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of studio-based things within their design work. There are also fully immersive trends—sound and audio incorporated into work.

that they can get. Networking is so very important to success in the arts. We do our best to provide students with those opportunities. We bring in artists from the outside to talk about students’ work. The staff gives TEDstyle talks (inspirational—modeled after the famous conference) about our own work and what we’re doing and what’s current in our careers. We also have a shadow program, in which students apprentice with a professional artist or faculty member.

IS THE DRIVE TO INCORPORATE TECHNOLOGY A MORE NATURAL INSTINCT FOR ART STUDENTS TODAY?

HOW HAS ART SCHOOL CHANGED?

I think students have to be better prepared when they come to college. They need to have drive and a vision to be successful. They need to know many more skills in electronic media than even students from 10 years ago. Knowing most creative software is critically important to being successful in the visual arts. WHAT’S EXPECTED OF ART STUDENTS TODAY IN ORDER FOR THEM TO SUCCEED IN GALLERIES? Be prepared.

I’ve worked with many professional artists that don’t follow through or don’t do things on time. I try to tell my students that deadlines are very important. Gallery owners will respect you if you meet the deadlines. For the design students, it’s important to consider presentation. It’s really important in the business today that everything looks professional. If you’re doing something unique—if you’re making custom wood pieces—are your corners nice, and is everything crisp and neat? What does the space look like? Is it set up well? Did you show up on time to dismantle your work? If you follow this protocol, you’ll be right on track. If you do all these professional things you need to do, then you can focus on your own work. WHAT ARE SOME TRENDS YOU SEE HAPPENING WITH NEW ARTISTS? Many

of the pieces in our senior show are done completely by hand. Even the design is hands on—students will do a screen print and that’s what their poster will be; they’ll do a lot

“I think students have to be better prepared when they come to college. They need to have drive and a vision to be successful.” —DAVID KNIGHT

Absolutely. They grew up in the digital age. As a university, that fact has challenged us, because we LEFT: Senior Brittany McIntosh try to provide and her installation most of what “Night Watch” at students need, “Surge: BFA Visual including Communication technology. Design Senior Exhibitions.” We all know the minute you buy a computer, it seems as though there’s a new version a week later, but we do our best to provide art students with those resources. Technology in some form is almost always integrated into students’ work. We had a full sculptural installation that incorporated video projections of images and shadows; we have local artist Alice Pixley Young teaching a class for us to help integrate twodimension, three-dimension and video into work, and that class fi lled up immediately. Our student artists also work with music students to integrate music and sound into their work. It’s an on-going element: Media are utilized somewhere, somehow in the process, even if it’s just using the computer to create stencils to put on the wall. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE BEST WAYS FOR STUDENTS TO GET THEIR WORK IN GALLERIES? AND HOW EARLY SHOULD THEY START? I encourage students to

enter any exhibition they can and try for gallery shows as soon as they enter our program. They’ll be juried or judged on their artwork their whole creative career. The sooner they get started, the sooner they can learn to accept the success or rejections from exhibitions. DO YOU SEE A RANGE IN AGE WHEN IT COMES TO ART STUDENTS? Most of my

students are the typical college-aged MARCH 2017

MARCH 2017

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The artist's magazine easyindochinatravel  

ART AND COMMERCE are supposed to be at odds, but even purists acknowledge that the tradition of patronage— worldly popes, vainglorious kings...

The artist's magazine easyindochinatravel  

ART AND COMMERCE are supposed to be at odds, but even purists acknowledge that the tradition of patronage— worldly popes, vainglorious kings...

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