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The Artist’s Magazine Annual Art Competition 2016 Finalist

COMPETITION SPOTLIGHT

ABOVE: Anemone in Blue, II (watercolor on paper, 30x40)

Pat Rempel Hamilton, Michigan • patsartstudio.com MY FATHER TAUGHT ME HOW TO DRAW at a young age, and I had a wonderful art teacher in high school. After years in the corporate world, I started taking night classes at Kendall College of Art and Design, in Michigan. This led me to opening my own studio and gallery space. The colors and crazy pattern in this fabric gave me

the idea for Anemone in Blue, II. After taking photos outside in strong sunlight at different angles, I started the design with a detailed drawing on Arches 300-lb cold-pressed watercolor paper. I then masked out the flowers and leaves so I could put in a wash of warm transparent gray for the white tablecloth and vase’s shadow. I painted

COMPETITION SPOTLIGHT ARTISTS ARE CHOSEN FROM OUR ANNUAL COMPETITION FINALISTS. 88

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the blue vase next, using a wet-on-wet technique with dark saturated color mixtures of phthalo blue, cobalt and ultramarine blue. At the same time, I used a paper towel to lift off the lighter sections of the vase. The challenge was to paint it dark enough while maintaining the transparency of the glass. Later I used an airbrush with liquid watercolor to add some darks without disturbing the underpainting. Next came the crazy fabric! Since the same colors

Make time for the things that feed your soul. Art certainly feeds mine.

were repeated throughout the fabric, I laid out a color chart for reference over the next few weeks of painting. The best advice I ever received was not to quit when going through a rough painting period. You learn more during those times than when everything is coming easily. ■

The artist's magazine easyindochinatravel  

ART AND COMMERCE are supposed to be at odds, but even purists acknowledge that the tradition of patronage— worldly popes, vainglorious kings...

The artist's magazine easyindochinatravel  

ART AND COMMERCE are supposed to be at odds, but even purists acknowledge that the tradition of patronage— worldly popes, vainglorious kings...

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