jury each semester and a classical jury during the second semester of their first two years only. Classical studies are not required beyond semester four for Contemporary Music Studies majors, however, they are expected to pass the required levels in both the jazz and classical juries prior to performing their third year concert. Contemporary Music Studies students should demonstrate their ability to Interpret, improvise, and arrange their pieces and the repertoire should be chosen under the guidance of their Principal Instrument instructor. The student will be graded on their technical competence, accuracy, musicianship, stage deportment and overall execution.

INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL LESSON POLICY

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Music, the Bachelor of Music Education and the Associate of Arts degree are required to enroll for private (individual) instruction in their principal instrument each semester until the requirements have been fulfilled. Individual instruction in voice or an instrument will attract an additional fee per semester. Students are given weekly instrumental lessons with an instructor who guides the student in developing technique, musicianship and style in support of the curriculum goals.

PRINCIPAL INSTRUMENT STUDIES

In the first two years of study, instrumental students who specialize in Contemporary Music Studies should divide their 12 credit hours of principal instrumental studies between classical studies and contemporary music studies in brass, woodwinds, guitar, piano, bass, or percussion, by taking the following: • a 45-minute lesson in jazz/pop studies each week each semester and • a 30-minute lesson in classical studies each week each semester A Contemporary Music Studies student whose primary instrument is voice, electric guitar or electric bass may elect to take the following: • a 45-minute lesson in contemporary music each week in each semester and • a 30-minute lesson in classical music each week in each semester OR • a 60-minute lesson in contemporary music each week in each semester


All music majors who study a Second Instrument will receive a 30-minute lesson each week each semester for one credit hour. They are required to take a jury at the end of each semester.

the Independent Study course provides final year music students an opportunity to explore an area of music of their choice through in-depth research and analysis. This exploration culminates in an extensive written document. The students have an opportunity to develop a historical question based upon a topic of their choice, conduct research and write their findings in an extensive paper. The student is expected to meet regularly (weekly) with her/ his project supervisor for guidance in the research and writing process. Hence the student is expected to work independently to complete an extensive research paper of 4,500 – 5,500 words on the topic of their choice. The student’s final paper must include a fair amount of musical analysis relevant to the topic.

APPLIED MUSIC (OPTIONAL)

MASTER CLASS & PERFORMANCE LAB

In years three and four, the Contemporary Music Studies students are required to take 60-minute lessons each week each semester on their principal instrument only. All other Performance and Music Education majors are required to take a 60-minute lesson on their principal instrument each week in each semester.

SECOND INSTRUMENT STUDIES (OPTIONAL)

This course is designed for music majors and non-majors who qualify by an audition process for instrumental or vocal lessons. The student should be at an intermediate level on their instrument or voice. This is an individual lesson that can be repeated for credit. There are two types of Applied Music lessons: • •

a 60-minute lesson each week – Two (2) credits per semester (MP131) a 30-minute lesson in each week – One (1) credit per semester (MP132)

Students are required to practice a minimum of six (6) hours a week in each semester. Students will receive guidelines or a course outline at the beginning of each semester.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Our graduates are expected to contribute to the documentation, analysis and development of musical culture and history, particularly within the Jamaican and Caribbean context, although not limited to it. To this end,

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The Master Class is a compulsory class in which students develop performance techniques and critical thinking. Students will have the opportunity to perform and critique themselves and each other in a large group setting. The Performance Lab is required for all third and fourth year students who specialize in Contemporary Music Studies. Students will be given the basics on lead sheet preparation and microphone technique, audio terminology, show planning and how to work with other musicians and stage crew. These classes are conducted by lecturers from the department who assists students to develop musicianship, technique, interpretive skills and overall stage presentation.

TEACHING PRACTICUM

All Music Education students are required to undergo supervised classroom teaching at specific points during the programme. This will take place in the form of teaching observation and at least two opportunities for classroom teaching internship, which are supervised by the Music Education specialists. Performance majors are required to undergo supervised studio teaching after completing studies in Literature and Pedagogy of their Principal Instrument. This will be supervised by a specialist from the Performance Studies department.

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HONOURS RECITAL

The School of Music sponsors an annual Honours Recital which highlights and recognizes outstanding soloists In the School. It also celebrates the diversity of genres and instruments taught at the institution. The School of Music will publish dates for entry, audition and recital on the Academic Calendar. 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

6.

7.

All School of Music students registered in a full time programme, years 1 – 4, are eligible for auditions. Only the top six (6) to eight (8) performers from the auditions will perform at the Honours Recital. The adjudicators will determine this. Persons who have participated in previous Honours Recitals are still eligible to audition. The Honours Recital is for soloists. Accompaniment must be no more than four (4) performers. Students may audition only after their piece and their readiness has been assessed and approved by their principal instrument teacher. Entrants’ selected works must be at least four (4) minutes and no longer than ten (10) minutes. The auditionee may select more than one piece in order to meet the minimum time limit. Suitable genres include arias, songs, concerti (piano accompaniment), folk, jazz, reggae, pop, etc. are allowed.

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8. The music must be memorized for both the auditions and the recital. 9. Any contestant who is unable to attend their scheduled auditions for any reason will be disqualified. 10. Students must provide three (3) copies of their musical selection for jury members at least two (2) days before their audition. 11. The grading scheme for auditions is as follows: a. Accuracy & Technique (30): Correct Notes, Expression Marks, Steadiness of Beat, Time Values/ Rhythm, Tempo; Hand Position, Fingering, Pedal, Sticking-Musicianship (70 points): Articulation, Phrasing, Balance, Tone, Dynamics, Memory, Interpretation/Style 12. The performance should have a sense of assuredness, be persuasive, communicative and intuitive, and demonstrate artistic integrity and technical command in all areas of the performance. 13. The results of the auditions will be announced within two (2) days of the final audition. 14. The decisions of the jury members are final. 15. The Honours Recital will be open to the public and it is a paid event for the benefit of the College. 16. There is no monetary reward for participating in the auditions or the Honours Recital. 17. This Honours Award will become a permanent part of your academic record.


BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE The Bachelor of Music in performance is used as the overarching title for all degrees that have a performance emphasis. The performance degrees focuses on classical and/or contemporary studies in the various instruments and additionally, the classical degrees will include courses in literature of the principal instrument, pedagogy and a pedagogy practicum. The Contemporary Music Studies specialization will focus on popular, jazz, Traditional folk and other contemporary music forms. However, the main emphasis will be on Jamaica and the wider Caribbean. Students will be allowed to integrate both the classical and contemporary studies within their programme of study. This will be done through careful advisement. The specializations are listed below: Bachelor of Music (BM) in Performance • Piano • Voice • Violin • Wind (clarinet, flute, trumpet, trombone) • Steel Pan • Contemporary Music Studies (formerly Jazz and Popular Music Studies

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Contemporary Music Studies The Bachelor of Music in Performance with a specialization in Contemporary Music Studies is designed to train students for careers in jazz, popular and commercial music performance. Students will also be prepared for graduate studies in contemporary music performance and literature. The programme aims to develop a thorough understanding of contemporary music (including Jazz) and its relationship to contemporary Jamaican and Caribbean societies. Principal Instrument, improvisation, jazz harmony and arranging, jazz and Jamaican music history, and contemporary music ensembles are emphasized in this programme of study. This degree is designed to train students for careers in jazz, popular or commercial music performance and/or instruction. The programme aims to develop a thorough understanding of contemporary music and its relationship to contemporary Jamaican and Caribbean societies. Principal Instrument, improvisation, jazz harmony and arranging, jazz and Jamaican music history, and jazz and popular ensembles are emphasized in this programme of study. The minimum number of credits required for graduation is 123 credit hours inclusive of the Colleges’ General Studies offerings. In order to be considered full time, a student is required to register for a minimum of twelve (12) credits and a maximum of eighteen (18) credits. With permission from the director, students are allowed to register for credits in excess of eighteen. To qualify for the BM in Performance specializing in Contemporary Music Studies, students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 123 credits over four (4) years, as set out below.

CREDIT STRUCTURE FOUR YEARS

CREDITS

Specialization

81

Adjunct

9

General Studies

27

Electives

6

Total

123

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COURSE MENU CODE

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument I

3

MJ

Principal Instrument II

3

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II (non-piano majors)

1

MU102A Keyboard Skills I (non-piano majors) MU111

Keyboard Harmony I (piano majors only) 1

MU112

Keyboard Harmony II (piano majors only)

1

MU103

Vocal Skills I (non-voice majors only)

1

MH105

Survey of Traditional Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU109

Traditional Jamaican Drumming

1

MT111B

Music Theory II

3

MU110A Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU134

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble II

1

MT111A

Music Theory I

3

GS100B

Critical Thinking & Expository Writing

2

MU133

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble I

1

GS111

Information Technology for Artist and Entrepreneurs 3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

 

GS105

Critical Thinking and Creative Insight

2

 

GS115

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

3

 

CODE

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument III

3

MJ

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH200

Western Music: An Overview

3

MH201

The Evolution of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MU201

Computer Music Notation

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU202A Keyboard Skills III

1

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MU210A Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MT212B

Jazz Theory II

3

MT212A

Jazz Theory I

3

MU243

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble IV

1

MU242

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble III

1

GS114

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

GS201A

Psychology I

2

 

Ensemble

1

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

 

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy

3

 

CODE

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument V

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT312A

Harmony and Arranging I

2

MT312B

Harmony and Arranging II

2

MH304

Music of the Americas I

2

MH305

Music of the Americas II

2

MU329

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble V

1

MU330

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble VI

1

MU307

Music Technology 1

2

MU308

Music Technology II

2

MU309

Music Business

2

AM104

Principles of Accounting I

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

GS231

College Mathematics

3

 

Elective

2 or 3  

CODE

YEAR 4 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument VII

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MU401

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble VII

1

MT400

Song Writing

2

MU409

Music Technology III

2

MU404

Independent Study

3

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

MU402

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble VIII

1

Elective

2 or 3 MU410

Music Technology IV

2

Elective

 

*NB: Psychology I can be substituted by Introduction to Philosophy or Psychology and Education – 3 credits each *College Mathematics (GS231) can be used as a substitute for Principles of Accounting I (AM104). *Electives: Students are encouraged to take electives in intra-Disciplinary (courses in music outside of their specialization) and cross-disciplinary courses (courses in drama, dance, visual arts or education).Please note electives maybe completed in any year. Only 4-6 credits are needed to complete the elective requirement. 207

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Contemporary Music Studies Diploma upgrade Graduates with a minimum of a C Average in the Diploma in Jazz and Popular Music Studies will be required to do a minimum of 30 credits inclusive of specialization and electives.

CREDIT STRUCTURE ONE YEAR

CREDITS

Major

17

Adjunct

7

General Studies

3

Electives

3

Total

30

COURSE MENU YEAR 4 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ4--7

Principal Instrument VII

3

MJ4--8

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MU401

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble VII

1

MT400

Song Writing

2

MU409

Music Technology III

2

MU404

Independent Study

3

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

MU402

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble VIII

1

Elective

2 or 3

MU410

Music Technology IV

2

AM104

Principles of Accounting I*

3

Elective

*College Mathematics (GS231) can be used as a substitute for Principles of Accounting I (AM104).

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Piano, Voice, Guitar, Wind and Steel Pan This programme of study is designed for those who wish to pursue a career in music performance and/or private studio teaching, and will also prepare students for graduate studies in performance. Course offerings include individual lessons, chamber and large ensemble performance, literature, pedagogy of the principal instrument, music theory and musicology. The Bachelor Degree in Performance is ascribed a minimum of 123 credits over four years and is structured as set out below:

CREDIT STRUCTURE FOUR YEARS

CREDITS

Specialization

79 – 83

Adjunct

11 – 15

General Studies

27

Electives

3–6

Total

123

209

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COURSE MENU CODE

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument I

3

MJ

Principal Instrument II

3

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I (non-piano majors)

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II (non-piano majors)

1

MU111

Keyboard Harmony I (piano majors only) 1

MU112

Keyboard Harmony II (piano majors only)

1

MU103

Vocal Skills I (non-voice majors)

1

MH105

Survey of Traditional Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU109

Traditional Jamaican Drumming

1

MT111B

Music Theory II

3

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

GS100B

Critical Thinking & Expository Writing

2

MT111A

Music Theory I

3

GS111

Information Technology for Artist and Entrepreneurs

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS105

Critical Thinking and Creative Insight

2

 

GS115

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

3

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

 

CODE

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument III

3

MJ

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH200

Western Music: An Overview

3

MH201

The Evolution of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MU201

Computer Music Notation

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV (non-piano majors)

1

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III (non-piano majors)

1

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

GS114

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

 

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

 

CODE

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument V

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

2

MU240

Conducting I

1

MH306

Western Music I

3

MH307

Western Music II

3

MH

Repertoire and Literature

2

MT311B

Form and Analysis II

2

MU228

Diction for Singers I (voice majors only)

2

MU328

Diction for Singers II (voice majors only)

2

GS231

College Mathematics

3

MU

Pedagogy

2

AM104

Principles of Accounting I

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

CODE

YEAR 4 SEMESTER I

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument VII

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MH400

Twentieth Century Western Music

3

MU309

Music Business

2

MT313

Arranging and Composing I

2

MU404

Independent Study

3

MU434

Pedagogy Practicum

2

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

 

Elective

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

 

Elective

 

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COURSE MENU Cont. *NB. Psychology I can be substituted by Introduction to Philosophy or Psychology and Education – 3 credits each *College Mathematics (GS231) can be used as a substitute for Principles of Accounting I (AM104). *Electives Students are encouraged to take electives in intra-Disciplinary (courses in music outside of their specialization) and crossdisciplinary courses (courses in drama, dance, visual arts or education).Please note electives maybe completed in any year. Only 4-6 credits are needed to complete the elective requirement. Ensemble Students are required to take a prescribed number of credits in the ensembles. The ensembles offered are: Vocal, Woodwind, Brass, Steel Pan, and Drumming.

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Piano, Voice, Guitar, Wind Degree Completion/Diploma upgrade Graduates with a minimum of a C Average in the Diploma in Performance will be required to do a minimum of 30 credits inclusive of specialization and electives.

CREDIT STRUCTURE ONE YEAR

CREDITS

Major

17

Adjunct

6-7

General Studies

3

Electives

2-3

Total

30

COURSE MENU YEAR 4 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument VII

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MH400

Twentieth Century Western Music

3

MU309

Music Business

2

MT313

Arranging and Composing I

2

MU404

Independent Study

3

MU434

Pedagogy Practicum

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1-2

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

Elective

2-3

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU201

Computer Music Notation

1

MU328

Diction for Singers II I (Voice majors only)

1

AM104 Principles of Accounting I*  3       *College Mathematics (GS231) can be used as a substitute for Principles of Accounting I (AM104).

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION (BME) The Bachelor of Music Education is a general music degree that offers two areas of concentration within the programme. They are: • Choral • Instrumental This degree programme prepares students for careers in music teaching at the secondary level. The philosophy of the programme is based on the principle that a person must first be a good musician in order to be a good music educator. Therefore the programme includes substantial work in music theory, aural training, musicology, instrumental/vocal studies, ensembles, and conducting, in addition to music education methods courses and teaching practicum. Students elect either an instrumental concentration or vocal concentration, or a combined program which includes a mixture of the instrumental and vocal concentrations. In addition to fulfilling the School of Music requirements for graduation, all music majors must complete the list of General Studies courses offered by the college, and all Music Education majors must also complete the list of Professional Education courses prescribed by the School of Music in collaboration with the School of Arts Management and Humanities. To qualify for the BME full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 140 to a maximum of 145 credits over four (4) years, as set out below:

CREDIT STRUCTURE PIANO FOUR YEARS

CREDITS

Major

62

Adjunct

6

General Studies

24

Professional Education

28

Practicum

15

Electives

5

Total

140

VOICE, RECORDER, GUITAR FOUR YEARS

CREDITS

Major

64

Adjunct

6

General Studies

23

Professional Education

8

Practicum

15

Electives

6

Total

140

WIND, PERCUSSION, STRINGS FOUR YEARS

CREDITS

Major

66

Adjunct

6

General Studies

23

Professional Education

28

Practicum

15

Electives

2

Total

140

213

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COURSE MENU CODE

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MI

Principal Instrument I

2

MI

Principal Instrument II

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH105

Survey of Traditional Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU111

Keyboard Harmony I

1

MU112

Keyboard Harmony II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B Keyboard Skills II

1

MU109

Tradititional Jamaican Drumming

1

MU110B Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU111B Music Theory II

3

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100B

Critical Thinking and Expository Writing

2

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS114

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

GS105

Critical Thinking and Creative Insight

2

GS115

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

3

CODE

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MI

Principal Instrument III

2

MI

Principal Instrument IV

2

MH200

Western Music: An Overview

3

ME203

Foundation of Music Education

3

MU201

Computer Music Notation

1

MH201

The Evolution of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU104A

Guitar Skills I

1

MU104B Guitar Skills II

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

GS231

College Mathematics

3

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

CODE

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MI

Principal Instrument V

2

MI

Principal Instrument VI

2

ME307

Methods and Materials in Music I

3

ME309

Methods & Materials in Music II

3

MT314

Arranging and Composing for Classroom I

1

MT315

Arranging and Composing for Classroom II

1

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

2

MU240

Conducting I

1

ME315

Instrumental Techniques

1

MU323

Recorder II

1

ME314

Choral Techniques

1

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

ME308

Steel Band Techniques

1

PE207

Psychology and Education

3

MU322

Recorder I

1

ME317

Measurement and Evaluation in the Music 3 Classroom

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

Ensemble

1

PE305

Technology and Learning in the Classroom 3

**Teaching Practicum & Lab

Ensemble

1

**Teaching Practicum & Lab

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CODE

YEAR 4 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MI

Principal Instrument VII

2

MI

Principal Instrument VIII

2

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

ME401

Methods & Materials in Music III

1

PE400

** Teaching Practicum and SLP

15

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research

3

PE403

Fundamentals of Educational Administration

3

Elective

3 or 4

NB: **Teaching Practicum, Observation and Teaching Labs = 15 credits spread over years three and four. Practicum Lab and Observation – 3 credits in Year 3; Practicum - Nine credits in Year 4; Service Learning Project – 3 credits in Year 4. All areas are compulsory to complete the Teaching Practicum credits.

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade 35 Credit Programme JBTE Double Option Graduates from 2008 CREDIT STRUCTURE ONE YEAR

CREDITS

Major

14

General Studies

6

Professional Education

12

Electives

3

Total

35

Professional Education

Cr

Specialization Courses

Practical Researcher

3

Principal Instrument VII – VIII* 4

Reflective Practice and Action Research

3

Computer Music Notation

1

Technology and Learning in the Classroom

3

Pop Ensemble I

1

Fundamentals of Educational Administration

3

Form and Analysis I

2

Guitar Skills I

1

General Education

Cr

Academic and Professional Writing

3

Music Elective

5

Conversational Spanish

3

Electives

3

COURSE MENU YEAR 4

 

CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MI

Principal Instrument VII

2

MI

Principal Instrument VIII

2

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research

3

MU104A

Guitar Skills I

1

PE403

Fundamentals of Educational 3 Administration

MU106A

Pop Ensemble I

1

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

MU201

Computer Music Notation

1

Elective

3

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

2

 

Music Elective

2-3

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

PE305

Technology and Learning in the Classroom

3

Music Elective

2-3

Students are expected to take three (5) credits of Music Electives in any semester of their choice Total number of credits: Thirty Five (35)

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION Degree Completion/Diploma Upgrade Fifty Six (56) Credit Programme JBTE Double Option Graduates from 2001 - 2007 CREDIT STRUCTURE TWO YEARS

CREDITS

CREDITS

Major

33

Specialization Courses

General Studies

6

Principal Instrument V – VIII

8

Professional Education

12

Music Theory I – II

6

Electives

5

Music Theory III – IV

6

Total

56

Jazz Theory I – II

6

Aural and Sight Singing I – IV

8

Professional Education Practical Researcher

Computer Music Notation

1

Reflective Practice and Action Research

3

Pop Ensemble I

1

Technology and Learning in the Classroom

3

Form and Analysis I

2

Fundamentals of Educational Administration

3

Guitar Skills I

1

Academic and Professional Writing

3

Electives

3

Conversational Spanish

3

General Education

Other specialization courses may be chosen from the School of Music’s menu of courses.

COURSE MENU CODE

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MI

Principal Instrument V

2

MI

Principal Instrument VI

2

MT111A

Music Theory I

3

MT111B

Music Theory II

3

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

PE305

Technology and Learning in the Classroom

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

MU104A

Guitar Skills I

1

 

Elective

2 -5

MU106A  Pop Ensemble I

1

MU201

Computer Music Notation

1

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

CODE

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MI

Principal Instrument VII

2

MI

Principal Instrument VIII

2

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

2

PE403

Fundamentals of Educational Administration

3

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research 3

Elective

0-3

Students are expected to take five (5) credits of Electives in any semester of their choice. Total number of credits: Fifty Six (56)

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ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN MUSIC (AA) The Associate of Arts (AA) degree offers music courses in a curriculum intended to lead, by transfer, to a professional bachelors degree programme. This two-year degree focuses on intensive work in music supported by a programme in general studies. The programme is designed to meet the common pre-requisites required for students transferring with an Associate of Arts (AA) degree to the Bachelor’s degree in Music at the Edna Manley College. The programme aims to prepare students for general careers in music and also for further study in music performance or music teaching. Therefore the programme includes substantial work in music theory, aural training, musicology, instrumental/vocal studies, and ensembles, in addition to other general studies. Students elect either an instrumental concentration or vocal concentration, or a combined programme which includes a mixture of the instrumental and vocal concentrations. In addition to fulfilling the School of Music requirements for graduation, all music majors must complete the list of Specilization and General Studies courses prescribed by the college. In order to progress to the bachelor’s degree, all requirements from the associate degree must be completed. Hence, the programme is comprised of a two-year associate degree (years one and two) which, on completion, smoothly articulates into the BM and BME degrees (years three and four). The Associate of Arts Degree in Music is ascribed a minimum of 70 credits over two years. To qualify for the Associate of Arts in Music Studies students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 70 credits over two (2) years, as set out below:

CREDIT STRUCTURE PIANO FOUR YEARS

CREDITS

Major

45

Adjunct

4

General Studies

0

Elective

1

Total

70

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218


COURSE MENU CODE

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ1--

Principal Instrument I*

3

MJ1--

Principal Instrument II*

3

MI1--

Principal Instrument I*

2

MI1--

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU111

Keyboard Harmony I

1

MU112

Keyboard Harmony II

1

MU103

Vocal Skills I

1

MH105

Survey of Traditional Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU109

Traditional Jamaican Drumming

1

MT111B

Music Theory II

3

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

GS100B

Critical Thinking & Expository Writing

2

MT111A

Music Theory I

3

GS111

Information Technology for Artist and Entrepreneurs

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS105

Critical Thinking and Creative Insight

2

 

GS115

The Self: Ethics and Creativity

3

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

 

CODE

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I

CR CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ2--

Principal Instrument III*

3

MJ2--

Principal Instrument IV*

3

MI2--

Principal Instrument III*

2

MI2--

Principal Instrument IV*

2

MH200

Western Music: An Overview

3

MH201

The Evolution of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MU201

Computer Music Notation

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

GS114

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

ME203

Foundation of Music Education**

3

GS210

Conversational Spanish

3

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

 

*Associate of Arts optional courses. *Electives Students are encouraged to take electives in intra-disciplinary (courses in music outside of their specialization) and crossdisciplinary courses (courses in drama, dance, visual arts or education). Please note electives maybe completed in any year. **Transfer Credits All credits are transferable to the Bachelor of Music in performance, Bachelor of Music in Jazz and Popular Music Studies, and the Bachelor of Music Education degrees at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts. ***Skills Courses Skills courses are chosen based on the students’ specialization and on the recommendation of their advisor.

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CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC (CM) The Certificate in Music (CM) offers music courses that focus on the basic elements of contemporary music performance, aural skills, and its related theory. This one-year programme mainly focuses on intensive work in the art form. The programme aims to introduce students with an interest in pursuing a career in contemporary music performance to the convention of Jamaican Popular Music. Therefore the programme includes level-one courses in music theory, aural training, Jamaican Music history, listening and appraising, instrumental/vocal studies, and ensembles. Students may elect either an instrumental or vocal concentration. In order to qualify for entry into the Certificate in Music (CM), a student must successfully complete the Preliminary Qualifying Programme then apply for the certificate. Qualified students may also gain acceptance into the programme through the open audition, have a minimum of two CSEC subjects including English, and the equivalent of Grade 5 music theory (ABRSM). In order to graduate from the programme, all certificate requirements must be completed. The Certificate in Music is ascribed a minimum of 31 credits over one year. To qualify for the Certificate in Music full-time students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 31credits over one (1) year, as set out below.: Certificate in Music Credits Specialization

23

Adjunct

4

General Studies

4

Credits

Credits

Specialization/Major

23

Music Elective (optional)

1-3

Principal Instrument (Music Education)

4 OR

Adjunct

4

Principal Instrument (Performance)

6

Keyboard Harmony I - II (piano majors only)

2

Keyboard Skills I – II

2

Music Theory/Aural Music Theory I – II

6

Vocal Skills I

1

Aural and Sight Singing I – II

4

Traditional Jamaican Drumming

1

Musicology

3

General Studies

4

Survey of Traditional Jamaican Folk Music

Fundamentals of English

2

Performance Ensembles

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

Pop Ensemble I

1

Ensemble

2

COURSE MENU CODE

YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ1--

Principal Instrument I*

3

MJ1--

Principal Instrument II*

3

MI1--

Principal Instrument I*

2

MI1--

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU111

Keyboard Harmony I

1

MU112

Keyboard Harmony II

1

MU103

Vocal Skills I

1

MH105

Survey of Traditional Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU109

Traditional Jamaican Drumming

1

MT111B

Music Theory II

3

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

GS100B

Critical Thinking & Expository Writing

2

MT111A

Music Theory I

3

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

Fundamentals of English

2

 

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

 

GS100A

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MUSIC MINOR The Minor in Music is a general music programme designed for the non-music major who has an intermediate level grounding in music and performance. This programme of study is intended to supplement the academic and professional requirements of several majors outside of the School of Music. The programme is a thorough integration of the practical, theoretical, and performance elements of music. A minimum of 23 credits, drawn from both the academic and practical courses offered by the programme, is required for the completion of the minor. Students pursuing a Music Minor are held to all programme regulations concerning interviews, prerequisites, and auditions. Therefore, all students interested in pursing a Music Minor are required to participate in a scheduled audition before they can be accepted to the Music Minor programme. Prior to registering for music courses, the student will be assigned an advisor from the music faculty.

COURSE MENU Code

Course

Credits

MI

Principal Instrument I

2

MI

Principal Instrument II

2

MT111A

Music Theory I

3

MT111B

Music Theory II

3

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU107

Listening and Appraising

2

Students should select their additional seven (7) music credits from the following areas: *One 200–Level course (Word based) Ensemble

2–3 1–2

*Musicology

2–4

*compulsory requirement Total credit requirements:

23 credits

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GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE UWI/EMC BA – General Arts, Faculty of Humanities & Education The University of the West Indies, Mona, in association with the Edna Manley College offers a BA Degree with a Major or Special in any of the Visual or Performing Arts disciplines offered by the College. The degree runs for three years and students attend classes on the campuses of both institutions. Candidates must meet the academic entry requirements set by the University as well as the Edna Manley College. Students are required to select courses according to credit requirements laid down for the BA Degree Major or Special as set out below. To qualify for a Major the students will be required to successfully complete at the Edna Manley College: • 36 credits over three years • achieve a minimum grade average of Bare Pass (40%-43%) To qualify for the Special, students will be required to successfully complete at Edna Manley College: - 54 credits over three years, - achieve a minimum grade average of Bare Pass (40%- 43%) Strict attention must be paid to the prerequisite requirements for all courses.

UWI/EMC BA – General Arts, Humanities & Education Degree - Music Major COURSE MENU Year 1 Code

Course

Credits

MU110

Principal Instrumental Study

6

MU111

Musicianship Studies I

6

MU112

Keyboard/fretboard Harmony

6

MU120

Introduction to Music

6

Code

Course

Credits

MU212

Orchestration

6

MU23A

Ceremony and Spectacle

3

MU23B

Beethoven to the Romantics

3

MU210

Principal Instrumental Study

6

MU211

Musicianship Studies II

6

Code

Course

Credits

MU317

Arranging

6

MU31A

Historical Perspectives in Jazz

3

MU310

Principal Instrumental Study

6

MU311

Musicianship Studies III

6

MU312

Study of Western Classics

6

Year 2

Year 3

The General Arts courses are taken at The University of the West Indies.

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SCHOOL OF MUSIC ELECTIVE COURSES (NON-MAJORS) Code

Course

Credits

MP131

Applied Music

2

MP132

Applied Music

1

MU107

Listening and Appraising

2

MU120

Choir

1

MU126

Drum Orchestra I

1

MU127

Drum Orchestra II

1

MU102 A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU104 A

Guitar Skills I

1

MU104 B

Guitar Skills II

1

MU204A

Guitar Skills III

1

MU204B

Guitar Skills IV

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU103 B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU203 A

Vocal Skills III

1

MU203B

Vocal Skills IV

1

MU105A

Recorder I

1

MU105B

Recorder II

1

MU205A

Recorder III

1

MU205B

Recorder IV

1

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PRINCIPAL INSTRUMENT Performance & Music Education CODE

SUBJECT

INSTRUMENT

YEAR

DEGREE

CREDIT

MJ 101

Principal Instrument I

Piano

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 102

Principal Instrument II

Piano

3

MJ 203

Principal Instrument III

Piano

Year 2

3

MJ 204

Principal Instrument IV

Piano

3

MJ 305

Principal Instrument V

Piano

Year 3

3

MJ 306

Principal Instrument VI

Piano

3

MJ 407

Principal Instrument VII

Piano

Year 4

3

MJ 408

Principal Instrument VIII

Piano

3

MI 101

Principal Instrument I

Piano

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 102

Principal Instrument II

Piano

2

MI 203

Principal Instrument III

Piano

Year 2

2

MI 204

Principal Instrument IV

Piano

2

MI 305

Principal Instrument V

Piano

Year 3

2

MI 306

Principal Instrument VI

Piano

2

MI 407

Principal Instrument VII

Piano

Year 4

2

MI 408

Principal Instrument VIII

Piano

2

MJ 111

Principal Instrument I

Voice

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 112

Principal Instrument II

Voice

3

MJ 213

Principal Instrument III

Voice

Year 2

3

MJ 214

Principal Instrument IV

Voice

3

MJ 315

Principal Instrument V

Voice

Year 3

3

MJ 316

Principal Instrument VI

Voice

3

MJ 417

Principal Instrument VII

Voice

Year 4

3

MJ 418

Principal Instrument VIII

Voice

3

MI 111

Principal Instrument I

Voice

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 112

Principal Instrument II

Voice

2

MI 213

Principal Instrument III

Voice

Year 2

2

MI 214

Principal Instrument IV

Voice

2

MI 315

Principal Instrument V

Voice

Year 3

2

MI 316

Principal Instrument VI

Voice

2

MI 417

Principal Instrument VII

Voice

Year 4

2

MI 418

Principal Instrument VIII

Voice

2

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224


MJ 121

Principal Instrument I

Guitar

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 122

Principal Instrument II

Guitar

3

MJ 223

Principal Instrument III

Guitar

Year 2

3

MJ 224

Principal Instrument IV

Guitar

3

MJ 325

Principal Instrument V

Guitar

Year 3

3

MJ 326

Principal Instrument VI

Guitar

3

MJ 427

Principal Instrument VII

Guitar

Year 4

3

MJ 428

Principal Instrument VIII

Guitar

3

MI 121

Principal Instrument I

Guitar

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 122

Principal Instrument II

Guitar

2

MI 223

Principal Instrument III

Guitar

Year 2

2

MI 224

Principal Instrument IV

Guitar

2

MI 325

Principal Instrument V

Guitar

Year 3

2

MI 326

Principal Instrument VI

Guitar

2

MI 427

Principal Instrument VII

Guitar

Year 4

2

MI 428

Principal Instrument VIII

Guitar

2

MJ 131

Principal Instrument I

Bass Guitar

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 132

Principal Instrument II

Bass Guitar

3

MJ 233

Principal Instrument III

Bass Guitar

Year 2

3

MJ 234

Principal Instrument IV

Bass Guitar

3

MJ 335

Principal Instrument V

Bass Guitar

Year 3

3

MJ 336

Principal Instrument VI

Bass Guitar

3

MJ 437

Principal Instrument VII

Bass Guitar

Year 4

3

MJ 438

Principal Instrument VIII

Bass Guitar

3

MI 131

Principal Instrument I

Bass Guitar

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 132

Principal Instrument II

Bass Guitar

2

MI 233

Principal Instrument III

Bass Guitar

Year 2

2

MI 234

Principal Instrument IV

Bass Guitar

2

MI 335

Principal Instrument V

Bass Guitar

Year 3

2

MI 336

Principal Instrument VI

Bass Guitar

2

MI 437

Principal Instrument VII

Bass Guitar

Year 4

2

MI 438

Principal Instrument VIII

Bass Guitar

2

MJ 141

Principal Instrument I

Woodwind

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 142

Principal Instrument II

Woodwind

3

MJ 243

Principal Instrument III

Woodwind

Year 2

3

MJ 244

Principal Instrument IV

Woodwind

3

MJ 345

Principal Instrument V

Woodwind

Year 3

3

MJ 346

Principal Instrument VI

Woodwind

3

MJ 447

Principal Instrument VII

Woodwind

Year 4

3

MJ 448

Principal Instrument VIII

Woodwind

3

225

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MI 141

Principal Instrument I

Woodwind

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 142

Principal Instrument II

Woodwind

2

MI 243

Principal Instrument III

Woodwind

Year 2

2

MI 244

Principal Instrument IV

Woodwind

2

MI 345

Principal Instrument V

Woodwind

Year 3

2

MI 346

Principal Instrument VI

Woodwind

2

MI 447

Principal Instrument VII

Woodwind

Year 4

2

MI 448

Principal Instrument VIII

Woodwind

2

MJ 151

Principal Instrument I

Brass

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 152

Principal Instrument II

Brass

3

MJ 253

Principal Instrument III

Brass

Year 2

3

MJ 254

Principal Instrument IV

Brass

3

MJ 355

Principal Instrument V

Brass

Year 3

3

MJ 356

Principal Instrument VI

Brass

3

MJ 457

Principal Instrument VII

Brass

Year 4

3

MJ 458

Principal Instrument VIII

Brass

3

MI 151

Principal Instrument I

Brass

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 152

Principal Instrument II

Brass

2

MI 253

Principal Instrument III

Brass

Year 2

2

MI 254

Principal Instrument IV

Brass

2

MI 355

Principal Instrument V

Brass

Year 3

2

MI 356

Principal Instrument VI

Brass

2

MI 457

Principal Instrument VII

Brass

Year 4

2

MI 458

Principal Instrument VIII

Brass

2

MJ 161

Principal Instrument I

Steel Pan

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 162

Principal Instrument II

Steel Pan

3

MJ 263

Principal Instrument III

Steel Pan

Year 2

3

MJ 264

Principal Instrument IV

Steel Pan

3

MJ 365

Principal Instrument V

Steel Pan

Year 3

3

MJ 366

Principal Instrument VI

Steel Pan

3

MJ 467

Principal Instrument VII

Steel Pan

Year 4

3

MJ 468

Principal Instrument VIII

Steel Pan

3

MI 161

Principal Instrument I

Steel Pan

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 162

Principal Instrument II

Steel Pan

2

MI 263

Principal Instrument III

Steel Pan

Year 2

2

MI 264

Principal Instrument IV

Steel Pan

2

MI 365

Principal Instrument V

Steel Pan

Year 3

2

MI 366

Principal Instrument VI

Steel Pan

2

MI 467

Principal Instrument VII

Steel Pan

Year 4

2

MI 468

Principal Instrument VIII

Steel Pan

2

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MJ 171

Principal Instrument I

Percussion

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 172

Principal Instrument II

Percussion

3

MJ 273

Principal Instrument III

Percussion

Year 2

3

MJ 274

Principal Instrument IV

Percussion

3

MJ 375

Principal Instrument V

Percussion

Year 3

3

MJ 376

Principal Instrument VI

Percussion

3

MJ 477

Principal Instrument VII

Percussion

Year 4

3

MJ 478

Principal Instrument VIII

Percussion

3

MI 171

Principal Instrument I

Percussion

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 172

Principal Instrument II

Percussion

2

MI 273

Principal Instrument III

Percussion

Year 2

2

MI 274

Principal Instrument IV

Percussion

2

MI 375

Principal Instrument V

Percussion

Year 3

2

MI 376

Principal Instrument VI

Percussion

2

MI 477

Principal Instrument VII

Percussion

Year 4

2

MI 478

Principal Instrument VIII

Percussion

2

MJ 181

Principal Instrument I

Strings

Year 1

Performance

3

MJ 182

Principal Instrument II

Strings

3

MJ 283

Principal Instrument III

Strings

Year 2

3

MJ 284

Principal Instrument IV

Strings

3

MJ 385

Principal Instrument V

Strings

Year 3

3

MJ 386

Principal Instrument VI

Strings

3

MJ 487

Principal Instrument VII

Strings

Year 4

3

MJ 488

Principal Instrument VIII

Strings

3

MI 181

Principal Instrument I

Strings

Year 1

Music Ed.

2

MI 182

Principal Instrument II

Strings

2

MI 283

Principal Instrument III

Strings

Year 2

2

MI 284

Principal Instrument IV

Strings

2

MI 385

Principal Instrument V

Strings

Year 3

2

MI 386

Principal Instrument VI

Strings

2

MI 487

Principal Instrument VII

Strings

Year 4

2

MI 488

Principal Instrument VIII

Strings

2

MJ = Performance Majors - Three (3) Credits MI = Music Education Majors - Two (2) Credits First digit = Year Second digit = Assigned Instrument Number Third digit = Semester in programme

227

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SECOND INSTRUMENT CODE

SUBJECT

INSTRUMENT

YEAR

DEGREE

CREDIT

MS 101

Second Instrument I

Piano

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 102

Second Instrument II

Piano

1

MS 203

Second Instrument III

Piano

Level 2

1

MS 204

Second Instrument IV

Piano

1

MS 305

Second Instrument V

Piano

Level 3

1

MS 306

Second Instrument VI

Piano

1

MS 407

Second Instrument VII

Piano

Level 4

1

MS 408

Second Instrument VIII

Piano

1

MS 111

Principal Instrument I

Voice

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 112

Principal Instrument II

Voice

1

MS 213

Principal Instrument III

Voice

Level 2

1

MS 214

Principal Instrument IV

Voice

1

MS 315

Principal Instrument V

Voice

Level 3

1

MS 316

Principal Instrument VI

Voice

1

MS 417

Principal Instrument VII

Voice

Level 4

1

MS 418

Principal Instrument VIII

Voice

1

MS 121

Second Instrument I

Guitar

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 122

Second Instrument II

Guitar

1

MS 223

Second Instrument III

Guitar

Level 2

1

MS 224

Second Instrument IV

Guitar

1

MS 325

Second Instrument V

Guitar

Level 3

1

MS 326

Second Instrument VI

Guitar

1

MS 427

Second Instrument VII

Guitar

Level 4

1

MS 428

Second Instrument VIII

Guitar

1

MS 131

Second Instrument I

Bass Guitar

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 132

Second Instrument II

Bass Guitar

1

MS 233

Second Instrument III

Bass Guitar

Level 2

1

MS 234

Second Instrument IV

Bass Guitar

1

MS 335

Second Instrument V

Bass Guitar

Level 3

1

MS 336

Second Instrument VI

Bass Guitar

1

MS 437

Second Instrument VII

Bass Guitar

Level 4

1

MS 438

Second Instrument VIII

Bass Guitar

1

MS 141

Second Instrument I

Woodwind

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 142

Second Instrument II

Woodwind

1

MS 243

Second Instrument III

Woodwind

Level 2

1

MS 244

Second Instrument IV

Woodwind

1

MS 345

Second Instrument V

Woodwind

Level 3

1

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228


MS 346

Second Instrument VI

Woodwind

1

MS 447

Second Instrument VII

Woodwind

Level 4

1

MS 448

Second Instrument VIII

Woodwind

1

MS 151

Second Instrument I

Brass

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 152

Second Instrument II

Brass

1

MS 253

Second Instrument III

Brass

Level 2

1

MS 254

Second Instrument IV

Brass

1

MS 355

Second Instrument V

Brass

Level 3

1

MS 356

Second Instrument VI

Brass

1

MS 457

Second Instrument VII

Brass

Level 4

1

MS 458

Second Instrument VIII

Brass

1

MS 161

Second Instrument I

Steel Pan

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 162

Second Instrument II

Steel Pan

1

MS 263

Second Instrument III

Steel Pan

Level 2

1

MS 264

Second Instrument IV

Steel Pan

1

MS 365

Second Instrument V

Steel Pan

Level 3

1

MS 366

Second Instrument VI

Steel Pan

1

MS 467

Second Instrument VII

Steel Pan

Level 4

1

MS 468

Second Instrument VIII

Steel Pan

1

MS 171

Second Instrument I

Percussion

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 172

Second Instrument II

Percussion

1

MS 273

Second Instrument III

Percussion

Level 2

1

MS 274

Second Instrument IV

Percussion

1

MS 375

Second Instrument V

Percussion

Level 3

1

MS 376

Second Instrument VI

Percussion

1

MS 477

Second Instrument VII

Percussion

Level 4

1

MS 478

Second Instrument VIII

Percussion

1

MS 181

Second Instrument I

Strings

Level 1

Non-Major

1

MS 182

Second Instrument II

Strings

1

MS 283

Second Instrument III

Strings

Level 2

1

MS 284

Second Instrument IV

Strings

1

MS 385

Second Instrument V

Strings

Level 3

1

MS 386

Second Instrument VI

Strings

1

MS 487

Second Instrument VII

Strings

Level 4

1

MS 488

Second Instrument VIII

Strings

1

MS = Non-majors only, any school

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BM, BME, AA, Cert. & PQ COURSE SEQUENCE 2010/11 & 2011/12 BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN JAZZ & POPULAR MUSIC STUDIES YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II

3

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU106A

Pop Ensemble I

MU106B

Pop Ensemble II

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MP200A

Principal Instrument III

3

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU213A

Jazz Improvisation I

1

MU213B

Jazz Improvisation II

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT212A

Jazz Theory I

3

MT212B

Jazz Theory II

3

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

MP300A

Principal Instrument V

3

MP300B

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT312A

Harmony and Arranging I

2

MT312B

Harmony and Arranging II

2

MH304

Music of the Americas I

2

MH305

Music of the Americas II

2

MU306A

Jazz and Pop Ensemble I

1

MU306B

Jazz and Pop Ensemble II

1

MU307

Music Technology 1

2

MU308

Music Technology II

2

MU309

Music Business

2

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

YEAR 3

AM103A

Basic Accounting*

3

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU201

Music Notation and Sequencing

1

Elective

2 or 3

MP400A

Principal Instrument VII

3

MP400B

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MU406A

Jazz and Pop Ensemble III

1

MU406B

Jazz and Pop Ensemble IV

1

MU415A

Jazz Improvisation III

1

MU415B

Jazz Improvisation IV

1

MU409

Music Technology III

3

MU410

Music Technology IV

3

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

MT400

Song Writing

2

Elective

2 or 3

MU404

Independent Study

3

YEAR 4

Elective

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230


BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Piano, Voice, Percussion, Guitar YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II

3

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

Ensemble

1

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

Ensemble

1

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MP200A

Principal Instrument III

3

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU126

Accompanying (piano majors)

1

MU126

Accompanying (piano majors)

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

MJ

Principal Instrument V

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

2

MT311B

Form and Analysis II

2

MH306

Western Music I

3

MH307

Western Music II

3

MH

Repertoire and Literature

2

Pedagogy

2

MU228

Diction for Singers I (voice majors)

2

MU328

Diction for Singers II (voice majors)

2

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU240

Conducting I

1

AM103A

Basic Accounting*

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

MT313

Arranging and Composing I

YEAR 3

Elective

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

MJ

Principal Instrument VII

3

MH400

Twentieth Century Western Music

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MU309

Music Business

2

MT413A

Arranging and Composing II

2

MU404

Independent Study

3

MU434

Pedagogy Practicum

GS303

Performance Research Forum

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

3

Elective

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

YEAR 4

Elective

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP101A

Principal Instrument I

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MP201A

Principal Instrument III

2

MP201B

Principal Instrument IV

2

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

ME101

Introduction to Music Education

1

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU104A

Guitar Skills I

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

MP301A

Principal Instrument V

2

MP301B

Principal Instrument VI

2

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

3

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

MU322

Recorder I

1

MU323

Recorder II

1

Ensemble

2

Ensemble

1

MU100

Percussion: Conga

1

ME308

Steel Band Techniques

1

ME310

Choral Techniques I

1

ME311

Choral Techniques II

1

ME312

Instrumental Techniques I

1

ME313

Instrumental Techniques II

1

ME305

Music Methods & Materials I

1

ME306

Music Methods & Materials II

2

PE204

The Emergent Teacher

3

PE205

Teacher, School and Society

2

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

PE202

Understanding the Learner

3

MU104B

Guitar Skills II

1

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

2

MT314

Arranging and Composing for Classroom I

1

MT315

Arranging and Composing for Classroom II

1

MU201

Music Notation and Sequencing

1

ME302

Technology in Music Education

1

YEAR 3

**Teaching Observation & Lab

**Teaching Lab

YEAR 4 MP401A

Principal Instrument VII

2

MP401B

Principal Instrument VIII

2

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

ME401

Methods & Materials in Music III

1

PE400

** Teaching Practicum and Lab

15

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research

3

PE302

Introduction to Educational Administration

3

Elective

3 or 4

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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232


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS - MUSIC YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I*

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II*

3

MP101A

Principal Instrument I*

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MP200A

Principal Instrument III*

3

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV*

3

MP201A

Principal Instrument III*

2

MP201B

Principal Instrument IV*

2

MT211A

Music Theory III*

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV*

3

MT212A

Jazz Theory I*

3

MT212B

Jazz Theory II*

3

MU207

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

MU104B

Guitar Skills I*

1

GS104A

Caribbean History Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History Culture and Aesthetics II

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy

3

ME101

Introduction to Music Education*

1

233

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT


CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I*

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II*

3

MP101A

Principal Instrument I*

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

PRELIMINARY QUALIFYING PROGRAMME YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MU001A

Principal Instrument

2

MU001B

Principal Instrument

2

MU002A

Music Theory

3

MU002A

Music Theory

3

MU003A

Vocal Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU003A

Vocal Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU004A

Aural and Sight Singing

2

MU004A

Aural and Sight Singing

2

MU006A

Keyboard Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU006A

Keyboard Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU109

Introduction to Listening and Appraising

2

MU109

Introduction to Listening and Appraising

2

MU008A

Keyboard Sight Reading

1

MU008A

Keyboard Sight Reading

1

Sight Reading for Singers

1

MU009A

Sight Reading for Singers

1

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

MU009A

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT

234


BM, BME, AA, Cert. & PQ COURSE SEQUENCE 2012 - 2013 BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN JAZZ & POPULAR MUSIC STUDIES YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II

3

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B Vocal Skills II

1

3

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B Aural and Sight Singing II

2

3

MU111B Music Theory II

3

MU111A

Music Theory I

MU106A

Pop Ensemble I

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

MU106B Pop Ensemble II

YEAR 2 MP200A

Principal Instrument III

3

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU213A

Jazz Improvisation I

1

MU213B Jazz Improvisation II

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT212A

Jazz Theory I

3

MT212B

Jazz Theory II

3

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics 2 II

YEAR 3 MP300A

Principal Instrument V

3

MP300B

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT312A

Harmony and Arranging I

2

MT312B

Harmony and Arranging II

2

MH304

Music of the Americas I

2

MH305

Music of the Americas II

2

MU306A

Jazz and Pop Ensemble I

1

MU306B Jazz and Pop Ensemble II

1

MU307

Music Technology 1

2

MU308

Music Technology II

2

MU309

Music Business

2

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

Principal Instrument VIII

3

AM103A

Basic Accounting*

3

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU201

Music Notation and Sequencing

1

Elective

2 or 3

MP400A

Principal Instrument VII

3

MP400B

MU406A

Jazz and Pop Ensemble III

1

MU406B Jazz and Pop Ensemble IV

1

MU415A

Jazz Improvisation III

1

MU415B Jazz Improvisation IV

1

YEAR 4

MU409

Music Technology III

3

MU410

Music Technology IV

3

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

MT400

Song Writing

2

Elective

2 or 3

MU404

Independent Study

3

Elective

235

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT


BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Piano, Voice, Percussion, Guitar YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II

3

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111B Music Theory II

3

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

Ensemble

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

3

Ensemble

1

MU120

Choir

1

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MP200A

Principal Instrument III

3

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU126

Accompanying (piano majors)

1

MU126

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics 2 II

Accompanying (piano majors)

YEAR 3 MJ

Principal Instrument V

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

2

MT311B

Form and Analysis II

2

MH306

Western Music I

3

MH307

Western Music II

3

MH

Repertoire and Literature

2

Pedagogy

2

MU228

Diction for Singers I (voice majors)

2

MU328

Diction for Singers II (voice majors)

2

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU240

Conducting I

1

AM103A

Basic Accounting*

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

MT313

Arranging and Composing I

Elective

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

MJ

Principal Instrument VII

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MH400

Twentieth Century Western Music

3

MU309

Music Business

2

MT413A

Arranging and Composing II

2

MU404

Independent Study

3

MU434

Pedagogy Practicum

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

Elective

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

YEAR 4

Elective

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT

236


BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP101A

Principal Instrument I

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

MP201B

Principal Instrument IV

2

YEAR 2 MP201A

Principal Instrument III

2

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

ME101

Introduction to Music Education

1

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

MU202B Keyboard Skills IV

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU104A Guitar Skills I

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MU210B Aural and Sight Singing IV

1 2

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics 2 II

Ensemble

1

MP301A

Principal Instrument V

2

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

MU322

Ensemble

1

MP301B

Principal Instrument VI

2

3

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

Recorder I

1

MU323

Recorder II

1

YEAR 3

Ensemble

2

Ensemble

1

MU100

Percussion: Conga

1

ME308

Steel Band Techniques

1

ME310

Choral Techniques I

1

ME311

Choral Techniques II

1

ME312

Instrumental Techniques I

1

ME313

Instrumental Techniques II

1

ME305

Music Methods & Materials I

1

ME306

Music Methods & Materials II

2

PE204

The Emergent Teacher

3

PE205

Teacher, School and Society

2

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

PE202

Understanding the Learner

3

MU104B

Guitar Skills II

1

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

2

MT314

Arranging and Composing for Classroom I

1

MT315

Arranging and Composing for Classroom II

1

Music Notation and Sequencing

1

ME302

Technology in Music Education*

1

MU201

**Teaching Observation & Lab

**Teaching Lab

237

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT


YEAR 4 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP401A

Principal Instrument VII

2

MP401B

Principal Instrument VIII

2

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

ME401

Methods & Materials in Music III

1

PE400

** Teaching Practicum and Lab

15

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research

3

PE302

Introduction to Educational Administration

3

Elective

3 or 4

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS - MUSIC YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I*

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II*

3

MP101A

Principal Instrument I*

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MP200A

Principal Instrument III*

3

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV*

3

MP201A

Principal Instrument III*

2

MP201B

Principal Instrument IV*

2

MT211A

Music Theory III*

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV*

3

MT212A

Jazz Theory I*

3

MT212B

Jazz Theory II*

3

MU207

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B Keyboard Skills IV

Ensemble

1

Survey of Western Music Ensemble

1 1

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

MU104B Guitar Skills I*

1

GS104A

Caribbean History Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History Culture and Aesthetics II

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy

3

ME101

Introduction to Music Education*

1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT

238


CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I*

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II*

3

MP101A

Principal Instrument I*

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

1

Choir

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

SEMESTER II

CR

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

PRELIMINARY QUALIFYING PROGRAMME YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

MU001A

Principal Instrument

2

MU001B Principal Instrument

2

MU002A

Music Theory

3

MU002A Music Theory

3

MU003A

Vocal Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU003A Vocal Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU004A

Aural and Sight Singing

2

MU004A Aural and Sight Singing

2

MU006A

Keyboard Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU006A Keyboard Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU109

Introduction to Listening and Appraising

2

MU109

2

MU008A

Keyboard Sight Reading

1

MU008A Keyboard Sight Reading

1

Sight Reading for Singers

1

MU009A Sight Reading for Singers

1

Ensemble

1

MU009A

239

Introduction to Listening and Appraising

Ensemble

1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT


BM, BME, AA, Cert. & PQ COURSE SEQUENCE 2013 - 2014 BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN JAZZ & POPULAR MUSIC STUDIES YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ1--

Principal Instrument I

3

MJ1--

Principal Instrument II

3

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU106A

Pop Ensemble I

MU106B

Pop Ensemble II

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS111

Information Technology for Artist and Entrepreneur

2

YEAR 2 MJ2--

Principal Instrument III

3

MJ2--

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU213A

Jazz Improvisation I

1

MU213B

Jazz Improvisation II

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT212A

Jazz Theory I

3

MT212B

Jazz Theory II

3

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ3--

Principal Instrument V

3

MJ3--

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT312A

Harmony and Arranging I

2

MT312B

Harmony and Arranging II

2

MH304

Music of the Americas I

2

MH305

Music of the Americas II

2

MU306A

Jazz and Pop Ensemble I

1

MU306B

Jazz and Pop Ensemble II

1

MU307

Music Technology 1

2

MU308

Music Technology II

2

MU309

Music Business

2

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

YEAR 3

AM103A

Basic Accounting*

3

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU201

Music Notation and Sequencing

1

Elective

2 or 3

MJ4--

Principal Instrument VII

3

MJ4--

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MU406A

Jazz and Pop Ensemble III

1

MU406B

Jazz and Pop Ensemble IV

1

MU415A

Jazz Improvisation III

1

MU415B

Jazz Improvisation IV

1

MU409

Music Technology III

3

MU410

Music Technology IV

3

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

MT400

Song Writing

2

Elective

2 or 3

MU404

Independent Study

3

YEAR 4

Elective

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT

240


BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Piano, Voice, Percussion, Guitar YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ1--

Principal Instrument I

3

MJ1--

Principal Instrument II

3

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MJ2--

Principal Instrument III

3

MJ2--

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU126

Accompanying (piano majors)

1

MU126

Accompanying (piano majors)

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

MJ3--

Principal Instrument V

3

MJ3--

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

2

MT311B

Form and Analysis II

2

MH306

Western Music I

3

MH307

Western Music II

3

MH

Repertoire and Literature

2

Pedagogy

2

MU228

Diction for Singers I (voice majors)

2

MU328

Diction for Singers II (voice majors)

2

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU240

Conducting I

1

AM103A

Basic Accounting*

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

MT313

Arranging and Composing I

YEAR 3

Elective

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

MJ4--

Principal Instrument VII

3

MH400

Twentieth Century Western Music

3

MT413A

Arranging and Composing II

2

MU434

Pedagogy Practicum

2

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

MJ4--

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MU309

Music Business

2

MU404

Independent Study

3

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

Elective

2

YEAR 4

Elective

241

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRONT


BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MI1--

Principal Instrument I

2

MI1--

Principal Instrument II

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MI2--

Principal Instrument III

2

MI2--

Principal Instrument IV

2

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

ME101

Introduction to Music Education

1

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU104A

Guitar Skills I

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

MI3--

Principal Instrument V

2

MI3--

Principal Instrument VI

2

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

3

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

MU322

Recorder I

1

MU323

Recorder II

1

Ensemble

2

Ensemble

1

MU100

Percussion: Conga

1

ME308

Steel Band Techniques

1

ME310

Choral Techniques I

1

ME311

Choral Techniques II

1

ME312

Instrumental Techniques I

1

ME313

Instrumental Techniques II

1

ME305

Music Methods & Materials I

1

ME306

Music Methods & Materials II

2

PE204

The Emergent Teacher

3

PE205

Teacher, School and Society

2

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

PE202

Understanding the Learner

3

MU104B

Guitar Skills II

1

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

2

MT314

Arranging and Composing for Classroom I

1

MT315

Arranging and Composing for Classroom II

1

MU201

Music Notation and Sequencing

1

ME302

Technology in Music Education*

1

YEAR 3

**Teaching Observation & Lab

**Teaching Lab

YEAR 4 MI4--

Principal Instrument VII

2

MI4--

Principal Instrument VIII

2

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

ME401

Methods & Materials in Music III

1

PE400

** Teaching Practicum and Lab

15

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research

3

PE302

Introduction to Educational Administration

3

Elective

3 or 4

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242


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS - MUSIC YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ1--

Principal Instrument I*

3

MJ1--

Principal Instrument II*

3

MI1--

Principal Instrument I*

2

MI1--

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MJ2--

Principal Instrument III*

3

MJ2--

Principal Instrument IV*

3

MI2--

Principal Instrument III*

2

MI2--

Principal Instrument IV*

2

MT211A

Music Theory III*

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV*

3

MT212A

Jazz Theory I*

3

MT212B

Jazz Theory II*

3

MU207

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

MU104B

Guitar Skills I*

1

GS104A

Caribbean History Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History Culture and Aesthetics II

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy

3

ME101

Introduction to Music Education*

1

243

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CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ1--

Principal Instrument I*

3

MJ1--

Principal Instrument II*

3

MI1--

Principal Instrument I*

2

MI1--

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS100B

Critical Analysis and Expository Writing

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

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244


BM, BME, AA, Cert. & PQ COURSE SEQUENCE 2010/11 & 2011/12 YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II

3

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU106A

Pop Ensemble I

MU106B

Pop Ensemble II

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV

3

YEAR 2 MP200A

Principal Instrument III

3

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU213A

Jazz Improvisation I

1

MU213B

Jazz Improvisation II

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT212A

Jazz Theory I

3

MT212B

Jazz Theory II

3

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

MP300A

Principal Instrument V

3

MP300B

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT312A

Harmony and Arranging I

2

MT312B

Harmony and Arranging II

2

MH304

Music of the Americas I

2

MH305

Music of the Americas II

2

MU306A

Jazz and Pop Ensemble I

1

MU306B

Jazz and Pop Ensemble II

1

MU307

Music Technology 1

2

MU308

Music Technology II

2

MU309

Music Business

2

AM103A

Basic Accounting*

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU201

Music Notation and Sequencing

1

Elective

2 or 3

YEAR 3

245

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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YEAR 4 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP400A

Principal Instrument VII

3

MP400B

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MU406A

Jazz and Pop Ensemble III

1

MU406B

Jazz and Pop Ensemble IV

1

MU415A

Jazz Improvisation III

1

MU415B

Jazz Improvisation IV

1

MU409

Music Technology III

3

MU410

Music Technology IV

3

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

MT400

Song Writing

2

Elective

2 or 3

MU404

Independent Study

3

Elective

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Piano, Voice, Percussion, Guitar YEAR 1 MP100A

Principal Instrument I

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II

3

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 MP200A

Principal Instrument III

3

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV

3

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU126

Accompanying (piano majors)

1

MU126

Accompanying (piano majors)

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

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246


YEAR 3 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument V

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VI

3

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

2

MT311B

Form and Analysis II

2

MH306

Western Music I

3

MH307

Western Music II

3

MH

Repertoire and Literature

2

Pedagogy

2

MU228

Diction for Singers I (voice majors)

2

MU328

Diction for Singers II (voice majors)

2

GS231

College Mathematics*

3

MU240

Conducting I

1

AM103A

Basic Accounting*

3

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

3

MT313

Arranging and Composing I

Elective

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MJ

Principal Instrument VII

3

MJ

Principal Instrument VIII

3

MH400

Twentieth Century Western Music

3

MU309

Music Business

2

MU404

YEAR 4

MT413A

Arranging and Composing II

2

Independent Study

3

MU434

Pedagogy Practicum

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

GS303

Performance Research Forum

3

Elective

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

Elective

BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP101A

Principal Instrument I

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

247

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YEAR 2 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP201A

Principal Instrument III

2

MP201B

Principal Instrument IV

2

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

ME101

Introduction to Music Education

1

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy*

3

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

MU210A

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU104A

Guitar Skills I

MT211A

Music Theory III

3

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

GS201A

Psychology I*

2

MT211B

Music Theory IV

3

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS104A

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History, Culture and Aesthetics II

2

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP301A

Principal Instrument V

2

MP301B

Principal Instrument VI

2

YEAR 3

MT311A

Form and Analysis I

3

PE206

Assessment in the Classroom

3

MU322

Recorder I

1

MU323

Recorder II

1

Ensemble

2

Ensemble

1

MU100

Percussion: Conga

1

ME308

Steel Band Techniques

1

ME310

Choral Techniques I

1

ME311

Choral Techniques II

1

ME312

Instrumental Techniques I

1

ME313

Instrumental Techniques II

1

ME305

Music Methods & Materials I

1

ME306

Music Methods & Materials II

2

PE204

The Emergent Teacher

3

PE205

Teacher, School and Society

2

PE201

Theory and Practice in Education

3

PE202

Understanding the Learner

3

MU104B

Guitar Skills II

1

GS203

Academic and Professional Writing

2

MT314

Arranging and Composing for Classroom I

1

MT315

Arranging and Composing for Classroom II

1

MU201

Music Notation and Sequencing

1

ME302

Technology in Music Education

1

**Teaching Observation & Lab

**Teaching Lab

YEAR 4 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP401A

Principal Instrument VII

2

MP401B

Principal Instrument VIII

2

PE401

Practical Researcher

3

ME401

Methods & Materials in Music III

1

PE400

** Teaching Practicum and Lab

15

PE402

Reflective Practice & Action Research

3

PE302

Introduction to Educational Administration

3

Elective

3 or 4

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248


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS - MUSIC YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I*

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II*

3

MP101A

Principal Instrument I*

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

YEAR 2 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP200A

Principal Instrument III*

3

MP200B

Principal Instrument IV*

3

MP201A

Principal Instrument III*

2

MP201B

Principal Instrument IV*

2

MT211A

Music Theory III*

3

MT211B

Music Theory IV*

3

MT212A

Jazz Theory I*

3

MT212B

Jazz Theory II*

3

MU207

Aural and Sight Singing III

2

MU210B

Aural and Sight Singing IV

2

MH102

History of Jamaican Popular Music

3

MH103

Survey of Western Music

3

MU202A

Keyboard Skills III

1

MU202B

Keyboard Skills IV

1

Ensemble

1

Ensemble

1

GS102A

Introductory Spanish I

2

MU104B

Guitar Skills I*

1

GS104A

Caribbean History Culture and Aesthetics I

2

GS102B

Introductory Spanish II

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS104B

Caribbean History Culture and Aesthetics II

2

GS206

Introduction to Philosophy

3

ME101

Introduction to Music Education*

1

249

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CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MP100A

Principal Instrument I*

3

MP100B

Principal Instrument II*

3

MP101A

Principal Instrument I*

2

MP101B

Principal Instrument II*

2

MU102A

Keyboard Skills I

1

MH101

Survey of Jamaican Folk Music

3

MU107

Listening and Appraising

1

MU103B

Vocal Skills II

1

MU103A

Vocal Skills I

1

MU102B

Keyboard Skills II

1

MU110A

Aural and Sight Singing I

2

MU110B

Aural and Sight Singing II

2

MU111A

Music Theory I

3

MU111B

Music Theory II

3

MU120

Choir

1

MU120

Choir

1

GS100A

College English I

2

GS100B

College English II

2

GS106A

Ethics, Creativity and the Self I

2

GS106B

Ethics, Creativity and the Self II

2

GS102B

Information Technology II

2

Ensemble or Accompanying

1

PRELIMINARY QUALIFYING PROGRAMME YEAR 1 CODE

SEMESTER I

CR

CODE

SEMESTER II

CR

MU001A

Principal Instrument

2

MU001B

Principal Instrument

2

MU002A

Music Theory

3

MU002A

Music Theory

3

MU003A

Vocal Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU003A

Vocal Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU004A

Aural and Sight Singing

2

MU004A

Aural and Sight Singing

2

MU006A

Keyboard Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU006A

Keyboard Skills (Non-majors only)

1

MU109

Introduction to Listening and Appraising

2

MU109

Introduction to Listening and Appraising

2

MU008A

Keyboard Sight Reading

1

MU008A

Keyboard Sight Reading

1

Sight Reading for Singers

1

MU009A

Ensemble

1

MU009A

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250

Sight Reading for Singers

1

Ensemble

1


Course Descriptions MJ Principal Instrument (Performance Major) 3 credits per semester MI Principal Instrument (Music Education Major) 2 credits per semester

MU 328 Diction for Singers II 2 Credits Principles of German and French diction through use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and the application of these symbols to early, intermediate and advanced repertoire. Prerequisite: MU 228.

Students are required to undertake intense study in voice or an instrument on which he / she has demonstrated reasonable performing skills. The course will be tailored to the individual student’s level and needs and will cover a broad repertoire relevant to the particular choice of study. A juried examination is held each semester in which students are expected to display satisfactory progress from one semester to the next; the grade given at the examination will go towards a percentage of the student’s overall semester grade for the course. A student Is required to pass both the course work and the examination in order to pass the course. One hour lessons. Available Options: Piano, Voice, Guitar, Clarinet, Flute, Trumpet, Trombone, Violin, Steelpan, Modern Guitar, Electric Bass and Drum Kit & Percussion in Traditional or Jazz/pop concentrations.

MU 110A Aural and Sight Singing I 2 Credits Aural perception and sight-singing skills developed mainly through scalar and triadic patterns within tonal music utilizing mainly primary chord progressions in the major key and basic rhythmic patterns. MU 110B Aural and Sight Singing II 2 Credits Prerequisite: MU 110A. This course further develops the students’ aural perception and analysis and the emphasis will be placed on the practical application to the written aspect of music theory. The students will explore the minor scale, dominant chord, compound time and dotted rhythms. MU 210A Aural and Sight Singing III 2 Credits Prerequisite: MU 110B. Dominant 7th patterns, larger diatonic intervals within the octave, and early advanced rhythmic patterns are the focus.

MS Second Instrument 1 Credit Students will undertake instrumental or vocal studies on a secondary instrument and on which He/she has demonstrated reasonable performing skills. The course will be tailored to the individual student’s needs. An audition and recommendation by the Director or Head of Department is required. 30-minute lessons. MP 131 Applied Music 2 Credits per semester (One hour lesson)

MU 210B Aural & Sight Singing IV 2 Credits Prerequisite: MU 210A. Modulations, two part dictation and chromaticism are introduced at this level. MT 111 Music Theory I 3 Credits Principles of notation, scales (major and minor), keys, intervals, and triads; identification of triads and seventh chords in inversion; part-writing using root position and first inversion triads are taught mainly through music of the common practice period (1600-1900).

MP 132 Applied Music 1 Credit per semester (Half hour lesson) Instrumental and Vocal lesson designed for the non-music major who has demonstrated at least an intermediate level on their instrument or voice. Basic music theory and ear training will be included in the lesson. An audition is required. May be repeated for credit.

MT 111B Music Theory II 3 Credits Prerequisite: MT 111A. Focus will be on the use of second inversion triads and cadences; harmonization of soprano and bass lines; phrase forms; non-chord tones (non harmony notes) and diatonic seventh chords.

MU 228 Diction for Singers I 2 Credits Principles of Italian and English diction through use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and the application of these symbols to early, intermediate and advanced repertoire. 251

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MT 211A Music Theory III 3 Credits Prerequisite: MT 111B. Chromatic harmony, the use of secondary dominants, secondary leading tone chords, modulations, mode mixture and the Neapolitan chord are the emphases.

MT 413 Arranging and Composing II 2 Credits Prerequisite: MT 313. Study and use of advanced arranging and composing devices and techniques for various instrumental and vocal combinations. Assignments are scored and performed.

MT 211B Music Theory IV 3 Credits Prerequisite: MT 211A. The study of, augmented sixth chords, chromatic alterations, Bach chorale harmonizations, and compositions using the simple forms of the 18th and 19th centuries, is the focus at this level.

MT 314 Arranging and Composing for Classroom I 1 Credit Prerequisite: MT 211B or MT212B Study and use of fundamental arranging and composing devices and techniques for various classroom instruments and the voice. Assignments are scored and performed.

MT 212A Jazz Theory I 3 Credits Prerequisite: MT 111B. Writing, and aural recognition, of scales, triads, chords, progressions and compositional devices commonly utilized in jazz as well as notation and performance of rhythms (including Latin claves and other syncopated patterns), and analysis of jazz performances. MT 212B Jazz Theory II Prerequisite: MU 212A

3 Credits

MT 312A Harmony and Arranging I 2 Credits Prerequisite: MT 212B. Study of the musical elements and devices commonly utilized in Jazz / Pop forms and the acquisition of skills leading to the development of a personal style in arranging for various combinations of instruments / voices. MT 312B Harmony and Arranging II Prerequisite: MT 312A

2 Credits

MT 400 Song Writing 2 Credits Prerequisite: MT 211B or MT212B This course teaches the principles of song writing by guiding the student through the creative process of song writing. Topics to be covered include creativity and inspiration, choosing and manipulating a subject matter, song construction (structure), writing the music, creating demos, publishing the score and marketing. MT 313 Arranging and Composing I 2 Credits Prerequisite: MT 211B or MT212B Study and use of fundamental arranging and composing devices and techniques for various instrumental and vocal combinations. Assignments are scored and performed. TABLE OF CONTENTS

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MT 315 Arranging and Composing for Classroom II 2 Credits Prerequisite: MT 314 This course focuses on the study and use of fundamental arranging and composing devices and techniques for various instrumental and vocal combinations. This will be explored through the use of music notation and sequencing software. MT 311A Form and Analysis I 2 Credits Prerequisite: MT 211B or MT 212B. Homophonic forms and styles mainly, of the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Contemporary periods are studied and analyzed. MT 311B Form and Analysis II 2 Credits Prerequisite: MT 311A. Larger forms mainly of the Classical and Romantic periods are studied and analyzed MT 401 Orchestration 2 Credits Prerequisite: MT 211B. Study of the individual capabilities of standard orchestral, and other common instruments as well as writing / arranging for small ensembles. MU 107 Listening and Appraising 2 Credits The development of foundational listening and appraising skills as well as the acquisition of appropriate vocabulary to describe musical features heard in different genres and styles of music are the objectives of this course. Elective and Music Minor course. MH 101 Survey of Traditional Jamaican Folk Music 3 Credits The Traditional Music Folk Forms of Jamaica are investigated through lectures, demonstrations, research projects and presentations.

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MH 102 The Evolution of Jamaican Popular Music 3 Credits The evolution of Jamaica’s popular music forms and the diverse, dynamic cultures that influenced them are investigated. Listening, analysis, independent research and reporting are required MH 103 Western Music: An Overview 3 Credits An overview of the development of Western Art music from the Middle Ages to the 20th century through the main forms and styles of each period. Listening, analysis, independent research and reporting are required. MH 401 Survey of World Music Cultures 3 Credits Music of various regions of the world (mainly Africa, Asia, and the Americas) is explored with the aim of developing an understanding of the relationship between music and the culture within which it is created. Listening, analysis, independent research and reporting are required. MH 306 Western Music I 3 Credits The major influences and styles of the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical music (up to Haydn and Mozart) are studied through works by the major composers of these periods. Listening, analysis, independent research and reporting are required. MH 307 Western Music II 3 Credits Prerequisite: MH 306. The major influences and styles of late Classical (Beethoven), Romantic, Impressionistic and an introduction to 20th century art music are studied through works by the major composers of these periods. Listening, analysis, independent research and reporting are required. MH 304 Music of the Americas I 2 Credits This course gives a historical overview of the origins and evolution of the significant musical forms found in the Americas. Listening, analysis, independent research and reporting are required.

MH 400 Twentieth Century Western Music 2 Credits Prerequisite: none This course covers the history of Western music from 1900 to the present. The elements of musical language and style are traced through representative composers’ works. Listening, analysis, independent research, and writing are required. Repertoire and Literature 2 Credits Mainstream literature of the principal instrument / voice being studied is explored and discussed. Listening, analysis, independent research and reporting are required. Offered in the following areas: MH 310 Piano MH 311 Voice MH 312 Guitar MH 313 Woodwind MH 314 Brass MH 315 Percussion Pedagogy of Principal Instrument 2 Credits Methodologies and materials used for teaching instruments / voice are explored through lectures, workshops and demonstration lessons. Offered in the following areas: MU 314 Piano MU 315 Voice MU 316 Guitar MU 317 Woodwind MU 318 Brass MU 319 Percussion MU 321 Pedagogy Practicum 2 Credits Prerequisite: Individual instruction given by the student to beginning / elementary level instrumentalists / vocalists under the supervision of a faculty member, with ongoing assessment of lesson planning, teaching strategies, choice of repertoire, and performance evaluation. MU 120 Choir 1 Credit per semester A variety of choral arrangements, mainly for SATB voices, will be attempted each semester. May be repeated for credit.

MH 305 Music of the Americas II 2 Credits Prerequisite: MH 304 The impact and influence of African music on the contemporary music of the Americas is the main focus. Listening, analysis, independent research and reporting are required.

MU 109 Traditional Jamaican Drumming 1 Credit per semester Foundation conga drumming techniques taught through the use of Jamaican rhythms and those from our African heritage. Ensembles of Principal Instruments 1 Credit per semester Students are required to take a prescribed number of credits in the ensemble related to their principal study and area

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of specialization. The experience provides the opportunity for the development of musicianship skills and knowledge associated with the particular ensemble. Ensembles may be repeated for credit. Main ensembles offered are: MP 121 Vocal Ensemble MP 220 Recorder Ensemble MP 124 Woodwind Ensemble MP 125 Brass Ensemble MP 122 Steel Pan Ensemble MP 123 Drumming Ensemble MP 221 Chamber Music Ensemble MP 222 Mixed Instrumental Ensemble MP 126 Accompanying MP 133 Percussion Ensemble MP126 Accompanying 1 Credit per semester A compulsory course for all classical piano performance majors, conducted as a workshop in which students hone skills for accompanying the voice and instruments in a range of musical styles. May be repeated for credit. MU 240 Conducting I 1 Credit Fundamental conducting gestures, score reading for choirs and instrumental ensembles, form the main content of this course. MU 241 Conducting II 1 Credit Prerequisite: MU 240. More advanced conducting skills and rehearsal techniques for more idiomatic groups are attempted. ME203 Foundation of Music Education 3 Credits The course is an introduction to the music education profession in general and as it has been practiced in Jamaica. Students will explore historical, social, and philosophical considerations and foundations that relate directly to the Caribbean music educator, and include a critical evaluation of some contemporary trends in the field. Students will explore the history of Jamaican music education, and curricular achievements in school music programmes. Other topics include a broad look at different music educator philosophers and theorists, understanding the self, the roles of the music teacher, and tools of teaching. The course will place emphasis on practical approaches to teaching both in the classroom and rehearsal setting. ME 307 Methods and Materials in Music I 3 Credits Prerequisite: ME 203 This methods course reflects the historical, social and TABLE OF CONTENTS

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cultural milieu in which music takes place in the schools of our nation. The course focuses not only on giving our students the necessary musical tools needed for a career in music education but also prepares them for the pedagogical skills needed to effectively design, and manage learning and instruction at the secondary level in a Jamaican school. Emphasis is given to planning, teaching and evaluating music lessons and to utilizing techniques and materials from a variety of approaches. The cultural framework in which music education takes place is focused on so that students will not only be exposed to musical ideas from outside the geographical region in which they live but an emphasis will be placed on materials and musical ideas from Jamaica and the Caribbean region. The course will operate as a learning laboratory where students will function as both student and teacher. Students will be asked to teach mini-lessons and be involved in pedagogical practice modules in schools. The course is a two part one: the first part focuses primarily on giving students the methods and materials that they will need in their career as music educators; the second part will broaden the offerings to include more intense work on pedagogy and educational organization aimed at preparing students for teaching practice and the ultimate goal of being effective educators in secondary school music. ME 309 Methods and Materials in Music II 3 Credits Prerequisite: ME 307 This methods course reflects the historical, social and cultural milieu in which music takes place in the schools of our nation. The course focuses not only on giving our students the necessary musical tools needed for a career in music education but also prepares them for the pedagogical skills needed to effectively design, and manage learning and instruction at the secondary level in a Jamaican school. Emphasis is given to planning, teaching and evaluating music lessons and to utilizing techniques and materials from a variety of approaches. The cultural framework in which music education takes place is focused on so that students will not only be exposed to musical ideas from outside the geographical region in which they live but an emphasis will be placed on materials and musical ideas from Jamaica and the Caribbean region. The course will operate as a learning laboratory where students will function as both student and teacher. The course is a two part one: the first part focuses primarily on giving students the methods and materials that they will need in their career as music educators; the second part will broaden the offerings to include more intense work on pedagogy and educational organization aimed at preparing students for teaching practice and the ultimate goal of being effective educators in secondary school music. ME 401 Methods and Materials in Music III 1 Credit Prerequisite: ME 309 During this section of the course, the class and course work

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will broaden to include more intense work on pedagogy and educational organization aimed at preparing students for their careers as music teachers. There will be some attention given to exposing students to the curriculum requirements of primary music; namely, music from the sounds in the environment, music from musical and extra-musical stimuli and music in everyday life. These requirements are of course focused on the parameters of music teaching in Jamaican schools, namely, Performance, Listening and Appraising, and Composing. In addition, course materials will focus on the CSEC syllabus, and Competitions in Jamaican schools and the role of the music teacher in delivering and preparing for these tasks. Students will be exposed to the skills needed to effectively design, and manage learning and instruction at the secondary level. The goal of the course is to prepare students to be effective educators in school music. ME 317 Measurement and Evaluation in the Music Classroom 3 Credits Prerequisite: ME 307 This course will offer a broad foundation of all aspects of assessment and measurement as well as evaluation including, but not limited to, other forms of data collection applied in music education. Topics in this course will include psychometrics; measurement of musical aptitude, achievement, performance, and affect; measurement tools, including assessment instrument development; administration and scoring of assessments; and reporting systems. ME 314 Choral Techniques 1 Credit This course is designed to provide students with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required to teach choral ensembles in secondary schools. Among topics to be addressed in this phase of the course are vocal production, an introduction to effective rehearsal techniques, the changing voice, musicianship skills, choral conducting, and evaluation and assessment. ME 315 Instrumental Techniques 1 Credit This course is designed to established techniques (methods) and materials necessary for running a successful Instrumental Music Program at the secondary school level. It exposes students to the brass/woodwind family of instruments as well as hands-on experience playing selected instruments from these families. Instruction will focus on the policies, procedures and challenges faced by instrumental music educators; program administration, planning, and development; recruitment of students; selection of musical literature and method books; teaching strategies; equipment selection and repair; and personal/ professional preparation.

basic steel pan playing techniques but also the theoretical knowledge, historical background, and practical skills required to teach steel bands in secondary schools. Students will be introduced to the instruments in the steel band family and must be actively involved in the class’ steel band for the duration of the semester. Instrumental and Vocal Skills Classes 1 Credit per semester Students develop secondary instrumental and vocal skills that will enable them to function in the classroom and group settings primarily as accompanists and ensemble performers. Offered in the following areas: MU 102A Keyboard Skills I MU 102B Keyboard Skills II Prerequisite: MU 102A

MU 202A Keyboard Skills III Prerequisite: MU 102B

MU 202B Keyboard Skills IV Prerequisite: MU 202A

MU 104A Guitar Skills I MU 104B Guitar Skills II Prerequisite: MU 104A

MU 103A Vocal Skills I MU 103B Vocal Skills II Prerequisite: MU 103A MU 322 Recorder I MU 323 Recorder II Prerequisite: MU 322 MU 306A/B & MU406A/B MU111 Keyboard Harmony I 1 Credit This course will develop keyboard skills which will enable piano students to transpose music. They will also be harmonizing melodies which involves the use of chord progressions and cadences. The students will also gain an understanding of the circle of 5ths which demonstrates how keys are related. The course is delivered in a keyboard lab setting. MU112 Keyboard Harmony II 1 Credit This course will further develop keyboard skills which will enable piano students to transpose and harmonize melodies.

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble I – VIII 1 Credit per semester These courses focus on the fundamentals of jazz ME 308 improvisation and performance practice of jazz and Steel Band Techniques 1 Credit pop music repertoire, performed on students’ principal This course is designed to provide students not only with instruments collectively and in an ensemble setting. This TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT 255


is an eight semester sequence ending with advanced level improvisation and complex arrangements. MU133 MU134 MU242 MU243 MU329 MU330 MU401 MU402

MU 309 Music Business 2 Credits The business and professional practices of musicians as well as artist and event production and promotion are studied.

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble I Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble II Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble III Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble IV Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble V Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble VI Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble VII Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble VIII

MU 201 Computer Music Notation 1 Credit This course involves using music notation software to create a variety of scores for voice and instruments (including the drumset), and educational charts and test sheets for the classroom. MU 307 Music Technology I 1 Credit This course examines the science of sound production, the history, development and techniques of analog and digital recording, live audio mixing, MIDI, sequencing and the basics of record production. The first semester of the course is a basic introduction to the properties of sound, number systems and computers. The course will also introduce filters and spectrum processors like equalizers and the uses of delay; transducers- microphones and their polar patterns; MIDI, sequencing, recording considerations and synchronization; Synthesizers and signal flow. There is an introduction to notation software. MU 308 Music Technology II 2 Credits Prerequisite: MU 307 This course takes a more in-depth look at synthesis systems, sequencing, sampling, the Digital Audio Workstation (DAW), audio editing and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) concepts. MU 409 Music Technology III 2 Credits Prerequisite: MU 308 This course focuses on music composition and production with the aid of a Digital Audio Workstation. Several small projects along with a large project are required. MU 410 Music Technology IV 2 Credits This course takes a more in-depth look at the studio process and practical applications of concepts learned in the Music Technology III. A final thesis/project is required. Prerequisite: MU 409

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MU 404 Independent Study 3 Credits Prerequisites: GS303 The course provides students with an opportunity to develop an historical question based upon a topic of their choice, conduct research and write their findings in an extensive paper. The student is expected to meet regularly (weekly) with her/his project supervisor at times that are mutually convenient for guidance in the research and writing process. This is not a formal class, as students are expected to work on their own initiative. The student’s final paper must include a fair amount of musical analysis. MU 108 Musical Instruments of Africa and the Diaspora 3 Credits This Studio Seminar course develops students’ awareness of a wide range of stringed and percussion instruments from ancient Africa up to the African Diaspora. Each student will create a variety of instruments from this area of study. Emphasis will be placed on the various materials, power tools, hand tools and techniques used in the creation of their own musical instruments


FACULTY Maurice E. Gordon – Coordinator of Guitar Studies Lecturer - Modern Guitar, Contemporary Music Studies BA (Jazz Performance) - York University

FULL-TIME LECTURERS Roger N. Williams Director Lecturer - Piano and Music Theory MM (Performance) – Butler University, BM Summa Cum Laude (Performance) University of Southern Maine, Diploma in Music Education (Hons) – Jamaica School of Music (Edna Manley College)

Angela Gay Magnus – Coordinator of Percussion Studies Lecturer – Steel Pan and Percussion MM (Performance) – Northern Illinois University BA (Musical Arts Special) – University of the West Indies, St. Augustine BSc. (Botany) – University of the West Indies, Mona

Michael Sean Harris Assistant Director Lecturer - Music Technology and Voice BM (Music Synthesis and Arranging) Berkelee College of Music MM (Music Technology) Berkelee College of Music

Rafael Salazar Coordinator of Wind Studies Lecturer – Clarinet & Wind BM (performance, teaching & band conducting) – Conservatorio de Musica Estaban Salas, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba Advanced Certificate – Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music

Allison Wallace HOD, Department of Music Theory and Musicology Lecturer Piano, Music Theory and Aural MM (Performance) Florida International University, BM (Performance & MusicEducation) Lewis and Clark College Michael Dyke HOD, Department of Music Education Lecturer - Music Research Unit, Music Education Musicology DJSM (Adv.) - Jamaica School of Music Orville Hammond HOD, Department of Performance Studies Lecturer – Piano and Jazz Studies MM (Jazz Performance) – Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester BM (Performance) - Oberlin Conservatory of Music

Debra-Ann Davidson Lecturer - Musicology and Piano Masters in Educational Technology – University of British Colombia, Vancouver MM (Historical Performance) Oberlin Conservatory of Music, MM (Performance) - University of North Carolina (Greensboro), BM (Performance) - University of North Carolina (Greensboro) Teresita Iraneta Ruiz Lecturer - Piano MA (Performance) - Instituto Superio de Arte, Havana, Cuba, BA (Teaching) - Havana, Cuba

Pauline Watson – Coordinator of Vocal Studies Lecturer - Voice MFA (Singing) - Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatoire, Certificate (Teaching) -The Mico Teachers’ College Ann McNamee – Coordinator of Keyboard Studies Lecturer - Piano and Conducting BM (Organ Performance) - University of Ottawa, FTCL (Accompanying) - Trinity College, London

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Lori Burnett Lecturer – Voice BM (Performance) – State University of New York, Fredonia Diploma in Performance – Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music

Michael Fletcher Lecturer - Contemporary Music Studies Graduate Diploma in Arts Education - Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts Performing artist, songwriter and Band leader for the internationally acclaimed artiste, Shaggy

Curtis Watson Lecturer - Voice Certificate in Teaching - Mico Teachers’ College, Certificate in Solo Singing -Tchaikovsky State Conservatory, FTCL - Trinity College Major Joseph Williams Lecturer - Woodwinds Diploma (Bandmastership) - Royal Military School of Music, Kneller Hall, ARCM – Royal College of Music, Diploma (Journalism) Bennett College, Sheffield

Ruth Royes Lecturer - Voice and Jazz studies BA in Contemporary Music Performance (Voice) Honours - Humber College Certificate in Commercial Jazz Music - Humber College Andre Adman Lecturer - Piano, Music Theory & Aural Bachelor of Music Education – Edna Manley College, Diploma in Music Education (JBTE) Edna Manley College, Diploma ABRSM (Piano Performing) - Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music

Stephanie Williams Lecturer - Music Education MA (School Music) - McGill University, Canada, Mus. Bach. (Hons.) Music Education - University of Toronto, Canada, LRSM (Piano Teaching) Devon Richardson Lecturer - Drum Kit Performer and recording artiste

PART-TIME LECTURERS Michael “Ibo” Cooper Lecturer - Piano and Contemporary Music Studies MPhil. (pending) - The University of the West Indies Performing artist, songwriter and founding member of the Third World Band.

Derrick Stewart Lecturer - Drum Kit Performer and recording artiste Jon Williams Lecturer – Piano DipRCM (Piano) – Royal College of Music, London; ARCM (Violin Teaching); LRSM (Piano Performance), Royal College of Music

Angella Elliott Lecturer - Piano & Music Theory BM - Florida International University Albert Shaun Hird Lecturer - Flute and Band Instruments BM (Conducting), Advanced Certificate Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music Noel Dexter Lecturer - Voice BA (Economics) - University of the West Indies, Mona; ATCL Trinity College,London June Lawson Lecturer - Voice FTCL - Trinity College, London; LRSM TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Ouida Lewis Master Drummer (hand drum/Djembe)

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Darren Young Lecturer – Strings and Musicology MA (pending - Musicology); BM (Performance) – SUNY, Fredonia; Diploma in Performance (Viola) – Edna Manley College


Jillian Castle Lecturer – Keyboard Skills and Music Education MBA – University of New Orleans; BSc. (Economics and Management) – UWI, Mona Bachelor of Music Education; Diploma in Music Education – Edna Manley College

Janet Ismay Kerr Lecturer – Music Education MA in Education – University of the West Indies BA in Education – University of the West Indies Certificate in School Music Teaching – Jamaica School of Music (EMCVPA)

Kyran O’Connor Lecturer – Music Education Bachelor of Music Education; Diploma in Music Education – Edna Manley College

Nomali Lumsden Lecturer – Music Education MM in Music Education – University of Miami Diploma in Music Education – Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

Adrian Hemans Accompanist - Piano Diploma in Jazz and Popular Music Studies – Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

Alistair Petir Lecturer – Cello & Double Bass Graduate Diploma – Northern College of Music

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Programmes GENERAL INFORMATION The School of Visual Arts offers Degrees, Associate Degrees in Fine Arts and Minor programmes, Certificate programmes and B.A.E. in Art Education which seek to produce individuals who will havesignificant impact on the cultural sphere in the area of Visual Art. • Bachelor of Fine Arts - Four (4) years • Associate Degree – Fine Arts (2) years • Minor Programme – 20 credits • Bachelor of Art Education - Four (4) years • Certificate Programme - Fine Arts - Two (2) years • Studio Certificate - Fine Arts - One (1) year • UWI/EMC BA Humanities & Education Degree - Visual Arts Major - Three (3) years Students are required to select courses according to the credit requirement laid down for the Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Art Education, Associate of Arts, Certificate and Studio Certificate programmes.

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

1. Upon registration a Student Information Handbook listing courses, credits and course descriptions will be issued to students. This will aid students in selecting their courses. 2. Registration forms must be collected in the office of the Registry. 3. Registration forms must be accurately completed and signed by theLecturer / Head of Department. 4. Department Heads and Lecturers will be available to assist and advise students during registration week. 5. Note UWI/EMC Students: Registration is not complete until you have registered at The University of the West Indies (UWI) and returned a copy of your UWI registration form and all other pertinent documents to the Edna Manley College Registry.

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS

To qualify for the B.F.A. - Visual Arts, full-time students are required to successfully complete 132 credits including electives: To qualify for the Associate of Arts Degree in Visual Arts full time students are required to complete a minimum of 66 credits over two (2) years. This includes a minimum of 6 credits of electives as set out. Achieve a minimum grade average of 2.0 (C-) for all courses completed in order to earn the credits. To qualify for the B.A.E. – Visual Arts, full-time students will be required to successfully complete: TABLE OF CONTENTS

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A minimum of 140 credits over four (4) years, as set out. Achieve a minimum grade average of 2.0 (C-) for all courses completed in order to earn the credits. To qualify for the UWI/EMC (Major) students will be required to successfully complete at the Edna Manley College: 36 credits over three years, Achieve a minimum grade average of Bare Pass (40% - 43%) To qualify for the UWI/EMC (Special) students will be required to successfully complete at the Edna Manley College: 54 credits over three years, Achieve a minimum grade average of Bare Pass (40% - 43%) Students are reminded to pay strict attention to prerequisite requirements for all courses. A minimum of 96 credits over three (3) years, as set out. Achieve a minimum grade average of 2.0 (C-) for all courses completed in order to gain the credits. To qualify for the Studio Certificate, students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 30 credits over one year (and 2.0 minimum grade). To qualify for the Certificate, students will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 60 credits over two years (and 2.0 minimum grade).

B.F.A. STUDIO MAJOR: This is your department of specialization in which a minimum of 18 credits including drawing per year MUST be taken.

B.A.E. STUDIO MAJOR: This is your department of specialization in which a minimum of 12 credits including drawing in years 2 & 3 and 6 credits in Year 4 MUST be taken.

ELECTIVES Electives may be chosen from any department across the College within the same year level or the previous year i.e. second year students may choose a second year course from any department across the College, and third year students may select from the second year courses but not vice versa. It is advised that you discuss your choice of electives with your Department Head or Coordinator. NB. Some departments may also have recommended courses for electives.

CHANGES IN SCHEDULE: ADD / DROP

ADDING: Any student wishing to add or exchange courses may do so within the first three (3) weeks of the semester. Change after this time will attract a charge.


Art Supply Shop

DROPPING: Any student wishing to withdraw from class or drop a course may do so within the first three (3) weeks of the semester. Change after this time will attract a charge. The procedure for change as related to the above is as follows:

There is a small art supply shop on the campus. A wide range of art materials and supplies needed by students are available from the shop. Where these are not in stock, students are advised to use commercial outlets to secure the materials. Students are to acquire all recommended text at the beginning of their Foundation year and subsequent years thereafter Semester. The School gives no undertaking to stock all materials required by students.

1. Pick up Add / Drop slip in the office of the Registry. 2. Obtain signed approval of the Lecturer and/or Department Head or Coordinator or Faculty Advisor. 3. Return Add /Drop slip to the School of Visual Arts Office for forwarding to the Registry.

Art Supply Shop Opening Hours Monday - Thursday: 8:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. / 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Friday 8:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Saturday 8:30 p.m. - 12 noon

ABSOLUTELY NO WITHDRAWAL AFTER THE DEADLINE NOTE: DISCONTINUANCE OF ATTENDANCE AT CLASSES OR NOTIFICATION TO THE LECTURER DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN OFFICIALWITHDRAWAL. RESPONSIBILITY FOR OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL OR COURSE CHANGE RESTS WITH THE STUDENT.

School of Visual Arts Programme Structure

Within the School of the Visual Arts there are nine departments each specializing in a specific artistic expression.

STUDENTS WHO DO NOT COMPLY WITH THE ABOVE REGULATIONS WILL BE DEEMED TO HAVE FAILED THE COURSE. ACADEMIC AND STUDIO COURSES SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED MAY NOT BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT.

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BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (BFA)

4 Years: 132 Credits: (120 Required course credits plus twelve (12) elective credits over 4 years)

FOUNDATION STUDIES The Foundation Studies develops skill and discipline. Students develop a sense of adventure for exploring new materials, techniques and ideas. This year challengesprevious assumptions about art and design as well as develops an awareness of the immense range of art-making possibilities. In the Foundation Studies, students are given the opportunity to express ideas personally and collectively through projects and it is the year to become aware of ones personal commitment to Art and Design. Students doing the Foundation Studies must complete 12 credits in 2D/3D, 6 credits in Drawing, 4 credits in Art History, 8 credits in General Studies. Up to 12 credits in Electives must be taken over four years

YEAR I FOUNDATION

YEAR II

Specialized /studio courses

Specialization /studio courses

Credits per Semester

Per Year

Credits per Semester

Per Year

Integrated 2D/3D I & II

3

6

Studio Major

6

12

Studio Practice /Intro to Departments

3

6

Drawing

3

6

Drawing I & II

3

6

General Studies

4

8

General Studies

4

8

Adjunct courses

2

4

Adjunct courses

2

4

(Art History)

(Art History)

Electives

Electives

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

30

30

YEAR III

YEAR IV- FINAL YEAR

Specialization/studio courses

Specialization/studio courses

Credits per Semester

Per Year

Credits per Semester

Per Year

Studio Major

6

12

Independent Study 918

9

18

Drawing

3

6

General Studies4 8

4

8

General Studies

4

8

Research Methods 2 4

2

4

Adjunct courses

2

4

Electives

(Art History)

2

4

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

Electives TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

30

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30


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN VISUAL ARTS

2 Years: 66 Credits (year one and two of the BFA & (6) six elective credits to be taken over two years).

YEAR I Specialized studio courses Credits per Semester

Per Year

Integrated 2D/3D

3

6

Studio Practice /Intro to Departments

3

6

Drawing

3

6

General Studies

4

8

Adjunct courses

2

4

(Art History) Electives TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

30

YEAR II –FINAL YEAR Specialization/studio courses Credits per Semester

Per Year

Studio Major

6

12

Drawing

3

6

General Studies

4

8

Adjunct courses

2

4

(Art History) Electives TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

30

Students must directly register for and successfully complete year one and two the BFA for the Associates of Arts degree.

S.V.A. MINOR PROGRAMMES

A minor requires a minimum of 20 credits. Students must maintain a G.P.A. of at least 2.00 in the minor. 15 Credits of studio in minor and a maximum of 9 credits may be used to meet the requirements for both the Minor and Major.

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BACHELOR IN ART EDUCATION 4 years: 140 Credits: (130 Required course credits and 10 Elective credits over 4 years) YEAR I FOUNDATION COURSES Specialized /studio courses

Credits Per Semester

Per Year

Integrated 2D/3D I & II

3

6

Studio Practice /Intro to Departments

3

6

Drawing I & II

3

6

General Studies

4

8

Adjunct courses (Art History)

2

4

Electives

4

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

34

Year II Art Education Professional course

2

2

Studio I (Major)

3

6

Studio II (Minor)

3

6

Drawing

3

6

General Studies

10

Adjunct Courses (Art History)

2

4

Electives

3

6

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

40

YEAR III Specialization /studio courses

Credits Per Semester

per year

Art Education Professional courses

21

Studio I( Major)

6

6

Studio II (Minor)

6

6

Drawing

6

6

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

36

YEAR IV – FINAL YEAR Specialization/studio courses

Credits Per Semester

per year

Professional Courses

3

6

Independent Study

3

6

Art Education

Teaching Practice

12

Seminar

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

27

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DEGREE COMPLETION /DIPLOMA UPGRADE JBTE - BAE EMCVPA GRADUATES 3 YEAR JBTE DIPLOMA TO 4 YEAR B.A.E. DEGREE 45 Credits to complete B.A.E. degree over three semesters Full-time or 6 semesters part-time. Students graduated more than 5 years must do three additional credits of Technology in Art Education. Specialization

Credits

Studio Major

21

Independent Study (Field Work)

4

Professional Study

12

General Studies

8

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

45

NON-EMCVPA GRADUATES 3 YEAR JBTE DIPLOMA TO 4 YEAR B.A.E. DEGREE 45 Credits to complete B.A.E. degree over three semesters. Full time or 6 semesters part-time. Students graduated more than 5 years must do three additional credits of Technology in Art Education. Specialization

Credits

Studio Major

36

Professional Study

15

Independent Study (Field Work)

4

General Studies

14

Adjunct courses (Art History)

4

Electives

7

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

80

3 YEAR FINE ART DIPLOMA TO 4 YEAR B.F.A. DEGREE 36 Credits to complete B.A.E. degree over three Semesters Full time. Specialization

Credits

Studio Major

18

General Studies

12

Adjunct courses

6

(Art History) TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

36

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CERTIFICATE

60 CREDIT Year I

Specialization/studio courses

Credits per Semester

Credits Per Year

Studio Work

9

18

General Studies

4

8

2

4

Adjunct courses (Art History) TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

30

YEAR II Specialization/studio courses

Credits per Semester

Credits Per Year

(Inc.3 credits Electives)

9

18

General Studies Semester I

7

General Studies Semester II

5

General Studies

12

Studio Work

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

30

STUDIO CERTIFICATE

30 CREDITS

Year I Semesters I & II Specialization /studio courses Credits per Semester

Credits Per Year

Studio Work

18

9

Technical Workshop

2

Adjunct courses (Art History)

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

22

Semester III Specialized studio courses

Credits per Semester

Credits Per Year

Studio Work 6

6

6

General Studies 2

2

2

8

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

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268


VISUAL ARTS MAJORS

4 Years: 132 Credits: (120 Required course credits &twelve (12) elective credits over 4 years). Electives to be selected from SVA Departments and /or other Schools.

BACHELOR IN FINE ARTS / ASSOCIATE OF ARTS FOUNDATION YEAR 1

SEMESTER I

Code

Course

Credits

FD102A Integrated 2D/3D I

3

FD103A Studio Practice

3

DR100A Drawing I

3

GS100A Fundamentals of English

2

GS101A Introduction to Critical Analysis I

2

AH100A History of Art Survey I

2

EL100E

Time-Based Media

3

YEAR 1

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Credits

FD102B

Integrated 2D/3D II

3

FD103B

Introduction to Departments

3

DR101B Drawing II

3

GS100B

Critical Writing and Analysis

2

GS101B

Introduction to Critical Analysis II

2

AH100B

History of Arts Survey II

2

EL100E

Time-Based Media

3

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BFA CERAMICS MAJOR Students study ceramics as expressive, functional, structural and decorative objects for use in interior or public spaces. This department encourages students to develop self-motivation and discipline as artists. This programme encourages students to develop experimental and innovative approach over production and repetition. Students are introduced to a variety of ways of working with clay and develop skills and confidence to build or throw forms and to fire and finish work. This programme has two majors - Studio Ceramics and Multimedia Ceramics from which students must choose one. Students are expected to take 18 credits in their major including Drawing, 4 credits in Art History, 8 credits in General Studies. Up to 12 credits in Electives must be taken over four years. YEAR 2

SEMESTER I

YEAR 2

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Cr.

Code

Course

Cr.

CD202A CD203A

Multimedia Ceramics Ia

3

CD202B

Multimedia Ceramics Ib

3

Ceramic Sculpture Ia

3

CD203B

Ceramic Sculpture Ib

3

CD205E

Ceramic Jewellery

3

CD205E

Ceramic Jewellery

3

CD206

Studio Ceramics Processes I (Workshop)

0

CD207

Studio Ceramics Processes II (Workshop)

0

TD207

Textile Design Surface Design (Workshop)

0

EL244E

Computer-Aided Design for Artists

3

EL244E

Computer-Aided Design for Artists

3

DR200B

Drawing from Observation 3

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

GS201B

Psychology II

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

AH204A

Black British Art

2

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

15

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

15

(Excluding Elective)

(Excluding Elective)

YEAR 3

SEMESTER I

YEAR 3

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Cr.

Code

Course

Cr.

CD301A

Studio Ceramics IIa

3

CD301B

Studio Ceramics IIb

3

CD302A

Multimedia Ceramics IIa

3

CD302B

Multimedia Ceramics IIb

3

CD303A

Ceramic Sculpture IIa

3

CD303B

Ceramic Sculpture IIb

3

CD304A

Surface Design IIa

3

CD304B

Surface Design IIb

3

DR301A

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

DR301B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

DR302A

Concept Development through Drawing I

3

DR302B

Concept Development through Drawing

3

II DR303A

Drawing for Design I

3

DR303B

Drawing for Design II

3

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

GS300A

Research Methods Ia

2

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

GS302A

World Literature I

2

GS302B

World Literature II

2

AH300A

Pre-Columbian Art

2

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

3

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270


AH301A

Caribbean Cultural Production for Social

2

GS314

Information in the British West Indies AH307A

Caribbean Dress Studies I:Survey of

3

Caribbean Textile & Fashion Designers

Introduction to Material Culture: A

2

AH300B

Latin American Art

2

AH302B

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

Caribbean Experience TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15 TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15 YEAR 4

SEMESTER I

Cr

YEAR 4

SEMESTER II

Cr

Code

Course

Cr

Code

Course

Cr

CD401A

Independent Study I

9

CD401B

Independent Study II

9

GS400A

Research Methods IIa

2

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

GS442A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466A

Principles& Practices of Art Criticism

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art 2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding

15

Elective)

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding

15

Elective)

271

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BFA JEWELLERY MAJOR This department places a very strong emphasis on design, aesthetics and beauty of the finished product. Students in this area of specialization are kept abreast of most major changes in art and design. This programme offers the fundamentals of metal-smithing, surface embellishment, settings and stone finishing for expressing ideas. Students are expected to take 12 credits in their major area, 4 credits in Art History, 8 credits in General Studies, 6 credits in drawing per year and up to 12 credits in Electives over four years. YEAR 2

SEMESTER I

YEAR 2

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Cr

Code

Course

Cr

JW200A

Introduction to Jewellery

3

JW202B

Goldsmithing I

3

JW201A

Principles of Design I

3

JW203B

Theory of Jewellery I

3

EL244E

Computer Aided Design Design for Artists

3

JW204B

Mechanics and Fittings (Mandatory Workshop)

0

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

DR201A

Issues in Drawing 1a

3

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS201B

Psychology II

2

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

AH204A

Black British Art

2

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 3

SEMESTER I

YEAR 3

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Cr

Code

Course

JW300A

Production Techniques I (Mandatory Workshop)

0

JW300B

Production Techniques II (Mandatory Workshop) 0

Cr

JW301A

Principles of Design II

3

JW303B

Goldsmithing IIb

3

JW302A

New Directions in Jewellery

3

JW304B

Caribbean Influences in Jewellery

3

JW303A

Goldsmithing IIa

3

JW305B

Theory of Jewellery II

3

DR301A

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

2

DR302A

Concept Development through Drawing I

3

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

DR303A

Drawing for Design I

3

GS302B

World Literature II

2

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

GS206B

Introduction to Philosophy

3

GS300A

Research Methods Ia

2

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

GS302A

World Literature I

2

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

3

AH300A

Pre -Columbian Art

2

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I:Survey of Caribbean Textile & Fashion Designers

3

AH301A

Caribbean Cultural Production for Social Information in the British West Indies

2

AH300B

Latin American Art

2

AH307A

Introduction to Material Culture: A Caribbean Experience

2

AH302B

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

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YEAR 4

SEMESTER I

Code

Course

Cr

YEAR 4

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Cr

JW401A

Independent Study I

9

JW401B

Independent Study II

9

GS400A

Research Methods IIa

2

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

GS442A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466A

Principles & Practices of Art Criticism

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

273

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BFA PAINTING MAJOR In this department students are encouraged and guided to develop their artistic talent and ability through a wide variety of courses in painting. Students are introduced to a wide range of traditional painting styles and more contemporary methods and forms. The programme offers the opportunity to develop strong painting and drawing skills, and explore old and new forms in representational, abstract and two-dimensional approaches. An appreciation of independent, personal expression and image making is developed. Students are expected to take 18 credits in their major area including Drawing, 4 credits in Art History, 8 credits in General Studies. Up to 12 credits in Electives must be taken over four years. YEAR 2

SEMESTER I

YEAR 2

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Cr

Code

Course

Cr

PD201A PD202A

Issues in Representation I

3

PD201B

Issues in Representation II

3

Media and Process I

3

PD204B

Caribbean Identity, the New Black Culture II

3

PD204A

Caribbean Identity, the New Black Culture I

3

PD205B

Mural Design II

3

PD205A

Mural Design I

3

PD203B

New Media and Process I

3

PD250WE Painting Methods and Techniques (Mandatory Workshop)

0

PD250WE

Painting Methods and Techniques Workshop (Mandatory for Students in the Department)

0

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS201B

Psychology II

2

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art I

2

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

AH204A

Black British Art

2

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 3

SEMESTER I

YEAR 3

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Cr

Code

Course

Cr

PD300A

Assemblage/Collage

3

PD301B

Image and Process

3

PD302A

Art in Context

3

PD303A

New Media and Process II

3

DR301A

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

DR303B

Drawing for Design II

3

DR302A

Concept Development through Drawing I

3

DR301B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

DR303A

Drawing for Design I

3

DR302B

Concept development through Drawing II

3

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

GS300A

Research Methods Ia

2

GS302B

World Literature II

2

GS302A

World Literature I

2

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

AH300A

Pre -Columbian Art

2

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

3

AH301A

Caribbean Cultural Production for Social Information in the British West Indies

2

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I: Survey of Caribbean Textile & Fashion Designers

3

AH307A

Introduction to Material Culture: A Caribbean Experience

2

AH300B

Latin American Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

AH302B

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

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274


YEAR 4

SEMESTER I

Code

Course

PD401A GS400A GS244A GS466A

YEAR 4

SEMESTER II

Cr

Code

Course

Cr

Independent Study I

9

PD401B

Independent Study II

9

Research Methods IIa

2

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

Principles& Practices of Art Criticism

2

GS466B

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

275

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

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BFA PRINTMAKING MAJOR This Department offers a range of studio experiences in four major printmaking disciplines: relief, intaglio, lithography and screen-printing. The approach to these disciplines is fine art based and encourages students to express personal imagery. The department offers a range on traditional and contemporary techniques including papermaking. Students have the opportunity to explore various print media and to develop personal content through independent experimentation processes. Students are expected to take a minimum of 18 credits in Major including Drawing, 4 credits in Art History, 8 credits in General Studies. Up to 12 credits in Electives must be taken over four years. AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

Cr

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

Issues in African Art

2

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I Code

Course

PM200A

Introduction to Graphic Stamp

3

AH203B

PM201A

Introduction to Intaglio I

3

AH205B

PM202A

Printmaking Concepts I

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDIT (Excluding Elective) 15

PM203A

Introduction to lithography I

3

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

PM204A

Introduction to Silk Screen Printing I

3

Code

Course

Cr

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

PM300A

Advanced Intaglio Print I

3

Advanced Lithography I

3

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

PM301A

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

PM302A

Advanced Silkscreen Printing I

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

PM303A

Advanced Techniques in Relief Printing

3

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

DR300A

GS201A

Psychology I

2

DR301 A

Concept Development through Drawing I

3

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

DR302A

Drawing for Design

3

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

Research Methods Ia

2 2

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

GS300A

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

GS302A

World Literature I

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

AH307A

Introduction to Material Culture:

AH204A

Black British Art

2

A Caribbean Experience

2

Pre-Columbian Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15

AH300A

YEAR 2 SEMESTER II

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15

Code

Course

Cr

YEAR 3 SEMESTER II

PM200B

Collograph & Linoleum

3

Code

Course

Cr

PM201B

Introduction to Intaglio II

3

PM300B

Advanced Intaglio Print II

3

Advanced Lithography

3

PM202B

Printmaking Concepts II

3

PM301B

PM203B

Introduction to Lithography II

3

PM302B

Advanced Silkscreen Printing II

3

PM204B

Introduction to Silkscreen Printing II

3

DR300B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

Concept Development Through Drawing II

3

DR200B

Life Drawing

3

DR301B

DR201B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

DR302B

Drawing for Design

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

World Literature II

2 3

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

GS302B

GS201B

Psychology II

2

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I: Survey of

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

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AH300B

276

Caribbean Textile & Fashion Designers

3

Latin American Art

2


AH302B

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15 YEAR 4 SEMESTER I Code

Course

Cr

PM401A

Independent Study I

9

GS400A

Research Methods IIa

2

GS442A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466A

Principles &Practices of Art Criticism

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15 YEAR 4 SEMESTER II Code

Course

Cr

PM401B

Independent Study II

9

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15

277

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BFA SCULPTURE MAJOR This department will introduce students to ideas and materials that inform his or her response to three-dimensional form. The department encourages exploration of contemporary sculptural materials and processes and how they relate to artists’ concepts. Emphasis is on ideas of modeling, carving and constructing as well as the possibilities of more contemporary modes of expression. Technical Workshops in Metal, Wood, Casting and Foundry are mandatory for Sculpture majors. Students are expected to complete a minimum of 18 credits in Major including Drawing, 4 credits in Art History, 8 credits in General Studies. Up to 12 credits in Electives must be taken over four years. YEAR 2 SEMESTER 1

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

Code

Course

Cr

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

SD200A

The Body and Process I

3

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

SD202A

Structure Substance & Surface I

3

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

SD205WE

Wood Workshop (Mandatory

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15

for all students in the dept.)

0

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

SD205WE

Metal (Workshop Mandatory)

0

Code

Course

Cr

SD206A

Contemporary Directions

3

SD300A

The Body and Process II

3

Structure, Substance & SurfaceII

3

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

SD302A

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

SD304A

Space and Material Context I

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

SD305A

Issues in Contemporary Sculpture

3

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

DR300A

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

DR301A

Concept Development Through Drawing I

3

GS201A

Psychology I

2

DR302A

Drawing for Design

3

Research Methods 1a

2

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

GS300A

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

GS302A

World Literature I

2

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

Introduction to Material

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

AH307A

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

Culture

: A Caribbean Experience

2

AH204A

Black British Art

2

AH300A

Pre-Columbian Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER II

YEAR 3 SEMESTER II

Code

Course

Cr

Code

Course

Cr

SD201B

Installation/Environment / Site I

3

SD301B

Installation/Environment/Site II

3

3

SD303B

New Media and Process II

3

SD306B

Introduction to Object Design

3

DR301B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

DR302B

Concept development through Drawing II

3

SD203B

New Media & Process I

SD205CE

Casting & Foundry (Mandatory for all students In the department.)

SD205DE SD206B

0

Digital Imagery (Mandatory For all students in the dept.)

0

DR303B

Drawing for Design II

3

Sound as Medium

3

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

Research Methods Ib

2

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

GS300B

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

GS302B

World Literature II

2

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

3

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I:

GS114

The Self Ethics, Creativity

3

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

Survey of Caribbean Textile

GS201B

Psychology II

2

& Fashion Designers

3

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

AH300B

Latin American Art

2

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

AH302B

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)15

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278


YEAR 4 SEMESTER I Code

Course

Cr

SD401A

Independent Study I

9

GS400A

Research Methods IIa

2

GS442A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466A

Principles & Practices of Art Criticism

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15 YEAR 4 SEMESTER II Code

Course

Cr

SD401B

Independent Study II

9

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies in Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15

279

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BFA TEXTILES Textile Design, Fibre Arts, Weaving and Fashion Major This department offers a broad range of studio experiences in the three (3) major textile disciplines of: Textile Design, Weaving and Fibre Arts and Fashion from which students must choose one major for specialization. Any of the three (3) major areas of the programme provides exposure to traditional and contemporary techniques. The courses draw on historical precedents, inherent properties and technical development that serve as a point of departure for self-expression. Students electing to do Fibre Arts must choose their 12 credits in years 2 & 3 from either the Textile Design, Weaving or Fashion courses, which would provide the technical understanding of the course. This would facilitate exploration of the techniques for visual expression of their ideas. Students are expected to complete 18 credits in the major including Drawing, 4 credits in Art History, 8 credits in General Studies. Up to 12 credits in Electives must be taken over four years. YEAR 2 SEMESTER I Code Course

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

Cr

DR201B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

TD201A

Textile History & Contemporary Printing I 3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

TD203A

Natural Dyes Fibers & Properties

3

GS115

The Self Ethics Creativity

3

TD206E

Introduction to Interior Design

3

GS200B

Business of Art & Design II

2

TD207

Textile Design Surface Design (Workshop) 0

GS201B

Psychology II

2

TW203

Introduction to Weaving I (Workshop)

0

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

TW206

Non-Loom Weaving (Workshop)

0

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

TF206A

Pattern Making & Construction I

3

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

TF207A

Fashion Illustration I

3

AH200B

Modern Western Art

2

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

AH202B

Issues in African Art

2

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

AH206B

History of Jamaican Dress

GS115

The Self, Ethics Creativity

3

& Fashion Industry

2

GS200A

Business of Art & Design I

2

AH207B

History of Fashion Survey II

2

GS201A

Psychology

2

EL244E

Computer-Aided Design for Artists

3

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

AH200A

Modern Western Art

2

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

Code Course

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

TD301A

Contemporary Studio

AH207A

History of Fashion Survey I

2

Practice & Design Procedures

3

EL244E

Computer-Aided Design for Artists

3

TD305

Layered Textiles (Workshop)

0

TW304A

Woven Imagery I

3

TW305A

Exploring Tapestry

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER II

15

Cr

TF306A

Pattern Making & Construction III

3

Cr

TF308A

Portfolio Development II

3

TD201B

Textile History & Contemporary Printing II 3

TF300A

Applied Fashion Illustration I

3

TW202B

Introduction to Weaving II

3

DR300A

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

TW206

Non-Loom Weaving (Workshop)

0

DR301A

Concept Development through Drawing Ia 3

TD205B

Design Across Boundaries

3

DR302A

Drawing for Design Ia

3

TF206B

Pattern Making & Construction II

3

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

TD206E

Introduction to Interior Design

3

GS300A

Research Methods 1a

2

TF207B

Fashion Illustration II

3

GS302A

World Literature 1

2

TF208B

Portfolio Development I

3

AH300A

Pre-Columbian Art

2

Code Course

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280


AH306A

Modern Western Fashion I

AH307A

Introduction to Material Culture:

A Caribbean Experience

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

2

TW401A

Independent Study

9

TF401A

Independent Study

9

2

GS400A

Research Methods Ia

2

15

GS442A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466A

Principles & Practices of Art Criticism

2

YEAR 3 SEMESTER II Code Course

Cr

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

TD300B

Textiles Design for Furnishing & Apparel

3

TD303B

Form & Imagery with Cloth

3

TD304B

Contemporary Textiles:

The Art of Fabric Design

3

TD401B

Independent Study II

9

TW304B

Woven Imagery II

3

TW401B

Independent Study II

9

TW305B

Exploring Tapestry II

3

TF401B

Independent Study II

9

TF306B

Pattern Making & Construction IV

3

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

TF309B

Portfolio Development III

3

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

TF300B

Applied Fashion Illustration II

3

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring

DR301B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

Philosophies in Art

DR302B

Concept development through Drawing II 3

DR303B

Drawing for Design II

3

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

GS302B

World Literature II

2

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

3

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I:Survey of

Caribbean Textile

& Fashion Designers

3

AH300B

Latin American Art

2

AH302B

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

AH306B

Modern Western Fashion II

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

YEAR 4 SEMESTER II Code Course

CrTD401B

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

2 15

2 15

YEAR 4 SEMESTER I Code Course TD401A

Independent Study

Cr 9

281

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BFA VISUAL COMMUNICATION MAJOR In this department students are encouraged to develop a personal style while creating solutions for communication design problems. The department encourages creativity, technological, and intellectual skills to become designers and visionaries for the new millennium. Students develop skills in articulating their own personal voices as designers and artists. There are three majors - Graphic Design, Digital Design and Illustration from which students must choose one area for specialization. Students are expected to take 18 credits in their major including Drawing, 4 credits in Art History, 8 credits in General Studies. Up to 12 credits in Electives must be taken over four years. YEAR 2 SEMESTER I Code Course

Cr

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

VC200A

Visual Communication Ia

3

Code

Course

VC203A

Illustration I

3

VC303

Digital Design Ia (Workshop)

0

EL244E

Computer-Aided Design for Artists

3

VC301A

Graphic Design Ia

3

DR200A

Life Drawing

VC302A

Illustration III

3

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

VC306A

Design with Type I

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

VC308A

Method and Media Ia

3

GS115

The Self Ethics, Creativity

3

VC310A

Packaging Design I

3

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

VC312A

2D Computer Design

3

GS201A

Psychology I

2

VC314A

Interactive Media

3

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

VC316A

3D Animation

3

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

DR300A

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

DR301A

Concept Development through Drawing I 3

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

DR302A

Drawing for Design

3

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

AH204A

Black British Art

2

GS300A

Research Methods Ia

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

GS302A

World Literature I

2

AH307A

Introduction to Material

Culture: A Caribbean Experience

AH300A

Pre-Columbian Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER II Code Course

Cr

Cr

2

VC200B

Visual Communication Ib

3

VC203B

Illustration II

3

VC206

Design Procedures for

Graphics (Workshop)

0

Code Course

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

VC300B

Digital Design Ib (Workshop)

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

VC301B

Graphic Design Ib3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

VC302B

Illustration IV

GS115

The Self Ethics, Creativity

3

VC308B

Method and Media Ib3

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

VC311B

Exhibition and Display Design

3

GS201B

Psychology II

2

VC313B

3D Modeling

3

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

VC315B

Comic Book Illustration

3

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

DR301B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

VC345B

Design Internship

3

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

VC345B

Communication Advertising Seminar

3

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

DR302B

Concept Development through Drawing II 3

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

DR303B

Drawing for Design II

3

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

15

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

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YEAR 3 SEMESTER II

282

Cr 0 3


GS302B

World Literature II

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

3

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I:Survey

Philosophies of Art

of Caribbean Textile & Fashion Designers 3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

AH300B

Latin American Art

2

AH302B

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

2 2 15

15

YEAR 4 Semester I Code Course

Cr

VC401A

Independent Study I

9

GS400A

Research Methods IIa

2

GS442A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466A

Principles & Practices of Art Criticism

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 4 Semester II Code Course

Cr

VC401B

Independent Study II

9

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

283

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BFA PHOTOGRAPHY The B.F.A. in Photography provides broad exposure to a range of practice and conceptual and aesthetic approaches, while offering the opportunity to select a track in one of three areas: Fine Art Photography, Photojournalism, and Commercial Practice. In the first year students will undertake Foundation Studies, where they will be given a broad introduction to photography. In the second year they will select a track, which will require them to complete core courses in one of these areas, but will allow them to take courses across concentrations based on the direction of their work. Technical skills and processes will be delivered through workshops, which may be selected by the students based on their interests. The provision of concentrations in Fine Art Photography, Photojournalism, and Commercial Practice allows the College to produce graduates who will be equipped for the varied professional demands in photography and related practice which are required in the society, while having a common understanding of the conceptual and theoretical framework of art production. PHOTOGRAPHY FINE ART MAJOR

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

Cr

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I Code Course PP200A

Intermediate Photography

3

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

PP202A

Studio Photography

3

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

PP204WS

Staged Photography in Contemporary Art 0

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

PP203SE

Seminar: Alternative Imaging

0

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

PP206

Photography Seminar

0

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

Code Course

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

PD303A

New Media and Process II

3

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

PP301A

Photography Open Lab

3

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

DR301A

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

GS201A

Psychology I

2

DR302A

Concept development through Drawing I 3

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

DR303A

Drawing for Design I

3

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

GS300A

Research Methods Ia

2

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

GS302A

World Literature I

2

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

GS307A

Introduction to Material Culture

2

AH204A

Black British Art2

AH300A

Pre-Columbian Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER II

15

Cr

YEAR 3 SEMESTER II

Code Course

Cr

Code Course

Cr

PP201B

Introduction to Alternative Processes

3

PP300B

The Constructed Image

3

PD203B

New Media and Process

3

PP301B

Photography Open Lab II

3

PP204WS

Staged Photography in Contemporary Art 0

DR301B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

PP203SE

Seminar: Alternative Imaging

0

DR302B

Concept development through Drawing II 3

PP206

Photography Seminar

0

DR303B

Drawing for Design II

3

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

GS302B

World Literature II

2

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

3

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I: Survey of

GS201B

Introduction to Psychology II

2

Caribbean Textile & Fashion Designers

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284

3


AH300B

Latin American Art

2

AH302B

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 4 SEMESTER I Code Course

Cr

PP401A

Independent Study I

9

GS400A

Research Methods IIa

2

GS244A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466A

Principle & Practices of Art Criticism

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 4 Semester II Code Course

Cr

VC401B

Independent Study II

9

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies in Art 2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

285

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BFA PHOTOGRAPHY Photojournalism – Major YEAR 2 SEMESTER I Code Course PP200A Intermediate Photography PP202A Studio Photography PP204WS Staged Photography in Contemporary Art PP203SE Seminar: Alternative Imaging DR200A Life Drawing DR201A Issues in Drawing Ia DR202E Anatomy of the Human Figure GS115 The Self, Ethics, Creativity GS200A Business of Art and Design I GS201A Psychology I GS202A Caribbean Literature I GS212A Conservation Theory I AH200A Modern Western Art I AH201A Modern Jamaican Art AH202A Introduction to African Art AH204A Black British Art TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

GS307A Introduction to Material Culture AH300A Pre-Columbian Art TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

Cr 3 3

YEAR 3 SEMESTER II Code Course Cr PP303B Multimedia Documentary 3 PP301B Photography Open Lab II 3 DR303B Drawing for Design II 3 DR301B Issues in Drawing IIb 3 DR302B Concept development through Drawing II 3 GS300B Research Methods Ib 2 GS302B World Literature II 2 GS107B Gender & Caribbean Culture 3 GS313B Collections Management and Care 3 GS314 Caribbean Dress Studies I: Survey of Caribbean Textile & Fashion Designers 3 AH300B Latin American Art 2 AH302B Re-reading the Caribbean 2 TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) 15

0 0 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER II Code Course Cr PP201B Introduction to Alternative Processes 3 PD205B Introduction to Photojournalism 3 PP204WS Staged Photography in Contemporary Art 0 PP203SE Seminar: Alternative Imaging 0 DR201B Issues in Drawing Ib 3 DR200B Drawing from Observation 3 DR202E Anatomy of the Human Figure 3 GS115 The Self, Ethics, Creativity 3 GS200B Business of Art and Design II 2 GS201B Introduction to Psychology II 2 GS202B Caribbean Literature II 2 GS211B Introduction to Curatorial Studies 3 GS212B Conservation Theory II 3 AH200B Modern Western Art II 2 AH201B Modern Caribbean Art 2 AH203B Issues in African Art 2 AH205B Art of the Black Diaspora 2 TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I Code Course PP302A Advanced Still Photojournalism PP304A Museum Photo Studies DR301A Issues in Drawing IIa DR302A Concept development through Drawing I DR303A Drawing for Design I GS206A Introduction to Philosophy GS300A Research Methods Ia GS302A World Literature I

Cr 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2

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2 2 15

YEAR 4 SEMESTER I Code Course PP402A Independent Study I GS400A Research Methods IIa GS244A Critical Thinking Seminar GS466A Principle & Practices of Art Criticism TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

Cr 9 2 2 2 15

YEAR 4 SEMESTER II Code Course PP402B Independent Study II

Cr 9

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art 2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

286

15


Commercial Photography – Major YEAR 2 SEMESTER I

DR301A

Issues in Drawing IIa

3

Cr

DR302A

Concept development through Drawing I 3

PP200A

Intermediate Photography

3

DR303A

Drawing for Design I

3

PP202A

Studio Photography

3

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

PP204WS

Staged Photography in Contemporary Art 0

GS300A

Research Methods Ia

2

PP203SE

Seminar: Alternative Imaging

0

GS302A

World Literature I

2

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

GS307A

Introduction to Material Culture

2

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I:

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

Survey of Caribbean Textile

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

& Fashion Designers

3

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

AH300A

Pre-Columbian Art

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

YEAR 3 SEMESTER II

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

Code Course

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

PP306B

Commercial Photography II:Advertising

3

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

PP301B

Products, Design & Consumers

3

AH204A

Black British Art

2

DR301B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

DR302B

Concept development through Drawing II 3

DR303B

Drawing for Design II

3

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

Code Course

YEAR 2 SEMESTER II

Cr

Cr

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

PP201B

Introduction to Alternative Processes

3

GS302B

World Literature II

2

PD203B

Introduction to Photojournalism

3

GS313B

Collections Management and Care

3

PP204WS

Staged Photography

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I:

in Contemporary Art

0

Survey of Caribbean Textile

PP203SE

Seminar: Alternative Imaging

0

& Fashion Designers

3

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

AH300B

Latin American Art

2

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

AH302B

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

GS115

The Self, Ethics, Creativity

3

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

YEAR 4 SEMESTER I

GS201B

Psychology II

2

Code

Course

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

PP403A

Independent Study I

9

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

GS400A

Research Methods IIa

2

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

GS442A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

GS466A

Principle & Practices of Art Criticism

2

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

Code Course

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

2

Code Course

Cr

PP305A

Commercial Photography I:

Fashion & Lifestyle

3

PP304A

Museum Photo Studies

3

Cr

15

YEAR 4 Semester II

15

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I Code Course

15

VC403B

Independent Study II

9

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art 2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

287

Cr

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15

FRONT


BFA DESIGN STUDIES The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts is a multi-faceted educational institution strategically positioned within the Caribbean to facilitate the development and promotion of a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Design. In addition to the College’s lucrative menu of courses this degree in design is in direct response to the burgeoning connections between aesthetics, objects, industry and the global-market needs. Thus it is the College’s determination that the designer must possess the ability to critically respond to these multi-faceted design challenges. This will therefore locate Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts at the center of current trends and discourse pertinent to design within the Caribbean and the international arena by providing a degree comparable to universities and colleges offering similar pathways. Paramount is the need to create opportunities for students to explore and experiment in an atmosphere that nurtures diversity through individuality. Students will be challenged through their selected programme of study with varied options in an integrative approach to conceptualize, fabricate and present marketable

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288

solutions to optimize as active industrial networkers as well as becoming the driving force in the development of the artistic and creative industries. Graduates will exit as creative diverse thinkers to develop as a community of practitioners redefining and challenging the norms to initiate changes in and tackle social and cultural environmental issues. Ultimately, these designers will become the force for social and entrepreneurial economic development of the creative industries. Students in the B.F.A. Design Studies programme will choose courses from the existing menu of courses in departments, as well as new courses which have been developed specifically for the programme. The B.F.A. Design Studies will prepare students to take advantage of a wider range of career possibilities, and make them more marketable in the dynamic and expanding creative industries.


BFA DESIGN STUDIES YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

2AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

AH204A

Black British Art

2

Code

Course

Cr

Elective

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D I

3

*Art History

FD103A

Studio Practice

3

* General Studies4

DR100A

Drawing I

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

GS101A

Introduction to Critical Analysis I

2

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

*Recommended History Courses for Design Studies AH209 History of Design: Industrial Revolution *Recommended General Studies Course for Design Studies

EL100E

Time-Based Media

3

GS 215

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

Philosophies of Design

Code Course

Code

Course

FD102B

Integrated 2D/3D II

3

FD103B

Introduction to Departments

3

DR101B

Drawing II

3

GS100B

Critical Writing and Analysis

2

GS101B

Introduction to Critical Analysis II

2

AH100B

History of Arts Survey II

2

EL100E

Time-Based Media

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I Code Course

Cr

Design Applications: 2D Focus

(One other level 2 course from

Department of Specialization)

DS200WS

Material and Properties I

Cr 3 3

Fibres, Plastics

(Mandatory workshop)

0

EL244E

Computer-Aided Design for Artists

3

DR200A

Life Drawing

3

DR201A

Issues in Drawing Ia

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

GS115

The Self Ethics, Creativity

3

GS 215

Philosophies of Design

2

GS200A

Business of Art and Design I

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS202A

Caribbean Literature I

2

GS212A

Conservation Theory I

3

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

DS203

Integrated Principles of

Design Applications:3D Focus

Cr 3

************ (One other level 2 course from

Integrated Principles of

15

YEAR 2 SEMESTER II

YEAR 1 SEMESTER II

DS202

2

Department of Specialization)

DS201WS

Material and Properties II

Glass, Ceramics

(Mandatory workshop)

0

*DR203

Technical Drawing for Design

3

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

GS115

The Self Ethics, Creativity

3

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

GS201B

Psychology II

2

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

GS212B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

*AH210

History of Design: Arts and

Craft Movement to Bauhaus &

Beyond

2

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

3

15

*Recommended Drawing Course for Design Studies: DR203 Technical Drawing for Design *Recommended History Courses for Design Studies AH210 History of Design: Arts and Craft Movement to Bauhaus & Beyond

289

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BFA INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES YEAR 1 SEMESTER I

YEAR 3 SEMESTER I

Code Course

Cr

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D I

3

Code Course ********** (Any level 2 Studio of choice)

FD103A

Studio Practice

3

********** (Any level 2 Studio of choice) Issues in Drawing IIa

Cr 3

3

DR100A

Drawing I

3

DR301A

3

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

DR302A

Concept Development through Drawing I 3

GS101A

Introduction to Critical Analysis I

2

DR303A

Drawing for Design I

3

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

GS206A

Introduction to Philosophy

3

Research Methods Ia

2

EL100E

Time-Based Media

3

GS300A

FD104E

Introduction to Digital Foundations

3

GS302A

World Literature I

2

15

AH300A

Pre -Columbian Art

2

AH301A

Caribbean Cultural Production

for Social Information in

the British West Indies

AH307A

Introduction to Material Culture:

A Caribbean Experience

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective) YEAR 1 SEMESTER II Code Course

Cr

FD102B

Integrated 2D/3D II

IN100

Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies 3

DR101B

Drawing II

3

GS100B

Critical Writing and Analysis

2

SEMESTER II

GS101B

Introduction to Critical Analysis II

2

Code Course

AH100B

History of Arts Survey II

2

*********

(Any level 3 Studio of choice)

3

EL100E

Time-Based Media

3

*********

(Any level 3 Studio of choice )

3

FD104E

Introduction to Digital Foundations

3

DR303B

Drawing for Design II

3

15

DR301B

Issues in Drawing IIb

3

DR302B

Concept development through Drawing II 3

GS300B

Research Methods Ib

2

GS302B

World Literature II

2

GS107B

Gender & Caribbean Culture

3

Collections Management and Care

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

3

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

YEAR 2 SEMESTER I Code Course IN200

Cr

Interdisciplinary Studies Research Process 3

2 15

Cr

********** (Any other level 2 Studio Course)

3

GS313B

DR200B

Drawing from Observation

3

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I:Survey

DR201B

Issues in Drawing Ib

3

of Caribbean Textile

DR202E

Anatomy of the Human Figure

3

& Fashion Designers

3

Latin American Art

2

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

GS115

The Self Ethics, Creativity

3

AH300B

GS200B

Business of Art and Design II

2

AH302B

GS201B

Psychology II

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

GS202B

Caribbean Literature II

2

GS211B

Introduction to Curatorial Studies

3

GS212B

Conservation Theory II

3

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

AH205B

Art of the Black Diaspora

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

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15

290

15


YEAR 4 SEMESTER I Code Course

YEAR 4 SEMESTER II Cr

Code Course

Cr

IN401A

Independent Study I

9

IN401B

Independent Study II

9

GS400A

Research Methods IIa

2

GS400B

Research Methods IIb

2

GS244A

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS442B

Critical Thinking Seminar

2

GS466A

Principles& Practices of Art Criticism

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art 2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

15

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS (Excluding Elective)

291

TABLE OF CONTENTS

15

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MINOR PROGRAMMES

Minor in Visual Communication

Visual Communication – Graphic Design Minor Code Course

Code Course

Cr

Cr

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

VC103B

Introduction to Dept.

3

(Visual Communication)

3

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

FD103B

Introduction to Dept.

(VisualCommunication)

3

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

EL1004E

Introduction to Digital Foundations

3

VC200A

Visual Communication3

VC314A

Interactive Media

3

Select three of the following courses: VC203A

Illustration I

3

Mandatory Workshops:

VC203B

Illustration II

3

VC205B

Design Procedures

VC302A

Illustration III

3

for Graphics (Workshop)

0

VC308A

Method and Media Ia

3

VC300A

Digital Design Ia (Workshop)

0

VC200E

Visual Communication Ia

3

VC314A

Interactive Media

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS 20

VC301A

Graphic Design Ia

3

Visual Communication – Illustration Minor

Mandatory Workshops: VC205B Design Procedures for Graphics (Workshop)

0

VC300A

0

Code Course

Cr

FD102B

Integrated 2D/3D

FD103B

Introduction to Dept.

3

(Visual Communication)

3

VC203A

Illustration I

3

VC203B

Illustration II

3

AH100

History of Art Survey I

2

EL1004E

Introduction to Digital Foundations

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS 20

Select one of the following courses: VC302A

Illustration III

3

VC308A

Method and Media Ia

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS 20

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Digital Design Ia (Workshop)

292


Minor in Ceramics Code Course

Textiles and Fibre Arts – Textile Design for Printing Minor

Credits

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

Code Course

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Ceramics)

3

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

Ah100A

History of Art Survey I

2

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Textiles

3

CD202A

Multimedia Ceramics Ia

3

and Fibre Arts)

EL244E

Computer Aided Design for

3

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

Artists (CAD) Mandatory Workshop:

TD203A

Natural Dyes, Fibre & Properties

3

CD206

Studio Ceramics Processes I (Workshop)

EL244E

Computer-Aided Design

3

CD207

Studio Ceramics Processes II (Workshop) 0

For Artists (CAD) Mandatory Workshop:

TD207

Textile Design Surface Design (Workshop) 0

0

Credits

Select one course from the following: CD203A

Ceramics Sculpture Ia

3

Select one course from the following:

CD302A

Multimedia Ceramics IIa

3

TD201A

Textile History & Contemporary Printing I 3

CD304B

Ceramic Jewellery

3

TD300B

Textiles Design for Furnishing and Apparel 3

TD303B

Form and Imagery with Cloth

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS 20

3

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

Minor in Jewellery

20

Textile and Fibre Arts – Weaving Minor

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

Code Course

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Jewellery)

3

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

FD103B

Introduction to Dept.

JW201A

Principles of Design I

3

(Textiles and Fibre Arts)

3

JW203B

Theory of Jewellery I

3

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

EL244E

Computer-Aided Design

3

TD203A

Natural Dyes, Fibre & Properties

3

For Artists (CAD) Select a course:

JW303A

Goldsmithing I

3

Mandatory Workshops:

JW301A

Principles of Design II

3

TD207

Textile Design Surface Design

JW302A

New Directions in Jewellery

3

(Workshop)

JW304B

Caribbean Influences

3

TW203

Introduction to Weaving I

(Workshop)

TW206

Non-Loom Weaving (Workshop)

Mandatory Workshops: JW204B

Mechanics and Fittings

0

Jw300A

Production Techniques I

0

Credits 3

0

0

Select one course from the following:

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS 20

Computer-Aided Design for Artist

TW304A

Woven Imagery I

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

293

3 3 20

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Textiles and Fibre Arts – Fashion Design Minor Code Course

Credits

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept.

(Textiles and Fibre Arts)

3

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

VC203A

Illustration I

3

TF206A

Patternmaking and Construction I

3

TF206B

Patternmaking and Construction II

3

Illustration II

3

TF208B

Portfolio Development I

3

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Ceramics)

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept.

(Textiles and Fibre Art)

FD103B

Introduction to Dept.

(Visual Communication)

Textiles, Ceramics, Jewellery

3 3 3

Level 3 course – Visual Communication, Textiles,Ceramics, Jewellery

3

DR302A

3

Drawing for Design I

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS 20

Minor in Visual Arts

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS20

(For Dance, Drama, Music and Arts Management students only)

Minor in Textiles and Fibre Arts – Mixed Option Code Course

Introduction to Dept. (Jewellery)

Level 2 course – Visual Communication,

Select one course from the following: VC203B

FD103B

Code Course

Credits

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

Credits

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

3

DR100A

Drawing I

3

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

FD103B

Introduction to Dept.

(Textiles And Fibre Arts)

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Ceramics)

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

Introduction to Dept. (Textiles and

Select courses from the following (12 credits):

Select one course from the following:

3

Fibre Arts)

TF206A

Patternmaking I

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Textiles and

TF206B

Patternmaking II

3

Fibre Arts)

VC203A

Illustration I

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept.

VC203B

Illustration II

3

(Visual Communication)

3

TF208B

Portfolio Development I

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Jewellery)

3

Computer-Aided Design for Textiles

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Painting)

3

TD203A

Natural Dyes Fibres and Properties

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Sculpture)

3

TD202B

Textiles History and

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Printmaking)

3

Contemporary Printing I

TD300B

Textile Design for Furnishing

And Apparel

3

TD303B

Form and Imagery with Cloth

3

TW304A

Woven Imagery I

3

3

Level 2 course – Any Department TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

Textile Design Surface Design

0

TW203

Introduction to Weaving I

0

TW206

Non-Loom Weaving

0

Code Course

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS 20

Minor in Design Code Course

Credits

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

FRONT

3 20

Credits

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Sculpture)

3

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

SD200A

The Body and Process

3

SD201B

Installation/Environment/Site I

3

SD206A

Contemporary Directions

3

Select a Course:

Select courses from the following:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

3

Fine Arts – Sculpture Minor

Mandatory Workshops: TD207

3

294

SD203B

New Media and Process I

3

SD300A

The Body and Process II

3


SD301A

Installation/Environment/Site II

3

SD303B

New Media and Process II

3

Minor in Art History Code Course

Mandatory Workshops:

GS101A

Introduction to Critical Analysis I

Digital Media, Woodwork, Metal, Foundry 0

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

History of Art Survey II

20

2 2AH100B 2

Select from the Following courses (14 credits):

Fine Arts – Painting Minor Code Course

Credits

AH101A

Looking at Art I

2

Credits

AH101B

Looking at Art II

2

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

AH202A

Introduction to African Art

2

FD103B

Introduction to Dept. (Painting)

3

AH203B

Issues in African Art

2

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

2

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

PD201A

Issues in Representation I

3

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

PD203B

New Media and Process I

3

AH201A

Modern Jamaican Art

2

PD300A

Assemblage/Collage

3

AH201B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

Select a course:

AH206B

History of Jamaican Dress and

PD202A

Media and Process

3

Fashion Industry

2

PD283A

Mural Design I

3

AH207A

History of Fashion Survey I

2

SD201B/

Installation/Environment/Site I

3

AH207B

History of Fashion Survey II

2

PD204A/B

Caribbean Identity, the

AH209

History of Design: Industrial Revolution

2

New Black Culture I/II

AH210

History of Design: Arts and Crafts

PD302A

Art in Context

3

Movement to Bauhaus & Beyond

2

PD301B

Image and Process

3

AH306A

Modern Western Fashion I

2

Mandatory Workshop:

AH306B

Modern Western Fashion II

2

Materials and Techniques

0

AH302A

Re-reading the Caribbean

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS

20

AH307A

Introduction to Material Culture:

A Caribbean Experience

2

GS207

Caribbean Culture and Identity

3

GS215

Philosophies of Design

2

Fine Arts – Printmaking Minor Code Course

Credits

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

GS466A

Aesthetics: Principles

FD103A

Introduction to Dept. (Printmaking)

3

and Practices of Art Criticism

AH100A

History of Art Survey I

3

GS314

Caribbean Dress Studies I: Survey

PM200A

Introduction to the Graphic Stamp

3

of Caribbean Textiles

PD202A

Introduction to Intaglio I

3

& Fashion Designers

2

GS466B

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies in Art

2

Select two courses from the following: PM203A

Introduction to Lithography

3

PM204A

Introduction to Silkscreen Printing

3

PM200B

Collograph and Linoleum

3

PM201B

Introduction to Intaglio II

3

PD303A/B

Advanced Techniquesin Relief Printmaking 3

2

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS20

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS20

295

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BACHELOR OF ART EDUCATION The goal of the Art Education Department is to prepare students for a professional career in education. Students are challenged and supported to excel in an extremely demanding and incredibly rewarding career as a teacher. Being a good artist is essential to being a good art teacher. To qualify for the BAE students are required to complete a minimum of 140 credits over four (4) years as laid out below. Students must complete: • • • • •

• • •

24 Credits in Studio I (specialization) including Drawing in Years 2 and 3. 12 Credits in Studio II in Years 2 and 3. 2 Credits of Art Education Professional Studies in Year 2. 21 Credits of Art Education Professional Studies in Year 3 inclusive of 3 credits of Practicum. 27 Credits of Art Education Professional Studies in Year 4 inclusive of 12 credits for Practicum and Service Leaning project. 8 Credits of Art History, 18 Credits in General Studies 10 credits of electives over 4 years

YEAR I

SEMESTER I

Code Course

any school or Department

level 1 courses.

Year II

SEMESTER I

Code

Course

Credits

***Studio I(Major)

3

***Studio II (Graphics/Ceramics)

3

AE 212A

Issues in Drawing & Painting IA

3

AH200A

Modern Western Art I

2

GS201A

Psychology I

2

GS203A

Academic and Professional Writing

2

GS205A

Exploring Philosophies in Art I

3

TOTAL CREDITS

Cr

3

17

FD102A

Integrated 2D/3D

3

FD103A

Studio Practice

3

YEAR II

DR100A

Drawing I

3

Code Course

GS100A

Fundamentals of English

2

***Studio I (Major)

3

GS101A

Introduction to Critical Analysis I

2

***Studio II (Textiles)

3

2

AE212B

Issues in Drawing & Painting IB

3

TOTAL CREDITS17

AH200B

Modern Western Art II

2

Students may select electives from:

GS205B

Exploring Philosophies in Art II

2

AE207B

Museums in Art Education

2

Voice and Speech

2

AH100A

EL002A

Modern Jamaican Art

Introduction to Photography

3

SEMESTER II

FL100EL

Time-Based Media or they

TT106B

can be chosen from

TOTAL CREDITS

any school or Department

YEAR III

level 1 courses.

YEAR I

SEMESTER II

Code Course

Cr

20

SEMESTER I

Code Course

3

Credits

Credits

***Studio I (Major)

3

***Studio II

3

FD102B

Integrated 2D/3D

3

(Graphics/Ceramics)

3

FD103B

Introduction to Department

3

AE302A

Issues in Drawing & Painting IIA

3

Introduction to Art Education

3

DR103B

Drawing II

3

AE330A

GS100B

Critical Analysis & Expository Writing

2

AE335A

Art Curriculum Development

3

GS101B

Introduction to Critical Analysis II

2

AE331A

Assessment in the Art Classroom

3

AH100B

Modern Caribbean Art

2

AE332A

Technology in the Art Classroom I

TOTAL CREDITS

TOTAL CREDITS 17 Students may select electives from: EL002B

Introduction to Photography

FL100EL

Time-Based Media or

they can be chosen from

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3

296

3 21


YEAR IV YEAR III

SEMESTER II

Code Course

SEMESTER I

Code Course Credits

Credits

AE400A

Research Methods in

***Studio I (Major)

3

Art Education IIA

3

***Studio II (Textiles)

3

AE420E

Teaching Practice II

9

AE302B

Issues in Drawing & Painting IIB

3

TOTAL CREDITS

AE330B

Research in Art Education 1

3

AE320B

Curriculum: Methods & Media

3

YEAR IV

SEMESTER II

AE320E

Teaching Practicum I

3

Code

Course

AE432B

Technology in the Art Classroom II B

3

AE401B

Independent Study

6

Seminar – Reflections

3

AE400B

Research Methods in Art Education IIB

3

TOTAL CREDITS

18

12

Credits

TOTAL CREDITS15 *** Will reflect the code of the studio chosen

297

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UWI/EMC BA HUMANITIES & EDUCATION DEGREE To qualify for a Visual Arts Major, students must successfully complete 36 credits over three years and achieve a minimum grade average of Bare Pass (40% - 43%). To qualify for a Visual Arts Special, students must successfully complete 54 credits over three years and achieve a minimum grade average of Bare Pass (40% - 43%). Strict attention must be paid to the prerequisite requirements for all courses.

UWI/EMC BA Humanities & Education Degree – Visual Arts Major YEAR 1

Code

SEMESTER 1 Course

Credits

VA18A

Life Drawing I

VA19C

Art and Process

3

(Intro to Critical Analysis)

VA154

Intro to Philosophy

VA19A

History of Art Survey I

VA160

Entrepreneurial Skills for Artists

and Designers

VA161

Printmaking I

3 3

3 0 0

YEAR I

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

VA18B

Aspects of Drawing

3

VA10B

Papermaking

3

VA19B

History of Art Survey I

3

VA160

Entrepreneurial Skills for

Artists & Designers

6

VA161

Printmaking I

6

YEAR II

SEMESTER I

Code

Course

VA21C

Life Drawing II

VA254

Intermediate Photography -

VA202

Printmaking II

VA203

Introduction to Silkscreen Printing I-

VA20A

Pre-Columbian Art

3

VA20H

Introduction to African Art

3

VA204

Arts Administration I-

VA26D

Modern Western Art I

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SEMESTER II

Code

Course

VA21D

Drawing from Observation

3

VA254

Intermediate Photography

6

VA202

Printmaking II

6

VA203

Introduction to Silkscreen Printing

6

VA20B

Latin American Art

3

VA20L

Issues in African Art

3

VA204

Arts Administration I

6

VA26C

Modern Western Art II

3

YEAR III

SEMESTER I

Code Course

Credits

3 -

3

298

Credits

Credits

VA20F

Principles & Practices of Art Criticism

3

VA30A

Modern Jamaican Art

3

VA304

Concept Dévelopment through Drawing

VA37A

Printmaking IIIA

3

VA306

Silkscreen Printing II-

0

VA307

Arts Administration II-

0

VA308

Advance Photography-

0

VA309

Digital Imagery

0

YEAR III

SEMESTER II

Code Course

Credits

FRONT

YEAR II

Credits

VA20G

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies in Art

3

VA30B

Modern Caribbean Art

3

VA304

Concept Development through Drawing 6

VA37B

Printmaking IIIA

3

VA306

Silkscreen Printing II

6

VA307

Arts Administration II

6

VA308

Advance Photography

6

VA309

Digital Imagery

6


UWI/EMC OPEN CHOICES COURSES LEVEL III

LEVEL I Code Course

Credits

Code

Course Principles and Practices

Credits

VA18A

Life Drawing I

3

VA20F

VA18B

Aspects of Drawing

3

of Art Criticism

3

VA19C

Art and Process

VA20G

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies in Art

3

(Introduction to Critical Analysis)

3

VA30A

Modern Jamaican Art

3

Modern Caribbean Art

3

VA154

Introduction to Photography

3

VA30B

VA19A

History of Art Survey I

3

VA304

Concept Development through Drawing 6

VA19B

History of Art Survey I

3

VA37A

Printmaking IIIA – The Intaglio Print

3

VA160

Entrepreneurial Skills for

VA37B

Printmaking IIIB –Lithography

3

Artists and Designers

6

VA306

Silkscreen Printing II

6

VA161

Printmaking I

6

VA307

Arts Administration II

6

VA308

Advance Photography

6

VA309

Digital Imagery

6

LEVEL II Code

Course

Credits

VA21C

Life Drawing II

3

VA21D

Drawing from Observation

3

VA254

Intermediate Photography

6

VA202

Printmaking II

6

VA203

Introduction to Silkscreen Printing I

6

VA20B

Latin American

3

VA20A

Pre-Columbian Art

3

VA20H

Introduction to African Art

3

VA20L

Issues in African Art

3

VA204

Arts Administration I

6

VA26C

Modern Western Art I

3

VA26D

Modern Western Art II

3

299

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POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ART THERAPY The Art Therapy Program seeks to provide the individual with an ability to integrate the creative arts and the psychological understanding as a therapeutic modality. It will allow the participant to obtain theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to practice art therapy with clients with diverse physical and psychological issues under the direct supervision of a registered or licensed Art Therapist. The Certificate is geared towards Edna Manley Graduates, Art Teachers, Special Education Teachers, Early Childhood Educators, Nurses, Social Workers, Psychologists, Speech and Language Pathologists, Occupational Therapists, Physical Therapists who wish to integrate the use of art into their mental health practice. It is also open to administrators – Principals and administrators who plan to hire Art Therapists for their programmes. Individuals who hold a certificate in Art Therapy will not be eligible to provide supervision in the area. Administrators will have the necessary knowledge about the value of art therapy and the need skills to integrate Art therapy services in their offerings. This programme is offered through the School of Continuing Education and Allied Services and courses are taught in consecutive five-week modules. It is a combination of on campus classes and online classes (i.e., virtual classroom).

ADMISSIONS

YEAR I

Admission to the Art Therapy Certificate Program requires applicants to have the following: • B.S. or B.A degree or Diploma in Visual Art from an accredited university or college. •

SEMESTER I MODULES I – III

Code Course

A first degree in a related field (i.e., Counseling, Special Education, Psychology, Early Childhood Educators, Social Work, Nursing, etc). A first degree and documented study of Visual Art.

AT001A

Child Abuse for the Mandated Reporter

AT002A

Elder Abuse for the Mandated Reported 0

AT100A

Art Practices for Non-Art Majors

3

AT101

Theories and Practice For Art Therapy

3

AT102A

Professional Ethics in Art Therapy

3

YEAR I

SEMESTER II MODULES IV – V

Code Course

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300

Credits

AT103B

Art Therapy across the

Life Span – Children

AT104B

Art Therapy across the

Life Span – Adolescents

AT105B

Art Therapy across the

Life Span – Adults

AT117B

Art Therapy Certificate

Internship & Supervision (225 hrs)

0

Credits 3 3 3 3


POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ART THERAPY DUAL ENROLLMENT COURSES Dual enrollment allows students to register for the Art Therapy programme whilst pursuing another major. Students who are accepted for Dual Enrollment will begin their modules in the following manner: YEAR 3

SEMESTER IMODULES I - II

Code Course

YEAR 4 Credits

SEMESTER IIMODULES III - IV

Code Course

AT101

Theories and Practices of Art Therapy

3

AT102

Professional Ethics in Art Therapy

3

AT001

Child Abuse for the Mandated Reporter

0

AT106

AT002

Elder Abuse for the Mandated Reporter

0

Lifespan – Adolescents*

AT107

Art Therapy Across the

AT105

Credits

Art Therapy Across the Lifespan - Children

3

Art Therapy Across the

Lifespan - Adults*

AT117

Art therapy Certificate

Internship & Supervision

3

3 3

*Concurrent with Internship

301

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS FOUNDATION STUDIES FD102A Integrated 2D/3D I 3 Credits - 1 Semester The course lends itself to the investigation of problem solving through conceptual and actual means utilizing the fundamental elements of visual language. This will enable students to recognize the interrelatedness and integrative processes that emphasize the synergy of 2D and 3D elements. Students will explore the subtle differences between 2D and 3D, and acquire an understanding of how they inform each other. Throughout the semester students will engage with varying materials and integrated explorations of the formal fundamental concepts that underpin studio practice. This will be enhanced by specific readings related to contemporary studio practice. FD102B Integrated 2D/3D II – 3 Credits - 1 Semester Throughout the semester students will continue to engage with varying materials and integrated explorations of the formal fundamental concepts that underpin studio practice. Students will further explore the subtle differences between 2D and 3D, and acquire an understanding of how they inform each other. This will be enhanced by specific readings related to contemporary studio practice.   To introduce students to 2 and 3 dimensional art processes in a holistic manner. The course seeks to foster the exploration of the inter-relatedness of these art-making principles, while simultaneously developing the language and understanding of the formal aspects of art creation. Prerequisite – Integrated 2D/3D I FD103A Studio Practice 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop a sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design are employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice within three department of their choice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions. FD103B Introduction to Departments 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course helps to introduce the student to their department of choice for specialization and fundamental underpinning for their chosen field. Each department offers a broad mix of experiences that will strengthen and heighten the personal experiences of each student. Students will engage in several experiential programme designed to stimulate interest in and appreciation for the work of the department. Each course runs for a full semester in each department and aims to help students understand and apply the elements of pure design to the aesthetics of  various art forms. Emersion in this area will guide and broaden students’ knowledge in the development of their chosen field. Prerequisite – Studio Practice

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FD104 Introduction to Digital Media Foundations 3 Credits - 1 Semester The course is an Introduction to the theory and practice of digital media. Through a series of lectures, demonstrations, discussions, individual student research projects and group activities, this course examines the basic practices of digital media: formats, processes and practices, image acquisition and manipulation, raster image, vector illustration, 3d design, digital video, web, social networked, collaborative and participatory technology. In addition, soft digital media literacy skills for example, file and asset management, introduction to copyright and intellectual property, will be covered. This course will also examine the development and use of digital media and technology in social and cultural contexts DR100A Drawing I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course aims to develop students’ observational and recording skills through drawing; the depiction of form, space and light through the exploration of expressive mark-making using a variety of approaches and materials. Practical techniques such as measuring for proportion, perspective and formatting for the pictorial plane will be investigated using a broad range of subject matter. Students will be encouraged to view the process of drawing as a development of a personal visual language. DR101B Drawing II 3 Credits - 1 Semester Further development of students’ observational and recording skills through drawing is facilitated. Students engage in the investigation of form, space and light through the exploration of expressive mark making using a variety of approaches and materials. Application of practical techniques such as measuring for proportion, perspective and formatting for the pictorial plane will be investigated using a broad range of subject matter. Students will be encouraged to view the process of drawing as a development of a personal visual language. EU400A Issues in 2D Visual Representation I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will examine the context and practice of the visual arts in the disciplines of painting, drawing and printmaking. Through the investigation of developments in contemporary art, referencing of current literature and exposure to a broad range of visual culture related to contemporary practice, students will develop a body of work which is informed by their research and discussions. Emphasis will be placed on the inter-disciplinary nature of art. EU400B Issues in 2D Visual Representation II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This section of the course will seek to further examine the context and contemporary practices found in drawing, painting, printmaking and photography. Students will further explore the developments taking place in contemporary literature and art. Students will be expected to produce cohesive bodies of work that will be a reflection of their research and personal histories. Emphasis will be placed on the exploration and the use of multi-media. It is expected that students will reference both contemporary as well as past artists.


EU403A Issues in 3D Visual Representation I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will examine the context and practice of the visual arts in the discipline of sculpture and ceramics. Through the investigation of developments in contemporary art, referencing of current literature and exposure to a broad range of visual culture related to contemporary practice, students will develop a body of work which is informed by their research and discussions. Emphasis will be placed on the inter-disciplinary nature of art. EU403B Issues in 3D Visual Representation II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This Course continues the examination of the context and practice of the visual arts in the disciplines of sculpture and ceramics. Students will explore ways in which contemporary approaches to art and visual culture can be integrated in the teaching of the visual arts.

INTERDECIPLINARY STUDIES IN100 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course provides the opportunity to integrate ideas, media and processes developed in the study of selected studio disciplines. Students are introduced to three student-determined disciplines in four week modules through intense immersion, and are required to integrate the knowledge gained from each module to inform their artistic production in a process of interaction and experimentation. The body of work produced through this process will reflect this interdisciplinary dialogue. The course will be team taught. Prerequisite – Studio Practice IN200 Interdisciplinary Research Process (Seminar) 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course focuses on building individual visual language and facilitating the development of interdisciplinary studio projects which cut across or transcend disciplinary boundaries, through analysis and contextualization of these projects within contemporary practice and critical discourse. This weekly seminar focuses on the development of individual projects which are presented for discussion, and provides a forum for dialogue and critique. Students’ present ongoing work developed in their selected studio practice for group discussion. Through a collaborative process, guided by the lecturer, students critically analyze studio projects presented, exploring the ways in which ideas are explored and translated through interactions and responses to information gained in selected studio courses. Class discussions will be supported by presentations on issues central to interdisciplinary art practice, as well as discussion of the work of selected interdisciplinary artists. Through this course students will begin to develop their own processes for connecting and integrating practice across disciplines.

PAINTING DEPARTMENT PD201A Issues in Representation I 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course the student will work from life models, landscape on location, and still life in order to explore traditional and contemporary methods of representation in Painting. Students will be encouraged to experiment with materials, composition and scale. The works of the super realist and other contemporary artists will be researched

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and discussed and compared with the works of the old masters. Prerequisite – Foundation Studies PD201B Issues in Representation II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will further focus on the traditional notions of representation including the narrative, through the convulsions of the various modern movements of the early years: the twentieth century to the extreme formalism of the 1950s and beyond. This course seeks to examine what representation looks like today and what it might become as it continues to evolve. In doing so, fundamental skills and practices held to be at the very core of representation will be re-evaluated and questioned. PD202A Media and Process 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course focuses on the process of exploring materials. Students will explore a broad range of media and techniques, from the conventional to the unconventional, whilst dealing with the formal aspects of painting such as composition and investigation of pictorial space. Individual and group discussion of contemporary concerns in painting will be used to stimulate the students’ analytical ability. PD203B New Media and Process I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course encourages students to develop ideas through the process of performance and time-based projects using media such as photography, digital imaging and video. The student is introduced to the possibilities of using basic recording methods to document transitory or ephemeral activity along with more traditional means such as drawing and text. Prerequisite – Media and Process PD204A Caribbean Identity: The New Black Culture I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course seeks to align students with concepts ideas and aesthetics related to the Caribbean including its historic context. It stresses the importance of research and study of Caribbean literature, politics and socio-cultural geography as a necessary pre-requisite in order to have a concrete understanding of imagemaking and other concerns. PD204B Caribbean Identity: The New Black Culture II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course seeks to align students with concepts ideas and aesthetics related to the Caribbean including its historic context. It stresses the importance of research and study of Caribbean literature, politics and socio-cultural geography as a necessary pre-requisite in order to have a concrete understanding of imagemaking and other concerns. PD283A Mural Design I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course explores historical and contemporary approaches to mural painting and design with an emphasis on concepts and philosophies developed in the 20th century. Students will be encouraged to regard the city of Kingston as an open classroom. Community involvement and collaboration with public and private sectors will be encouraged and designs created as coursework will be placed in the public domain. Emphasis will be placed on media research. Students will be encouraged to think outside the traditional notion of mural painting (pigment on surfaces) in an effort to forge new possibilities in murals.

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PD285B Mural Design II 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course students will focus on developing and executing collaborative community-based projects and projects for public spaces. It will be oriented towards group projects which seek to transform social spaces and respond to current issues and events. Emphasis will be placed on developing team-building skills and an awareness of the social value of art through the intervention of the artist. Students will also be introduced to strategies for fundraising for public art projects. PD300A Assemblage/Collage 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course provides students with the opportunity to develop an interdisciplinary approach to Painting and/or Sculpture through an exploration of the medium of assemblage, collage and installation. PD301B Image and Process 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course is built on the principle that the idea is the vital core of all art. Students are encouraged to explore the process of materials and experience a broad range of media and techniques whilst dealing with the formal aspects of painting pictorial possibilities inherent in sources such as language, literature, folk ritual etc. Students are also encouraged to draw from their personal/cultural experience to develop ideas relevant to the essential self. PD302A Art in Context 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course investigates the connections that exist between the making of art and environment in which art is made. This includes the student’s personal/psychological response to social, historical and political issues. The discussion and analysis of information through the presentation of slides, video and guest lecturers will heighten students’ awareness of concerns in contemporary art practices as well as develop a more analytical approach to their own studio practice. The utilization of text, drawing, photography or other relevant means of documentation in an art book/journal to be presented at the end of the semester. PD303B New Media and Process II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course builds on the foundation of basic technical skills and ideas developed in year 2. Students are encouraged to further relevant technical skills, explore the possibilities of the editing process (both technical and manual) and explore working within an interactive/collaborative environment. Prerequisite – New Media and Process l PD401A Independent Study IA 9 Credits 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study

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projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. PD401B Independent Study IB 9 Credits 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

SCULPTURE DEPARTMENT SD200A The Body and Process l 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course focuses on exploration of the dynamics and structure of the human figure. Through intensive investigation students will develop a strong visual understanding of the body so that they can readily manipulate this subject to meet their conceptual needs. Form, proportion, movement, expression and gesture are some of the issues to be investigated. SD201B Installation/Environment/Site l 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course focuses on the theory and practice of site activation. Students will be introduced to concepts of ‘site’ and ‘sitespecificity’. Through discussion and practice they will examine the ways in which these concepts have radically re-contextualized art, challenged existing hierarchies and contributed to redefinition of art. Examination of the social, political and economic implications of locating art outside of the traditional gallery space will form the basis of individual works, which engage the audience in the public domain. SD202A Structure, Substance & Surface l 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course investigates the complex relationships between applied and inherent surfaces and substances/materials. Students are encouraged to use their own project ideas to explore the aesthetic issues evoked by a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials and surfaces, in and on wall-based and free-standing sculpture. SD203B New Media Process l 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course encourages students to develop ideas through the process of performance and time-based projects using media such as photography, digital imaging and video. The student is introduced to possibilities of using basic recording methods to document transitory or ephemeral activity along with more traditional means such as drawing and text. SD204A Space, Material and Context I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course explores the inherent relationships between space, material and context through the investigation of varied forms of


Architecture. Students are challenged to personalize the principles gained by applying them to their own modes of creativity. Research and writing are vital to the practical aspects of this course. SD206A Contemporary Directions 3 Credits - 1 Semester This studio seminar course will look at non-traditional themes and media that are currently being explored in contemporary arts as well as when and how they were developed through art history. Sculptural themes and issues that will be explored are; the developments of public art installation and Land art, photo-based installation, performance art, outsider art, conceptual art, text and objects, the readymade, light and sound as medium, rapid prototyping, the body as context and the artist collective. Through research and practice students will examine how these trends in contemporary art have redefined the boundaries of the Sculptor’s creative language. SD206B Sound as Medium 3 Credits - 1 Semester This studio seminar course introduces students to the notion of working with sound in the context of contemporary sculpture. Students will investigate the potential of sound as an aural medium in installation based works, performance, found objects and chordophones as art objects. Historical and contemporary artists and their efforts in developing sound globally as a viable art form will be investigated through lectures. SD300A The Body and Process II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course focuses on the psychological notion of the body. Issues such as culture, sexuality, disease, technology, gender, evolution and religion will be explored. Students will be required to complete reading assignments and make research presentations to the class. SD301B Installation/Environment/Site II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course provides the opportunity for students to explore the diverse interdisciplinary approaches to contemporary installation practice. Students will examine concepts of site, site-specificity, time and space, interaction and environment. The development of individual thematic concerns and documentation are integral to this course. Prerequisite: Collage/Assemblage or Installation / Environment /Site 1 SD302A Structure, Substance and Surface II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course further investigates the complex relationships between applied and inherent surfaces and substances/materials. Students are encouraged to use their own project ideas to explore the aesthetic issues evoked by a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials and surfaces, in and on wall-based and freestanding sculpture. SD303B New Media and Process II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course builds on the foundation of basic technical skills and ideas developed in year 2. Students are encouraged to further the development of relevant technical skills, explore the possibilities of the editing process (both technical and manual) and explore working within an interactive/collaborative environment. Prerequisite – New Media and Process I

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SD304B Space, Material and Context II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course explores architectural structures that embody varying ideologies that will prepare students to investigate and experiment with the concept of manipulating space and material to create environments that are manifestations of abstract thought. Both the societal and personal realms will be considered throughout the course. SD305A Issues in Contemporary Sculpture 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will employ and analyze the use of a variety of materials and individual conceptual development within the context of a contemporary sculptural practice. Students will gain a strong theoretical underpinning of the diverse issues in contemporary sculpture through participating in lectures, presentations, gallery visits, videos, readings and assignments. Themes to be examined are: the revisiting of modernism by contemporary sculptors, found objects and authenticity, minimalism and the reductive object, redefining figurative strategies and land art. SD306B Introduction to Object Design 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces students to the conceptual elements, organizing principles, and creative processes used in object design. Using a variety of materials and processes, students critically evaluate the importance of form and function, as well as gaining the technical ability to produce structurally sound creations with emphasis on craftsmanship. Central, too, are the relationships among concept, idea, form, and context. Students will gain knowledge in object design through lectures, research and assignments SD401A Independent Study IA 9 Credits 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. SD401B Independent Study IB 9 Credits 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The

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research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

PRINTMAKING DEPARTMENT PM200A Introduction to the Graphic Stamp 3 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the world of printmaking; working with machines and tools and the process of impression and edition making. Students will receive instruction in wood-printing in black and white and colour, as well as ancient techniques of paper stamping and experimental contemporary approaches. Students are encouraged to develop personal imagery from a technical and personal point of view. PM200B Collograph and Linoleum 3 Credits -1 Semester This course closes the process of surface printing and introduces the technique of hollow printing, combined through the medium of collography. Students are encouraged to use hand drawn images and the use of the press to transfer their images to paper from linoleum, woodcut and found objects. The exploration of colour prints and traditional techniques of Collograph. PM201A & B Introduction to Intaglio Print I & II 3 Credits -1 Semester each This course introduces students to the techniques of printing from metal, the development of hollow printing and the use of varnishes, acids and resins to print images in black and white. Various plate making and intaglio printing techniques are studied. Students are encouraged to develop personal imagery and to translate them into prints. PM201A Introduction to Intaglio I 3 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to explorations and theoretical underpinning in basic intaglio printing. Students will acquire of the knowledge of the technique of printing from metal, the development of the hollow printing and the use of varnishes, acids and resins to print images in black and white. PM202A Printmaking Concepts I 3 Credits -1 Semester A stimulating course of creative development for printmaking students, in which students refine the acquisition of techniques and highly useful resources in the field of printmaking. Traditional techniques as well as experimental contemporary approaches are encouraged while learning the basics and developing personal imagery. PM203A Introduction to Lithography I 3 Credits -1 Semester This course shows a new type of surface printing. The students are introduced to black and white lithography, making images through different procedures: pencil, gouache, pen and ink, collage, etc. and transfer to stones or metal plates to be printed. PM204A Introduction to Silkscreen Printing I 3 Credits -1 Semester Students are introduced to basic silkscreen printing techniques and the application of the medium to commercial design and printing. Students are also encouraged to develop their own style of expression.

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Traditional methods of stencil making using hand drawn painterly techniques will be studied. Students will also be introduced to the photo emulsion process for screen making. PM300A Advanced Intaglio Print I 3 Credits -1 Semester In this course students consolidate the techniques of intaglio printing from metal through colour printing. Students are expected to develop independent projects. Projects are to be printed in editions and are to be related in concepts. Students are guided through individual and group tutorials for the duration of the course. PM30A Advanced Techniques in Relief Printing I 3 Credits -1 Semester This course consolidates the techniques using multimedia to explore various forms of printmaking. The relationship between drawing, painting, illustration and printmaking is emphasized. Skills in registering and editing images are developed. PM301A Advanced Lithography I 3 Credits -1 Semester In this course students further develop skills in lithography printing with colour. Students will discover possibilities similar to painting while developing their knowledge of colour. PM302A Advanced Silkscreen Printing I 3 Credits -1 Semester This course is a continuation of Silkscreen Printing 1. Students are encouraged to develop personal imagery and to move towards producing fine art silkscreen prints. Students are also introduced to photographic silkscreen techniques. PM401A Independent Study IA 9 Credits 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. PM203B Introduction to Lithography II 3 Credits -1 Semester This course continues the investigation of personal approaches to visual representation through the exploration of black and white lithography and its relationship to drawing and painting. PM201B Introduction to Intaglio II 3 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to explorations and acquiring the knowledge of the technique of printing from metal, the development of the hollow print and the use of varnishes, acids and resins to print images in black and white. PM201B Introduction to intaglio II 3 Credits -1 Semester Students are encouraged to explore ideas and develop personal imagery, using technical skills acquired in Introduction to Intaglio


I. Students will be exposed to aquatint, mezzotint, and embossing techniques, and emphasis will be placed on sketching in the development of ideas. PM202B Printmaking Concepts II 3 Credits -1 Semester This course facilitates the continuation of experimentation and research begun, enabling students to develop their ideas and visual language through traditional and non-traditional approaches to printmaking. PM204B Introduction to Silkscreen Printing II 3 Credits -1 Semester This course is a continuation of Introduction to Silkscreen Printing I. Students are encouraged to explore personal imagery using a range of basic screen printing methods, materials and applications. Emphasis will be placed on developing personal visual language.

customer personality and gender on design. Emphasis is on developing creative ability and visual sensitivity. Suitable rendering techniques, painting and perspective requirements are covered. JW202B Goldsmithing I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This is a study of metal work techniques specific to the nature and characteristics of metal. Students will begin to work in copper, brass or silver and to develop and execute their own design ideas for simple pieces of Jewellery to study these basic procedures.

PM300B Advanced Intaglio II 3 Credits -1 Semester This course is a continuation of Advanced Intaglio I. Students are encouraged to develop personal imagery though a series of related works.

JW203B Theory of Jewellery I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course is a study of the properties of metals and processes involved in the identification of precious metals, the circulation and preparation of alloys and other specific practices of the profession such as electroplating and hallmarking. Other areas explored are stone identification and workshop practices related to business ventures. Students are made aware of stylistic differences, the reason for them and how styles are influenced by social and political events.

PM301B Advanced Lithography II 3 Credits -1 Semester In this course students continue the exploration of the possibilities of colour lithography, as well as photo-based techniques. Emphasis is placed on developing personal visual language. PM302B Advanced Silkscreen Printing II 3 Credits -1 Semester Students will develop ideas and personal language, utilizing technical approaches investigated in Advanced Silkscreen Printing I.

JW301A Principles of Design II 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course students continue to develop a portfolio of designs using reference material drawn from natural and man-made environment. Plant life, fossil, crystalline and mineral forms etc. are transcribed into design ideas giving them a Caribbean content. They also learn to simulate metals through painting on black paper. They also study the impact of customer personality and gender on design.

PM401B Independent Study IB 9 Credits 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

JW302A New Directions in Jewellery 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course seeks to enrich the vocabulary of the Jewellery student by looking at and discussing the work of avantgarde designers and their techniques in art Jewellery making. This course looks at Jewellery fashion, principles and cycles while studying trends.

JEWELLERY DEPARTMENT JW200A Introduction to Jewellery 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces students to technical aspects of jewellery making. Basic processes used in the design and creation of jewellery making techniques is studied. Students fabricate their own design in studio. JW201A Principles of Design I 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course students are encouraged to develop a portfolio of design ideas using as reference material from plant life, fossil, crystalline and mineral forms. They also study the impact of

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JJW303A Goldsmithing IIA 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course is a continuation of Goldsmithing 1. Students study more advanced goldsmithing techniques such as inlay enameling, mosaic and fittings and their construction. Students are encouraged to develop their own individual designs. JW303B Goldsmithing IIB 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course is a continuation of Goldsmithing 1. Students are presented with advanced and challenging goldsmithing techniques such as inlay enameling, mosaic and fittings and their construction. Students are encouraged to develop their own individual designs. JW304B Caribbean Influences 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course encourages the student to focus on indigenous materials, architecture, and fashion and costume designs in the Caribbean and its application in Jewellery. JW305B Theory of Jewellery II 3 Credits - 1 Semester Further study of the properties of metals and processes involved in the identification of precious metals, the circulation and preparation

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of alloys and other specific practices of the profession such as electroplating and hallmarking. Other areas explored are stone identification and workshop practices related to business ventures. Students are made aware of stylistic differences, the reason for them and how styles are influenced by social and political events. Investigation of gem species and their characteristics are covered. Prerequisite: Theory of Jewellery I JW204B Mechanics and Fittings (Mandatory Workshop) 0 Credit – 7 Weeks In this course students are introduced to the technical aspects of precision necessary for making Jewellery. Students will be taught the fundamentals of mechanical and plan drawing as it applies to materials, mechanisms, concepts and designs used in Jewellery. JW300A Production Techniques I (Mandatory Workshop) 0 Credit – 7 Weeks This course focuses on pre-production work for lost wax casting, an intermediary process used when a design cannot be transferred directly to metal. Students learn the different stages from the making of clay or plaster model through to the final stage of centrifugal casting. JW300B Production Technique II (Mandatory Workshop Mass Production) 0 Credit - 7 Weeks This course focuses on pre-production work for lost wax casting, an intermediary process used when a design cannot be transferred directly to metal. Students learn the different stages from the making of clay or plaster model through to the final stage of centrifugal casting. JW401A Independent Study IA 9 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. JW401B Independent Study IB 9 Credits 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The

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research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. EL244E Computer-Aided Design for Artists 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course ensures that students are capable of applying computeraided design (CAD) software to the design and presentation of their projects, and makes them aware of the manufacturing capabilities of computer technology. Projects will focus on design presentation, and hands-on experience in the use of CAD software packages. Topics include CAD hardware, geometric modeling rendering, and an introduction to computer numerical control (CNC) machining and rapid prototyping technology (RPT).

CERAMICS DEPARTMENT CD202A Multimedia Ceramics I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course is designed to broaden the scope of production, creativity and experimentation. The limitation of executing a single piece is expanded by means of mass production of identical pieces in a short time. The course also provides possibility of producing ‘new’ individualistic pieces. CD206 Ceramic Studio Processes I (Mandatory Workshop) 0 Credit – 1 Semester This workshop will provide a series of the necessary technical underpinnings as the foundation to providing the springboard for the ceramic experience of the student artist and designer. Students will engage in an intensive immersion in the various practices. This workshop is open to design majors as well as studio specific student artist. CD207 Ceramic Studio Processes II (Mandatory Workshop) 0 Credit – 1 Semester Students will engage the potter’s wheel. Through repetition of fundamental processes of throwing students will work at the processes inherent in creating all cylindrical oriented forms. The composite form will also be explored in structures such as the traditional tea pot form and other contemporary structures. CD203A Ceramic Sculpture I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will focus on mixed media approaches to express individual ideas. Students will have the opportunity to explore the potential of the materials being used for large or small 3D structures. Model-making and studies to illustrate the relationship between ideas and processes will also be covered. CD301A Studio Ceramics II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course follows on to Studio Ceramic 1 for continued development of good craftsmanship. Students will be encouraged to do individual study and develop personal expression in thrown or hand built clay pieces. CD302A Multimedia Ceramics II 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course the students learn the technical process of duplicating original pieces while simplifying complex pieces so that they become reproducible. Students are encouraged to take a creative approach in their exploration of materials, processes and ideas as well as a professional approach to the resolution of ceramic objects, surfaces and structures.


CD304A Surface Design II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course follows on from Surface Design 1, and teaches additional techniques of surface decoration. The student designs and executes work choosing an appropriate technique, size and form for his or her individual preference. CD401A Independent Study IA 9 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. CD401B Independent Study IB 9 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. CD205E Ceramic Jewellery 3 Credits - 1 Semester The course provides an opportunity for students to explore ceramic materials and processes specifically oriented towards the production of ceramic jewellery pieces. They will garner skills and concepts for developing, designing and creating ornamental pieces that are either functional or “non-functional”. The course provides a broad range of traditional, contemporary and experimental approaches to designing and producing ornamental pieces which are both collectable and functional. The student acquires the freedom to go beyond the limitations imposed by tradition and seeks new ways to creating innovative pieces of individualistic or/and multi-functional purposes. EL244E Computer- Aided Design for Artists 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course ensures that students are capable of applying computeraided design (CAD) software to the design and presentation of their projects, and makes them aware of the manufacturing capabilities of computer technology. Projects will focus on design presentation, and hands-on experience in the use of CAD software packages.

Topics include CAD hardware, geometric modeling, rendering, and an introduction to computer numerical control (CNC) machining and rapid prototyping technology (RPT).

TEXTILE & FIBRE ARTS, FASHION DEPARTMENT TD207 Textile Design Surface Design (Workshop) 7 Weeks -1 Semester This course offers processes, techniques and insight, which are valuable in solving design problems. Innovative techniques, media, CAD and texture in creating designs are explored. Procedures and methods including the use of the computer are also explored which will help to nurture, develop and exercise student’s creativity. TD201A Textile History and Contemporary Printing I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This is a study of traditional and contemporary dyeing and printing techniques of textiles of Japan, Africa and India, and investigation of social, cultural and historical context of textiles from these regions. Students will also engage in the exploration and examination of the exciting possibilities these techniques offer to contemporary artists. TD201B Textile History and Contemporary Printing II 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students are introduced to traditional dyeing and printing processes. Students will also develop new, innovative and individual experiments in designing and applying traditional techniques with the silkscreen in actual workshop surroundings. As skills develop, designs will be a major consideration. TD203A Natural Dyes, Fibres and Properties 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course is a study of natural and synthetic fibres and fabrics, including testing methods for strength and colour-fastness. Research and experimentation with local plants, which can yield dyes, is also carried out, using previous local and international research. Extraction of colour from plants, development of new natural dyes and use of a variety of dyes made from plants on fabric or yarn as well as the chemicals needed for extracting, changing and fixing colours is studied. TD204B Textiles History and Techniques ll 3 Credits - 1 Semester A study of the functions of traditional, social, cultural and historical context of the origins of the countries of the Americas, Africa and Japan. Students engage in the exploration of traditional techniques and the exciting possibilities it offers to contemporary artists. TD 205B Design Across Boundaries 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course presents students with an overview of the relationship of art movements and periods to textile design and their interrelation. Students will examine the cyclic nature of designs. Students are encouraged to develop their own ideas through processes, techniques and insight that are valuable in solving design problems related to themes synonymous with particular art periods and movements. Innovative techniques, media, and texture in creating contemporary interpretations of designs are explored in order to provide students with the experience of working in a studio setting. The use of the computer is also explored as a tool in expanding

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students’ creativity. Students will also be exposed to presenting their work as projects. The designer’s brief format will be utilised in the presentation of their work. TD206E Introduction to Interior Design 3 Credits - 1 Semester This Introductory Interior Design course will focus on the design and study of interior spaces, form, colour and light, and how an individual or various groups are affected by the design of spaces. The course will include a combination of hands-on studio projects, class discussions and field trips. Students will be introduced to drafting, rendering and model-making. Students will engage in discussions on the notion of good design, the role of design and the responsibility of the designer to meet the demands of an everchanging society. TF206A Pattern Making & Construction I 3 Credits - 1 Semester It is critical that students understand techniques for measuring and calculating body dimensions and how those 3D measurements translate to lines, shapes and cuts on 2D material. The student’s introduction to the concept of working in the duo dimensional world of the fashion designer will centre on the basic 2 Dimensional skirt pattern or “skirt block”, which is used to construct a wide range of skirts. TF206B Pattern Making & Construction II 3 Credits - 1 Semester Create an understanding of how the general difference between the male body and female body affects the bodice/shirt pattern. Further the development of pattern cutting and garment construction techniques. Increase the level of drafting, cutting and construction complexity. Continue to get students to maintain the disciplined to work within construction principles and set parameters. TF208B Portfolio Development I 3 Credits - 1 Semester The use of strong dynamic imagery will form the basis of the student’s portfolio, from inspirational mood boards to concept sketches through to photo shoot with finished garments. This module will focus on a deliberate development of techniques and applications for creating visuals common to the fashion industry. It will have a practical component where students can use their own designs as the basis for generating visual communications and texts that are geared toward packaging and marketing their own brand. TW203 Introduction to Weaving I (Workshop) 7 Weeks -1 Semester This course provides an introduction to basic weaving. It focuses on tapestry techniques, using the frame loom. Experimentation with methods of colouring and dyeing for use in woven fabrics is encouraged. 0 Credits TW202B Introduction to Weaving II 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course students are introduced to floor loom weaving. Individuals will be encouraged to focus on developing personal imagery in weaving.

TW206 Non-Loom Weaving (Workshop) 7 Weeks – 1Semester Focus is on using basketry, finger weaving and felt-making techniques as a means of expressing ideas. These techniques will expose students to a variety of methods for exploring fibre sculpture. Students will be encouraged to focus on developing personal imagery using these techniques. 0 Credits TD300A Textile Design for Furnishing and Apparel 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students develop a professional approach and aesthetic dimension to design and printing. This is a course in workshop methods and restrictions, design considerations and limitations, distribution and application related to furnishing and apparel fabrics. Students will study complex styles, repeats and croquis and sophisticated application of colour. TD301A Contemporary Studio Practices and Design Procedures 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course prepares students to design for small studio production by introducing them to the practices of contemporary design studios and how they differ from the printing industry. Site visits to studios are made and students’ reports on their observations form part of the course requirement. Current trends in textile designs are looked at, as well as site differences between the small studio printer and industrial printing practices. This course also stresses basic professional techniques in the construction of a designer’s first sample. Students gain insight into the relationship between creative design and quality of finished sample. TD305 Layered Textiles (Workshop) 7 Weeks – 1Semester This course will broaden students’ knowledge of traditional layering methods. Examples will be drawn from various parts of the world known for this type of work. These methods will be explored along with other surface design techniques such as hand and machine embroidery, quilting and patchwork. Students are encouraged to use these techniques to develop ideas for sculptural/relief approach to fabric, moving away from the flat planar textile. 0 Credits TD303B Form and Imagery with Cloth 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students are exposed to various techniques of manipulating fabric/ soft materials into 3D and relief through the joining of planes and shaping of forms with the aid of various types of stiffeners and moulds. Development of personal imagery is encouraged. TD304B Contemporary Textiles: The Art of Fabric Design 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students must be able to conceptualize designs based on a personal theme, create and present work with an awareness of local / Caribbean culture. Students are encouraged to develop their ideas through the lenses of critical art theories, periods, movements and issues such as Instrumentalism, or Post-Modernism. They must also look at trends in textile design and printing while utilizing the fundamental approaches through experimentation. TW302A Woven Imagery l 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course explores weaving as a drawing medium utilizing supplemental warp/weft, and double cloth. Along with direct encounter with material and weaving system at the loom, each

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student will make a hard bound note/journal which will include drawings, drafting, writings, bibliography, vocabulary and personal evaluation and all relevant individual explorations and research throughout the course.

expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

TW302B Woven Imagery ll 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course further explores weaving as a drawing medium utilizing supplemental warp/weft, and double cloth along with direct encounter with material and weaving system at the loom. Students will continue to make a note/journal, which will include drawings, drafting, writings, and bibliography and expand their vocabulary and personal evaluation and all relevant individual explorations and research throughout this course.

EL244E Computer-Aided Design for Artists 3 Credits - 1 Semester I This course ensures that students are capable of applying computeraided design (CAD) software to the design and presentation of their projects, and makes them aware of the manufacturing capabilities of computer technology. Projects will focus on design presentation and hands-on experience in the use of CAD software packages. Topics include CAD hardware, geometric modeling, rendering, and an introduction to computer numerical control (CNC) machining and rapid prototyping technology (RPT).

TW305A Exploring Tapestry l 3 Credits - 1 Semester The emphasis of this course is hinged on research and development of ideas, employing various tapestry techniques. These ideas should be documented in written and visual form in a sketchbook. Students are expected to produce one major piece of work at the end of the semester displaying a high level of technical competence and development of concept. Experimentation and use of non-fibre material will be encouraged. TW305B Exploring Tapestry ll 3 Credits - 1 Semester Further research and development of ideas and experimentation of tapestry techniques is encouraged. Students will continue to document ideas in written and visual form in a sketchbook. Students are expected to produce one major piece of work at the end of the semester displaying a high level of technical competence and development of concept. Further experimentation and use of nonfibre material is encouraged. TW401A Independent Study IA 9 credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. TW401B Independent Study Ib 9 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are

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TD401A Independent Study Ia 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. TD401B Independent Study Ib 9 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study

DESIGN STUDIES DS202 Integrated Principles of Design Applications: 2D Focus 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students will be able to develop through further immersion the principles of design through practice, underpinned by critical research. Through this practice students will develop their own visual language and identity by strategically employing elements that will enhance their designs referring various philosophies and beliefs from various schools of design. Students will communicate ideas with a dominant 2dimensional framework including new media approaches to visual arts.

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Students will be knowledgeable of the possibilities of using basic recording methods to document transitory or ephemeral activity along with more traditional means such as drawing, colour application and text in their creations in developing a body of work. DS210 Integrated Principles of Design Applications: 2D Focus 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students will be exposed to and become conversant with the vocabulary, ideas methodologies of creating projects while exploring a myriad of approaches that contributes to the process of design. Students will investigate the material culture of three-dimensional objects referencing specific prominent cultures, or forces in order to grasp the meaning, of and factors that contributes to their creation. The meaning of objects will be explored through the critical lenses of social, political, gender and cultural and what they reflect of us. Specific problem solving projects will be formulated to provide methods of enquiry considering purpose, use, functionality and possible cost for reproduction. DR203 Technical Drawing for Design 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will provide students with the opportunity to explore, invent and resolve design issues through technical drawing and referencing while building dexterity. Critical thinking in the realm of design problem-solving is also crucial through employing drawing as a tool of analysis. This course will provide students with the opportunities to create, recreate and tackle through design-led projects, issues pertinent to the environment and the Caribbean context. DS200WSMaterials and Properties (Workshop I: Fibre & Plastics) 7 Weeks - Semester I The foci of these workshops are to enable students to understand the applicability of choice of material for end products. Working with various materials to produce products takes into consideration the inherent properties of the materials at hand. Students will explore materials documenting their findings, while demonstrating an understanding of issues such as malleability, conductivity, resilience, response to pressure, elasticity and material memory and the suitability of material to desired function. Compositions – working with mixed materials; understanding how they work independently and in conjunction with each other will also be investigated. 0 Credits DS210WSMaterials and Properties (Workshop II): Fibre & Plastics) 7 Weeks - Semester 2 Working with various materials to produce products/designs, takes into consideration the inherent properties of the materials at hand while demonstrating an understanding of issues such as malleability, conductivity, resilience, response to pressure elasticity and material memory suitability of material to desired function. Compositions – working with mixed materials; understanding how they work independently and in conjunction with each other.The foci of these workshops are to enable students to understand the applicability of choice of material for end products/design ideas. 0 Credits.

VISUAL COMMUNICATION DEPARTMENT VC200A Visual Communication Ia 3 Credits - 1 Semester Introduction to basic layout and typography as the fundamental language to graphic communication. Students build on the ability to manipulate visual content to create derivative form. Issues of hierarchy, audience, context and research are investigated and applied. VC200B Visual Communication Ib 3 Credits - 1 Semester Part 2 of the year long course Visual Communication. Students continue learning layout and typography as the fundamental language to graphic communication. Students continue to build on the ability to manipulate visual content to create derivative form. Issues of hierarchy, audience, context and research are investigated and applied. VC203A Illustration I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will concentrate on individual solutions to illustration assignments while considering communications on a broad scale. Emphasis is on concept, content and execution. Students explore media, technique and printing applications and develop the skillful handling of these. VC203B Illustration II 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students learn all aspects of producing illustrations from initial concept to finished artwork. Students are encouraged to develop mastery of composition and draughtsman-ship and to find creative solutions considering tonal contrast and colour harmony. VC206 Design Procedure for Graphics (Workshop) 0 Credits - 7 Weeks (Semester 1) This course will cover the equipment, materials, techniques and procedures required in a graphic design studio to produce everything from layouts to mechanical and prepress electronic art. Emphasis is placed on the use of the computer as well as traditional techniques. VC303 Digital Design Ia (Workshop) 0 Credits - 7 Weeks (Semester I) This course will introduce the creative processes, methods, strategies and tools used in developing concepts and final designs for various forms of media distribution. Along with understanding these technical approaches, students will also attempt to explore the psychological implications of these processes by investigating the role of the designer as an active agent of change and the impact of new technological developments on society and culture. VC304 Digital Design Ib (Workshop) 0 Credits – 7 Weeks – (Semester 2) Digital Design is about developing a wide range of skills necessary for the designer of the future -from traditional graphic design and visual communication processes and procedures to interactive or web design, motion design, and video production. Digital Design is essential in knowing which kind of creative or design solution is best for a project. This course focuses on digital images and web design. VC30IA Graphic Design I a 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will concentrate on the basic symbol development through a creative problem solving for complex concepts.

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The idea is for student to learn to present a visual message that is clear, stylistically beautiful and memorable. VC301B Graphic Design Ib 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will concentrate on the design of all categories of print media from postage stamps to posters, brochures, book covers etc. The idea is for student to learn to present a visual message that is clear, stylistically beautiful and memorable. VC302A Illustration III 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will concentrate on individual solutions to advanced illustration problems while considering communications on a broad scale. VC303B Illustration IV 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course provides the opportunity to develop a personal style of illustration supported by examination of historical trends. VC306A Design with Type 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will cover execution of lettering for reproduction. The computer will be used to introduce basic principles of typography design and type setting. VC307B Calligraphy 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course involves the study of alphabets and their characteristics. The general principles of layout, spacing, balance and contrast are emphasized. Tools and materials, letterforms, using pen, brushes and useful processes are studied. Projects include alphabet designs, posters, letterheads, greeting cards, illustrated poems, and certificates etcetera. VC308A Method & Media 1a 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will introduce students to the work of ten highly acclaimed international illustrators. Students will be shown how each illustrator achieves his or her technique and will complete an illustration using a method from each. VC308B Method & Media Ib 3 Credits - 1 Semester A variety of mediums such as conte crayons, scratchboard, acrylic, linoleum, collage, pen and ink, watercolour and marker rendering will be employed in the execution for various illustrations. VC310A Packaging Design 3 Credits - 1 Semester This is a study of packaging graphics and 3D design with emphasis on a variety of products. Packages are analyzed and positioned from a marketing point of view. Students develop visual graphics and colour schemes suitable for individual products. Typical projects include export oriented food and cosmetic products from Jamaica and the Caribbean region. VC311B Exhibition and Display Design 3 Credits - 1 Semester The elements of thematic display and exhibition design in commercial and institutional arenas are examined. Professional growth in conceptual ability, ideology and skills development

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is stressed. Students design visual presentations and develop techniques for varied applications, learning materials sourcing, graphics, merchandise, budget planning and installation factors. VC312A 2D Computer Design 3 Credits -1 Semester This course explores 2-dimensional imaging on an intermediate to advanced level. Projects involve digital painting, drawing and image manipulation, with an emphasis on output issues and presentation. VC313B 3D Modeling 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces students to the basic principles of building 3-dimensional objects and environments with a computer, looking at issues of modeling techniques, rendering, lighting and colour. Concepts of 3-dimensional space and geometrical transformation are reviewed. Prerequisite - Introduction to Digital Foundations VC314A Interactive Media 3 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the principles of interactivity in computer media. Students combine dimensional imaging, graphics authoring as well as audio and video technology for achieving interactivity from multiple source media. Interface design and scripting tools are covered. Prerequisite – Introduction to Digital Foundations VC315B Comic Book Illustration 3 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the world of comic book design and illustration. Students are introduced to the styles and techniques as well as the communicative structure of comic books. The historical underpinning is also examined. VC316A 3D Animation 3 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the basic aspects of designing and producing a 3-dimensional computer animation. It is assumed that students are already familiar with all basic modeling techniques. Students will develop storyboards in terms of clarity of meaning, camera motion and rendering techniques. Key frame and interpolation techniques are covered thoroughly. Students will be required to complete a short animated piece, one-minute long story. Prerequisite - 3D Modeling. VC345B Design Internship 3 Credits -1 Semester This course aims to expose the student to real world projects and a real world environment. Students will be placed within a Design Firm or Advertising Agency and work alongside experienced designers and art directors for one day a week. It is in this environment that they will learn to balance quality and cost, as well as learning the true importance of a deadline. This Design Internship will not only offer the students real world experience but they will also participate in a Production Internship at a press or media house. VC343E Communication Advertising Seminar 3 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the various aspects involved in communicating an idea. The course covers or starts from the client with the product through to the various processes involved in reaching the consumer. The focus is on Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations. The role and function of the Creative Director,

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Senior Art Director, Artist/Designer, Production Manager and production Houses are also looked at.

This introductory course in the art of lighting and photography studio use and function will serve them well in careers in the field

VC401A Independent Study IA 9 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

PP200A Intermediate Photography 3 Credits -1 Semester This course provides students with the opportunity to expand on the basic knowledge acquired in the introductory course. Further exploration of the camera use and darkroom is encouraged. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography

VC401B Independent Study IB 9 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study. EL244E Computer-Aided Design for Artists 3 Credits -1 Semester This course ensures that students are capable of applying computeraided design (CAD) software to the design and presentation of their projects, and makes them aware of the manufacturing capabilities of computer technology. Projects will focus on design presentation, and hands-on experience in the use of CAD software packages. Topics include CAD hardware, geometric modeling, rendering, and an introduction to computer numerical control (CNC) machining and rapid prototyping technology (RPT).

PHOTOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT PP202A Studio Photography 3 Credits -1 Semester This course will introduce students to the fine art and commercial practice of Studio Photography, and its history. It will be the first intensive course detailing the profound potential of the controlled environment in which light is manipulated to define the subjects and conceptions of the artist. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of process to concept through critical engagement with works of selected artists. Students will be introduced to the environment and methodology of the photography studio. Areas to be covered include backdrop systems; camera formats from digital single lens reflex through digital medium format and large format cameras. The art of lighting, existing light, continuous light and flash/strobe lights will be an area of focus. Through a process of investigation students will develop work based on their conceptual concerns.

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PP201B Introduction to Alternative Processes 3 Credits -1 Semester This course will introduce students to the processes, the art, as well as to the history of alternative processes in photography. Students will be exposed to the ways in which historical processes are utilized and integrated with contemporary processes such as digital imaging. The course will focus on early photographic processes, image transfer processes, as well as photomontage, Photoshop and image projection. A number of these processes are considered alternative as they are not conventionally utilized in mainstream image making and many utilize processes that were some of the foundations of photographic image making. PP203E Seminar: Alternative Imaging 0 Credits – Either Semester Alternate Imaging will establish a process of building layers of all kinds with the photographic print and other materials in creative ways. Students will begin to explore in studio hands on processes of assembling and adhering. Images will include digital and or traditional photographic prints merged with methods of printmaking, drawing, collaging, painting and the very old encaustic [hot wax] layering. Social, political, religious, and personal issues can be explored and expressed through the use of Alternative Imaging. Alternative Imagery is a multi-disciplinary art form and will be considered an amalgamated working experience between departments. PP300B The Constructed Image 3 Credits -1 Semester This course will introduce students to a new perspective in their conception and practice of photography. Traditional pedagogy in regards to the medium propagates a modernist bias in favour of straight photographic representation of primarily external realities. Students will be instructed in the methods and execution of conceptually based image making. The constructed image involves the scripting, sketching, visualizing and ultimately creating images that are pure expressions of the artists and not merely the recorder, the documenter This course will examine the aesthetic, philosophical and practical aspects of working in this mode PP205B Introduction to Photojournalism 3 Credits -1 Semester Students will be introduced to using digital SLR camera systems to cover various photojournalism assignments such as breaking news, general news events, sports and features. Students will be exposed to writing skills pertinent to the practice of photojournalism. The history of photojournalism will also be a key factor, as students will be made aware of ethical and legal issues in photojournalism, and the risk and trauma associated with photojournalism.


PP301A Photography Open Lab I 3 Credits -1 Semester This course facilitates the exploration of photography from a multidisciplinary perspective, with emphasis on developing personal visual language. PP301B Photography Open Lab II 3 Credits -1 Semester Students continue exploration of the multi-disciplinary possibilities of photography, developing a body of work which explores issues of personal concern. PP302A Advanced Still Photojournalism 3 Credits -1 Semester Students will develop their visual storytelling knowledge and technical skills necessary to produce multiple still-image photo stories. They will learn how to create, research, develop shoot, edit and layout major photo stories for print and on-line formats as well as the exhibition gallery. Students will examine: Feature writing and captioning for photo stories, the 21st century photojournalism market and industry; the paradigm shift from print to web-based journalism, independent journalism and citizen journalism; contemporary photojournalism practices; the place of photojournalism in the gallery and the effect of images on society. PP303B Multimedia Documentary Journalism 3 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the basics of multimedia, webbased visual storytelling, using still images, audio and video to produce documentaries. These are necessary skills and experience required to be a 21st century photojournalist, using both still and video cameras. Students will be taught how to use equipment and software to create and produce a variety of online visual stories, whether documentary, narrative or editorial. PP304A Museum Photo Studies 3 Credits -1 Semester This course is designed to encourage students to take an active interest in the collections and documentation of images to be used as historical evidence for the Institute of Jamaica and similar types of institutions. The objective is to research, visit and document historical sites, maps, artefacts, objects that are vestiges of religion, slavery and the vernacular. This course, under the guidance of the Institute of Jamaica history department, will also include cataloguing, storage and exhibition. Students will conduct site visits to selected museums, and interact with museum professionals. Museum staff will also deliver lectures on the role of object/image documentation in collections management, and issues related to Visual Display and Representation. PP308B Products, Designs & Consumers 3 Credits -1 Semester An industry-based course that introduces the photographer to the needs of the clients in terms of the look and design of the subject, and how it will be used in the final product. This course incorporates studies of commercial photography with emphasis on a variety of products and markets. Projects are analyzed and positioned from a marketing point of view. Students develop visual graphics and colour schemes suitable for individual products. Students design projects and develop techniques for varied applications, learning materials sourcing, graphics, merchandise, budget-planning and installation factors. The course will give students the opportunity to interact directly with professionals in the field.

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PP305A Commercial Photography I - Fashion & Lifestyle 3 Credits -1 Semester While designed to explore the commercial aspects of portraiture, fashion & glamour photography students must also consider the relations and needs of the clients, models and designers who are also critical to the image making process. This course will examine products and issues of ethics. Discussions and projects will also drive students to investigate and critically analyze the use of imagery and how photographic artists can apply their creative, technical, and conceptual skills to commercial photographic applications to evoke particular sensory reactions. The creating of a dynamic portfolio influenced by commercial applications such as editorial and studio or location photography will be explored. Student will also be sensitized to development in and appreciation of the breath of opportunities within commercial business practices shooting strategies for creating a dynamic portfolio. PP306B Commercial Photography II – Advertising Photography 3 Credits -1 Semester In this course issues of studio management will be discussed as it relates to the independent photographer. While the course is designed to explore the commercial aspects of portraiture, fashion & glamour, students must also consider the relations of managing their studio practice and pursuing multiple projects. By engaging the student in multiple projects simultaneously provides the simulation of a real-world working approach particularly for the media. This component will be heavily project based with continued attention to ethical issues and critical analysis to image making and content. The building of a dynamic portfolio influenced by commercial editorial applications will be developed. PP206SE Photography Seminar 1 0 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the history and contemporary practice of photography in Jamaica, from Duperly to contemporary practitioners. It also examines the work of selected artists in North America, Germany and South Africa focusing on the relationship of context to the development of the work. Major conceptual shifts in contemporary photography such as the staged tableau and video portraiture are also explored. This seminar course will be interactive and encourages students to critically engage with works through dialogue. In class discussions students will examine the conceptual and formal framework of specific works. The seminar will be offered to students across disciplines, but is mandatory for students in Year 2 Photography. PP204WS Staged Photography in Contemporary Art 3 Credits -1 Semester (Required for students in New Media & Process I) This course introduces students to staged photography through the examination of the work of Afro-American/Caribbean artist Renee Cox, and white South African artist Pieter Hugo, as well as others. Students will be introduced to the photographic portrait and staged tableau in contemporary photographic practice, and will reference the work of artists such as Richard Avedon, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Wall, Phillip Lorca di Corcia, Yinka Shonibare, Oneil Lawrence, Marvin Bartley, and Marlon James. This seminar course will be interactive and encourages students to critically engage with works through dialogue. In class discussions students will examine the conceptual and formal framework of specific works.

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The seminar will be offered to students across disciplines, but is mandatory for students in New Media and Process I. 0 CREDITS PP203SE Alternative Imaging Seminar 3 Credits -1 Semester Alternate Imaging will establish a process of building layers of all kinds with the photographic print and other materials in creative ways. Students will begin to explore in studio hands on processes of assembling and adhering. Images will include digital and or traditional photographic prints merged with methods of printmaking, drawing, collaging, painting and the very old encaustic [hot wax[ layering. Social, political, religious, and personal issues can be explored and expressed through the use of Alternative Imaging. Alternative Imagery is a multidisciplinary art form and will be considered an amalgamated working experience between departments. 0 CREDITS

DRAWING COURSES DR100E Drawing I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course aims to develop students’ observational and recording skills through drawing; the depiction of form, space and light through the exploration of expressive mark-making using a variety of approaches and materials. Practical techniques such as measuring for proportion, perspective and formatting for the pictorial plane will be investigated using a broad range of subject matter. Students will be encouraged to view the process of drawing as a development of a personal visual language. DR101E Drawing II 3 Credits - 1 Semester Further development of students’ observational and recording skills through drawing is facilitated. Students engage in the investigation of form, space and light through the exploration of expressive mark making using a variety of approaches and materials. Application of practical techniques such as measuring for proportion, perspective and formatting for the pictorial plane will be investigated using a broad range of subject matter. Students will be encouraged to view the process of drawing as a development of a personal visual language. DR200A Life Drawing 3 Credits - 1 Semester The human figure, its positions, movement, relationship to the environment, will be thoroughly studied from the life model. Anatomy will be introduced and the discipline of building a drawing through stages will be emphasized. DR200B Drawing from Observation 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces the analytical and expressive drawing of objects. From lighting, spatial relationship and other techniques are investigated. Students begin to develop fluency in drawing and start to pursue a personal approach. DR202E Anatomy of the Human Figure 3 Credits - 1 Semester Students will study the human skeleton, - anterior and posterior view - using diagrams and reference to the actual human skeleton. Students will build on this by studying the superficial muscles of the body, front view and rear view, of the arms, hands and legs front and rear view. The names of the important superficial muscles will be part of the study and annotated drawings will be required of the

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front and rear torso as well as arms hands legs and feet. The study of the anatomy of the human figure will be supported by drawing form the live model throughout the course and therefore their knowledge of what appears on the surface and contours of the life model. This may also be applied in other media such as sculpture, painting illustration etc wherever the human figure is the subject. TF207A Fashion Illustration I 3 Credits - 1 Semester The ability to illustrate a concept is the most basic tool of the designer’s portfolio. This course is an introduction to illustrating the fashion figure. Understanding how to draw the clothed figure in a variety of poses which emphasize the garment is an advantage for any designer who is trying to communicate their ideas. The exaggerated proportions of the fashion figure have become synonymous with fashion illustration. In this course students will explore an exaggeration of the proportions of the human figure in order to create the female, male and child fashion figures TF207B Fashion Illustration II 3 Credits - 1 Semester Emphasis will be placed on illustrating patterns and textures in fabric, garment details and accessories. This course proposes experimentation as a means of determining which medium and approach can best express a particular fashion concept. Familiarization with different media will ultimately bring a more confident approach to the student’s work. Exploring different media will be encouraged also as a means of developing their individual skills and styles of illustration. This component will also introduce students to drawing “flats” and “specs” which are an integral part of the storyboards used in Portfolio Collection Development. AE212A Issues in Drawing and Painting Ia 3 Credits -1 Semester This course will examine the context and practice of the visual arts in the disciplines of drawing and painting and their relationship to visual representation. Students will be encouraged to see drawing and painting as related disciplines, with drawing as both the initial, immediate tool for expression of ideas as well as an end in itself, and painting as an expressive medium which is linked to drawing. Students will investigate the human figure and its potential for expressing ideas, as well observational drawing and painting as a vehicle for developing personal visual language. Emphasis will be placed on introducing students to a range of technical and conceptual approaches to drawing and painting through which they can develop their understanding of visual representation. AE212B Issues in Drawing and Painting Ib 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course is a continuation of the exploration of drawing and painting issues. It will focus on the exploration of painting media and processes, and will examine the context and practice of the visual arts in the disciplines of drawing and painting and their relationship to visual representation. Emphasis will be placed on introducing students to a range of technical and conceptual approaches to drawing and painting through which they can develop their understanding of visual representation. Through the investigation of developments in contemporary art, referencing of current literature and exposure to a broad range of visual culture related to contemporary practice, students will develop a body of work which is informed by their research and discussions. Emphasis will be placed on the inter-disciplinary nature of art.


DR201A Issues in Drawing IA 3 Credits - 1 Semester This drawing course will promote the use of contemporary practices found in drawing today. Emphasis will be placed on exploring alternative concepts and methodology through drawing. Experimentation will play an integral role in the development of alternate concepts and students will be encouraged to work quickly and sequentially thereby enabling them to understand and develop their own process through drawing. DR201B Issues in Drawing IB 3 Credits - 1 Semester This drawing course is a continuation of Issues in Drawing I. Students will continue to explore contemporary practices in drawing through their own explorations, and will develop a series of related works which explore personal issues and visual language.. DR300A Issues in Drawing IIA 3 Credits - 1 Semester The status of drawing has been elevated from that of preliminary stage of painting to having its own place in fine art. During the middle ages drawings were commonly done as standard designs previous to the final work. Contemporary drawing often borrows from traditional techniques however it frequently crosses over into other related disciplines such as mixed media and print, sometimes devoid of realistic representations of the subject all together. DR300B Issues in Drawing IIB 3 Credits -1 Semester The status of drawing has been elevated from that of preliminary stage of painting to having its own place in fine art. During the middle ages drawings were commonly done as standard designs previous to the final work. Contemporary drawing often borrows from traditional techniques however it frequently crosses over into other related disciplines such as mixed media and print, sometimes devoid of realistic representations of the subject all together. DR302A Concept Development through Drawing I 3 Credits - 1 Semester The purpose of this course is to aid in the development of student’s ability to widen their capacity and conscientiousness of both their environment and the world they live in. The themes that are given will provide students with an opportunity to express their individual views in a unique framework that will reveal new creative approaches, whether through experiments and through the exploration of researching other artists in the field. DR302B Concept Development through Drawing II 3 Credits - 1 Semester The purpose of this course is to further aid in the development of the students’ ability to see a myriad of possibilities and outcomes using the expressive qualities of drawing as a vehicle for personal statement and creative expression to develop concepts. This course will further aid in the development of student’s ability to widen their capacity and conscientiousness of both their environment and the world they live in. The themes that are given will provide students with an opportunity to express their individual views in a unique framework that will reveal new creative approaches, whether through experiments and through the exploration of researching other artists in the field.

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DR302A Drawing for Design 1 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course Applied Art students explore the relationship between drawing and design whether in Ceramic, Jewellery Textiles or Visual Communication. Students will use various sources for study, including the figure, the object or simply free expression. DR302B Drawing for Design 11 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course Applied Art students continue to explore the relationship between drawing and design whether in Ceramic, Jewellery Textiles or Visual Communication. Students will use various sources for study, including the figure, the object or simply free expression. TF300A Applied Fashion Illustration II 3 Credits - 1 Semester To illustrate concepts is the basic tool for fashion illustrators. This course follows on from Fashion Illustration 1 and 2, where students were introduced to basics of illustrating the fashion figure. They were introduced to drawing the clothed figure in a number of poses to emphasize garments and accessories, to the advantage of the designer, and for editorial purposes. They will now concentrate on the ‘Fashion Industry’ related illustration. They will learn to create through design and research, sophisticated and innovative illustrations in various media for specific and realistic fashion and editorial projects. TF300B Applied Fashion Illustration II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will seek to expand on all areas covered in Fashion Illustration 1 and 2. The referencing and representation of specific features as cultural signifiers of the Caribbean personage from various ethnicities through the use of colour, the exaggerated figure and scaling will be the core of this course, providing the avenue to explore and celebrate the black figure type and other ethnic groupings of the Caribbean. The development of a deeper understanding of material culture and its influence on the fashion industry will be explored. Students will be able to, through further immersion in illustrative explorations enhance the visual language of their individual style of fashion illustration as an art form in itself, drawing in culture, history film and fine art. Emphasis will be placed on the use of branding, cultural signifiers, and digital methods to produce Fashion Illustrations underpinned by a personal design philosophy through research and cultural references responding to a variety of editorial projects. It is important that students see Fashion Illustration as a career pathway to include branding and identity, design and labelling driven by research and a grounded personal philosophy. (Pre Requisite. AFI) VA101A & B Still Life and Figure Drawing I and II 6 Credits -2 Semesters This course focus will include an investigation of the role of line, shape, tonal values, and volume in an environment that encourages your personal creativity. Working from objects and the figure, students will learn how to estimate shapes, see relationships and measure proportions. Imagination will be used to develop visualization skills and create inventive images.

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BACHELOR OF ART EDUCATION (B.A.E.)

students will develop a body of work which is informed by their research and discussions. Emphasis will be placed on amplifying and expanding on formal and expressive aspects of drawing, and the broad range of technical and conceptual possibilities of painting.

GS205A Academic and Professional Writing 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course focuses on providing students with academic writing skills, with emphasis on enhancing analytic skills. AE207A Museum Education 2 Credits -1 Semester This course explores how museums and art galleries can be used in the Caribbean context to teach art-related subjects, such as history, geography and sociology. The course starts with a concise overview of the history of museums and their functions in modern society, including a review of the main Caribbean museums and art galleries. Special attention is paid to the critiques of the traditional museum as an elitist “temple of culture” that emerged out of the social and cultural activism of the 1960s and the resulting shifts in museum practices towards displays and programmes that are more visitor-oriented, interactive and educationally effective - the so-called New Museology. TT106A Voice and Speech 2 Credits - 1 Semester Through exploration of the natural capacity of the voice, this course provides the student with a fundamental grasp of how the expressive and communicative potential of the voice and how it may be may be manipulated. The ability to listen with care, think and speak with clarity as well as using the voice persuasively for motivational purposes will be the areas of focus. AE212A & B Issues in Drawing and Painting IA & IB 6 Credits -2 Semesters This course will examine the context and practice of the visual arts in the disciplines of drawing and painting, and the possibilities for visual representation through drawing and painting. Students will be introduced to a range of materials, techniques and processes which facilitate the development of ideas, and emphasis will be placed on exploring the ways in which visual language is linked to concepts. Through the investigation of developments in contemporary art, referencing of current literature and contemporary practice, students will develop a body of work which is informed by their research and discussions. AE302A Issues in Drawing and Painting IIa 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will examine the context and practice of the visual arts in the disciplines of painting and drawing and their importance to visual representation. Through the investigation of developments in contemporary art, referencing of current literature and exposure to a broad range of visual culture related to contemporary practice, students will develop a body of work which is informed by their research and discussions. Emphasis will be placed on amplifying and expanding on formal and expressive aspects of drawing, and the broad range of technical and conceptual possibilities of painting. AE302A Issues in Drawing and Painting IIb 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will examine the context and practice of the visual arts in the disciplines of painting and drawing and their importance to visual representation. Through the investigation of developments in contemporary art, referencing of current literature and exposure to a broad range of visual culture related to contemporary practice,

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BACHELOR OF ART EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION COURSES AE330A Introduction to Art Education 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces students to the fundamental, historical and philosophical antecedents that influence and shapes contemporary art education practices and theories. Throughout the course students will focus on the exploration of issues, concepts, theories and philosophies that influence how we understand art, value art, create art, and teach art. AE335A Art Curriculum Development 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course allows students to delineate and examine important theories, concepts, and events that influence contemporary art education curriculum development. Students will examine the events and the historical and socio-political currents that drive art education curriculum development in Jamaica making them more cognizant of the relationship between local and international trends in curriculum development. Using the local curriculum standards and guides, students will develop teaching units that foster learners’ cognitive, social, physical emotional and perceptual growth. Throughout the course students will discuss the role of the art specialist; the function of subject matter; the role methods and materials play in facilitating learning and; the connection of art education curriculum to other disciplines and governmental policies. AE331A Assessment in the Art Classroom 1 Semester – 3 Credits This course introduces student-teachers to the field of assessment and the shifts and tension points existing within the field. Specifically it provides them with opportunities to explore the idea of learner-centred assessment and to examine their roles within it. Student-teachers will question their assumptions about how students learn, the best way to teach and how to know if teaching has been successful. Throughout the course students will investigate and apply diverse approaches to varying assessment situations that may arise within the classroom. The course is centred in the philosophy of constructivism and the vision is for student teachers to become conversant with the principles and the key concepts of learner-centred assessment and become empowered to apply these to classroom contexts. AE330B Research in Art Education I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course seeks to help the beginning art education researcher understand research process and practices and to initiate their preparation for conducting scholarly research and writing. Students will examine samples of research in art education, be introduced to research methods and develop skills in critically analyzing research in art education. Throughout the course students will be exposed to the contemporary issues in art and in the classroom (theoretical, philosophical) the national and global issues, and the policies that impact the practice of art education.


AE320B Curriculum: Methods and Media 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course examines the contemporary theories, methods, media and practices that underpin the learner-centred art classroom. Such a classroom is grounded in the understanding that learners are not passive receptors of knowledge but that they actively construct knowledge in their attempt to understand the world. In such a learning environment teacher and student become coconstructors of knowledge. AE332A Technology in the Art Classroom I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces students to technology in the classroom, exposing them to a wide variety of technological equipment and their uses in the teaching of art. AE335A Art Curriculum Development 3 Credits – 1 Semester This course allows students to delineate and examine important theories, concepts, and events that influence contemporary art education curriculum development. Students will examine the events and the historical and socio-political currents that drive art education curriculum development in Jamaica and internationally. This will make them more cognizant of the relationship between local and international trends in curriculum development. Using the local curriculum standards and guides students will develop teaching units that foster learners’ cognitive, social, physical emotional and perceptual growth. Throughout the course students will discuss the role of the art specialist; the function of subject matter; the role methods and materials play in facilitating learning and; the connection of art education curriculum to other disciplines and governmental policies. AE432B Technology in the Art Classroom II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course continues to prepare students to perform in technology enhanced learning environments, with emphasis on the teaching of art. AE400 IIA & llB Research in Art Education 6 Credits - 2 Semesters The course functions as a practicum for collaborative public projects in the arts. It specifically explores the possibilities for collaborations between the school and the community and highlights the cultural negotiations necessary for such teamwork. Students will collaborate with community centres, churches, local schools, arts organizations and other community agents in an effort to engage the community and affect positive change. Here the trainee art educator will place his/her artistic and organizing skills at the service and development of an identified community and learning is promoted through and in the arts for schools and for the wider community. Students are challenged to research, design, present and execute a proposal for a community-based project that helps to educate and support those who are interested in developing their talents in the field of the arts. Examples of such projects could include the development of after-school programming, innovative arts integration curriculum and research projects addressing historical, cultural issues and events that impact the teaching and learning process. The vision is that through community based arts research projects, bridges will be created that unify different people for different reasons and purposes through the arts. Such efforts will invariably create positive relationships between the institution and the community. The project requires the combination of various academic skills research, teaching, writing, interviewing and design. It is also

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a valuable training ground for art teachers to develop skills in advocacy, to examine community and school relations, to identify issues, concerns and projects for research. Prerequisite: Research in Art Education I AE401A & B Independent Study 1 &ll (Art Education) 6 Credits -2 Semesters This course examines the contemporary theories, methods, media and practices that underpin the learner-centered art classroom. Students should use knowledge gained from their research in art education as well as teaching practice experience to develop lessons, visual aids and other teaching and learning methodologies that demonstrate their understanding of the issues and trends that influence the field of curriculum; the characteristics, principles, functions and limitations of various approaches to visual arts curriculum development. Prerequisite: Completion of Year 3 courses AE420E Secondary Student Teaching Practice 12 Credits - 1 Semester This component gives students the opportunity to experience the role of the teachers through practical application. Each student is required to complete a minimum of 270 hours of teaching in this course.

POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN ART THERAPY Edna Manley College of Visual Arts offers a Post Graduate Certificate Program in Art Therapy. All participants who complete this program will be able to work under the direct supervision of a Registered Art Therapist (ATR) with a Masters degree in Art Therapy. These participants will be aware that only an individual who has completed an approved Masters Program in Art Therapy and has been suitable registered and or licensed will have the right to use the term Art Therapist in reference to their practice. The Art Therapy Program seeks to provide the individual with an ability to integrate the creative arts with psychological understanding as a therapeutic modality. It will allow the participant to obtain theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to practice art therapy with clients with diverse physical and psychological issues under the direct supervision of a registered or licensed Art Therapist. The Certificate is geared towards Edna Manley Graduates, Art Teachers, Special Education Teachers, Early Childhood Educators, Nurses, Social Workers, Psychologists, Speech and Language Pathologists, Occupational Therapists, Physical Therapists who wish to integrate the use of art into their mental health practice. Individuals who apply and do not have documented evidence of completing a first degree/study in Studio/Visual Art may be recommended to complete art courses including Drawing, Painting, Ceramics and Sculpture as prerequisites for the individual to enter the program. Students applying to the program who do not have a trained clinical background will be expected to complete the following Psychology courses including Psychology 1 and 2, Theories of Personality, Developmental and/or Child Psychology, Abnormal Psychology and Group Dynamics as prerequisites before the individual enters the program or before the individual commences the internship process.

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The content of the Post Graduate Certificate in Art Therapy program will be delivered in modules. The course will be taught in consecutive modules of five weeks in length. Consecutive modules must be taken sequentially as each succeeding module builds on the knowledge base of the previous modules.

ART THERAPY COURSES AT100A Art Practices for Non Art Majors (Prerequisite) 0 Credits - 1 Semester This course is designed to prepare clinicians who do not hold a Bachelors or Diploma in Art to receive some basic knowledge of the field. The course will introduce participants to the field of Art. Participants will be introduced to various art forms and develop an appropriate art vocabulary and become familiar with the methods and materials used to produce art. AT101A Theories and Practices of Art Therapy 3 Credits -1 Semester This course is designed to give the student an introduction to the field of Art Therapy. It will provide an historical overview of the field which will include the evolution of the field as more scientific data such as neuroscience has become available. The students will be made aware of the range of art therapy modalities and approaches that can be used for children, adolescents, adults and the elderly. Prerequisite – AT100 - Art Practices for Non Art Majors AT102A Professional Ethics in Art Therapy 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course will provide an overview of issues in law and ethics as it applies to the Art Therapist such as Licensure, values, legal and ethical responsibilities, malpractice, confidentiality, and the development of a professional identity. The course will be offered in a blended manner, that is, both in person and in the virtual classroom. Prerequisites – AT100 - Art Practices for Non Art Majors AT101A - Theories & Practices of Art Therapy AT001A Child Abuse for the Mandated Reporter 0 credits - 1 semester This course is designed to equip the participants with the knowledge and skills needed to recognize child abuse and neglect; what it is, how to recognize it, how to report it to the central registry in each parish. Students will learn how to submit a written report to fulfill the legal duties of being a mandated reporter. Students will understand that child abuse and neglect needs to be reported in a timely manner so that effective intervention by the local authorities can protect the child and get help for the family.

AT002A Elder Abuse for the Mandated Reporter 0 Credits - 1 Semester This course is designed to equip the participants with the knowledge and skills needed to recognize elder abuse and neglect; what it is, how to recognize it, how to report it to the central registry in each parish. Students will learn how to submit a written report to fulfill the legal duties. Students will understand that elder abuse and neglect needs to be reported in a timely manner so that effective intervention by the local authorities can protect the elderly and get help for the family.

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AT103B Art Therapy across the Life Span - Children Virtual Classroom 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course provides an overview of Human Growth and Development and the Social Environment over the period of Module III. The course will be taught online. The three-credit course will be taught over the period of five weeks for nine hours each week. The course will address normal behaviors at various developmental stages of the first twelve years of life and the pathology that might occur when the developmental tasks are not mastered in an appropriate manner. The various treatment modalities available for children will be examined. Students will be able to apply theoretical framework to assessing and providing interventions for the various stages of development. Prerequisites – AT101A Theories & Practices of Art Therapy AT102A Professional Ethics in Art Therapy AT001A Child Abuse for the Mandated Reporter AT002A Elder Abuse for the Mandated Reporter AT104B Art Therapy across the Life Span - Adolescence 3 Credits - 1 Semester Virtual Classroom This course provides an overview of Human Growth and Development and the Social Environment over the period of one Module. The course will be taught online. The three-credit course will be taught over the period of five weeks for nine hours each week. The course will address normal behaviors at various developmental stages of the second twelve years of life and the pathology that might occur when the developmental tasks are not mastered in an appropriate manner. The various treatment modalities available for adolescents will be examined. Students will be able to apply theoretical framework to assessing and providing interventions for the various stages of adolescent development. Prerequisites AT101A AT102A AT001A AT002A AT103A

Theories & Practices of Art Therapy Professional Ethics in Art Therapy Child Abuse for the Mandated Reporter Elder Abuse for the Mandated Reporter Art Therapy Across the Lifespan – Children

AT105B Art Therapy across the Life Span - Adult Virtual Classroom 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course provides an overview of Human Growth and Development and the Social Environment over the period of Module V. The course will be taught online. The three-credit course will be taught over the period of five weeks for nine hours each week. The course will address normal behaviors at various developmental stages of the second twelve years of life and the pathology that might occur when the developmental tasks are not mastered in an appropriate manner. The various treatment modalities available for adults will be examined. Students will be able to apply theoretical framework to assessing and providing interventions for the various stages of adult development. Prerequisites – AT101A AT102A AT001A AT002A AT103A

Theories & Practices of Art Therapy Professional Ethics in Art Therapy Child Abuse for the Mandated Reporter Elder Abuse for the Mandated Reporter Art Therapy Across the Lifespan - Children


AT104B Art Therapy Across the Lifespan -

Adolescence

AT117B Art Therapy Certificate Internship & Internship Supervision 3 Credits - 1 Semester The Certificate Program requires two hundred and twenty-five (225) hours of experience under the supervision of a Registered Masters level Art Therapist. The Internship hours must be done consecutively. All placements will have a task supervisor who may or may not be a clinician however the school will ensure that the students have a clinician who will provide ongoing supervision. An Art Therapist from the Faculty will be assigned to the student. Internships are available in health Care, Early Childhood Settings, Mental Health, Schools. Each Intern will receive individual and group supervision.

POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN ART THERAPY DUAL ENROLLMENT PROGRAM BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN ART EDUCATION/ GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ART THERAPY The dual enrollment program offers Art Educators additional skills. These skills will allow them to assume additional roles as individuals who need to provide mental health support. They will acquire tools that will allow them to assist clients in a clinical manner. The program is designed so that individuals who complete the program will have two sets of skills; one being an educator and the other as an assistant to a clinician. Participants who complete the dual program will earn a Bachelors Degree in Art Education and a Graduate Certificate in Art Therapy. The graduate will be a full professional in education and they will be eligible to use art in a therapeutic manner with appropriate supervision. Students who plan to participate in the Graduate Certificate Program in Art Therapy must complete the second year of their degree program in Art Education. Students should discuss with their advisor their intent to apply for dual enrollment at the end of their second year. In this way the use of electives may be used to meet the prerequisites for the Art Therapy Certificate. The applicants for Dual enrollment in addition to their Studio Arts courses should have basic Psychology courses which must include Human Growth and Development, Developmental or Child Psychology, Abnormal Psychology and Theories of Personality. All individuals who are accepted to the Dual Enrollment Program who have not yet completed the Bachelor’s will be considered “Advanced Undergraduates” capable to mastering graduate work. Others who are engaged in graduate programs must have a letter from their department giving permission for their participation in the program. Students who are enrolled in other graduate programs who do not have permission to participate in the Certificate in Art Therapy will not be accepted to the program. They must complete the AT100 Arts Practice for Non Art Majors as a prerequisite for participating in the Certificate Program. Individuals who are currently not enrolled in the Bachelors in Art Education program will submit an Application to the Certificate Program in Art Therapy when they have completed – Year I and Year II Requirements for the BS in Art Education. Students who participate in the Dual Enrollment Program will be involved in a program that uses five week intensive modules and distance learning.

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Prerequisites – AT101A AT102A AT001A AT002A AT103A AT104B Adolescence

Theories & Practices of Art Therapy Professional Ethics in Art Therapy Child Abuse for the Mandated Reporter Elder Abuse for the Mandated Reporter Art Therapy Across the Lifespan - Children A r t T h e ra py A c ro s s t h e L i fe s p a n -

AT117B Art Therapy Certificate Internship & Internship Supervision 3 Credits - 1 Semester The Certificate Program requires two hundred and twenty-five (225) hours of experience under the supervision of a Registered Masters level Art Therapist. The Internship hours must be done consecutively. All placements will have a task supervisor who may or may not be a clinician however the school will ensure that the students have a clinician who will provide ongoing supervision. An Art Therapist from the Faculty will be assigned to the student. Internships are available in health Care, Early Childhood Settings, Mental Health, Schools. Each Intern will receive individual and group supervision.

GENERAL STUDIES COURSES GS100A Fundamentals of English 2 Credits - 1 Semester The course Fundamentals of English seeks to secure full tertiary level English competence to ensure success in all areas of academic and social lives of students. The aim is to harness all human, technical and on-line resources at the Edna Manley College to provide individual and whole group support to all learners. This course is designed to help students become skilled in reading for meaning, speaking fluently and writing confidently and coherently in any context. Use diligent process writing methods and peer revision to apply grammar and vocabulary confidently and effectively both in speech and writing Apply comprehension strategies to critically analyze and synthesize as they use meaning in printed materials. GS100B Critical Thinking and Expository Writing 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course seeks to further develop students’ competencies in writing beyond a five paragraph expository essays to writing freely and efficiently on any topic while being guided by sound principles of efficient expository writing skills as well as applying the appropriate linguistic resources of vocabulary, mechanics and grammatical and syntactic skills. Students will continue to identify author’s themes and methods, write formally in response to diverse cues, critically evaluate literary and non literary forms, plan and write with a purpose that builds an argument towards an overall point or goal. As critical readers, they will thoughtfully assess the effectiveness of a text by evaluating the author’s strategies and intention. Students will, in time, become efficient and independent readers and authors in their own rights. Prerequisite – Fundamentals in English GS101A Introduction to Critical Analysis I 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces students to critical thinking and analysis, and encourages students to develop independent theoretical points of view. Through lectures, class discussions, video screenings and gallery visits, students will be exposed to a broad range of visual culture as well as basic concepts and vocabulary. Emphasis will be placed on discussing and interpreting art in relation to its historical, social, political, cultural and personal context.

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GS101B Introduction to Critical Analysis II 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course builds on the previously introduced ideas in the philosophy of art and art analysis and seeks to deepen the relationship between theory and practice. Students will continue to analyse some of the major themes in contemporary critical theory which underpin the production, distribution and reception of practice in the arts, while searching for practical application to assigned studio tasks. GS115 The Self: Ethics and Creativity 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course seeks to facilitate the process of self development and create awareness of the synergistic relationship between the creative process and personal development of the student. The emphasis is on holistic development incorporating ethical and moral development, the process of decision-making and choices, values clarification and identity. GS202 A Caribbean Literature I

2 Credits - 1 Semester This course will broaden students’ knowledge and appreciation of Caribbean authors, dramatists and poets. Students will compare and contrast different themes and the development of literary traditions across different islands. GS202 B Caribbean Literature II 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course exposes students to an overview of writers from the Caribbean who create in the different genres of literature and explores the culture of orality that is a foundation stone of Caribbean writing and the conservation processes and tools used to preserve them. GS313A Collections Management and Care 3 Credits- 1 Semester This course introduces students to the various aspects of managing collections of historic objects or works of art; collections care practices, handling, packaging & transporting objects, methods of preventive conservation, including pest management and disaster planning. An introduction to factors, such as light, incorrect temperature and relative humidity and pollutants that cause deterioration of museum objects will be provided. Assessment of the environment and generating methods for minimizing the decay of artefacts by controlling environmental factors will be explored, along with aspects of the museum building, building services and management that affect collections care. GS300A Research Methods IA 2 Credits- 1 Semester This course offers exposure to Research Methods and procedures for conducting original research projects. Research types and formats, language and terminology, measurements and instruments are studied. Also explored are the problems of validity and reliability and the procedures and methods available for establishing these. Planning, conducting and presentation of an original research or thesis are studied through student seminars based on preliminary research in selected topics. A practical and uniform method to be followed in the writing and presentation of the research paper is introduced.

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GS300B Research Methods IB 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course offers exposure to Research Methods and procedures for conducting original research projects. Research types and formats, language and terminology, measurements and instruments are studied. Also explored are the problems of validity and reliability and the procedures and methods available for establishing these. Planning, conducting and presentation of an original research or thesis are studied through student seminars based on preliminary research in selected topics. A practical and uniform method to be followed in the writing and presentation of the research paper is introduced GS314 Caribbean Dress Studies I: Survey of Caribbean Textile and Fashion Designers 3 Credits – 1 Semester The course connects both the textiles as well as fashion designs produced by the Caribbean’s leading producers. It positions itself as a front seat for the exploration of the region’s material culture producers – textile and fashion designers. A framework engaging Caribbean dress aesthetic through the lens of Caribbean history, cultural studies and art history is used throughout this course to critically analyze the final products produced by the designers engaged. Students are instructed to keep in mind the relevance of their discussions to the profitable advancement of the Caribbean Fashion and Textile Industry. Furthermore the course examines governmental policies that are geared towards the aim of the profitable development of the Caribbean Textile and Fashion Industry. Students are encouraged to identify strategies that can be undertaken by both the professional textile and fashion designers and the student designers for the fulfilment of this aim. GS302A World Literature I 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course provides an opportunity for students to read and analyze international literary works by writers from Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. This course can be taken at Levels 2 or 3.

GS302b World Literature II 2 Credits - 1Semester The course is a continuation of World Literature I with a broadened scope of narratives representing diverse regions. The human condition becomes a focal interest in the course with close textual analysis on the different aspects affecting and shaping the life of the main characters. Consideration is therefore given to the underpinnings of political, cultural or psycho-social, gender, class, ethnicity or race issues which shape and inform the narrative and which provides the framework for analysis and interpretation. This course can be taken at Levels 2 or 3. GS201A Psychology I 2 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces student to general behavioural psychology as it relates to personality, growth and development. This course provides an introduction to a discipline that is growing in popularity as more and more people become interested in gaining an understanding of human behavior. The course provides information on a broad range of topics that illustrate how and why we think, feel and act by introducing students to topics within the areas of developmental, abnormal, and social psychology.


GS201B Psychology II 2 Credits –1 Semester This component of Psychology investigates and further analyzes behavioural psychology as it relates to the cognitive, development of the individual and further theories on personality development, growth and development. This course provides an introduction to a discipline that is growing in popularity as more and more people become interested in gaining an understanding of human behavior. The course provides information on a broad range of topics that illustrate how and why we think, feel and act by introducing students to topics within the areas of developmental, abnormal, and social psychology. Students should be able to appreciate the similarities and differences among the various approaches to psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology I GS 200a Business of Art and Design I 2 Credits – 1 Semester This course offers students the opportunity to develop an entrepreneurial approach to their studio practice being able to employ concepts of business, business practices and commerce to their development as artists and designers. They will explore concepts and practices pertinent to the development of micro and small business enterprises that are design-led by nature or that are enhanced by their own creativity. The course takes a ‘concept to market’ approach allowing students to fully integrate ideas from their studio practice to developing business/entrepreneurial endeavors. GS200b Business of Art and Design ll 2 Credits – 1 Semester This course offers students the opportunity to further develop an entrepreneurial approach to their studio practice being able to employ concepts of business, business practices and commerce to their development as artists and designers. They will explore concepts and practices pertinent to the development of micro and small business enterprises that are design-led by nature or that are enhanced by their own creativity. The course takes a ‘concept to market’ approach allowing students to fully integrate ideas from their studio practice to developing business/entrepreneurial endeavors. Prerequisite: Business of Art and Design I GS205a Exploring Philosophies in Art Education 2 Credits – 1 Semester This course provides students with an introduction to multiple ideas of art and artists. It uses the texts of philosophers and scholars and practicing artists and artistic movements to reflect on the changing perceptions of the nature and purposes of art. The class also examines case studies of artistic controversy or practice in Jamaica to tease out some of the issues under discussion. GS206E Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credits –1 Semester This course introduces beginners to three definitions of philosophy, and to examples of these definitions in practice. It covers issues in logic, aesthetics, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and Caribbean philosophy. Designed for students of the arts, the emphasis is on the critical analysis of life issues from the perspective of the aspiring artist. The main aim is to get students to see philosophy as a transformative practice in society

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GS212a Conservation Theory I 3 Credits – 1 Semester This course provides an introduction to the basic theoretical knowledge on which the field of conservation is based. Students will explore the history of the field; the decision-making processes and ethical considerations involved in conservation and basic preventative interventions and treatments. GS212b Conservation Theory II 3 Credits – 1 Semester This course follows on from Conservation Theory I. Students will be introduced to a range of materials found in historic objects and work of art, their processes of and the conservation processes and tools used to preserve them. GS215 Philosophies of Design 2 Credits – 1 Semester Students will engage through discourse, research and integrated readings, the study and exploration of existing philosophies of design principles, questioning norms and given assumptions. The Exploration of semiotics within the varying frameworks of design will also be explored while investigating what constitutes the basis of our beliefs, objects within our environment and how they apply to various disciplines, their use and our interpretation. Our .interaction with these perspectives is paramount in understanding human interpretation, problem-solving and navigation of our environment and interactions with each other throughout history to present, informing our systems of evaluation, beliefs and practices. GS400a Research Methods IIA 2 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces student to the rudiments of writing a research from data gathering, Preliminary Analysis and Finalization of research. Individual tutorials and occasional seminars on specific methodological problems assist students with the research, writing and presentation of the final research paper. GS400b Research Methods IIB 2 Credits -1 Semester This course provides a guide for students to complete their final year research paper. In semester II students are expected to complete their research paper and hand in three bound copies to the School of Visual Arts. During the course of the semester students will submit revisions of their entire paper before the final bound copies. GS404b Introduction to Caribbean Studies 2 Credits -1 Semester This course facilitates the examination of the history of the Caribbean societies and their political and social processes in relation to the arts generally. It traces the growth of cultural identity in the region and identifies some of the roots of current Caribbean problems. Caribbean Studies is a requirement for the 60 Credit Certificate Programme. GS466a Principles and Practices of Art Criticism 2 Credits -1 Semester This course explores the aesthetic concepts central to the understanding and enjoyment of works of art. The meaning of concepts used in discussing and the understanding of iconography and other elements and their expression particularly in Jamaican Art are studied. Stylistic trends in Jamaican art, relationships between the visual arts and other artistic expressions in Jamaica and art as a subjective experience of artist and viewer.

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GS466a Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art 2 Credits -1 Semester This course explores the aesthetic concepts central to the understanding and enjoyment of works of art. The meaning of concepts used in discussing and the understanding of iconography and other elements and their expression particularly in Jamaican Art are discussed. Stylistic trends in Jamaican art, relationships between the visual arts and other artistic expressions in Jamaica and art as a subjective experience of artist and viewer. GS211b Introduction to Curatorial Studies 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces participants to the principles and practice of contemporary art curatorship, with a specific emphasis on how these apply to the Anglophone Caribbean. In particular, it explores how art exhibitions are developed, from initial concept, research and scripting, to administration, design, installation and, ultimately, dismantling and closure, and how curators, by means of these processes, serve as intermediaries between artists and audiences. While other curatorial functions, such as collections management and museum/gallery education, are also considered, the primary focus is on exhibition curatorship and, specifically, on exhibitions of contemporary art. Students are introduced to the main exhibition genres (the solo exhibition, the retrospective, the survey, the thematic exhibition, and the biennale); the main purposes of exhibitions (sales, educational, aesthetic); the different venues and organizations that typically initiate, facilitate and host art exhibitions (public and private cultural institutions, non-profit art spaces and commercial GS307b Introduction to Material Culture: A Caribbean Experience 2 Credits -1 Semester The course explores the complex story of the Caribbean as revealed by its tangible history. It engages an interdisciplinary discourse interrogating the appearances, roles and histories of material culture ranging from art, food, architecture and dress to religion and indigenous artefacts. Truly interdisciplinary in nature, this course applies theories and methods from a broad field of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, art history, museum studies and cultural studies. The students are encouraged to start thinking critically about the artefacts they encounter on a daily basis. Additionally, the course focuses on how things are part of power relations in the Caribbean society and how things are used to both express, contest, reinforce and culture as an academic foundation is central for each undermine power relations based on sex, gender, class, race, nationality and other forms of oppression and exploitation.

ART HISTORY AH100A History of Art Survey l 2 Credits -1 Semester This is a survey course that explores selected aspects of Art History, spanning the period from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Focus is given to those stylistic periods that have special relevance to the curriculum. Projects are set which enrich the programme and aid in the learning of the philosophies and ideas of different periods in the history of art. AH100B History of Art Survey II 2 Credits -1 Semester This is a survey course that explores selected aspects of Art History, spanning from the Renaissance to Impressionism. Emphasis is

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placed on Western Art but comparison is also made with a range of different cultures, including Asia, the Middle East, the Americas and Africa. Focus is placed on styles and their contexts that have special relevance to the curriculum. Projects are set which enrich the programme and aid in the learning of the philosophies and ideas of different periods in the history of art. AH102E Visuality and the Jamaican Experience 2 Credits -1 Semester In the Caribbean, visual and performance cultures can have multiple and often contradictory effects. These cultural forms can simultaneously be vehicles for personal expression, means of socialization, or sites for political mobilization. They can become symbols of cultural solidarity, but they are also sites where competing and contested stakes in national culture are fought. From artifacts to contemporary art and popular styles, this class introduces students to the aesthetic production of visual forms in Jamaica. Moreover, we examine the use of visual culture in the reclamation and invention of history and the self-fashioning of racial and national identities. How do these visual cultural forms shape Jamaican public discourse and how are they fashioned by them? How do these forms visually construct/perform/transform debated identities? AH202A Introduction to African Art 2 Credits -1 Semester The course approaches African Art from a non-Western perspective, investigates the influence of African Art on Jamaican Art, and looks at the role of the African artist, their function and importance in society. Sculpture, weaving, painting, costume, dress symbolisms are all looked at as they relate to the culture they serve. AH203B Issues in African Art 2 Credits -1 Semester The course explores issues related to traditional and contemporary African Art from a non-western perspective, with emphasis on continuities in the art of contemporary Africa and the Diaspora. AH204A Black British Art 2 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the art of Black British artists since the 1950s. It explores the historical parameters and context of the modern black presence in Britain and discusses the work of individual artists who have significantly impacted art in a now multiracial Britain. AH205B Art of the Black Diaspora 2 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the work of artists of the black Diaspora internationally. It explores the historical parameters and context of the modern Black presence in urban cities and discusses the work of individual artists whose work has significantly contributed to the development of a black art form. The course examines notions of blackness and a black aesthetic and how such concepts have impacted the art practice of artists in places such as Europe, USA, Latin America and the Caribbean. It considers common issues such as Pan-Africanism, attitudes to race and AH 206B Jamaica Fashion History 2 Credits -1 Semester The course examines the history of Jamaican dress from the period of enslavement to present day with the goal of surpassing the simple chronicles of dress as culture representation. Students will define dress, fashion, style, identity and national identity along


with other dress jargons which consolidate to create and dress identity representative of Jamaican culture. Critical thinking skills are emphasized as students apply cultural studies discourse to interrogate arguments of race, gender, hegemony and identity to the history of Jamaican dress identity, and cultural difference and attempts to establish links between current art practice in Jamaica and other artists within the Black Diaspora. AH306A Modern Western Fashion I 2 Credits -1 Semester th The course examines the history of fashion during the 19 Century with the goal of surpassing the simple chronicles of dress as culture representation. Students are introduced to relevant concepts such as purpose of dress, silhouettes, costuming, classic fashion, style, trends, and identity through dress. Critical thinking skills are emphasized as students apply knowledge of historical dress to fashions that are available today. Students will explore the significant developments in dress and the specific purposes those developments served. Additionally, students will examine the unique structure of Jamaican Fashion as it bridges the gap between historical and contemporary dress cultures through in-depth design projects Modern Western Fashion II 2 Credits -1 Semester Critical thinking skills are emphasized as students apply knowledge of historical dress to fashions that are available today. Students will also explore the significant developments in fashion and the purposes those developmentsthserved. The course examines the history of fashion during the 20 Century with the goal of surpassing the simple chronicles of dress as culture representation. Students are introduced to relevant concepts such as purpose of dress, silhouettes, costuming, classic fashion, style, trends, and identity through dress. AH207A History of Fashion survey I 2 Credits -1 Semester The course examines the th history of fashion from Mesopotamia and prehistoric times to 13 Century Europe with the goal of surpassing the simple chronicles of dress as cultural representation. Students are introduced to relevant concepts such as purpose of dress, silhouettes, costuming, classic fashion, style, trends, and identity through dress. Critical thinking skills are emphasized as students apply knowledge of historical dress to dissecting fashions that are available today, and what significant developments have been made for specific purposes. Additionally, students will examine the unique structure of Jamaican Fashion as it bridges the gap between historical and modern dress cultures. AH207B History of Fashion survey II 2 Credits -1 Semester This course further examines the impact of social influences, famine war and pestilence, the iconic dress, fine art, the role of the church and the development of art; the Renaissance. Further investigations will include the Gothic era, religious and political turmoil, the advent of the printing press and the Industrial Revolution. AH307A Introduction to Material Culture: A Caribbean Experience 2 Credits -1 Semester The course explores the complex story of the Caribbean as revealed by its tangible history. It engages an interdisciplinary discourse interrogating the appearances, roles and histories of material

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culture ranging from art, food, architecture and dress to religion and indigenous artefacts. Truly interdisciplinary in nature, this course applies theories and methods from a broad field of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, art history, museum studies and cultural studies. The students are encouraged to start thinking critically about the artefacts they encounter on a daily basis. Additionally, the course focuses on how things are part of power relations in the Caribbean society and how things are used to both express, contest, reinforce and undermine power relations based on sex, gender, class, race, nationality and other forms of oppression and exploitation. AH300A Pre-Columbian Art History 2 Credits -1 Semester This course explores the art traditions of a selected number of PreColumbian cultures. AH300B Latin American Art History 2 Credits -1 Semester This course surveys modernist trends in Latin American Art. In particular, it focuses on the populist mural tradition and the influence of the Mexican aesthetic in the 19th and 20th centuries; the reassessment of the Latin American identity to accommodate European, African and Amerindian contributions; and emergence of more socially motivated art concerned with politics and dictatorships from the 1930s through to the present. AH301A Caribbean: Cultural Production and Social Information in the British West Indies 1660 – 1860 2 Credits -1 Semester Through the various types of cultural media produced between 1660 and 1860 (maps, architecture, painting, engraving, sculpture, lithographs, ceramic and silverware), this course provides an overview of the complex and dynamic interplay between historical events, politics, economic interests and aesthetic production as shown by the visual body of artwork commissioned and created by Britons and their English-speaking Caribbean colonists during the period 1660-1860. AH302B Re-reading the Caribbean 2 Credits -1 Semester Re-reading the Caribbean: Theories, Geographical Definitions and Discussions concerning a Caribbean Poetics Discourse. A course that introduces students to theories, geographical definitions and discussions concerning a Caribbean Poetics and Aesthetic in modern Jamaican and Caribbean Art c. 1900 –2000. AH200A Modern Western Art I 2 Credits -1 Semester This course introduces students to the development and context of Modern Western Art from Realism to Postmodernism and to place it in a context concurrent with developments in Jamaican and Caribbean Art. AH200B Modern Western Art II 2 Credits -1 Semester This course examines developments in Modern Western Art after World War II. Emphasis will be placed on Postmodernism and issues related to contemporary practice. AH206B History of Jamaican Dress & Fashion Industry 2 Credits -1 Semester The course examines the history of the Jamaican dress from the

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period of enslavement to present day with the goal of surpassing the simple chronicles of dress as culture representation. Students are introduced to relevant terms uch as dress, costume, fashion, style, identity and industry. Critical thinking skills are emphasized as students apply cultural studies narratives to interrogate arguments of race, gender, hegemony and identity to the history of Jamaican dress. Additionally, students will examine the unique structure of the Jamaican Fashion Industry as it acts as the vehicle for the nation’s dress cultures. AH201A Modern Jamaican Art 2 Credits -1 Semester This course familiarizes students with the development and context of Jamaican and Caribbean Art of the 20th Century. AH201B Modern Caribbean Art 2 Credits -1 Semester In this course students examine issues related to the development of contemporary art practice in Jamaica and the Caribbean. AH209 History of Design – The Industrial Revolution 2 Credits -1 Semester Inherent in this course is the presentation in varied formats of specific developments of the move from a dominantly craftoriented existence to the age of mechanisation and manufacturing processes and replication. The adaptability of designs through the ages and the reworking and re-application of re-defined thoughts of needs that has prompt divergent thinking and historical creative development of our environment and possibilities for the future will be explored. Covering the development of the poster in visual communication, mechanisation, interior and furniture design are critical to understanding the evolution of design. AH201History of Design from the Arts and Craft Movement to Bauhaus and Beyond 2 Credits -1 Semester The understanding of the history and evolution of design through the centuries will provide students with a broader understanding of design and how they can internalise discuss and position themselves within the inter-related nexus of design and fine art. Students should not isolate the evolution of needs, functionality and aesthetics but over time learn to integrate those needs as a valid system of reinterpreting and redefining the history of design through contemporary approaches. A thorough investigation into the development and use of 2dimensional, 3dimensional aspects of design across select Eastern and Western Cultures will provide context for interrogation. AH101A Looking at Art I 2 Credits -1 Semester This course is designed to develop insight and appreciation of different art forms, widening the artistic horizon of the student and developing critical abilities and art vocabulary. AH101B Looking at Art II 2 Credits -1 Semester This course continues the examination of art forms and practice with emphasis on

UWI/EMC Open Choice Courses LEVEL I VA18A Life Drawing I 3 Credits - 1 Semester In this course, the model is used as a reference to approach the study of shape, form and space in terms of line, tone and volume. The element of balance and proportion as well as individual and expressive approach to the figure by combining media in unusual ways is encouraged. Prerequisite: None VA18B Aspect of Drawing 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces the analytical and expressive drawing of objects. Form lighting, spatial relationship and other techniques are investigated. Students begin to develop fluency in drawing and start to pursue a personal approach, and line from objects. Visits to a number of off-campus locations are done. Prerequisite: None VA19C Art and Process (Introduction to Critical Analysis) 3 Credits - 1 Semester To broaden students’ understanding of the process by which art is produced, and to introduce students to contemporary approaches to Art. Prerequisite: None VA154 Introduction to Photography 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces the student to black and white photography both from a technical viewpoint and towards a personal vision. Basic rules of composition, aesthetic qualities of the print and self expression are all important. Students also learn the technical aspects of darkroom and camera functions. Prerequisite: None VA19A History of Art Survey l 3 credits -1 semester The Art and Architecture of Prehistory. Antiquity and the Middle Ages Prerequisite: None VA19B History of Art Survey ll 3 credits - 1 semester From the Renaissance to Romanticism in European Painting and Sculpture This survey course explores selected aspects of art history of specific relevance to the curriculum, spanning the period from prehistory to the 19th century. The course seeks to equip students with a good basic understanding to the main conceptual, thematic, stylistic and technical developments in the selected periods and cultures, placed in a broader cultural and historical context. While structured as a conventional survey, the course also provides a critical perspective on Western art-historiography. This course can be taken on Tuesdays or Wednesdays. Prerequisite: History of Art Survey I VA160 Entrepreneurial Skills for Artists & Designers 6 Credits - 2 Semesters This course introduces the concepts, ideas and practices of business and commerce to students of art. Prerequisite: None VA161 Printmaking I 6 Credits - 2 Semesters This course introduces students to working with machines and tools

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and the process of impression and edition making. Students will receive instruction in wood-printing in black and white and colour, as well as in the ancient technique of paper printing. Prerequisite: None

LEVEL II

VA21C Life Drawing II 3 Credits - 1 Semester The human figure, its positions, movement, relationship to the environment, will be thoroughly studied from the model. Anatomy will be introduced and the discipline of building a drawing through stages will be emphasized. Prerequisite: None VA21D Drawing from Observation 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces the analytical and expressive drawing of objects. From lighting, spatial relationship and other techniques are investigated. Students begin to develop fluency in drawing and start to pursue a personal approach, and line from objects. Visits to a number of off-campus locations are done. Prerequisite: None VA254 Intermediate Photography 6 Credits - 2 Semesters This course provides students with the opportunity to expand on the basic knowledge acquired in the introductory course. Further exploration of the camera use and darkroom is encouraged. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography VA202 Printmaking II 6 Credits - 2 Semesters The relief printmaking techniques of collography and woodcut are studied as well as experimental printmaking using embossing, mono-printing, found object printing and mixed media printing. Proper use and cleaning of equipment is emphasized and technical skill is stressed. Prerequisite: None VA203 Introduction to Silkscreen Printing I 6 Credits - 2 Semesters Students are introduced to basic silkscreen printing techniques and the application of the medium to commercial design and printing. Students are also encouraged to develop their own individual style of design for expression. Prerequisite: None VA20B Latin American Art 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course investigates a case study of the Mexican Muralist, with particular reference to the emergence of the Mexican aesthetic in the part of the 19th centuries, specifically the work of Rivera, Siguerios and Orozco. Prerequisite: None VA20A Pre-Columbian Art 3 Credits - 1 Semester This survey course in non-western art will expose students to artistic tradition of Meso-American and Andean regions of ancient America. VA20H Introduction to African Art 1 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course approaches African Art from a Non-Western perspective, investigates the influence of African Art on Jamaican Art and looks at the role of the African artist, their function and importance in the

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society. Sculpture, weaving, painting, costume dress symbolism are all looked at as they relate to the culture they serve. VA20L Issues in African Art 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course explores issues related to traditional and contemporary African Art from a non-western perspective, with emphasis on continents in the art of contemporary Africa and the diaspora. Prerequisite: None VA204 Arts Administration l 6 Credits -2 Semesters (See timetable for Organizational Structure and Arts Administration l &ll) This course includes examining policy development in a political and social context, the finance and marketing of arts events and comparison between the arts in the English-speaking Caribbean and other territories in the region. Prerequisite: None VA26C Modern Western Art I 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course familiarizes students with the development of the origin of Modernism. Prerequisite: None VA26D Modern Western Art II 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course introduces students to the development of Art from Modernism to Postmodernism looking at its influences in contemporary art in Jamaica and the Caribbean region. Prerequisite: Modern Western Art I LEVEL III VA20F Principles and Practices of Art Criticism 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course explores the aesthetics concepts central to the understanding and enjoyment of works of art, the meaning of concepts used in discussing and the understanding of iconography and other elements and their expression particularly in Jamaican Art; stylistic trends in Jamaican Art, relationships between the visual arts and other artistic expressions in Jamaica and art as a subjective experience of artist and viewer. Prerequisite: None VA20G Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies in Art 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course explores the aesthetics concepts central to the understanding and enjoyment of works of art, the meaning of concepts used in discussing and the understanding of iconography and other elements and their expression particularly in Jamaican Art; stylistic trends in Jamaican Art, relationships between the visual arts and other artistic expressions in Jamaica and art as a subjective experience of artist and viewer. Prerequisite: None VA30A Modern Jamaican Art 1 3 Credits - 1Semester This course familiarizes students with the development of Jamaican Art of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: None VA30B Modern Caribbean Art 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course familiarizes students with the development of Caribbean Art of the twentieth Century. Prerequisite: None

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VA304 Concept Development through Drawing 6 Credits - 2 Semesters In this course students will be encouraged to investigate and pursue individual concerns using drawing as an investigating tool and a means of study and analysis, important to the process of concept building. VA37A Printmaking IIIA - The Intaglio Print 3 Credits - 1Semester This course introduces knowledge of the technique of printing from metal, the development of the hollow printing and the use of varnishes, acids and resins to print images in black and white. Prerequisite: None VA37B Printmaking IIIB - Lithography 3 Credits - 1 Semester This course shows a new type of surface printing. The students are introduced to black and white lithography, making images through different procedures: pencil, gouache, pen and ink, collage etc. Prerequisite: None PM204B Introduction to Silkscreen Printing II. 3 Credits - 1Semester This course is a continuation of Silkscreen Printing I. Students are encouraged to develop personal imagery and to move towards producing fine art silkscreen prints. Students are also introduced to photographic silkscreen. Prerequisite: Introduction to Silkscreen Printing I VA307 Arts Administration II 6 Credits - 2 Semesters This course examines the link between policy and implementation. How theory and practice combine to produce strategies for delivery of the arts product in the creative/cultural industries. It also provides for hands-on experience in arts and culture organization. Prerequisite: Arts Administration I

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VA308 Advance Photography 6 Credits - 2 Semesters This course sets out to equip students with skills necessary to produce quality photographic images. The students will be expected to develop their technical skills alongside the artistic composition component in order to express their personal interpretation of their chosen subject matter. The emphasis of the course will be on fine art photography. VA309 Digital Imagery 6 Credits- 2 Semesters This course is software driven. Adobe Photoshop programme is used as an artist’s tool to solve basic design problems and create original, innovative work. Emphasis is on exploring the visual elements inherent in good design. Students are encouraged to use personal imagery. Prerequisite: None

ELECTIVES

FL100LE Time-based Media Semester 3 Credits 1 Semester This course introduces students to the various time-based mediums and learning methods of analyzing various examples. This course is based on creating projects which relate to works which have been screened as well as concepts discussed in lectures and workshops. Students will learn to work collaboratively and individually to create projects using major industry software such as Flash MX and Photoshop. Examples of works in the following categories such as film, photography, animation, video art, interactive art/websites, and motion design will be screened and there will be exposure to non-linear video editing, sound recording and editing. The works screened will be from various sources in visual culture and the course is designed to allow students to link idea and practice with what is happening in the industry and fine art.


Faculty Peter Omal M.A. (Art Education), Ohio State University; Post Graduate Diploma in Education - University of Technology M.I.S (Management Information System) UCC Dip. (Visual Communication) School of Visual Arts, Edna Manley College

Full Time Miriam Hinds Director, M.A. (Textiles & Fashion) Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, UK; Post-Graduate Diploma in Education, University of Technology, Jamaica Post-Graduate Diploma, Industrial Textile Application, L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Mulhouse Alsace Fra nce Diploma Textiles and Fibre Arts, Edna Manley College Paula Daley Assistant Director, M.F.A. Maryland Institute College of Art; Diploma (Painting), Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts; School of Visual Arts Diploma (Sculpture), Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts; School of Visual Arts College Omari Ra Head of Fine Arts Department, Head of Painting Department M.F.A. University of Massachusetts; (pending) Certificate (Painting) Edna Manley College

Robert Archer B.F.A, Graphic Design Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts; School of Visual Arts Diploma (Graphic Design), Jamaica School of Art, Certificate, Netherlands, GNBC Oswald Mattis Head of Department, Visual Communication Department M.Sc. (Communication Design) Pratt University; Diploma (Graphic Design) Jamaica School of Art Petrina Dacres, Head of Department, Art History, Department Ph.D. Emory University USA, B.A, Cornell University USA Eugenio D’Melon Barrios Head of Department, Printmaking Department M.A. (Printing), Graduate Institute of Art, Cuba; B.A. (Printing), National Academy of Plastic Art, Cuba

Claudia Hucke Ph.D. MA. (Art History), University of Hamburg, Germany Richard Griffith BSc. Computer Animation Full Sail University Florida, USA Associate of Built Environment Caribbean School of Architecture

Donette Zacca Head of Department Photography Department M.F.A. (Studio Art / Art Education), Maryland Institute College of Art, USA; Diploma (Graphic Design & Art Education), Jamaica School of Art

Shauna Murray M.Sc. (Communication Design) Pratt University; B.F.A., Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

Israel Delmonte MFA (Painting), BFA (Painting), Cuba Nicole Johnson Head of Department Art Education Department. M.A. (Art Education), M.F.A. (Painting), University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth; Diploma (Painting), Edna Manley College Raymond Watson Diploma, Jamaica School of Art

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Part-Time

Jeff Menzies AOCAD in Sculpture, Ontario College of Art and Design Toronto, Canada MFA in Sculpture – York University, Toronto, Canada

Beverly DaCosta Designer, Diploma Clothing and Distributive Trades City and Guilds

Michael Layne M.A. (Art Education) Ohio State University B.A.E., Diploma (Ceramics) Jamaica School of Art

Carol Campbell Diploma (Applied Arts), Alberta College, Calgary, Canada

Shelley-Ann Morgan PhD Candidate (Pending), University of the West Indies M.B.A. Nova South Eastern University Jamaica W.I. / Florida; B.Sc.(Economics & Statistics) University of the West Indies Susan Lee Quee B.A. Art Education, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts B.F.A. Visual Communications, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts Diploma (Graphic Design), Jamaica School of Art

Phillip Thomas M.F.A. New York Academy of Art; Diploma (Painting) Edna Manley College of the Visual & Performing Arts; School of Visual Arts

Margaret Stanley B.A. (Fashion and Textiles), Ravensbourne College of Art, England; Diploma (Art and Design), Ravensbourne College of Art UK Winston Campbell PhD. M.A. (Pre-Columbian Art), University of Essex, UK; B.A. Hons. (Visual Arts & Philosophy), The University of the West Indies, Jamaica Laura Jones, Head of Department, (Acting) Textile and Fibre Arts and Fashion Department MA (Pending) (Heritage Studies, Philosophy), UWI, Mona, Jamaica; B. A., (History and Archaeology),UWI, Mona, Jamaica; Diploma (Textile and Fibre Arts),Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

Cleve Bowen B.F.A. (Printmaking) Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

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Brian Williams B.A. (Architecture), University of Technology, School of Architecture Lutalo Makonzi D.F.A. (Fine Arts), C.F.A. (Fine Art), University of East Africa, Postgraduate Certificate Small Business Management U.W.I.; Postgraduate Certificate (Graphic Reproduction and Printing), London; Industrial Design Ceramics; R.C.A. London College of Printing, England. Phillip Supersad Diploma (Ceramics), Jamaica School of Art, Certificate (Ceramics), Centre for International Technical Cooperation, Rome, Italy; In-house Training, Things Jamaican,

Gianna Fakhourie M.A. (Fashion Marketing & Management) Instituto Polimoda: Florence, Italy, affiliate; Fashion Institute of Technolog , U.S.A. B.F.A. (Fashion Merchandising) A.A. (Fashion Merchandising) Miami International University of Art & Design

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Katrina Coombs M.F.A. Creative Practice, Transart Institute – University of Plymouth B.A. Fine Arts (Textile and Fibre Arts), Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts

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Prudence Lovell B.F.A. (Painting) Kingston University U.K. Stanford Watson M.A. (Community Art), Maryland Institute College of Art; Certificate (Painting), Jamaica School of Art


Administration Principal VP Academic VP Administration Registrar Asst Registrar Examination Asst Registrar Admission Director School of Dance Director School of Music Director School of Drama Director School of Visual Arts Director School of Arts Management & Humanities Director of Finance Director of Assets and Facilities Director of Student Services Manager Student Housing

Nicholeen DeGrasse-Johnson PhD Carol 'Annie' Hamilton Denise Salmon Claudia Woon-Chin Melody McDowell Cavel Jackson Kerry-Ann Henry Roger Williams Eugene Williams Miriam Smith Phylis Hemmings Carlene Colville Ryan Gayle Horace Prince Rudolf Rowe

Find us on the web: Website: Facebook: Twitter: Instagram:

www.emc.edu.jm www.facebook.com/EdnaManleyCollege twitter.com/#!/EMCJamaica instagram.com/edna_jamaica

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Highly Recommend Links •

Justin's Drama and Theatre Links

Artcyclopedia

Art Images for Collection Teaching

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/a/aict?g=art-ic;page=index

VADS: Visual Arts Data Service

http://www.vads.ac.uk

Infomine

http://infomine.ucr.edu

International Directory of Design

Visual Collections: Images of Art, History

and Culture

http://www.davidrumsey.com/collections/

Caribbean Music Database

http://www.caribbeanmusicdatabase.com/

American Musicology Society

http://www.ams-net.org/

Society for Music Theory

http://societymusictheory.org/

Society for American Music

http://www.american-music.org/

International Musicological Society

http://www.ims-online.ch/

Royal Academy of Music

http://www.ram.ac.uk/

Andrew Furmanczyk Academy of Music

http://www.youtube.com/user/lypur

Music History 102: a Guide to Western

Composers and their Music from Middle

Ages to Present

http://www.ipl.org/div/mushist/

Ricci Adams’ MusicTheory.Net

http://www.musictheory.net/

http://www.theatrelinks.com

http://www.artcyclopedia.com

http://www.penrose-press.com

• eMusicTheory http://www.emusictheory.com/learning.html •

Music Genres List

http://musicgenreslist.com/

The History of Music

http://webpages.shepherd.edu/BREICH01/

• AcousticMusic.Net http://acousticmusic.net/ •

Timelines of Art History

http://www.art-and- archaeology.com/timelines/tl001.html

Ballroom Dancers

http://www.ballroomdancers.com/

OTHER HIGHLY RECOMMENDED LINKS •

Institute of Jamaica

http://instituteofjamaica.org.jm/

National Gallery of Jamaica

http://natgalja.org.jm/ioj_wp/

Jamaica Library Service

http://www.jls.gov.jm/

National Library of Jamaica

http://www.nlj.org.jm/

University of Technology, Jamaica

http://www.utechjamaica.edu.jm/

University of the West Indies, Mona

http://www.mona.uwi.edu/

Jamaica Gleaner Online

Jamaica Observer

Internet Archive

https://archive.org/

Google Books

http://books.google.com/

TABLE OF CONTENTS

http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/

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Unlock your full potential with our masters, bachelors, associates and certificate programmes in:

Visual Arts

Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Jewellery, Ceramics, Textiles and Fibre Arts (Weaving, Design and Fashion Design), Visual Communication (Illustration, Graphic Design, Photography) Art Education, Art Therapy

Music

Jazz and Popular Music Studies Music Performance Music Education All programmes accredited by the University Council of Jamaica (UCJ)

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Dance

Traditional and Folk Dance Studies Performance and Choreography Dance Education Dance Performance Dance Technique

Evening Courses

Arts Management and Humanities Arts Management

Drama

Theatre Arts – Acting, Theatre Arts – Directing, Drama in Education

Evening courses offered under the School of Continuing Education and Allied Studies.

For further information contact:

Get social and connect with us:

1 Arthur Wint Drive, Kingston 5

Edna Manley College

Tel: (876) 619-EDNA; (876) 960-6171

@EMCJamaica

Email: registry@emc.edu.jm

@edna_jamaica

Website: www.emc.edu.jm

EMCVPAJamaica

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