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use the breakfast bowl format and offer an exciting taste profile that takes breakfast to a new level. Badaracco offers up additional inspiration with countries whose foods can form the basis of emerging breakfast dishes: • Lebanon—manakish, a flatbread “pizza” seasoned with the Mediterranean spice blend za’atar. • Britain— a heaping plate of bacon, Lincolnshire sausage, black pudding, eggs, baked beans, tomato, mushrooms and toast, known as the “full English breakfast.” • Israel—smoked white fish, lox, bagels, shakshuka, hummus, halloumi, labneh, rugelach, bourekas and gvina levana. • Cuba—casamiento (rice and eggs), huevos habaneros (ham and eggs), picadillo cuacua (Havana ham and eggs), torrejas con frutas (Cuban French toast) and the tostada (Cuban toast).

‘Party dresses’ While menu development teams can emulate or replicate dishes from afar, there is also an easier way to integrate their influence. Badaracco suggests incorporating preparations, seasonings or toppings/addins from international breakfast dishes while keeping the base familiar. “This is a territory that would be easy to make a mistake in right now—keep your base familiar and approachable, and use the add-in or prep as the party dress,” she says. “Consumers will pass you by if there is anything off-putting— they are not in a risk-taking mood.” Eggs would be a good base to start with, particularly prepared as an omelette--fried or poached--creating a familiar platform. Guests could then choose from two or

three toppings that reflect a popular global dish. Taking inspiration from Mexico, salsa and tortillas could be one option.. Another option could be simmered tomato with Mediterranean spices. Yet another could be a savory porridge or rice add-in. While the base is familiar and comforting, the topping options would change, but still adhere to authentic preparation and roots. A good example of too much risk-taking would be, for example, to fuse toppings from different world regions together into one dish. Flavor trends that are sweeping many categories include smoke, floral, liquor and tea, says Badaracco. Bolder flavors should be expected at breakfast time, particularly as the “party dress,” even though the historical and traditional will be an underlying theme. As an approach to culinary development at chains, Badaracco suggests, “Fusion has retreated and been replaced by hybrids. These are being sassed with flirty toppings and bolder flavors.” While menu development professionals have an open canvas when it comes to global breakfast, it’s evident that innovation in this day and age requires a thoughtful and strategic approach. The opportunities outweigh the risks, however, and keeping an eye on consumer sentiments and trends will serve restaurant chains well. Taking cues from global flavors and dishes, there are more ways than ever before to attract consumers to restaurants for their breakfast occasions. At the same time, diners will be exposed to new flavors and dishes that will continue to drive home the benefit of breakfast at restaurants. It’s a competitive advantage that chain restaurants have to fend off pesky food retailers. RESTAURANT C-SUITE 29

Profile for Eatery Pulse Media

Restaurant C-Suite Magazine | Spring 2019  

As Restaurant C-Suite Magazine is a trend-based news source, we continue to dive deeper into 2019 trends in this issue, including zero waste...

Restaurant C-Suite Magazine | Spring 2019  

As Restaurant C-Suite Magazine is a trend-based news source, we continue to dive deeper into 2019 trends in this issue, including zero waste...