Page 1

SOUTHERN CENTRES

2013

Competitions


CONTENT

EVENT INTRODUCTION

ORGANISERS -

PAGE 1

BAT AND TRAP

WEST KENT

2/3

BOULE/PENTANQUE

EAST SUSSEX

4

CAKE RECIPE

WEST SUSSEX

5/6/7

CHILDRENS SPORT

WEST SURREY

8

CONNECT 4

SOUTH LONDON

9

CRIBBAGE

EAST KENT

10/11/12

CROQUET

EAST SURREY

13

DARTS

WEST SURREY

14

DOMINOES

SOUTH LONDON

15/16/17

DRAUGHTS

SOUTH LONDON

18

5 A SIDE FOOTBALL

EAST KENT

19

FUN RUN

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

20

HAGARS CHESS

WEST SURREY

21

HANDICRAFT

WEST SUSSEX

22

HORSESHOES

EAST SURREY

23

LAWN DARTS

EAST SURREY

24

REVERSING SKILL

SOUTH LONDON

25

OPEN VOLLEYBALL

EAST KENT

26

WELLY WANGING

EAST SUSSEX

27


INTRODUCTION

RULES The rules are abbreviated and compiled for Southern Centres use only. All competitors and contestants must be resident on the rally field. Each event will be covered by independent judges, referees or umpires and their decision will be final. The organising Centre will be responsible for arranging and ensuring that: All equipment is available at rally Their sport liaison officer makes themselves known to the Sports Officer Making sure games run to schedule wherever possible PLAQUES Plaques will be presented to every member of a team or an individual who has attained, first or Second place in any group, class or for each event. Plaques will be presented at Centre Flagpoles for individual games. ENTRIES All entries for competitions must be handed to the sports liaison / sports officer by 8pm Friday. The check-in desk will be located in the bar area.

1


The Rules of Bat and Trap Bat and Trap is a pub game of the same family as cricket played almost exclusively in Kent, England. Being a traditional pub game without any national governing body, variations of equipment and rules abound. Where there is doubt, locally played rules should always apply. Description. Any cut grass area can be used as the pitch for a bat and trap game. The trap is placed on the ground at one end of the pitch and 21 yards in front of it at the other end are two white posts, 7 feet high and 13 feet, 6 inches apart. A straight white line is drawn on the ground between the posts and another curved white line joins them behind the posts to form a semi-circle. Sometimes, a whole pitch is marked out, 21x13.5yds.The "trap" is essentially a rectangular box between 22 and 24 inches long, 5 inches high and 5 inches wide that lies on the ground. The front part of the trap features a wicket which is a square white target with a black circle on it for the bowlers to aim at. This is effectively a 5 inches square rectangular flap hinged at the bottom and standing vertically so that a successful throw will knock the flap down backwards. On the top of the trap is a simple see-saw mechanism called a "striker" with a spoon shape at one end that propels the ball upwards when a batsman pushes the other end downwards. The wooden bat can vary in shape but the oval striking face must be not more than 8 inches long and no more than 5 inches wide at any point. The ball is made of hard rubber and is 2 and a quarter inches in diameter. Play Bat and Trap is a team game with eight players on each side. The team captains should toss a coin to decide which team bats first. An "innings" consists of each player on the team having one chance to bat, each player batting until he is "out". Each team plays an innings and the team with the most points wins the game. A normal league match will be the best of three legs but if a leg is drawn a fourth leg would be played to decide the match. Only one player bats at a time. To start, the batsman stands beside the trap and knocks the lever down smartly with his bat which shoots the ball upwards where it can be hit with the bat. The batsman is allowed 3 attempts to shoot the ball to a sufficient height to be struck but as soon as a swing is made at the ball, the strike is deemed to have been taken. The objective is to strike the ball so that it passes between two white posts. If the batsman misses the ball or the ball does not manage to cross the line between the two posts or if the ball passes over the line at a higher altitude than the top 2


of the posts, the batsman is "Knocked Out". Behind and between the two white posts, the opposing or fielding team stand in a line ready to field the ball. The fielders must remain behind the line but should the ball be caught by one of the fielders before touching the ground, the batsman is "Caught Out". This is quite unusual however and normally, the ball bounces once or twice before successfully crossing the line where it is stopped by the fielders. After this, the bowling half of the turn begins. This is simply a chance for one of the fielders to throw the ball back down the pitch at the target flap at the front of the trap. The fielding side take turns to bowl so that each fielder bowls only once every 8 balls and the bowler must keep one foot behind the line between the posts at all times. The batsman can do nothing to prevent the ball hitting the wicket and must stand to one side while the ball is hurled. If the ball knocks the target so that it is knocked backwards and hits the ground, the batsman is "Bowled Out". If the bowler does not manage to knock down the target, the batsman scores one run, collects the ball and starts the process over again. There are no standard methods for bowling or batting - the batsman can hold the bat with one or two hands can bash the ball in the air however he likes, while the bowlers can bowl, toss or throw underarm at their preference

3


BOULE/PENTANQUE

1. Each team shall consist of four players 2. The first team to play is chosen by the tossing of a coin. 3. The wooden jack shall be thrown from within a 50cm (18 inch) circle to be between 6cm and 10cm away and not nearer than 50cm from any obstacle. 4. Any player in the second team then tries to throw his boule trying to place it as near as possible to the jack. Both feet must remain on the ground until the boule has landed. 5. Any player in the second team then tries to throw his boule even nearer to the jack or knock away the leading boule placed there by the other team. The boule nearest the jack leads. 6. Then it is up to the players in the team leading to throw until one of their boules is leading. If this happens then the players from the opposing team throw until they lead. When a team has no more boules, the players of the other team throw their remaining boules. 7. The end is finished when the two teams have no more boules and the points are counted. The winning team gets as many points as it has boules that are better placed than the best of the losing team. 8. A new end is started from the opposite end by the team that won the previous end. Play continues until after the completion of an end and one of the teams reach 9 points (13 final) 9. Preliminary rounds shall consist of one game, the final shall be the best of three games. 10.The general rules of boules (pentanque) apply (except as they may be varied by the above) 4


CAKE RECIPE Chocolate Brownies

125g / 4 ½ oz plain chocolate, broken into pieces 125g / 4 ½ oz butter 225g / 8 oz caster sugar 2 eggs 125g / 4 ½ oz plain flour ½ tsp baking powder 125g / 4 ½ oz chopped walnuts

Preparation:

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees C / 350 degrees F / Gas mark 4. Grease a shallow 28 x 18cm (11 x 7 in) rectangular tin. Put the chocolate and butter in a mixing bowl and put the bowl over a saucepan of gently bubbling water. When the butter and chocolate have melted, take off the heat and stir in all the remaining ingredients. Pour into tin and spread out. Bake for 30 minutes. Take out of the oven and leave in the tin for 10 minutes, then cut them into squares and put out on a cooling tray.

5


CAKE RECIPE

Scones

225g / 8oz self-raising flour Pinch of salt 1 tsp baking powder 3 tbsp butter 150ml / 5 fl oz milk 1 egg, beaten, to glaze

Preparation:

Preheat the oven to 220 degrees C / 425 degrees F / Gas mark 7. Grease baking sheet. Sift the flour, adding the salt and baking powder. Rub the butter into the flour until it looks and feels like fine breadcrumbs, then pour in the milk carefully so the mixture is a soft dough and dry enough to roll out. Flour surface and the rolling pin and roll out the dough so it is about 2cm / ¾ inch thick. Cut into rounds using a 6cm / 2 ½ inch round pastry cutter. Place on baking tray and brush with beaten egg. Bake for approximately 10 minutes until light golden colour. Cool slightly on a baking tray. Recipes from Monica Rivron’s ‘Caravan Cookbook’

6


CAKE RECIPE Madeira Cake

6 oz butter 6-7 oz caster sugar 3 large eggs 8 oz flour, preferably plain 1 teaspoon baking powder (with plain flour only) approximately 2 tablespoons milk To decorate: 1 tablespoon caster sugar, piece of candied lemon peel

Preparation

Prepare 2lb loaf tin with cake liner from the Information desk. Cream butter and sugar until soft and light. Beat eggs and add gradually to butter mixture. Fold in sieved flour etc, then the milk. Place mixture in prepared tin. Bake for approximately 1 ½ hours in very moderate oven. Half way through cooking, place peel on top of cake. When cooked, place on wire tray to cool

7


CHILDRENS SPORTS

CHILDRENS SPORT WILL BE DETERMINED NEARER THE RALLY DATE. THIS WILL BE DETERMINED BY WEATHER CONDITIONS AND NUMBRER OF ENTRANTS. THIS EVENT WILL GO AHEAD EITHER INSIDE THE MARQUE OR OUTSIDE.

8


Connect Four

Connect Four is an absorbing and challenging game of vertical strategy that’s easy to learn and fun to play. Rules are simple. Each player tries to build a row of four playing pieces in the frame - horizontally, vertically, or diagonally - while trying to prevent his opponent from doing the same. Object of the game Be the first player to get four of your checkers in a row - horizontally, vertically or diagonally. Rules Choose who plays first. Each player in his turn drops one of his checkers down any of the slots in the top of the grid. The play alternates until one of the players gets four checkers of his colour in a row. The four in a row can be horizontal, vertical, or diagonal.(See examples). The first player to get four in a row wins. If the board is filled with pieces and neither player has 4 in a row, then the game is a draw.

9


The Rules of Cribbage Six Card Cribbage Scoring Cribbage is played with an ordinary pack of 52 cards without jokers. Scoring is normally recorded on a traditionally crafted board with four parallel lines of 30 holes each plus 2 game holes. Other cribbage board types exist. Two pegs record the score for each player, the rear peg showing the previous tally, the foremost peg recording the current score. The pegs move up the outside of one side of the board and then back down the inside. Objective The aim of Cribbage is to be the first to move the pegs all the way up and down the board twice and end in the in the game hole. Or put another way, to be the first to score 121 points. Note that the game ends immediately either player reaches the final hole even if this is during the play or when the dealer pegs "two for his heels". There is no requirement to get exactly 121 - it is simply the first to reach the target score. Competitions are normally played as the best of 3 games, a game being to either 61 or 121. Players take turns to deal the first hand of each game. The Deal Players cut for the deal - lowest card wins. After the first hand, players take turns to deal. The dealer shuffles, asks his opponent to cut and then deals six cards each. Both players discard two cards face down and these two cards are henceforth referred to as "the crib" or "the box". This crib is effectively an extra hand scored for the dealer. So the dealer aims to discard cards into the crib that will give a good chance of a high scoring hand whereas the opponent aims to confound this objective. Most of the skill in the game of Cribbage is down to the choice of cards discarded at this point. The Cut Next the dealer asks his opponent to cut the cards another time. The top portion of cards is placed underneath the lower portion and the new top-most card is turned face upwards. If this card is a Jack, the dealer pegs two points and says "Two for his heels".

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The Play The opponent begins the Play by laying one of his four cards face up while clearly stating it's numerical value. All royal cards count ten, the ace counts one and other cards are worth their pip value. The dealer then lays a card separately in front of himself and announces the total of both cards. Play continues like this with each player alternately laying a card on the pile in front of him while verbally keeping tally of the current joint total. However, the total must not go above 31. When a player cannot play without taking the total above 31, that player says "go" and, if possible, the remaining player must carry on alone until that player, too, cannot play without taking the total above 31. When neither player can play any card without taking the total above 31, the player who laid the last card pegs 1 point saying "One for last". Should either player manage to take the total to exactly 31, that player pegs 2 points instead of 1, saying "Two for thirty-one". Then the cards already played are turned over and the player who did not lay the last card starts a new play. When one player's cards are exhausted, the other player continues alone. The last card played scores 1 "for last" (unless the amount is 31 in which case 2 points are scored). During the play, the following events are scored and the appropriate amounts are immediately recorded on the cribbage board. If anyone lays down a card which brings the total to 15, 2 points are scored. If anyone lays down a card of the same type as the previous one, 2 points are scored ("2 for a pair"). In this context, the numerical value is not used so, for instance, a Jack cannot be paired with a Queen. If anyone lays down a third card of the same type, 6 points are scored ("6 for a pair royal"). If anyone lays down a fourth card of the same type, 12 points are scored "12 for a double pair royal"). If anyone lays down a card such that with the two preceding cards, a run can be scored, 3 points are scored. The cards do not have to be of the same suit nor do they have to have been laid in sequential order. Aces count low so Queen, King, Ace is not a run. Similarly, if anyone lays a card such that with the three or more preceding cards, a run can be constructed, the number of cards which would make up that run are scored. e.g. suppose cards were laid in the following order: 8,6,4,5,7. The fourth card would score 3 points, the fifth card would score five points. 11


The Show Each player then counts the score of the four cards in his hand plus the turned up card. The non-dealer shows first and this is important because it can often make the difference between winning and losing. Fifteen - All combinations of cards that add up to fifteen count 2 points. A pair, a pair royal or a double pair royal - count 2, 6 or 12 respectively. A run - A point for each card in a run. A flush - Four or five cards of the same suit. A point is scored for each card. A 4 point flush can only be scored using cards from the hand. The turned up card can ONLY be used in a five card flush. Note that flushes do not count in the play. One for his nob - a jack of the same suit as the turned up card. This is always scored last so that the score is tallied by finishing with the satisfying phrase "and one for his nob". The highest possible score in the show is 29 points - 3 fives and a Jack in the hand with the turned up card another five of the same suit as the held Jack. The Crib Finally, the dealer counts the score of the cards in the crib plus the turned up card and adds these points to his total. Scoring is done in exactly the same way as for the show except that a crib can only score a flush if all five cards are of the same suit for five points.

12


CROQUET

There will be mixed teams of four. One team uses the blue and black balls, the other team use the red and yellow balls. The object of the game is for the team to proceed through the loops in the correct order as designated below. The game is won by the first team to hit the winning peg. Anybody who succeeds in getting the ball through the loop gets another turn, so does anyone who hits another ball, provided they not already hit it in their turn (although if have already been through the loop between they can hit it again). ORDER OF PLAY WILL BE

1

2

5

4

O

6

3

13


DARTS

Darts can be played individually or as teams but this will depend on the number of entrants. In a game of 301 the object is for one player or a team to be the first to reach zero from starting total of 301. All games will start from 301 apart from the final, which will start from 501. In simple terms, after three darts are thrown, the throwing player subtracts the total scored from his current total until he reaches zero. In order to reach zero each player must finish by throwing a double i.e. if player one has 36 remaining he must hit double 18 to win, while if player two has 45 remaining he must hit single 5, double 20 to win – or another combination provided the final dart scores on a double. Games can be played to a ‘best of’ format whereby a player or team winning three legs in a best of five leg competition wins the match.

14


Dominoes Basic rules Most domino games are blocking games, i.e. the objective is to empty one’s hand while blocking the opponent’s. In the end, a score may be determined by counting the pips in the losing players’ hands. In scoring games the scoring is different and happens mostly during gameplay, making it the principal objective. Block game The most basic domino variant is for two players and requires a double six set. The 28 tiles are shuffled face down and form the stock or boneyard. Each player draws seven tiles; the remainder are not used. Once the players begin drawing tiles, they are typically placed on-edge before the players, so that each player can see his own tiles, but none can see the value of other players’ tiles. Every player can thus see how many tiles remain in the other players’ hands at all times during game play. One player begins by downing (playing the first tile) one of their tiles. This tile starts the line of play, a series of tiles in which adjacent tiles touch with matching, i.e. equal, values. The players alternately extend the line of play with one tile at one of its two ends. The game ends when one player wins by playing their last tile, or when the game is blocked because neither player can play. If that occurs, whoever caused the block gets all of the remaining player points not counting their own. Draw game In the Draw game, players are additionally allowed to draw as many tiles as desired from the stock before playing a tile, and they are not allowed to pass before the stock is (nearly) empty. The score of a game is the number of pips in the losing player’s hand plus the number of pips in the stock. Most rules prescribe that two tiles need to remain in the stock. The Draw game is often referred to as simply “dominoes”.

15


Muggins played with multi-coloured tiles. The doubles serve as spinners, allowing the line of play to branch. The line of play is the configuration of played tiles on the table. Typically it starts with a single tile, from which it grows in two opposite directions when the players add matching tiles. (In practice the players often play tiles at right angles when the line of play gets too close to the edge of the table.) The rules for the line of play often differ from one variant to another. In many rules the doubles serve as spinners, i.e. they can be played on all four sides, causing the line of play to branch. Sometimes the first tile is required to be a double, and serves as the only spinner. In some games such as Chicken Foot, all sides of a spinner must be occupied before anybody is allowed to play elsewhere. Matador has unusual rules for matching. Bendomino uses curved tiles, so that one side of the line of play (or both) may be blocked for geometrical reasons. In Mexican Train and other Trains games, the game starts with a spinner from which various trains branch off. Most trains are owned by a player, and in most situations players are only allowed to extend their own train. Scoring In blocking games the scoring happens at the end of the game. After a player has emptied their hand, thereby winning the game for their team, the score consists of the total pip count of the losing teams' hands. In some rules the pip count of the remaining stock is added. If a game is blocked because no player can move, the winner can often be determined by counting the pips in all players' hands. In scoring games each individual move potentially adds to the score. E.g. in Bergen, players score 2 points whenever they cause a configuration in which both open ends have the same value and 3 points if additionally one open end is formed by a double. In Muggins, players score by ensuring that the total pip count of the open ends is a multiple of a certain number. In variants of Muggins the line of play may branch due to spinners. In British public houses and social clubs the scoring version of "fives and threes" is used. The game is normally played in pairs 2 against 2 and is played as a series of "ends". In each "end" the objective is for players to attach a domino from their hand to one end of the those already played so that the sum of the two end dominoes is divisible by 5 and/or 3. One point is scored for each time 5 and/or 3 can be divided into the sum of the two dominoes i.e. four at one end and 5 at the other makes 9 which is divisible by 3 3 times (3 points), Double 5 at one end and 5 at the other makes 15 which is divisible by 3 5 times and divisible by 5 3 times (8 points). An "end" stops when one of the players is "Out" i.e. has 16


played all of their dominoes. In the event that no player is able to empty their hand then the player with the lowest domino left in their hand is deemed to be "out" and scores one point. A game consists of any number of "ends" with points scored in the "ends" accumulating towards a total. The game ends when one of the pair’s total score exceeds a set number of points. The running total score is often is kept on a cribbage board. Fives and Threes is played in a number of competitive leagues in the British.

17


DRAUGHTS The competition will be on a knock out basis played by five competitors from each centre. Each person will play one game. Two players each have 12 draughts, one set black and one set white. These are set out on the white squares of the first three rows at each end of the board. A draught is moved forward diagonally one square at a time, if an opponent’s piece has a vacant space beyond it, the player can pass over it and must remove that piece from the board. If several vacant spaces are open in a line of play then the mover must take all pieces as he/she moves over them. Each player moves in turn. A draught can only be moved in a forward direction at first but as a player gets his/her draughts across the board into the farthest row from him/her, it is crowned by placing another draught on it, thus making a KING and it can be moved backwards and forwards. When it is possible to take a draught it is compulsory to do so, otherwise the noncomplying draught is ‘buffed’ (taken of the board) by opponent before he/she makes the next move. The game is either won by removing all an opponent’s draughts from the board or by hemming in those remaining in such a way that the opponent cannot make another move. 18


5-A- SIDE FOOTBALL There will be two age groups for this event; however younger players may play up if they wish. The groups will be 10 – 14 years and 15 – 18 years. Teams of five maximum and two substitutes only. Only soft shoes to be worn – no studs. Goal keepers to wear keeper’s uniform. Team change ends after 10 minutes, half time rest 5 minutes. If a draw at the end of 20 minutes play, a penalty shoot out will be taken by the five members of the team that finished the game. Each competitor will be allowed one shot at a goal. If the score is still level after all the team have taken penalties, it will then be decided by sudden death, both teams having equal shots.

19


FUN RUN?

The fun run will be open to all ladies, gentlemen, boys and girls, irrespective of age. The course will be two and a quarter miles on grass/road (subject to variation). To qualify as a finisher you must complete the course. All finishers receive a certificate. The course will be on display at start and will be marked all the way around. The run will commence at 9:am on Monday from the arena. Entrants please report for registration at 8:30am. The finish will be in the arena.

20


HAGGARS CHESS

Played between two teams of four on a grass pitch 7 metres by 5 metres. Two teams made up with two men and two ladies on each. Battens are to be held on the end and thrown under arm. Team A in turn throw the battens (two for ladies one for men) from anywhere on their base line and aim to knock down the opponents Knights. These Knights are thrown back (by team B) from the team B base line into team A area and stood up where they land by the referee. Team B in turn throw the battens (two for the ladies one for the men) from anywhere on their base line and aim to knock down the opponents Knights, starting with any repositioned Knights. The knocked down Knights are thrown back (by team A) from the team A base line into team B area and stood up where they land by the referee. This continues alternating from one team to the other until one team has knocked down all their opponents Knights. They can then go for the King, knock it down and they are the winners. If the King is knocked down at any other time the game is over and the other team have won.

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Handicraft Handicraft programme – 2013 1. 2. 3.

4.

5.

6. 7.

Hand knitting (garments) Crochet garments Artwork a) oils b) water colours c) pen or pencil sketching d) photography picture any size, colour or black & white. Theme: Water Artwork – A child’s picture in the following age groups: a) Under 5 year olds b) 5 – 8 year olds c) 9 – 12 year olds d) 13 – 17 year olds Toy making a) knitted toys b) material toys c) doll dressing Woodwork Flower arrangements (fresh flowers only) Theme: Water Flower arrangements - A child’s garden on a plate in following age groups: a) Under 5 year olds b) 5 – 8 year olds c) 9 – 12 year olds d) 13 – 17 year olds Plates available from the Information Desk

8.

Needlework One class to any needlework medium e.g. embroidery, tapestry, cross-stitch

9. 10. 11.

Cake making – Chocolate Brownies – Children up to 8 years Cake making – Scones – 9 – 15 year olds Cake making – Madeira Cake - Adults Extra ingredient to be collected from the Information Desk All cake recipes are in the programme or on the Website Contact: Liz Manning secretary@southerncentres.org.uk 22


HORSESHOES A team shall consist of two adults and two children. The competitions will be of a knock-out basis. Early rounds will play one set. Semi- final and final rounds will be the best of three sets. Each set will be the first to 11 points. The distance between two stakes will be no longer than 9 meters. Each team will throw alternately and each team member will throw five horseshoes each. The order of play once decided, will remain throughout that heat. Horseshoes are to be thrown level from the stake or behind, not in front. If a horseshoe lands completely around the stake, this is called a RINGER. If a horseshoe hits the stake it is called a HIT. SCORING 3 points for a ringer 1 point for a hit.

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LAWN DARTS The competition is organised on a knock out basis. A team should consist of two adults and two children. The team does not have to belong to the same family. GAMES AND SCORING 1.

The rings to be placed a maximum of 10 metres apart.

2.

Each team member to throw two darts.

3.

The adults to throw from the same end.

4.

The children to throw from opposite end.

5.

Each team to throw the same number of darts.

6.

Darts must penetrate the ground i.e. the flight must be clear of the ground.

7.

To score: 1 dart in the inner ring – 3 points, 1dart outer ring – 1 point

8.

The first team to reach 15 points (1set) goes through to next heat.

9.

FINAL – play best of 3 sets.

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SLLIKS G

NISREVER

The rules and course for the Reversing competition will be made on the day.

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VOLLEYBALL The age groups will be; up to and including 20 years, 21 years and over A team consists of six players, if this number is not available, even after borrowing players from another centre, a team of five will be accepted. The teams may consist of male and female players. Volleyball is based on the rules of the I.v.b.f, compiled, with the English Volleyball Association. During the game a player can only address the referee through the captain of the team. SUBSTITUTES: A team is allowed a maximum of six players. A substitution can only be made when the ball is dead. Any player beginning the set may not return to it again in the same act. If a team member becomes incomplete through an injured player, a substitute can then replace the third player, even if he/she has already played in another position. The captain tosses a coin for the court of service. The winner chooses the court or the right to serve in the following game. TIME OUT: Half a minute – appeal for time out. A time out is a pause for rest or substitution or both. It is allowed by the referee on appeal by the captain or coach when the ball is dead. Each team is allowed two (2) time outs per set. During a time, the coach must address the players from outside the court. Time limit for obvious injury is three minutes. When a referee notices an accident, the game is stopped and the point played again. During a substitution, the coach is not allowed to address the players during the pause. The game is resumed immediately after the replacement has taken place, although there is normal allowance of five seconds to affect a change under international rules. A team taking longer than half a minute (if taken) will be charged a time out and penalised accordingly. If in a substitution more than half a minute is taken, the offending team is charged a time out. If in the current set, they have already had two time outs, they will lose a point of service. Qualifying heats will be of 10 minutes each way. The semi-final will be the best of three sets.

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WELLY WANGING Welly wanging is a sport open to all people irrespective of age, sex, race, creed, religion, nationality and colour and people from Lancashire. The sport shall be a civilised affair. Fair play, good humour and good manners shall be exhibited at all times. 1. Distances shall be measured in yards, feet and inches. None of this European nonsense. 2. The standard welly shall be the Dunlop green, size 9, non steel toe-cap. Competitors shall select whether they use left or right welly. 3. No tampering with the welly shall be allowed. Factory finish only. No silicone polish is to be applied. 4. A maximum run-up of 42 paces shall be allowed. This distance was chosen in memory of Douglas Adams, himself a proponent of the sport. 5. The run-up shall end with a straight line of 10 feet in length, that being the width of a standard Yorkshire gate. 6. The welly shall land within the area defined by the straight lines between the Upperthong Gala field and Holme Moss television mast on one side, and on the other by the line between the field and Longley Farm windmill. This playing area is known as the ‘Thong’. 7. There shall be four categories: Men’s and Women’s, and Boys and Girls (u-14’s). 8. The welly shall be projected using any action of the arm or foot for the respective categories. 9. The use of wind assistance is allowed and, indeed, encouraged. Waiting for a suitable gust, however, is limited to one minute. No artificial or man-made wind is to be used. 27

rules  

sports rules for 2013 rally

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