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n sig olio e D rtf Po

Evan Wyatt Bliss

M.Arch

‘14

University of Illinois at Chicago

‘11

B.S. Arch

University of Nebraska Lincoln


n sig lio De rtfo Po

Evan Wyatt Bliss

M.Arch

‘14

University of Illinois at Chicago

‘11

B.S. Arch

University of Nebraska Lincoln


years


cities


Folded Village


1

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio

University of Illinois at Chicago

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

Fall 2013

A proposal for a convention center was shaped by its constraint of lying on a compact, urban site. An intensive study of novel, productive urban conditions resulting from the nature of the contemporary city was used as a catalyst for staging new collisions of events and urban forms. The pitched roof formal typology, with its potential to modulate and accomodate a wide variety of programmatic types, was arrayed over the site to create a ‘village.’ This created a condition of small, tent-like commercial storefronts integrated and connected with long and low convention spaces, as well as scaled-up pitched hotel/office towers. The architecture incorporates a pedestrian-oriented circulation system with dramatic pitch shapes form an identifiable image for the complex.


ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio

Folded Village

FOLD

as formal and spatial device Urban Accordion

Accordion Extend

Lower

Raise

Accordion Expand

Extrude

16

Contract

Variable Extrude

Duck Under


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

17


ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio

Folded Village Exhibition Hall

Hotel

Exhibition Hall

Exhibition Hall

1/16=1’

1/16=1’

Auditorium

Auditorium

1/16”=1’ Auditorium

Auditorium

18

1/16”=1’

Office


Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

Fall 2012

Hotel

1/16”=1’

Pool / Recreation

Pool/Recreation

Pool/Recreation

1/16”=1’

1/16”=1’

Bar / Cafe

Bars/Cafes

1/16”=1’

19


ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio

Folded Village

1 2 3

Fold

Pattern 20


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

21


ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio

Folded Village

Retail shopper Office worker

Circulation Diagram

Program Diagram 22

Exhibition attendee / Hotel guest


Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

Fall 2012

Create pedestrian axis

Cluster diverse programs, create linear urbanism

Retail / Restaurant Office Hotel

Push long, low exhibition spaces under Lake Shore Drive

View to City

Segregate larger program spaces

View to Lake

23


Folded Village

24

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

25


Folded Village

Pedestrian Level

26

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

27


Folded Village

28

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

29


Folded Village

30

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

31


32


33


Folded Village

Section 34

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

35


Folded Village

36

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

37


Folded Village

38

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio


Fall 2012

Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

Section Zoom 39


40


41


Folded Village

Plan 42

ARCH 553 Urbanism Studio


Critics: Marina Nicollier & Alexander Eisenschmidt

Fall 2012

3

4

3

4

3

2 5

2

1

6

4

3

3

4

1

2

5

2

1

6

3

4

5

6

43


Futura Figures


2

ARCH 552 Power Studio

University of Illinois at Chicago

Critics: Andrew Zago, Grant Gibson & Sara Blankenbaker

Spring 2012

The programmatic intention of the project was to be an addition to the Smart Museum on the University of Chicago Campus. Formally, the project was an exploration of the notion of “near-figures,� or those semirecognizable or evocative shapes that conjure up a sense of familiarity or legibility. Form was derived from intersecting and booleaning extruded letterforms from the Futura font, aligning and filleting intersections in order to create new, discernable iconography. The resultant architecture has an identifiable quality, while creating anovel or becoming shape.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 46


47


ARCH 552 Power Studio

Futura Figures

B P S Physical model

Model section 48


Spring 2012

Critics: Andrew Zago, Grant Gibson & Sara Blankenbaker

Wireframe

Elevation 1

Axon 1 Elevation 2

Elevation 3 Axon 1

Elevation 4

Extrusion paths / trimming faces

Top view

49


Futura Figures

50

ARCH 552 Power Studio


Spring 2012

Critics: Andrew Zago, Grant Gibson & Sara Blankenbaker

51


Futura Figures

North elevation 52

ARCH 552 Power Studio


Spring 2012

Critics: Andrew Zago, Grant Gibson & Sara Blankenbaker

Roof plan 53


Futura Figures

Contour section 54

ARCH 552 Power Studio


Spring 2012

Critics: Andrew Zago, Grant Gibson & Sara Blankenbaker

Section model

55


Futura Figures

Ground floor plan 56

ARCH 552 Power Studio


Spring 2012

Critics: Andrew Zago, Grant Gibson & Sara Blankenbaker

57


Futura Figures

Site model 58

ARCH 552 Power Studio


Spring 2012

Critics: Andrew Zago, Grant Gibson & Sara Blankenbaker

Section 1

Section 2

Section 3

59


ARCH 552 Power Studio

Futura Figures

2nd floor plan

3rd floor plan

60

4th floor plan


Spring 2012

Critics: Andrew Zago, Grant Gibson & Sara Blankenbaker

61


Rossiville Elementary


3

ARCH 551 Control Studio

Critics: Paul Preissner & Kelly Bair

University of Illinois at Chicago Fall 2011

Rossiville Elementary School shed its Aldo Rossi exterior baggage and developed its curvy innards into a full architectural system. It seeked to address its context in the Rossi city by creating a new, curvilinear Rossi character. Curves were exploited to form novel interior and exterior typologies, and blend circulatory and occupiable spaces. The building deploys a continuous loop that morphs and adjusts to create differing conditions.


ARCH 551 Control Studio

Rossiville Elementary

La casa Dello studente di Chieti 80/6

I pile foundation for lighthouses with theatre

H G F E

80/4

C Monumento di egrate 1965

A 80/2

Casa d’abitazione a Milano?gallaratese 80/1

Le cabine dell’Elba

80/5

Il cubo di Cuneo, 1962

80/3

Le cabine dell’Elba

80/5

Le case di Bergamo 80/9

La scuola di Broni

Porta a Venezia 80/12

80/10

La case ul Ticino, 1975

Theatre veneziano 80/7

64

80/11


Fall 2011

Critics: Paul Preissner & Kelly Bair Following a close study of Rossi’s work via reproduction, and subsequently gaining a certain level of expertise, I was presented with the task of literally reversing Rossi’s originals, creating a new set of “counterfeit” drawings. Posing the question of “what would Aldo have done,” the architectures were re-presented as worm’s eye views of their backsides. Occurences and likelyhoods of consistency were carefully balanced with possibilities of deviation. Emphasis was placed on continuity within the whole drawing set, imagining them as characters within the bounds of a unified family.

Rossi’s hollow, empty shell characters were operated on through employing techniques of contemporary “architectural medicine,” giving these poor fellows the benefit of hearty guts. At its core, the exercise centered around reimagining how Rossi might have dealt with his interiors had the notion of the curve in architecture been at his disposal. The rectilinear, regular exteriors became ideal containers for fantastic, curvilinear organs. This is the Rossi no one ever knew - the Rossi with a knowledge of the curve and the right digital softwares.

65


Rossiville Elementary

ARCH 551 Control Studio

[perspective]

Perspective

[elevation]

Elevation

[plan]

Extrude

Transverse section 66

Longitudinal section

Plan


Critics: Paul Preissner & Kelly Bair

Fall 2011

[perspective]

Perspective

[perspective]

Perspective [elevation]

Elevation [perspective]

Perspective

[elevation]

Elevation

[plan]

Double Curve

Plan

Elevation [elevation]

[plan]

Droop

Plan

Plan

[plan]

Sweep

67


Rossiville Elementary

Instantaneous sections 68

ARCH 551 Control Studio


Fall 2011

Critics: Paul Preissner & Kelly Bair

69


Rossiville Elementary “Loop”

“Sweep”

“Droop”

“Pop--up”

70

ARCH 551 Control Studio


Fall 2011

Critics: Paul Preissner & Kelly Bair

Site Plan 71


ARCH 551 Control Studio

Rossiville Elementary

Basement Plan

2

1

1

2

1

1

1 classroom 2 gym

Basement

1

4

1

1

2

3

Ground floor plan First Floor

72

1 2

classroom student restroom

3 4

public restroom lobby

1

1

2nd floor plan

Second Floor

1

1 classroom


Critics: Paul Preissner & Kelly Bair

Fall 2011

3rd floor plan 1 1

open to below open to below

3

4

5

2

2

Fourth Floor

1 administration 2 cafeteria 3 public restroom

4 student restroom 5 storage

1

5th floor plan

4th floor plan

Sixth Floor

Fifth Floor

1 2

administration library

1 library

73


74


75


ARCH 551 Control Studio

Rossiville Elementary

Section 1

Section 2

Section 3

Section 4

76


Critics: Paul Preissner & Kelly Bair

Fall 2011

Section 5

Section 6

77


Alternative Atmospheres


4

ARCH 565 Topic Studio Critic: Sean Lally

University of Illinois at Chicago Fall 2013

It is possible that at some point in the not-so-distant future, we may begin to study in-depth, explore, or even occupy other planets. The Keplar Spacecraft has logged over 2,700 potential alien planets, and each of these planets harbors a unique and novel atmosphere, one for which technology and culture may potentially adapt the body to engage with. Tracing a historical trend, we may see humans become more or less suited to these new environments (or that of the earth) over time - through microevolution, we have seen the average size of the pinky finger in humans statistically continue to grow, as its usage in hand manipulations with tools is crucial. One might also cite examples such as mountain Sherpas or Olympic runners where biological, genetic advantages exist or have developed in order to better operate in specific environments. Extrapolating these principals a few steps further, a situation where humans have begun to become more culturally, biologically suited to what we perceive as harsh alien environments of other planets is not out of the question. This would necessitate an architecture back on earth able to ‘play back’ the energies and atmospheres of foreign planets and alternative, fantasy sci-fi environments (from literarature, cinema or otherwise), for the comfort, familiarity, or merely entertainment purposes of its users. The private, domestic landscape/garden becomes the moment for intervention with the re-creation of alien atmospheres through material energies, allowing idealized “nature” from other planets to be reconstructed in ones‘ private space of escape. Sensory augmentation through technological implements merged with the body could allow humans to interact with these new environmental conditions. The private energy landscapes would allow users to take a momentary “trip” to another planet, such that they are in a preferred environment when living or simply vacationing back on the motherland, planet Earth.


ARCH 565 Topic Studio

Alternative Atmospheres

O

AUGMENTATION

Extreme-environment mitigating envelopes move nearer to dermis

N

O

L

Y

G

H

Under-skin Technology

C

Performance Fabric

e

osph

T

Pr

iv

E

at

Space Suit

m At

Conditioned Space

The modernist, private house landscape design of James Rose

A

L

PRIVATE LANDSCAPE

U

T

I T

E

C 80

A R C H

R

Private, domestic landscape as place of respite, reference to a certain environmental typology, or means of entertainment and enjoyment


Critic: Sean Lally

Fall 2013

S ACCLIMATIZATION

O

C

I

Adaptation to alien, extreme environments, both biologically and culturally - energy landscapes for comfort, familiarity, or entertainment

A

Fantasy environments Extraterrestrial City or Babylon

L

heric

La

New York City if it was transposed to Venus, Mercury, or Neptune

nd sc

ap e

CHEMICAL Seasickness

Altitude sickness

GENETIC

B

Sherpa altitude performance

EVOLUTIONARY

O

Running Endurance

D

Human pinky toe shrinkage

Y

Making the body suitable to alternative environments - microevolution, genetic advantage, chemical augmentation

81


ARCH 565 Topic Studio

Alternative Atmospheres

Atmospheric Energy

Body - Atmosphere

Body Energy

COGNITIVE

CORE

-Thinking modulated by alternative environmental chemicals interacting with brain chemistry

-Breathing in mixture of extraterrestrial gases

-Perception of sight, sounds, and touch changed by varying atmospheric pressures, presence of unusual sound frequencies, vibrations,

-Skin encountering non-earthly frequencies of electromagnetic radiation -Hydrating with solvents other than water, such as ammonia

When the body is outside the energy space, there are no energies being exchanged or emitted from the body nor the space.

82


Critic: Sean Lally

Fall 2013

Interaction LIMBS -Changes in movement abilities due to higher or lower gravity -Different senses in limbschanges in circulation and blood pressure induced by extreme temperature fluctuating over course of day, alien winds, pressure changes

Occupants must move from one zone to another at a slow pace, along themselves to become acclimatized to the new energy space.

Intensity of energy exchange increases as the occupant moves deeper into the pavilion. 83


Alternative Atmospheres

84

ARCH 565 Topic Studio


Fall 2013

Critic: Sean Lally

85


Alternative Atmospheres

Plan

86

ARCH 565 Topic Studio


Fall 2013

Critic: Sean Lally

Perspective

Section 87


Alternative Atmospheres

Section 88

ARCH 565 Topic Studio


Critic: Sean Lally

Fall 2013

Perspective

Plan

89


Alternative Atmospheres

Perspective

90

Plan

ARCH 565 Topic Studio


Fall 2013

Critic: Sean Lally

Section 91


Alternative Atmospheres

Perspective

92

ARCH 565 Topic Studio


Critic: Sean Lally

Fall 2013

Plan

Section

93


Alternative Atmospheres

ARCH 565 Topic Studio

Nested World #1

Nested World #1

Electromagnetic

Nested World #1

Electromagnetic Zones

Nested World #1

Nested World #2

Nested World #2

Gas Zones

Nested World #2

Gas Zones

Nested World #2

Nested World #3

Nested World #3

Chemical Zone

Nested World #3

Chemical Zones

Nested World #3

Gravity Zones

Gravity Zones

Nested World Overlap

94

Nested World Overlap


Critic: Sean Lally

Fall 2013

Single Energy Single Energy Single Energy Single Energy Single Energy Single Energy Energy Single Energy Single Energy Single Energy Electromagnetic Zones Electromagnetic Electromagnetic Electromagnetic Electromagnetic Zones Electromagnetic Electromagnetic Zones Electromagnetic ZonesZones Electromagnetic ZonesZones Electromagnetic Zones ZonesSingle Zones

Gas Gas Zones Zones Gas Gas Zones Zones Gas Gas Zones Zones Gas Zones Gas Zones Gas Zones Gas Zones

Two Energies Two Energies TwoOverlapping Energies Overlapping Two Energies Overlapping Overlapping Two Energies Overlapping Two Energies Two Energies Overlapping Overlapping Two Energies Overlapping Two Energies Overlapping Two Energies Overlapping

Three Energies Overlapping Chemical Chemical Zones Chemical Zones Chemical ZonesChemical Zones ZonesChemical Zones Zones Three Energies Three Energies Overlapping Overlapping Chemical ZonesChemical Three Energies Overlapping Three Energies Overlapping Chemical ZonesChemical Zones Three Energies Overlapping Three Energies Three Energies Overlapping Overlapping Three Energies Overlapping Three Energies Overlapping

Four Energies Gravity Gravity ZonesGravity Gravity ZonesZones Gravity Zones Gravity Zones ZonesFour Energies Four Energies Overlapping Gravity Gravity Zones Gravity Overlapping Four Energies Overlapping Zones Four Energies Overlapping Four Energies Overlapping Gravity Zones Zones Four Energies Overlapping Four Energies FourOverlapping Energies Overlapping Overlapping Four Energies Overlapping

Five Energies Temperature Temperature Zones Temperature Zones Temperature Zones Temperature Zones Zones Temperature Zones Five Energies Overlapping Five Energies Overlapping Temperature Zones Five Energies Overlapping Five Energies Overlapping Temperature Zones Five Energies Overlapping Five Energies Overlapping Temperature Temperature Zones Zones Five Energies Overlapping FiveOverlapping Energies Five Energies Overlapping Overlapping

95


Site plan

a

b

96


Material Energy Legend

ELECTROMAGNETIC

CHE

Microwave Range

Ultraviolet Range

Gamma Range

Wavelength: 3 x 10^9 - 3 x 10^12 cm

Wavelength: 4 x 10^-5 - 10^-7 cm

Wavelength: < 10^-9 cm

Frequency: 10 - 0.01 Hz

Frequency: 7.5 x 10^14 - 3 x 10^17 Hz

Frequency: > 3 x 10^19 Hz

Strength 1 (Weak)

Strength 2 (Mid)

Strength 2 (Strong)

Range: .5 - 4 m/s^2

Range: 4 - 15 m/s^2

Range: 25 - 150 m/s^2

Radia

GRAVITY

Direc

GAS THERMAL

ELECTROMAGNETIC

Radiation 1 (Cold)

Radiation 2 (Mid)

Radiation 3 (Hot)

Range: -100 - 0 Deg F

Range: 0 - 100 Deg F

Range: 100 - 250 Deg F

Vitamins

Enzymes

Amino Acids

B, B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6, C, D, E, K

Lipase, Amylase, Maltase, Pepsine, Protease, Catalase

Alanine, Arginine, Cysteine, Glycine, Isoleucine, Lycine

CHEMICAL

Microwave Range

Ultraviolet Range

Gamma Range

Wavelength: 3 x 10^9 - 3 x 10^12 cm

Wavelength: 4 x 10^-5 - 10^-7 cm

Wavelength: < 10^-9 cm

Frequency: 10 - 0.01 Hz

Frequency: 7.5 x 10^14 - 3 x 10^17 Hz

Frequency: > 3 x 10^19 Hz

Strength 1 (Weak)

Strength 2 (Mid)

Strength 2 (Strong)

Range: .5 - 4 m/s^2

Range: 4 - 15 m/s^2

Range: 25 - 150 m/s^2

Radiant Emitter

Radiant Emitter

Directional Emitter

Directional Emitter

Radiant Emitter

GRAVITY

GAS

c

THERMAL

Directional Emitter

Radiation 1 (Cold)

Radiation 2 (Mid)

Radiation 3 (Hot)

Range: -100 - 0 Deg F

Range: 0 - 100 Deg F

Range: 100 - 250 Deg F

Composition 1

Composition 2

Composition 3

Range: 60% - 85% Hydrogen, 15% - 40% Helium

Range: 50% - 80% Nitrogen, 20% - 50% Oxygen

Range: 80% - 96% Carbon Dioxide, 2% - 10% Argon, 2% - 10% Nitrogen

97


Alternative Atmospheres

98

ARCH 565 Topic Studio


Fall 2013

Critic: Sean Lally

99


100


a

101


Alternative Atmospheres

102

ARCH 565 Topic Studio


Fall 2013

Critic: Sean Lally

103


b

104


c

105


Alternative Atmospheres

106

ARCH 565 Topic Studio


Fall 2013

Critic: Sean Lally

107


Fabrication


5

ARCH 522 Digital Fabrication

Barcelona Program UIC SOA

Advisor: Marta MalĂŠ-Alemany Faculty: Jordi Portell Torres & Miquell Lloveras

Spring 2013

(Group project with Catherine Liyan Wan) This elective course focused around exploring the potentials of extrudedplastic 3D-printing (and deriving ways to exploit its inherent limitations), researching current usages and speculating on future developments, and designing and producing a family of objects that had performative and aesthetic qualities. As students, we observed and assisted in the construction of a Maker-Bot 3D-printing machine in conjunction with our instructors, and learned how to learned how to use the accompanying object slicing and production softwares. The primary issue at stake was the non-intersecting nature of the single-path extrusion machine, for which we were challenged to design geometries that could produce the desired closed-surface, intersecting properties in the finished objects.


110


111


ARCH 522 Digital Fabrication

Fabrication

The objective is to create an columnar object in which its primary performance properties consist of:

Structural Strength

Mixing

Transportation

Distribution

To achieve this, a cylindrical structure generated from tubular forms transition from individual closed tubes a larger ring section, where all the tubes have gradually come together into one large unit. Individualized tubes are then reformed with intermittent apertures at the Gold Angle of 137.5 degrees apart for maximum range of spray distribution. The object then transitions back to closed tubes, which are now individual standalone tubes used to transport and direct the remaining undistributed fluid. The structure is twisted for added structural strength as well as to serve as a static mixer for various fluids introduced through initial closed tubes.

112


Advisor: Marta Male-Alemany

Spring 2013 Tubular Strength

Load Distribution

Medical stents have resiliant and structural properties in their tubular formation.

Ideal Geometry Distribution of Resources

Tubular columns use ribbing to create strength and create even load distribution.

Static Mixing

Nautilus shells are divided into internal chambers (camerae) by septa walls. The torqued walls increase the strength of support of the outer shell.

Static Mixers

Static mixing systems use geometry to to mix fluids without agitation.

Centrifugal Forces

Industrial Welded Mixers require an intensive fabrication process of bending and welding of many small metal plates.

Fluid Distribution Sprinkler systems use a radial array of small nozzles concentrated in one source of origin

Twist/Spin Effect on fluid pushes it to the container wall.

One-to-Many Squid tube body splits into multiple tubular tentacles

Ideal Geometric Distribution of Resources

Plant leaf growth display Fibonacci Phyllotaxis with a Golden Angle of 137.5 degrees for maximum sun exposure.

Fluid Transport

Fractal Fluid Injector

Leaf Veins

A fluid transport system for automotive air conditioning.

Marc-Olivier Coppens of TUDelftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nature Inspired Chemical Engineering program devised a fractal distributor for fluid introduction/collection.

Tubes carry water and minerals to the leaf from the root while a second set of tubes move sap out of the leaf. 113


Fabrication

Construction techniques were explored to make use of the RapManâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closed loop printing efficiency. Circular tubes constructed from discrete arcs were translated into a single surface irregularshaped tubes to create a circular tube at the intersecting junctures.

114

ARCH 522 Digital Fabrication


Spring 2013

Advisor: Marta Male-Alemany

115


ARCH 522 Digital Fabrication

Fabrication

The early models began to explore the notion of a series of radially-arrayed tubes. However, in these initial instances, the tubes were implied through the undulation of a single surface. Two base geometric profiles were introduced, and were extruded in different ways to create a matrix of possibilities.

This speculative model explored the possibility of the complex profile defining the top and the bottom of the column, and morphing to become a normative circle geometry at the middle ‘waist.’ The buttressing effect created by the tubelike elements adds to the lateral, structural strength of the object.

Twist

Narrow

A myriad of different ‘waist’ radii and twisting angles were experimented with. Ultimately, a model with a robust twist was chosen, as this would present a formidable challenge for the equipment to print at such a sharp angle. 116


Advisor: Marta Male-Alemany

Spring 2013

Column 1 Strength: Achieved by torquing tubes to form structural ribs.

Column 2 Geometric Test: Testing printerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s limits with more extreme twist geometry and curvature.

Column 3 Closed Tubes: Transition from open tubes to closed tubes Column 4 Mixing by Geometry: Individual tubes are merged to create a single mixing ring chamber.

117


Fabrication

ARCH 522 Digital Fabrication The sectional geometry was conceptualized and derived as two pipes with connective tissue, which were than arrayed radially.

Multiple variations in the concave degree of the tube-connecting surfaces were tested.

Multiple variations in the concave degree of the tube-connecting surfaces were tested.

118


Advisor: Marta Male-Alemany

Spring 2013

Column 5

Column 6

Tubular Transport: Straight section to test for new printing method of using half crescent tubes to create an enclosed circular tube.

Spray Distribution: Directional control of fluid flows from apertures created by changing the distance between the point of contact between tubes. Based on the speed of flow rate, distribution angle can be measured and controlled. Angle between consecutive apertures are at the Fibonacci series golden angle of 137.5 degrees for maximum evenness of distribution.

Column 7 Point Distribution: Closed tubular structure for precise fluid delivery. Tubes can also serve as a return system to complete a feedback loop into itself.

119


ARCH 522 Digital Fabrication

Fabrication

Final Column

The final column integrates all the sectional profiles and modeling concepts into a singular, continuous extrusion. The top half of the shape utilizes a modular technique, wherein a unit consisting of a closed tube and half crescent transforms into two full tubes, arrayed radially. At the middle juncture, an inner-wall and outer-wall system is deployed, allowing all the tubes to merge into a continuous, â&#x20AC;&#x153;mixingâ&#x20AC;? ring. Past this point, the upper technique is mirrored, culminating in a method where the edge profiles connecting the tubes dissolve, revealing the distinct array of individual tubes.

120


Spring 2013

Advisor: Marta Male-Alemany

121


122


123


Roofscapes


6

ARCH 410 Option Studio Critic: David Karle

University of Nebraska - Lincoln Fall 2010

The prototypical suburban strip-mall roofscape exists largely as unexploited territory, and this studio aimed to uncover its latent potentials. It is generally not much more than a large heat-island, with mechanical units dotting its barren landscape. My proposal imagines a novel roofscape, one that is mixed-use and facilitates nightlife and living/recreation for a younger demographic, one that is currently underserved in this location. The buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s structure properties allow not only for necessary stability, but also begin to effect light and aperature quality in the interior, adjusting parametrically to become best suited to various programmatic demands.


126


127


ARCH 410 Option Studio

Roofscapes Roof Typology Study Light

1 : 3 ratio

z

y

1’

x

2’

+

6” 6” 6” 6” 6” 6”

1:5 ratio vertical, 1:8 ratio horizontal

1 : 4 ratio (+78%)

6”

6”

6”

6”

6”

6”

4” 4” 4” 4” 4” 4” 4” 4” 4”

The two-way frame may be manipulated in the x, y, and z directions, modifying the ratio and proportion of the spaces between the frame. A dome has the variables of height and diameter.

Height

Diameter

Public program spaces

Roof reacts to program

128


Critic: David Karle

Fall 2010 Roof Typology Study Water

Axonometric

Section

Plan A funnel-like inverted dome water collector could serves as structure and drainage. Morphed domes that flow into each other allow for water to find a path of exit.

Y-axis spacing between members of the frame may be expanded or contracted based off program

Light variation based on roof structure

Member thickness varies based off program and desired light 129


ARCH 410 Option Studio

Roofscapes

Hours of Operation

The programs of choice were to fulfill the categories of exchange, distribution, consumption, and production. The chosen programs for the strip mall roof intervention were a fashion-oriented second-hand clothing store, a lounge, a bowling alley and arcade, a mid-size music venue, a 24hour diner-type eatery, and a small number of apartments. Circulation became one of the primary driving forces behind the design; the programs were layed out in an “ideal” procession for a typical night out, with secondary means of circulation for those that wish to break from this “ideal.”

130


Fall 2010

Critic: David Karle

An analysis of the existing strip mall programs was done. From this, it became clear that the strip mall was underutilized in the late evening hours. As well, the population of shoppers of different age groups (young adults, middle-aged, and senior citizens) was studied, and it was determined that the young adult demographic was primarily the one that operated during the later hours. Accordingly, the selected programs for the proposal were those that catered to this group.

131


ARCH 410 Option Studio

Roofscapes Program Layout

Primary Circulation

diagrams

Secondary Circulation

The programs were layed out in a “u” PRIMARY formation, allowing for the primary CIRCULATION PROGRAM LAYOUT SECONDARY CIRCULATION circulation to loop around through them. Secondary circulation paths allow direct access to non-adjacent programs. The void space created between the program and circulation becomes occupiable courtyards, green space, and a light couryard to the existing building below. As well, through this The design programs were layed outspace in a “u” formation, allowing for the primary approach program may be pushed and pulled outward to circulation to loop around through them. Secondary non-adjacent programs. Thespaces void space created between the program and circulation becomes occupiable courtyards, gre accommodate the various needed.

existing building below. As well, through this design approach program space may be pushed and pulled outward to accom

PRIMARY CIRCULATION

1

SECONDARY CIRCULATION

PRIMARY CIRCULATION

PROGRAM LAYOUT

[program]

SECONDARY CIRCULATION

green

space out in a “u”were formation, for the primary circulation totoloop around through them.[program] Seco The programs layed out inallowing a “u” formation, allowing for the primary circulation loop around through them. Secondary circulat non-adjacent programs. The void space created the program and circulation becomes becomes occupiable courtyards, green spac he void space created between thebetween program and circulation occupiable courtyard existing building below. As well, through this design approach program space may be pushed and pulled[program] outward to accommodate Program outward to a well, through this design approach program space may be pushed and[program] pulled green space

[views]

85’

SECONDARY CIRCULATION

100’ 80’

clothing store

50’

green Green space Space

green space

[program] Program

lounge lounge

85’ 100’

clothing store

80’

apartments

90’

50’

24-hour eatery

65’

apartments

90’ 75’

lounge lounge

140’

SECONDARY CIRCULATION 85’

music venue / bowling alley + arcade

65’

125’

24-hour eatery

140’

music venue / bowling alley + arcade

[program] Program

green Green space Space

green Green space Space

primary circulation to loop around through them. Secondary circulation paths allow direct ac rogram and circulation becomes occupiable courtyards, green space, and a light couryard t ogram space may be pushed and pulled outward to[views] accommodate the various spaces nee 75’

85’

125’

for the primary circulation to loop around through them. Secondary circulation paths allow direct access to n the program and circulation becomes occupiable courtyards, green space, and a light couryard to the 8,40 sq f Basic program layout and square footage was determined. Cuts in the volumes were made to allow for views to the creek, b oach program space may be pushed and pulled outward to accommodate the various spaces needed. 6,750

2

85’

100’

80’

clothing store

50’

lounge lounge

music venue / bowling alley + arcade

north of the strip mall complex. 90’

apartments

75’

65’

24-hour eatery 85’

140’

125’

Basic program layout and square footage was determined. Cuts in the volumes were made to allow for views to the creek, bike path, and green area directly to the north of the strip mall complex.

usic ue / ling y+ ade

[views]

85’

80’

90’

sq ft 75’

Basic program layout and square footage was determined. Cuts in the volumes were made to allow for views to the creek, bike pat north of the strip mall complex.

5’

c program layout and square footage was determined 3 [views] h of the strip mall complex. [views]

85’

80’ 85’

80’

40’

8,400 sq ft

40’ 80’

8,400 sq ft

50’

80’

50’

20’

20’

4,500sqft

4,500sqft

13,125

6,750 to allow 5,52513,sq1ft25sq forsqft views to the cr square footage was determined. Cuts in the volumes were made 6,750 sq ft 5,525 sq ft ft sq ft plex. 140’

65’

90’

140’

65’

90’

85’

75’

75’

132

85’

62.5’

62.5’

62.5’

62.5’


Fall 2010

Critic: David Karle

133


ARCH 410 Option Studio

Roofscapes

Zinc-panel cladding

Glu-lam two-way frame

Steel deck + concrete Long-span, openweb steel joists & girders

New columns

Steel deck + concrete Existing structural grid Egress

Atrium / Lobby Large openings, thin frame Diffuse, illuminating light

Light & Spatial Quality Skylight Analysis

Clothing Sales Floor Large, openings, thin frame Diffuse, illuminating light

Apartments Small openings, thick frame Focused, intimate light

Light Courtyard to Below Large, openings, thin frame Diffuse, illuminating light Restaurant Tables Large, openings, thin frame Diffuse, illuminating light Restaurant Booths Small openings, thick frame Focused, intimate light Outdoor Courtyard Patio Large openings, thin frame Diffuse, illuminanting light

134

Co

ver

ed c

ou r tya

rd s

pac e

Audience Gathering Space Large, openings, thin frame Diffuse, illuminating light Music Venue / Bar Small openings, thick frame Focused, intimate light


Fall 2010

Critic: David Karle

135


ARCH 410 Option Studio

Roofscapes

third floor plan

concert venue

second floor plan Structural section model transverse section longitudinal section

clothing store lounge bowling alley / arcade

apartments

24-hour diner

first floor plan

[lounge]

Longitudinal section longitudinal section 136


third floor plan Critic: David Karle

Fall 2010

Ground third floor planfloor

third floor plan

plan

concert venue

concert venue

second floor plan

concert venue

2nd floor plan

second floor plan

skylight daylighting

second floor plan

skylight daylighting

transverse section longitudinal section longitudinal section

transverse clothing store section

clothing store lounge bowling alley / arcade apartments

apartments

longitudinal lounge section

transverse section [concert venue]

clothing store

[concert venue]

bowling alley / arcade

[bowling alley / arcade]

lounge

[bowling alley / arcade]

24-hour diner

[existing strip mall retail]

24-hour diner

bowling alley / arcade

[existing strip mall retail]

transverse s

first floor plan

apartments

first floor plan

3rd floor plan

first floor plan [lounge]

transverse section

24-hour diner

[lounge]

[clothing store]

[courtyard] [clothing store]

[courtyard]

[existing retail]

skylight daylighting

[existing retail]

longitudinal section longitudinal section

27 skylight daylighting

[concert venue]

[lounge]

[bowling alley / arcade] [concert venue]

[existing strip mall retail]

longitudinal section

[bowling alley / arcade]

[existing strip mall retail]

transverse section Transverse section transverse section

[clothing store]

[courtyard]

[clothing store]

[courtyard]

[existing retail] [existing retail]

137

2 27


ARCH 410 Option Studio

Roofscapes

Glu-lam member

Doublepane glass with airspace

Mullion

Paver Paver-stand system

138


Fall 2010

Critic: David Karle

Zinc cladding Panel attachment detail El: varies T.O. metal Batt insul Wood conn. bracket Glu-lam member Steel I-beam Concrete deck

El: 135’ 0” T.O. slab Metal decking Steel conn. bracket Open-web steel joist

Concrete deck

El: 120’ 0” T.O. slab Metal 139 decking


Skyscraper + Park


7

ARCH 411 Urbanism Studio

Critic: Steven Ginn

University of Nebraska - Lincoln Spring 2011

My proposal for DuSable Park seeks to utilize the ideas of the urban stoop as a means for social gathering. DuSable Park is geographically in a position to become a gateway to the city. As such, conceptualizing the park site as a “stoop” on a large scale is fitting. I evaluate the urban stoop as having multiple functions - it is a means for moving from one location to another, changing elevation, and becoming a place for gathering on its multiple levels. I bring these ideals to my site in a conceptual manner, creating a way of moving through the park that has stopping points and program in the in-between spaces. It moves from a low lying area on the water’s edge on the south to a higher space on the north end, facilitating views out over the lake as one moves along and upward. In regard to the building design, it once again becomes a stepping transformation, in this instance manifested as an urban typology morph from low-rise, high-density housing and boutique shops to a high-rise apartment and condo tower. The low-rise portion seeks to become a microneighborhood, encouraging social interaction and a people-centric community. Ramps and bridges allow pedestrians to make visual contact with other pedestrians. This community reaches out and spans Lakeshore Drive in a skybridge, and moves upward in a twisting motion bringing together the two “legs” of the low-rise portion. This completes a pathway and procession from the micro-community to the high rise tower.


142


143


ARCH 411 Urbanism Studio

Skyscraper + Park

social

stepping

site plan, 1â&#x20AC;?=64â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Site plan 144 A

evan bliss 27 april 2011 arch 411 critic: steven ginn


Spring 2011

Critic: Steven Ginn

145


ARCH 411 Urbanism Studio

Skyscraper + Park

Section 146

0’

10’

20’

40’

80’


Spring 2011

Critic: Steven Ginn

147


Skyscraper + Park

ARCH 411 Urbanism Studio

3

Lobby perspective

1

4

1

2

2

1

Elevation 148


Critic: Steven Ginn

Spring 2011

Key

A

1. Bedroom 2. Living Room 3. Kitchen 4. Bathroom

1 2

1 2

1 2

4

3 4

3

4

4

3

3 2

3 2

3 3

2

4

4 4 1

4

4

4

1

4

1 1

4

1

1

Typical floor plan

1

A

KEY 1 Bedroom 2 Living Room 3 Kitchen

149


Extroverted Introversion


8

ARCH 554 Housing Studio

Critics: Claudi Aguilo & Sergi Serrat

Barcelona Program UIC SOA Spring 2013

This studio focused intensely around the context of the city of Barcelona and, more specifically, its unique Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Eixample chamfered block typology. We were given the problem of reinvigorating four of these blocks, based off urban deficiencies we uncovered through a study of the site conditions, program, and social activites. Once the four blocks were selected, we devised a set of strategies to add housing square footage while simultaneously improving quality of life for all existing and future dwellers. My proposal makes the block more accessible for users by coupling existing automobile entrances with pedestrian ways, and creates housing with a light footprint that occupies the existing block courtyard. Thus, each household is allotted private patio space, as well as larger, collective mixing outdoor space. Housing units themselves are based on a configurable grid system that is optimized for views and unit-tounit relationships.


Extroverted Introversion

Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Eixample Block Intervention

Block Facade Panorama Photographs 152

ARCH 554 Housing Studio


Critics: Claudi Aguilo & Sergi Serrat

Spring 2013

Barcelona Site Plan

Strategies Out-of-Range Reappropriation

Out-of-Range South Facade Max Solar Gain

Couple Parking & Pedestrian Entrances

Existing

Proposed

153


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ARCH 554 Housing Studio Extroverted Extroverted Introversion Introversion ARCH 554 Tectonics ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ The project site in the interior courtyard is relatively small in area. As well, units placed in the site would need to be in close proximity to one another in order to facilitate the necessary volume of housing. Accordingly, the qualities of transparency and lightness need to be embodied within the proposal in order to address these constraints.

1. Transparency and Lightness

2. Collective and Individual Patios

Collective

3. Low-rise and Compact footprint

4. Resident privacy

Individual

An aim of the project is to implement both larger, collective spaces for all the residents of the courtyard (also accessible to existing residents of the block), but also individual patio spaces for each house, to maintain a sense of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own space in this intimate site.

The project seeks to create an architecture which is lower in height and touches the ground minimally. This maintains unobstructed views out of and around the courtyard for the existing residents. As well, the minimal building footprint maximizes the possibility for outdoor and interstitial collective spaces in the small courtyard site.

Privacy and exclusivity for the residents of the courtyard and the block is of primary concern. The intimate space of the project site calls for close interactions between residents. These relationships are encouraged and develop the most when the space remains exclusive. The users of the block currently lack a larger collective space for full-grown residents, and making this space private improves the quality for residents.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 154 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Critics: Claudi Claudi Aguilo Aguilo && Sergi Sergi Serrat Serrat Spring Spring2013 2013 Critics: ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 4.35 m

Grid System 4m

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Rules and Conditions

1. Only one tower; should be positioned on North-west edge for optimal views and unobstruction of existing buildings

Units

2. The lower quarter should remain clear, except for low 4 unit abutting south-east wall. This allows open, continous space between block entrances 3. North-east interior facade should only be abutted by cantilevered building, optimally with a 4 meter setback

4. Maintain line-of-site views for second building stories

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 155 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ARCH 554 Housing Studio Extroverted Introversion ARCH 554 Tectonics ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Existing Axonometric

Proposed Axonometric ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +156 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


157


Extroverted Introversion

Exterior Courtyard Rendering

158

ARCH 554 Housing Studio


Spring 2013

Critics: Claudi Aguilo & Sergi Serrat

159


Ground Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

160

210 0

12 00

210 0

Extroverted Introversion

ARCH 554 Housing Studio


12 00

21 00

161

21 00


+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ++ + + + + + + +

Transverse Section A 162 Transverse Section A


+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ++ + + + + + + +

163


Longitudinal Section B 164 Longitudinal Section B


165


ARCH 554 Housing Studio

Extroverted Introversion

Housing Block Typologies Service Served 21 00

12 00

2 Bed

21 00

12 00

Plan

21 00

12 00

1 Bed

Section

12 00

12 00

1st Plan 12 00

2nd Plan

Section

Section

1st Plan

2nd Plan

2nd Plan 2 Bed

21 00

21 00

1st Plan

12 00

1 Bed

12 00

2 Bed

2nd Plan

Doublehigh 1st Plan

2nd Plan

210 0

1st Plan

Section

Section

Section

Longitudinal Section B 166

Section


Critics: Claudi Aguilo & Sergi Serrat

Spring 2013

Housing Block Typologies

210 0

210 0

210 0

210 0

210 0

21 00

21 00

21 00

1st Plan

2nd Plan

210 0

210 0

1 Bed

21 00

21 00

21 00

210 0

2nd Plan

210 0

210 0

1st Plan

210 0

210 0

210 0

210 0

2 Bed

Section

21 00

1 Bed 12 00

12 00

12 00 12 00

12 00

1st Plan

12 00

2nd Plan

21 00

12 00

21 00

12 00

21 00

21 00

2nd Plan

12 00

1st Plan

12 00

2 Bed

21 00

Section

12 00

Section

1 Bed

2nd Plan

3rd Plan

4th Plan

1st Plan

2nd Plan 21 00

1 Bed

21 00

21 00

21 00

21 00

12 00

1st Plan

Section

Section

Transverse Section B 167


ARCH 554 Housing Studio

Extroverted Introversion Solar Strategies

Perforated Panels

Glazed Facade Add Solar Shade

Closed

3D-Perspective Floor Plan 168

Open


Critics: Claudi Aguilo & Sergi Serrat

Spring 2013

Summer Sun

Winter Sun

169


170


171


Extroverted Introversion

ARCH 554 Housing Studio

Exploded Bay Axonometric 172


Critics: Claudi Aguilo & Sergi Serrat

Spring 2013 Exploded Unit Axonometric

Connection Detail B

Connection Detail B

173


Extroverted Introversion

ARCH 554 Housing Studio

Detailed Section

174


Spring 2013

Critics: Claudi Aguilo & Sergi Serrat

175


Competitions


9

Paul Preissner Architects Design Competitions

National Museum of Afghanistan & SEEH Sustainable School in Greece

Chicago, IL 2012

The proposal for the National Museum of Afghanistan reconsiders the method of the museum, which is dedicated to collections of historic artifacts and archeological evidence of past cultural moments. By allowing for the collection to be endlessly linear, and removing the separations between items in an era, eras in a past, and pasts within a culture, the museum incorporates a significant number of breakthroughs. The architects do so in terms of the architectural design, the notion of a cultural campus and the design thinking on curatorial endeavors, to revolutionize the way a museum works today. The design for a school in Greece imagines the architectureas a campus rather than a singular building. Each of the four volumes (a Primary School, Secondary School, Kindergarten, and Administration Building) feature gently sloping roofs that create a distinct identity for the complex, and curved corners that face towards a central square, creating a core gathering space for the buildingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; users. My contrib tion focused primarily on the Kindergarten building, which featured moveable partitions and circular rooms, conducive to the playful and imaginative nature of early education.


Paul Preissner Architects

National Museum of Afghanistan

c d b

a

Roof plan

Elevation 1

Elevation 2

Elevation 3

Elevation 4

(renders by Paul Preissner)

178


Paul Preissner Architects

SEEH Sustainable School in Greece

B

Site plan reference

A

A Kindergarten plan

B

Section A

(renders by Paul Preissner)

Section B 179


Facade Study

180


10 ARCH 562 Envelopes + Environments Critic: Julie Flohr

University of Illinois at Chicago Spring 2012

(Group project with Elizabeth Kivel)

The Cooper Union building’s architectural stature not only represents the school in icon, but fits in with a “kind of toughness that is New York.” The screen lifts at ground level, offering a transparency and porousness so crucial to the mission of the school, welcoming the city and the students. A transparency also pierces through the façade highlighting the central atrium, or the “vertical piazza”, stressing the importance of the gathering of the building’s inhabitants around this central space. Not only does the façade create this iconic building, cloaking a standard poured-in-place concrete structure, it also performs as a sustainable feature. The perforated screen exists just outside a standard window-wall system, mitigating heat gain in summer and retaining heat in the winter, by creating a layer of air that insulates the building. It additionally acts as sun screen, diffusing direct light for its inhabitants who heavily rely on natural daylight as well as lessening the impact of the sun causing additional heat gains. The perforated screen slows high winds from cooling the building, and lessens the amount of rain coming into contact with the main curtain wall system, lessening the chance for moisture infiltration. Thom Mayne’s ability to utilize a regular structure to create an iconic building is made possible by the dramatic perforated metal screen, which not only undulates and manipulates the perception of the structure beneath it, but highlights the important social atrium and porous bottom skirt.

181


ARCH 562 Envelopes + Environments

Facade Study

Axonometric

West facade 182

North facade

East facade


Critic: Julie Flohr

Spring 2012

South facade

Section detail 183


Graphic Design


Athletic Department Facilities Design Of�ice Volleyball Trophy Case Graphic Installation

University of NebraskaLincoln

2010

This permanent, large-scale 100’+ graphic installation was designed for a customfabricated, $100,000+ trophy case celebrating the achievments of the University of Nebraska’s championship Women’s Volleyball team. The graphic integrates a large quantity of information about the team’s achievements, including national and conference championships, star players, individual awards, coaching history, and narratives about team members, while maintaing a consistent graphic approach and aesthetic. As well,there were a multitude of design considerations in regard to production and installation, including creating an image that could effectively split into modular sections, and could also seamlessly allow for future updates without sacrificing its visual integrity.


Volleyball Trophy Case Graphic

186

Facilities Design OfďŹ ce


Athletic Department

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

187


Volleyball Trophy Case Graphic

Installation

188

Facilities Design OfďŹ ce


Athletic Department

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Completed

189



The Design Work of Evan Wyatt Bliss