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A feature of grisaille that makes it rewarding is the lack of interest I have in overcooking it; the grisaille painting must be ready for the application of color without fear of disturbing the underlayers. Color goes in for mood, for composition and for what I call the ‘gesture of light’ as soon as I can integrate it. I do my best to abide by a roadmap of color development outlined by Henry Hensche in his chapter “The Painting of a Still Life” in The Art of Seeing and Painting (Portier Gorman Publications, 1988; out of print). The great paintings, the ones that have left me speechless (like those of Marià Fortuny, Antonio Mancini and Adolph Menzel) involved superb editing. My middle game of painting approaches color building up by, as Charles Woodbury once said, “adding the element that is missing.” LBH: Please expand on the advantages of painting from life and your thoughts on using photographic reference. DT: Photographs and projected images are

use them to great effect, but photos have wreaked havoc on inexperienced painters because they cannot see past the distortions in depth of field, edges and monocular image freezes. Life work teaches many unexpected things, such as patient observation—honing the ability to arrive at a contour even as one continues to see past that contour, giving the pose slight changes. Better than painting from memory and more fulfi lling than a photograph, life painting is the mechanism of self-discovery. LBH. What criteria do you use to decide when a painting is finished? DT: A wonderful quotation caught my eye

recently by a contemporary figure painter, Eric Fischl. Answering the question of knowing when a painting is finished, he said, “... when I become the spectator.” ■ LOUISE B. HAFESH is an award-winning artist and writer, and a frequent contributor to The Artist’s Magazine. You can see examples of her work at louisebhafesh.com and paintersportal.blogspot.com.

DAN THOMPSON (danthompsonart. com) received a bachelor of fine arts degree from the Corcoran School of Art (Washington, D.C.) and a master of fine arts degree from the New York Academy of Art (NYAA). He supplemented his training with several additional years of private study and studio apprenticeships. He has been awarded two grants from the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation and has twice received the Ethel Lorraine Bernstein Memorial Award for Excellence in Painting from the Corcoran College of Art and Design. In 2001, Thompson won Best of Show in the American Society of Portrait Artist’s International Portrait Competition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In 2006, Thompson co-founded the Grand Central Academy of Art (now Grand Central Atelier) in New York City. His teaching credentials include the New School/ Parsons (New York City), the New York Academy of Art, the Art Students League of New York and Studio Incamminati (Philadelphia), as well as workshops in the United States, Italy and France.

not proxies for reality. Experienced painters MARCH 2017

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The artist's magazine easyindochinatravel  

ART AND COMMERCE are supposed to be at odds, but even purists acknowledge that the tradition of patronage— worldly popes, vainglorious kings...

The artist's magazine easyindochinatravel  

ART AND COMMERCE are supposed to be at odds, but even purists acknowledge that the tradition of patronage— worldly popes, vainglorious kings...

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