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JUNE 2010

DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN PRODUCED FOR EAST HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL


An introduction to the masterplan from Cllr David Parkinson, Chairman of the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive Group This masterplan represents the culmination of 18 months dedicated work by AECOM, its sub-consultants, councillors and officers of East Hampshire District Council, Whitehill Town Council, Hampshire County Council and our partners. We are grateful for the input made by the public and the local community in developing the draft masterplan. The masterplan is accompanied by a series of sub-reports which provide copious analysis of all the key issues which will be required to deliver a successful green town. This work can only be a snapshot of the current situation. Now is your opportunity to comment on the masterplan at this stage. During this next year the masterplan will become a robust framework against which planning applications can be tested into the future. More work still needs to be done to clarify the number of houses and new jobs as well as identifying all the new facilities and infrastructure needed for the community. Further studies will include: 1) Transportation studies

2) Biodiversity A series of further studies are required particularly to support the Habitats Regulations Assesment (HRA) process. In particular these include: • Pollution • Further screening work • Impacts of different zero carbon energy strategies • Green (and Blue) Infrastructure Strategy 3) Infrastructure Other areas of work will need to establish an Energy Strategy, Waste Strategy, a full Water Cycle Study and an Education and Health Strategy. Further work will also be required to drill down into more exact spatial needs for the new town centre, commercial, retail, leisure, public open space and sports facilities. 4) Viability Further viability work will continue over the coming year. 5) Economic Development Strategy Job numbers will depend upon housing numbers. The amount of land required for jobs is also dependent upon the sort of jobs that we can attract to the town. This is one of the most important parts of the project and in our current economic climate one of the most challenging. This year work will be done to establish an Economic Development Strategy for the town and to link that with the safeguarding of employment land.

The masterplan looks principally at traffic within the Ecotown boundaries, this work is supported by a transportation assessment completed by consultants WSP in 2008. Hampshire County Council is in the process of commissioning 6) Delivery and Implementation further transportation work which will (among other things) provide more detail on the following issues: One of the next phases of work will be about how the project will be delivered. The delivery mechanisms will be an a. Traffic impact on all roads within and around the Ecoimportant feature of future work. town and surrounding villages. b. Pollution impact in particular next to the Special Protection 7) Demonstration Projects Areas (SPAs) c. Any mitigation measures that must be initiated to resolve A series of mixed-use sites are recommended to be brought a) or b). forward for development in accordance with our funding d. The business case and further feasibility work for a rail/ agreement with the Department of Communities and Local rapid transit link. Government. These demonstration sites include Viking Park, Quebec Barracks, High Street, Moorlands and Bordon Working Men’s Club.

Independent feasibility studies will be carried out on all the possible future uses of these sites. As part of the feasibility studies everyone will have the opportunity to have their say on these sites. The pilot schemes will allow us to test ecodevelopment and viability as well as demonstrating our commitment to the best quality, exemplary schemes. The conversion of the Ministry Of Defence Fire Station into a community building, the Eco Station and the first demonstration house are at planning stage.

Programme of future work The masterplan and the further work we do over the coming years is all evidence which will influence the core strategy which East Hampshire District Council, the local planning authority, is preparing. The draft masterplan and any further iteration will remain a non-statutory document. But it will be taken into consideration when planning decisions are made and it will be updated alongside other documents. When the core strategy is updated the masterplan will also be updated and this will then become a supplementary planning document and will therefore become a policy document. It will still be capable of modification as the development progresses over the next 25 years. The Department for Communities and Local Government and the Homes and Communities Agency are now formally part of our partnership. We are pleased that the new government has re-committed to continuing support for the first four Eco-towns. It has given its commitment, which the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive Group fully endorses, that no development will go ahead without it going through the full planning application process.

Cllr David Parkinson Chairman of the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive Group June 2010


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O C Whitehill Bordon illustrative masterplan

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WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

The AECOM consultancy team would like to thank all those involved in the development of the masterplan to date including:

• The partners and members of the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive Group

This report should be read in conjunction with the following supporting technical documents:

• East Hampshire, County Council and Parish Councillors

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• Local residents, technical stakeholders, businesses and all those who have attended events and given their comments, ideas and feedback

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• Policy Advisory Group members, chairs, invited guests and administrator

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Produced by AECOM sub-consultancy team, February 2010: • Transport Strategy, Alan Baxter Associates

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• Bordon Area Action Group

• East Hampshire District Council and County Council officers • External consultants to EHDC including UE Associates, Halcrow, SQW Consulting and Bioregional.

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This report was produced by AECOM Design + Planning in March 2010 in collaboration with our team of sub-consultants: Kevin Murray Associates, AECOM Building Engineering, Alan Baxter and Associates and Zedfactory Ltd.

• Consultation summary and event reports, Kevin Murray Associates

Produced for East Hampshire District Council • Whitehill Bordon Economic Potentials Study, SQW Consulting, 2009 • Whitehill Bordon Baseline Report, GVA Grimley 2008 • Outline water cycle study, Halcrow Group, 2009 • Appropriate Assessment for the Draft Masterplan, UE Associates, 2009 • Visitors Survey, UE Associates, 2009 • Modelling of carbon and ecological footprint reductions in East Hampshire, Bioregional 2009 • Town centres, retail and leisure study, Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners Ltd, 2007

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Executive summary


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AECOM JUNE 2010

Executive summary i.

The town of Whitehill Bordon in

attractive landscape setting of heath lands, river corridors and woodlands which are highly valued by the town’s residents. It is located on the doorstep of the new South Downs National Park, adjacent to the protected European habitats of Woolmer Forest, Shortheath Common, Kingsley Common and Broxhead Common. The Parish of Whitehill is the only location in the British Isles to support all 12 native species of reptiles and amphibians. ii. The town grew in a piecemeal fashion around the military facility of Bordon Garrison and lacks a traditional town centre and a civic focus.The Ministry of Defence plan to leave the town from 2014 releasing around 230 hectares of former training land and barracks. This provides a major opportunity for growth, which town’s purpose and function emphasising the need to maintain the high quality environment that is the town’s unique asset. iii. To plan for the future, the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Group has been working in this process was the production of the

‘Green Town Vision’ in 2006. Since then, a masterplan (explained in this report) has been commissioned to put meat on the bones of the Green Town Vision and explore where, how, when and what can be developed. iv. Given the world class quality of life and environment on offer in Hampshire, it was clear that an exemplary plan was needed to The government’s Eco-town initiative was seen as a way of delivering this aspiration with its emphasis on creating sustainable settlements with reduced impacts on the local and global environment. In July 2009, Whitehill Bordon was selected as one of four projects in the UK to pilot the Eco-towns

funding was announced with Whitehill Bordon securing £10.69 million from Communities and Local Government and up to £500,000 from the Department for Energy and Climate Change funding a range of early projects and more detailed planning.

Purpose of this document v. This is the first masterplan for the Eco-town. It proposes a strategic framework showing how growth and change could occur in Whitehill Bordon in the next 20-25 years. It presents an overall vision for the physical, social and economic and environmental improvement of the town to ensure that development takes place in a considered manner to deliver community benefits for the town as a whole. It shows how the aspiration of the Green Town Vision and the requirements of PPS1 can be realised. It tests the development targets within the South East Plan for 5500 new homes at Whitehill Bordon and supports the work of EHDC in preparing their Core Strategy. vi. It is the starting point for a wide range of more detailed studies culminating in planning applications for development over the coming years. The masterplan sits alongside and is informed by detailed technical studies covering transport, community engagement, water, waste, energy, town centres, habitats regulation assessment and economic potential.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Sustainable community development

xi.

vii. The PPS1 supplement on Eco-towns1 requires that Eco-towns as a whole are zero carbon. This means that over a year the net carbon dioxide emissions from all energy use within the buildings in the Eco-town development are zero or below. Whitehill Bordon’s Green Town Vision2 set out an aspiration for the whole town to be carbon neutral by 2036.

• Stage 1 October – December 2008 Scene setting and orientation - to input issues, themes and opportunities for the area

viii. The growth of Whitehill Bordon presents a great opportunity. Through the masterplanning we can design for renewable energy and put in place suitable infrastructure to enable people to live more sustainably. Our consultation has shown that people care about the environment and we hope that with good physical provision of facilities for recycling waste, reducing energy use and improving transport choice people’s behaviour will shift, encouraging more environmentally conscious decision making. ix. The masterplan shows how measures can be integrated into the design of new neighbourhoods and retrofitted into older areas to make it easier for the town’s residents to mitigate and adapt to changing climate.

Working with the community x. The development of a framework masterplan to guide the co-ordination of proposals for future development in Whitehill Bordon was undertaken in tandem with a series of dialogues with local community and stakeholders. The intention of the process was that both the masterplan team and community would be able to learn from each other, progressively improving their combined knowledge and understanding of the issues. 1 2

The key stages of consultation were:

• Stage 2 April 2009 Masterplan Choices -to review the emerging approaches, Big Ideas and options • Stage 3 November 2009 Presentation of the draft masterplan - to present and discuss the emerging preferred plan xii. The engagement process in masterplanning Whitehill Bordon has been intensive, progressive and demanding on all parties. The process itself has been generally welcomed and often supported and genuinely informed the design and prospective outcomes in several areas and themes – which would have been materially different or absent without such engagement. The process has engaged and informed many people and bodies about the potential future role and opportunities of the area. Many are behind positive change. However, not all are fully supportive of either the concept or all the detail, and may not become so. The process of community engagement will continue as more detailed plans are prepared. Chapter 4 contains details of the consultation findings.

Photo: Identifying blue corridors using a site model, consultation events, November 2008

Planning Policy Statement: Eco-towns - A supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1, Communities and Local Government, July 2009 A green community vision – Whitehill Bordon EcoTown, Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Group, August 2008 update

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Illustrative artist’s impression for the Green Streets neighbourhood character


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Overall vision – ‘One Green Town’ xiii. The overarching objective for Whitehill Bordon must be to deliver ‘One Green Town’ – a place where the quality of life, opportunity and environment are raised for both existing and new residents to the town. The challenges of adapting to climate change and the need for one planet living apply equally to those living in older homes as well as new homes. Whitehill Bordon has the opportunity to show what is possible in both contexts and be an exemplar for existing towns and areas experiencing growth across the country. xiv. The masterplan seeks to deliver on a range of policy targets, community priorities, aspirations and viability considerations. These are not always without conflict, and the masterplan aims to provide a solution which balances the targets to create a well-rounded development framework. xv. An important consideration has been the protection of nearby Special Protection Areas and Special Areas of Conservation. The Habitats Regulations have a requirement that no harm should come to these sites as a result of the development. Due to the proximity of Whitehill Bordon to Broxhead Common, Kingsley Common, Woolmer Forest and Shortheath Common, a Habitat Regulations Assessment (HRA) has been undertaken by UE Associates for EHDC in parallel with the development of the masterplan to assess potential impacts and determine the appropriate mitigation measures. AECOM have worked closely with UE Associates, Natural England and other stakeholders to ensure that appropriate mitigation measures are in place within the masterplan to avoid negative impacts on the SPAs

and SACs. UE Associates have acted as a ‘critical friend’ to the masterplanning team to help shape the development proposals. xvi. Other key priorities which have been addressed by the masterplan include the need to:• provide land for employment growth to secure a new role for the town when the MoD leave • provide housing to meet South East Plan and Ecotown PPS growth targets • retain green spaces within the town including Hogmoor Inclosure and Standford Grange • meet Eco-town PPS and Green Town Vision sustainability targets • provide a new town centre, community facilities and sports pitches to make up for existing shortfalls (the top priorities emerging from public consultation) • create a public transport system that will offer a real alternative to car travel • avoid traffic impact in the town and on nearby villages • create a commercially viable scheme that can be delivered • and importantly, to create a place where people enjoy a high quality of life and a cohesive community.

Masterplan Proposals xvii. In summary the masterplan proposes: • A new mixed use town centre with around 30,000 sqm of retail and a range of supporting uses,

• Up to three new primary schools and early years centres and a new children’s centre • Re-building of Mill Chase Community Technology College on a new site with room for later expansion • Skills training and further education facilities • Sites for new commercial leisure facilities • Around 4000 new homes within identified new residential neighbourhoods and the town centre built to a zero carbon standard • A public sports hub with leisure centre and pitches, • Local healthcare and emergency services • Around 70,000 sqm Eco-business park floorspace and opportunities across the masterplan for the creation of at least 5500 new jobs • Around 127 hectares of new public greenspaces which provide Suitable Accessible Natural Greenspace (SANGS) to mitigate against human impacts on nearby European protected habitats • A central public transport hub and modern public transport systems including a safeguarded rail corridor • Retrofitting of existing homes and businesses to improve energy and water efficiency and reduce utilities bills • A biomass powered combined heat and power plant (CHP) expanded recycling centre and community ‘swapshop’

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Great places to live xviii. The aim of the masterplan is to create high quality neighbourhoods that are enjoyable to live in, with a strong sense of community and distinctive character rooted in the landscape setting. A wide range of housing types, styles and tenures are envisaged to increase housing choice in the area and provide opportunities for local people to stay within the town whatever their housing need. xix. All residents of the town will have the opportunity to live in a new or refurbished eco-home. Alongside the Eco-town standards of high energy and water efficiency that will be required for all new properties, the masterplan proposes that arrangements are made and funding set aside for existing owners and occupiers to retrofit their homes to improve their performance. EHDC has already been successful in securing ÂŁ900,000 from the Department of Energy and Climate Change to start this process immediately. xx. Capacity testing has indicated that the site has the potential to accommodate around 4000 new units within the former MoD land. A range of flexible density bands are proposed ranging from 20-30dph in wooded outer areas, to 40-55dph in central neighbourhoods and 50-70dph in and around the town centre delivering around 70% houses to 30% flats overall and 35% affordable housing.

Framework masterplan proposals plan Key (striped areas indicate a mix of uses) Mixed use town centre core Employment Community and education Commercial leisure Residential character areas: - Green roots - Green streets - Green views Buildings for potential retentionwithin development areas Existing built up areas Strategic public transport corridor

A variety of housing areas containing a range of housing types and styles. Based on average densities around 4000 new homes would be built in these areas. Town centre locations for office developments, leisure or cultural uses

Public transport hub - connecting with local bus routes Disused rail corridor safeguarded for potential future use Green infrastructure: - Green loop town wide recreation routes - Natural and informal open space, parks and recreation areas - Sports - School pitches

A new town centre with shopping for clothes and shoes (comparison shopping) as well as food shops and markets. Potential for a new hotel in the Sergeants’ Mess.

- Wildlife corridors - Indicative locations for allotments - Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation - 400m buffer to SPA / SAC - South Downs National Park boundary Core strategy, emerging policy boundaries, correct at November 2009: - Existing development boundary - Extended development boundary - Eco-town Policy Zone

xxi. A Habitats Regulations Assessment assessed the potential impact of 5,300 homes in the area and a series of measures including SANGs and a buffer zone were proposed. In response to the HRA, EHDC have proposed an upper cap of 5,300 units. They are currently commissioning further studies that will inform this work.

Executive eco-homes homes built to lower than normal densities within the existing wooded landscape around B.O.S.C.

Employment and leisure uses at Viking Park with some new homes fronting the High Street


Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

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A range of employment locations to replace the 1500 jobs lost when the MoD leave and provide at least one new job per new home

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Existing and new greenspaces connected by the Green Loop footpath and cycle route

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xxii. Three broad residential character areas are defined ‘Green Roots, Green Streets and Green Views’ to illustrate that a wide range of typologies and styles could be brought forward. Early demonstration projects, architectural competitions and design codes will test the appropriate densities and layouts in detail, drawing on local character studies.

Supporting the Community Town Centre: A central heart xxiii. Located centrally to the existing and proposed neighbourhoods, the new mixed use town centre provides an opportunity for phased growth linked to the local shops at Chalet Hill. The potential to create a new east-west connection into MoD land at the Chalet Hill / A325 corner is being explored seeking to connect the existing landmark building at Frisby’s Corner, via new retail streets into a public square outside the former Sergeant’s Mess and towards the retained Sandhurst Block. These buildings are of good architectural quality and have the potential for retention and conversion to tourism, residential or commercial uses. We believe that the integration and reuse of key existing buildings is a sustainable approach which will promote a sense of identity linked to the military heritage of the town. A wooded town park and mixed use street links the town centre core to a new entrance to Hogmoor Inclosure and the possible location for a future rail station. xxiv. The town centre could include around 30,000sqm of retail, and arts and community spaces, skills training and further education, commercial leisure, around 580 residential units, and a central public transport hub on the High Street. The Forest Centre could retain a secondary local centre/community function as part of

a mixed use redevelopment scheme in the longer term and it is envisaged some retail uses will be relocated to the new town centre.

Education xxv. Three indicative locations are provided for new primary schools serving the proposed neighbourhoods which would be developed in line with population growth. These locations have been informed by the principle of a ‘walkable’ community with school locations relating to a residential catchment of within 5-10 minutes’ walk. The locations are linked into the green space network and would form local community hubs in conjunction with other local community facilities, local businesses or shared school facilities. It is aspects like this which we believe will help to foster a lifestyle choice for future residents and help to promote the Green Town Vision. xxvi. It is proposed that the existing Mill Chase Technology College is rebuilt on a new site under the Building Schools for the Future programme with later expansion in line with population growth. Two locations are being considered in more detail by Hampshire County Council: Budds Lane and Mill Chase Road.

Commercial leisure xxvii. Flexibility for commercial leisure development is provided in space at the edge of the town centre and at Viking Park mixed with employment uses.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Sports and leisure

Green spaces

xxviii. A new leisure centre and pitches forming a ‘sports hub’ are proposed to occupy land at either Budds Lane or Mill Chase Road. Existing/derelict facilities at Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club and Whitehill Club would be improved. Informal sports areas would be provided within the neighbourhoods to encourage healthy lifestyles.

xxx. The green infrastructure strategy seeks to balance the needs of people and wildlife through the creation of new green space and integration of existing green space. This equates to around 175 ha of accessible public parks, natural areas and sports pitches which strengthen the existing landscape structure and character of the town. In addition, within the neighbourhoods an allowance has been made for the provision of smaller parks, private gardens, play areas, green roofs and walls and wetland areas.

xxix. In summary the masterplan proposes the following community facilities to support new and existing residential neighbourhoods in addition to the existing facilities in the town such as the Phoenix Theatre. Further details are provided in Chapter 7: • Mixed use town centre including civic, commercial, arts and culture, retail, housing, services, public squares etc (approximately 16 ha) • New secondary school (1800-2000 pupils) • Sixth form • Skills training centre • 3 primary schools and pre-schools forming local community hubs • Children’s centre • Primary care centre (5 GPs, 4 dentists) • Sports hub and renovation of B.O.S.C and Whitehill Club • Land for commercial leisure uses (2.5 ha)

xxxi. Together these elements create a hierarchy of open spaces which can provide a variety of functions to meet the needs of the community. These spaces are strategically connected to each other; help to provide high quality links between key destinations; act as a focus for activities and create a setting for the development which will help to reinforce its character and establish a sense of place. xxxii. Key elements include:• Green loop – a circular network of footpaths and cycle ways ringing the town, linking the parks, sports facilities, schools and town centre with new and existing neighbourhoods. • Wildlife corridors – a mosaic of restored heath land, wetland and woodland habitats to the east and west of the town. • Blue corridors – new and restored watercourses, pools, swales and wetlands as part of the sustainable drainage system and habitat gain. Photo: Broxhead Common heathland

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Illustrative artist’s impression of the proposed new market square outside the retained Sandhurst Block at Prince Philip Barracks


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

xxxiii. This includes the provision of around 127 hectares of Suitable Accessible Natural Green Space (SANGS) mitigation land, and a 400m no-residential buffer to SPA/SAC as a result of the HRA process. This level of provision is designed to mitigate against impacts arising from a development of up to 5300 homes. The location and character of the SANGS

Transport and connections

spaces are detailed in Chapter 8.

xxxvii. The aim of the transport strategy is to:

A new economic role

• establish sustainable patterns of movement to and within the town

xxxiv. In total around 5500 new jobs are envisaged from new commercial developments, town centre uses, public sector and home working. Around 70,000sqm of new employment floorspace is proposed in four core locations: Louisburg Barracks to the north (where residential development is inappropriate due to the proximity to the SPAs/SACs); Quebec barracks on the existing A325; Viking Park to the south and the town centre edge. These locations benefit from good peripheral access routes and proximity to public transport routes as well as short cycle and walking distances from existing and future communities. xxxv. In addition, existing MoD buildings will be reused in the short to medium term for cheap, flexible employment space. xxxvi. A variety of employment typologies will be developed focused around four potential future economic roles: • Sustainable development and green industries, linked to Eco-town status, • Innovation and technology linked to the Blackwater Valley,

• Tourism and leisure at the gateway to the newly designated South Downs National Park, and

• High quality bus routes serving three levels of passenger usage: strategic – local - town wide

Technical skills linked to the engineering excellence of

• A safe guarded rail corridor for future development, and an indicative station location close to the town centre

the MoD.

• minimise use of the private car through the provision of appropriate, appealing and realistic alternatives. xxxviii. Proposals which are detailed in chapter 10 include: • Public transport spine along the High Street (existing A325), with pedestrian priority area in town centre. This is an important move to reinforce integration between the existing and proposed extension to the town. • A central hub in the town centre, where all local bus services interconnect and information is provided on a range of sustainable travel options • A new through street connecting the development sites will become the primary vehicular route taking traffic off the existing High Street route. • ‘Green Loop and Grid’ for pedestrians and cyclists connecting all residential areas to key facilities • Overall 50% parking reduction to existing EHDC standards phased to suit development coming forward • Car free zone within heart of town centre, where no parking will be permitted (disabled and servicing vehicle access only)

• A network of clear and direct cycle routes connecting Whitehill Bordon with surrounding towns, villages and stations • Traffic management strategy for surrounding villages (being informed by traffic modelling work being carried out by Hampshire County Council)

Making it easy to go green: sustainable infrastructure xxxix. The masterplan so far has been developed giving due consideration to the stringent targets and aspirations set by the Eco-towns PPS and Green Town Vision to ensure that Whitehill Bordon will be a truly sustainable town. New buildings will be developed to have zero carbon emissions thanks to an energy efficient fabric, connection to a biomass combined heat and power distribution network and the inclusion of building mounted renewable energy technologies such as solar panels for electricity generation. The emissions from existing buildings will also be reduced by introducing a wide range of energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy retrofitting. Water consumption will be minimised by the specification of low water use sanitary ware and the use of greywater recycling systems. The aim is to reduce waste generation via educational campaigns and responsible construction site management. Organic waste will be treated as close to site as possible via composting and possibly anaerobic digestion, recyclable materials will be recycled through the Alton MRF and residual

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waste will be used for energy generation. Finally, the masterplan has been designed to be resilient to flooding an climate change induced overheating via sustainable drainage systems and the integration of large permeable areas throughout the site. Further details are given in Chapter 11.

Implementation and delivery xl. To date, the masterplan proposals for Whitehill Bordon have been advanced by a public sector led consortium involving East Hampshire District Council, Hampshire County Council, the Ministry of Defence and the HCA. Besides the MoD, the County Council also has significant land holdings within the masterplan area. East Hampshire District Council also has a small landholding. xli. Four phases of delivery are proposed (Chapter 12 provides details): a. Phase 1: Up until MoD withdrawal (assumed to be 2015) Post MoD withdrawal up to 2026 b.

Phase 2: 2015-2019

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Phase 3: 2020-2024

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Phase 4: 2025 onwards

xlii. A preliminary financial assessment of the masterplan undertaken by GVA Grimley in 2009 (assuming around 4000 dwellings, a new town centre and a range of supporting activities encompassing retail, commercial and employment uses in line with the final masterplan) has indicated that the scheme

achieves a positive financial position with the following baseline level of public funding support: • An Affordable Housing Grant (AHG) provided by the HCA to deliver the affordable housing element • Funding for a six form of entry secondary school (reprovision of the existing Mill Chase school) from DfES/Building Schools for the Future funding • The cost of retro-fitting existing homes to PassivHaus standards (where possible) from other public sector funding sources (so excluded from the current financial analysis). xliii. Adopting the above assumptions, the development appraisal of the masterplan scenario shows a positive Net Present Value (NPV) or residual land value in the order of £32m. This figure assumes current day estimates of both cost and values. Whilst no allowance has been made for inflation, the baseline scenario now assumes a 1% per annum uplift in residential sales values due to the increased attractiveness of Whitehill Bordon as a place to live, as the MoD vacate, a town centre is provided and the area becomes more attractive to potential purchasers. Further details are given in Chapter 12. xliv. One of the key early tasks in moving into the implementation phase is to establish the long term delivery mechanism and governance for the project through the Development Trust work stream. A key element of this work stream will be the presentation a more detailed Business Plan for the project. In parallel, following the funding decision from CLG, the continued scoping and implementation of the short term projects must continue to be advanced.

xlv. Over the next few years in taking the masterplan forward significant further detailed design and development work will be required, including: • Bringing forward a series of demonstration projects which will pilot some of the technologies, typologies and densities in order to establish the attractiveness and viability of development. These demonstration projects will also give the community further opportunities to test out the ideas and continue their input into the process. • The refinement of the masterplan content and phasing • Establishment of the delivery mechanism and public sector delivery partnership including further levels of business planning to refine the financial position of the masterplan • Development of design guidance to frame the masterplan, including further consideration of street, block and building typologies and densities, leading to the preparation of Design Codes • Capacity building including site visits to best practice housing examples with residents, Council officers and Councillors to encourage informed debate around densities and typologies. • Preparation of an inward investment strategy and complementary marketing and promotional strategy. • To compliment the above, the preparation of a detailed economic development plan for the town to bring about the anticipated levels of employment growth • Establishment of a business support network, including a business start up centre • Preparation of a detailed strategy (including funding) for the retrofitting of the existing properties


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

• Preparation of a detailed implementation plan to take the Eco-town energy strategy forward including a detailed carbon footprinting exercise to form the basis for later monitoring. • Ongoing ecological surveys, tree survey and preparation of a revised Biodiversity Action Plan and detailed Green Infrastructure Strategy. • Confirmation through the ongoing transport testing that the sub regional transportation impacts are acceptable as part of the evidence base for the Core Strategy. • Preparation of detailed feasibility studies and implementation strategies for the Modal Shift transport proposals, including LRT and heavy rail options • Preparation of and implementation of a progressive engagement programme. This should include a programme of public consultation activities to build on the momentum developed through the masterplan engagement process, particularly on how opponents can be engaged in a proactive debate.

Image: illustrative artist’s impression of natural green space (SANGS)

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contents:


PAGE

PART 1: BACKGROUND & CONTEXT

PAGE

1.

Introduction

23.

12. Implementation and Delivery

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2.

Whitehill Bordon Today

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13. Conclusions

207.

3.

The sustainability agenda

67.

4.

Working with the community

77.

PART 2: MASTERPLAN PROPOSALS 5.

The framework masterplan for Whitehill Bordon

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6.

Great places to live

99.

7.

Supporting the community

117.

8.

Green space

139.

9.

A new economic role

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10. Transport and Movement

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11. Making it easy to go green: outline strategies for energy, waste management, water and climate change adaptation

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PART 3: DELIVERY & CONCLUSIONS

APPENDICES A.

Housing quality standards

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B.

Population projections methodology

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C. Population statistics

225.

D. EHDC statement regarding the HRA

227.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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Part 1: background and context


1

Introduction


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

1.1 The town of Whitehill Bordon in Hampshire benefits from a unique, diverse and attractive landscape setting of heath lands, river corridors and woodlands which are highly valued by the town’s residents. It is located on the doorstep of the new South Downs National Park, adjacent to the protected European habitats of Woolmer Forest, Shortheath Common, Kingsley Common and Broxhead Common. The Parish of Whitehill is the only location in the British Isles to support all twelve native species of reptiles and amphibians. 1.2 The town grew in a piecemeal fashion around the military facility of Bordon Garrison and lacks a traditional town centre and a civic focus. The Ministry of Defence plan to leave the town from 2014 releasing around 230 hectares of former training land and barracks. This provides a major opportunity for growth, which must be supported by a redefinition of the town’s purpose and function emphasising the need to maintain the high quality environment that is the town’s unique asset. 1.3 To plan for the future, the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Group has been working closely with existing residents. The first step in this process was the production of the ‘Green Town Vision’ in 2006. Since then, a masterplan (explained in this report) has been commissioned to put meat on the bones of the Green Town Vision and explore where, how, when and what can be developed.

1.4 Given the world class quality of life and environment on offer in Hampshire, it was clear that an exemplary plan was needed to ensure Whitehill Bordon fulfils its potential. The government’s Eco-town initiative was seen as a way of delivering this aspiration with its emphasis on creating sustainable settlements with reduced impacts on the local and global environment. In July 2009, Whitehill Bordon was selected as one of four projects in the UK to pilot the Eco-towns approach, putting the town in line for significant funding. In February 2010 the first tranche of funding was announced with Whitehill Bordon securing £10.69 million from Communities and Local Government and £500,000 from the Department for Energy and Climate Change funding a range of early projects and more detailed planning. Figure 1.1 Whitehill Bordon was one of four projects to be designated as an ‘Eco-town’ by central government in July 2009.

23

Figure 1.1: Location of four CLG selected Eco-town projects Four Eco-town locations identified July 2009

Rackheath, Norfolk

NW Bicester, Oxfordshire LONDON

Whitehill Bordon, Hampshire St. Austell, Cornwall


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AECOM JUNE 2010

1.5 This framework masterplan for Whitehill Bordon represents the culmination of a sixteen month commission undertaken by AECOM Design + Planning alongside AECOM Building Engineering, Alan Baxter & Associates, Kevin Murray Associates, and Zedfactory Ltd, for East Hampshire District Council (EHDC) on behalf of the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive. 1.6 The Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive Group is a community partnership of local authorities, landowners and government agencies that are working together to plan and deliver the proposed growth. 1.7

Partners:-

• Whitehill Town Council (WTC) • Whitehill Town Partnership (WTP • East Hampshire District Council (EHDC) • Hampshire County Council (HCC) • Homes and Communities Agency (HCA) • MoD Defence Estates (MoD) • Natural England (NE) • South East England Development Agency (SEEDA) • Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG)

The opportunity 1.8 The project was generated by the MoD announcement of their intention to move from Bordon Garrison, releasing considerable development land.

1.9 Under the Defence Training Review the MoD, the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME), the School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering (SEME) and associated armed forces will be relocated to St Athan in Wales. The land vacated by the MoD will amount to around 230 hectares (570 acres). At the time of writing we anticipate that the majority of the land will become available for redevelopment from 2014 at the earliest. Other public sector land owned principally by HCC and EHDC amounts to a further 60 hectares. This large public sector land holding has been considered alongside privately owned development sites which could come forward within the masterplan timeframe to ensure a comprehensive strategy for the town as a whole. All in all the masterplan has considered the use of 310ha of land within the town. 1.10 MoD activity makes a considerable contribution to the economy of Whitehill Bordon. It provides a significant source of employment for local residents and forces personnel support local services, shops and businesses. The need to identify a strategy for regenerating the town’s economy following the departure of the MoD is a critical element of the masterplanning brief. Having a long term plan in place will ensure that change as a result of the MoD’s departure can be successfully managed through the phased delivery of new housing, community facilities and jobs. 1.11 The exact phasing of MoD withdrawal is as yet unclear, though we anticipate that it may take place over a short period. However development of the scale envisaged will take place up to 2026 (the end of the

EHDC Local Development Framework plan period) and could extend beyond that date. 1.12 The town currently lacks the quality and extent of facilities that might be expected for its size. Population growth will help drive the provision of new services, education, retail and community facilities within the town. Properly managed, this will bring real benefits to existing residents. 1.13 In the short term the impact of potential population and economic decline relating to the departure of the MoD will need careful management. 1.14 However the potential to use this vast area of brownfield land to develop a stronger town was viewed by much of the population of Whitehill Bordon as a positive opportunity and not simply a threat. The potential exists to use development and population growth to stimulate economic diversification, to improve and extend the conservation of natural environments and to develop new sustainable neighbourhoods in an exemplary way.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

The MoD currently occupy a significant proportion of the town’s built up area.

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AECOM JUNE 2010

Green Town Vision A Green Community Vision WHITEHILL BORDON ecotown

Update August 2008

Figure 1.2 The Green Town Vision, produced by EHDC, with the community

1.15 In response to the opportunity outlined above, East Hampshire District Council developed a Green Town Vision in 20063 with stakeholders and residents. This non-statutory document has provided the starting point and guiding principles for the masterplan and placed a strong emphasis on the quality of Whitehill Bordon’s natural environment and the need to safeguard this for future generations. It identified the need for a new town centre and new facilities to meet the needs of the existing residents as well as those arising from future population growth. The bottom-up approach of developing plans with the community has continued and been enhanced by the formation of Policy Advisory Groups of local residents, stakeholder and Councillors who have guided the masterplan’s development.

1.17 The objectives of the Government’s Eco-town initiative4 fit closely with the ethos of the Green Town Vision and were identified as a means of delivering the exemplary, high quality, sustainable development that the town aspires to. The EHDC bid to Communities and Local Government in September 20085 identified four areas in which Whitehill Bordon would seek to excel:

1.16 Key elements of the Green Town Vision

• biodiversity

• Encouraging the community to live and work in ways that respect the natural resources on which our society and economy depend

• water neutrality

• Environmental conservation • Creating an attractive built environment with a balanced mix of housing, community facilities, commercial and employment opportunities where people want to live, work, shop and play. • Creating a thriving, sustainable community with a distinct character that will give Whitehill Bordon a unique identity within Hampshire and the South East

Green Town Vision: Update, August 2008, East Hampshire District Council For information on the background to the eco-town initiative visit http://ecotownsyoursay.direct.gov.uk/ 5 Eco-town Revised Bid, Whitehill-Bordon Opportunity Eco-town, East Hampshire District Council, September 2008 3 4

• Improving the built environment in the town so that it complements the superb and diverse landscape surrounding the town • Using innovative, modern, environmentally friendly design including eco-homes and modern methods of construction. • Working in consultation with the community and in partnership with stakeholders

• carbon neutrality • transportation 1.18 The masterplan carries this forward and provides an innovative framework for Whitehill Bordon to become an international exemplar of sustainable community development for the 21st century.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Policy Context National Policy Eco-town PPS 1.19 In July 2009 Whitehill Bordon was granted Ecotown status and as such falls under the national policy guidance and targets of Planning Policy Statement: Eco-towns6, a supplement to PPS1 Delivering Sustainable Development. 1.20 The UK government has set itself a highly ambitious target of an 80% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 against 1990 levels7. Carbon emissions are the major cause of climate change, and the Government is very aware of the potential for CO2 savings that can be achieved in new building and urban development. 1.21 An important part of the masterplan brief is to test the deliverability of the national Eco-towns targets set by government and to resolve any variances between these and the Whitehill Bordon Green Town Vision. This report also makes further recommendations of additional targets where we see the potential to build on specific local opportunities. 1.22 Chapter 3 contains further details of the background to the sustainability agenda while Chapter 13 provides a summary of the Green Town Vision and PPS targets and the way in which the masterplan has responded to them. In addition to the Eco-towns PPS, the development will be required to show consistency with other national planning policies and

guidance including PPS3: Housing, PPG17: Planning for Open space, Sport and Recreation, Planning Policy Statement 9: Biodiversity and Geological Conservation8. Details of all PPS and PPG guidance is available from www.communities.gov.uk

Regional Policy Regional Spatial Strategy: The South East Plan 1.23 The South East Plan published in May 2009 identifies Whitehill Bordon as a new strategic development area in Policy AOSR3. Policies in the RSS run to 2026 ‘POLICY AOSR3: THE WHITEHILL/BORDON OPPORTUNITY Local development documents for East Hampshire District will allocate land and set out planning objectives for a new strategic development area at Whitehill/ Bordon. This will include provision for the delivery of up to 5,500 dwellings (net), in accordance with Policy H1.

iv. new development should contribute to improved town centre facilities and services v. improved access to town centre facilities, including increased modal shift from private cars to other forms of transport. The housing provision figure for this site is based on ongoing work including a water cycle study to assess and manage the integrated water environment and Habitats Regulations Assessment work, and should be regarded as an indicative figure. Should additional constraints or opportunities become apparent then a different scale of development should be identified and pursued through the local development framework. In the event that the site cannot be released for the delivery of up to 5,500 dwellings, there is no expectation that equivalent land elsewhere in East Hampshire District will be allocated to meet the overall district figure set out in Policy H1.’9

Objectives should include: i. a mix of housing types and tenures should be provided to help promote a balanced and sustainable community ii. new employment opportunities should be provided to support the local community iii. new green infrastructure to support local biodiversity and promote recreational opportunities

Planning Policy Statement: Eco-towns - A supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1, Communities and Local Government, July 2009 The Climate Change Act, 2008 8 PPS3: Housing, CLG, 2006; PPG17: Planning for Open space, Sport and Recreation, CLG, 2002; Planning Policy Statement 9: Biodiversity and Geological Conservation, CLG, 2005. 9 Page 278, The South East Plan - Regional Spatial Strategy for the South East, Government Office for the South East, May 2009 6 7

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Figure 1.3 Confirmed boundary of the South Downs National Park (source: www.southdowns.gov.uk)

ALTON

BOGNOR REGIS

Brighton & Hove UA

Saltdean

BRIGHTON Rottingdean A259 Peacehaven

A27

ckm e Riv re er

Hove

Denton Alfriston

Cu

A286

6

LEWES A27

Newhaven Seaford

EAST SUSSEX A259

East Dean

2

LITTLEHAMPTON

GOSPORT

WORTHING

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A2

A259

Barnham

0

Ringmer

3

CHICHESTER

Fulking

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A27

FAREHAM

PORTSMOUTH

Findon

Hassocks Ditchling

A28

Havant

80

A2

Arundel

Steyning R.Adur

run

WEST SUSSEX

over 800ft (over 244m) A2

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Storrington

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Hurstpierpoint Henfield

9 A2

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HORNDEAN

East A28 Dean

Burgess Hill

Pulborough

3

5

Singleton

400-600ft (122-183m)

A28

Duncton

A284

Wickham

A272

Petworth

MIDHURST South Harting

Clanfield

Shirrell Heath

A272

ther

0-200ft (0-61m) 200-400ft (61-122m)

A275

Bishop’s Waltham

2

R.Ro

A3

Eastleigh Bishopstoke

Meonstoke R.Meon

Upham

PETERSFIELD

Wisborough Green

A27

se

Colden Common West Meon

Settlement

A2 6

Milland

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83

HAMPSHIRE

A Road

Fernhurst

A2

R.Ou

West Tisted

Twyford

SOUTHAMPTON

Motorway Northchapel

Liphook

Liss

A273

A31

County/Unitary boundary

A3

7

Monkwood

Confirmed boundary of the South Downs National Park

SURREY

Haslemere

A20 3

Upper Farringdon

3

90

Bordon

1

A3

A325

Itchen Abbas

WINCHESTER A30

Four Marks

New Alresford

A34

South Downs National Park

Binsted

A2

1.27 The final number of houses will be decided by balancing the environmental impact of development, with the need to provide a range of facilities and open space as well as housing and employment uses, the viability of development and the most appropriate density and mix of residential development for each location.

‘The South Downs National Park is over 1,600 km.sq. and stretches 100 miles from the edge of Winchester to Beachy Head. The Park’s geology combines the greensands and clays of the Weald with the chalk of the Downlands. This geology provides the foundation for large tracts of internationally important ancient woodlands, open heath land and the famous rolling downlands that lead to the iconic, sheer cliffs at Seven Sisters and Beachy Head.’11

1.28 Whitehill Bordon is located on the boundary edge of the recently designated South Downs National Park, which was established in March 2010 and will impact on the way in which planning decisions in the town’s hinterland will be made in the future. It also presents opportunities for Whitehill Bordon to provide supporting facilities and attract tourist and visitors. Figure 1.3 illustrates the location of the National Park.

M

1.26 As a minimum 4000 homes will be supported by around 5500 new jobs. This relationship between homes and jobs relates to the need to re-provide jobs lost through the MoD’s departure, to generate a new economy for the town and to reduce commuting . Economic growth is discussed in detail in Chapter 9.

South Downs National Park

hen

1.25 A key element of the masterplanning process has been to test the capacity of the site using this policy as a starting point. This plan has identified capacity for approximately 4000 new homes principally located on MoD surplus land. However, we recognise that by including sites in the remainder of the town and planning for potential windfall sites during the Local Development Framework plan period that this figure may rise to a maximum of 5300 new homes, this figure was assessed as part of a Habitats Regulations Assessment.

R.Itc

28

EASTBOURNE Beachy Head

FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY

11

Quotes and details of operational arrangements taken from www.southdowns.gov.uk

Based upon Ordnance Survey material on behalf of HMSO. c Crown copyright and database right 2009. All rights reserved. Natural England OS licence number 100022021


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

1.29 The South Downs National Park Authority will become the planning authority within the National Park boundary, although aspects of this may be delegated to established local planning authorities. The details of this are yet to be agreed.

‘The South Downs National Park Authority will be a centrally-funded, public body run by a Board of 27 Members. The Authority will be able to make planning decisions and develop new projects & partnership programmes that promote the purposes of the South Downs National Park, which are: 1. To conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the area 2. To promote opportunities for the understanding and

Local Policy

EHDC Emerging Core Strategy

Local Plan

1.32 The masterplanning process is running concurrently with the development of EHDC Local Development Framework and has been informed by the emerging Core Strategy. The masterplan forms a component of the evidence base for the Core Strategy Preferred Policies document14 which underwent statutory consultation during November 2009 – January 2010.

1.31 The East Hampshire District Local Plan: Second Review 13 was adopted in March 2006. Most of the policies of this plan have been saved until such time as they are replaced by new Local Development Framework policies and proposals. The saved policies of the East Hampshire District Council Local Plan (Policies MOD1 and MOD2), promote the principle of the reuse and redevelopment of former military areas and recognise the opportunity for redevelopment at Whitehill Bordon to create a more sustainable community, providing a range of new employment, retail, community and leisure facilities as well as housing.

enjoyment of the Park’s special qualities by the public.’ 12 1.30 A Shadow Authority will be in operation from 1st April 2010 until the Full Authority (with Local Planning Authority Powers) comes into being on the 1st April 2011.

Quotes and details of operational arrangements taken from www.southdowns.gov.uk East Hampshire Local Plan, Second Review, East Hampshire District Council, March 2006 14 East Hampshire Core Strategy Preferred Policies Document, East Hampshire District Council, November 2009 12 13

1.33 Draft policies relating to the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity are covered in chapter 6 of the preferred policies document. Within this chapter the draft proposals map for Whitehill Bordon (Policy WH1 - Eco-town Policy Zone) identifies a development boundary for Whitehill Bordon and an Eco-town Policy Zone extending beyond the proposed development boundaries within which the Eco-town policies apply. This is shown in figure 1.4. 1.34 It is anticipated that the Core Strategy will undergo Examination in Public in 2011 and be adopted as a statutory plan within EHDC’s Local Development Framework in 2012. Policies in the Core Strategy will run until 2026.

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Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

FARNHA M ROAD

Shortheath Common SAC / SSSI

LIN DF OR

D ROAD

B.O.S.C. primary school S TA

B ordon Trading Estate

T ION

Bordon Park

D ROA

Lindford

OK AD RO

Bordon Infant & Junior School

River Wey

BU

DD

S

LA

NE

Alexandra Park

Weyford Infant & Junior School MILL

CH AS

RR OAD

De

Existing retail zone

LY W A TE H OL

Cemy

Forest Centre

Standford Grange Country Park

Chase Community Hospital C ON DE W AY

ND F O

Eveley Wood

M OO

S TA

H OG AD R RO

Existing development boundary

YB RO OK

Tesco

Hogmoor Park

Direction of retail extension

LL

FOREST ROAD

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H IG

Woolmer Trading Estate

O

PARK

Figure 1.4 EHDC Core Strategy Preferred Policies inset proposals map for Whitehill Bordon, November 2009

H ST

RE E T

H

Extended development boundary

LANE

HILL

ter wa

LE T

ad

C HA

Hollywater Primary School

AD

STA NDFORD

primary school

E RO

RD LAN E

children’s centre

HO

primary school

L IP

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OAKHA NGER ROAD

HOGMOOR ROA D

Standford W HITE

AD HILL RO

Local shops

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FIRGRO VE RO AD

FO RE ST

Publicly accessible green spaces

RO AD

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Primary schools / local centre LIP H O

N OW

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AD RO

OK RO AD

R OA D

Employment

ER S F

IE LD

Short-term Employment Buffer zones to SPA/SAC Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation

Woodlea Primary School

LLD WA

P ET

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Woolmer Forest SPA / SSSI

Whitehill Clubl

Woolmer Forest SAC

N

Eco-town Policy Zone

Alternative Education/Leisure Zones

Existing Retail Zone

Primary Schools/ Local Centre

Direction of Retail Extension

Employment

Existing Development Boundary

Short-term Employment

Extended Development Boundary

Buffer Zones to SPA/SAC

Whitehill Bordon Eco-town Policy Zone


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Masterplan brief and methodology 1.35 The initial brief to the appointed masterplan team in August 2008 was to develop a detailed masterplan, based on the agreed preferred policies of the Core Strategy and Green Town Vision. However, the Core Strategy preferred policies consultation was subsequently delayed and as a result, the masterplanning work has placed a greater emphasis on testing the basic spatial principles of the plan, agreeing the land use elements, development boundaries and capacity of the site with the community, PAG groups and stakeholders, rather than detailed design. 1.36 The development of Core Strategy preferred policies has run concurrently with the masterplan and has been informed by it. The masterplan forms part of the evidence base for the core strategy in combination with detailed technical studies including a full baseline report, town centre study, Habitats Regulations Assessment and open space study. These are referenced throughout this document. 1.37 The co-ordination of the masterplan and briefing of the AECOM team was managed by a monthly steering group chaired by Daphne Gardner, Deputy Chief Executive of EHDC. Sign-off of the masterplan at each stage was performed by the Whitehill Bordon Executive Group, chaired by Cllr Ferris Cowper and Cllr Ian Dowdle. Policy Advisory Groups have fed into the masterplan process and report to the Executive Group. 1.38 In summary, the masterplan has been developed during the following stages of work:

Setting the scene, September – October 2008 1.39 Previous studies and background material provided by the client including the Green Town Vision were reviewed by the team to draw out landownership boundaries, existing and emerging policy and political commitments, conflicts and uncertainties. These were discussed to understand the brief for the masterplan in more detail and agree the starting point for the development of a spatial plan and areas requiring further testing. A consultation strategy was prepared to ensure the community was involved throughout the masterplanning process. Community engagement: scene setting and orientation, October – December 2008 1.40 The first stage of wide scale public and stakeholder engagement was undertaken to discuss the issues, themes and opportunities for the area through a series of public events. The PAG groups provided a briefing to the masterplanning team on the issues that needed to be addressed by the plan and ideas that were already under development. Chapter 4 contains details of the findings from the consultation. Strategic options testing, January – March 2009 1.41 Drawing on the baseline review and community feedback a series of Big Ideas or concepts for the masterplan were created. Workshops with a core group of EHDC councillors and officers were held to test these concepts and discuss the appropriate boundaries for the development. Initial capacity testing was undertaken to understand the mix of other supporting uses, such as community facilities and employment that would be required, based on population forecasting.

Initial ideas for transport solutions, the location of the town centre, open space, housing and employment uses were discussed in detail with the core councillors group in preparation for public consultation. Community engagement: masterplan choices, April 2009 1.42 The second stage of public and stakeholder engagement was based around the emerging approaches, Big Ideas and options and took the form of workshops, focus groups and public exhibitions. Chapter 4 contains details of the findings from the consultation.

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Draft masterplan development, May – October 2009 1.43 Analysis of consultation responses was used as a starting point for the development of a framework masterplan. A series of papers were prepared and technical meetings held with external consultants, stakeholders, County and District council officers to develop in detail the strategies relating to transport, housing, community infrastructure, green infrastructure, habitats regulations assessment and the sub-regional economy. 1.44 AECOM presented a first draft masterplan to EHDC in May 2009. This first draft masterplan was used as the basis for initial testing under the Habitats Regulations Assessment by UE Associates. The first draft masterplan was further tested and refined during the summer through a second series of meetings with the core councillor group. Changes to the masterplan in response to these meetings included a reduction in the average housing densities and the introduction of additional blue corridors. 1.45 Strategies for waste, water, energy and climate change adaptation and a transport and movement strategy were produced. The build costs of the masterplan were tested and viability modelling undertaken prior to sign-off of the draft masterplan for consultation. A round table session of landowners and partners was held to discuss delivery.

Community engagement: draft masterplan, November – December 2009 1.46 The draft masterplan proposals were presented and discussed with residents and stakeholders through a series of exhibitions and public events. Feedback was obtained via postcards, letters, emails and through discussions at events. A meeting with the Bordon Action Area Group was held to discuss their concerns. The PAG groups provided additional feedback. Chapter 4 contains details of the findings of the consultation. During this time EHDC ran the Core Strategy preferred policies consultation which fed into the final stage of masterplan development. Masterplan finalisation, January – February 2010 1.47 Analysis of the feedback received were discussed with the project steering group and changes made to the masterplan as a result, including increased areas for wildlife and adjustments to the town centre layout. The supporting documents were finalised and the masterplan development process and findings are recorded in this report.

Onsite discussions with green infrastructure stakeholders, April 2009


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Purpose of the masterplan

Related documents

1.48 This is the first masterplan for the Eco-town. It proposes a strategic framework showing how growth and change could occur in Whitehill Bordon in the next 20-25 years. It presents an overall vision for the physical, social and economic and environmental improvement of the town to ensure that development takes place in a considered manner to deliver community benefits for the town as a whole. It shows how the aspiration of the Green Town Vision and the requirements of PPS1 can be realised.

1.52 The masterplan sits alongside and is informed by detailed technical studies covering transport, community engagement, water, waste, energy, town centres, habitats regulations assessment and economic potential.

1.49 It forms part of the evidence base for the Whitehill Bordon section of the Local Development Framework and it is envisaged that it will be developed as a supplementary planning document (SPD) or Area Action Plan (AAP) alongside the Core Strategy. 1.50 It is the starting point for a wide range of more detailed studies culminating in planning applications for development over the coming years. It sits within a wider planning policy context that includes the Eco-town Planning Policy Statement, the South East Plan and East Hampshire District Council’s emerging Core Strategy. 1.51 The framework masterplan is a flexible tool which will be revisited over the course of the project to respond to changing conditions. In particular we recognise that this plan has been written during a period of low development activity. Over the coming years there will be changes to the market, there may be policy changes, there will be further opportunities presented by the climate change agenda as well as a development of the dialogue with the local community and eventually with the new community as well.

These are listed on page 2 and in the bibliography.

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2

Whitehill Bordon today

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WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

2.1 Whitehill Bordon is located within East Hampshire District and the County of Hampshire, approximately 75 km south west of London, 43 km east of Winchester, 14 km north of Petersfield and 13 km south of Farnham. The hinterland of the town includes the villages of Kingsley, Oakhanger, Blackmoor, Greatham, Longmoor, Passfield, Standford, Headley, Sleaford and the village of Lindford

Stansted Airport

Luton Airport

M1

M11 M25

immediately to the north east.

M25

M40

London

Swindon

City Airport

Heathrow Airport

Reading

Berkshire

M4

Newbury M20

M26

A34 Basingstoke

Guildford M23

Wiltshire

Figure 2.1 Whitehill Bordon’s regional context

M3

Winchester

Railway

Whitehill Bordon Eco-town

A3

Hampshire

Hampshire County

Airport

Gatwick Airport

A31 Salisbury

Large urban areas

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Alton

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West Sussex Portsmouth

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Southampton

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Haslemere

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Brighton and Hove Worthing


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2.2 The town is set within beautiful open heath land and woodland and is located at the boundary of the newly designated South Downs National Park. Bordon Garrison, located adjacent to residential neighbourhoods, brings jobs, social activities and vitality to the town, but limits connections and access to considerable areas of land in the centre of the town. In social and economic terms, the town performs poorly in comparison to other East Hampshire towns, and offers a limited range of housing and job opportunities and relatively poor quality education and community facilities provision. Through understanding the social, economic and environmental context of the town today, the plans for the town’s future can be designed to bring benefits to the existing residents and protect the town’s existing assets. 2.3 The chapter provides a summary of the existing physical character, socio-economic baseline, utilities and landownership’s of Whitehill Bordon which set the context within which the masterplan has been developed. The masterplan is supported by a detailed

Historic development 2.3 The area around Whitehill and Bordon has evidence of human habitation dating back to prehistory including the presence of a high concentration of Bronze Age barrows still visible in the town today, though unfortunately most of them have been disturbed or damaged. 2.4 However it was not until the 19th century when the MoD started to use the area for military exercise that Whitehill Bordon began to develop into the town we recognise today. The first temporary encampments came in the 1850’s in response to the need to train troops for the Crimea, followed by the purchase of 1602 acres of land for military training at Bordon and Longmoor by the War Office in 1863. Construction of a garrison did not commence in earnest until the early 20th Century, with the construction of brick built barracks and stables at Louisburg (1906) and the fine red brick ‘Sandhurst Block’ and Sergeant’s Mess of Prince Phillip Barracks in the 1930’s. 16

Baseline Report produced by GVA Grimley in 200815.

15 16

Whitehill Bordon Opportunity, Revised baseline report: main report, GVA Grimley, September 2008 An overview of the history of Whitehill Bordon by Woolmer Forest Heritage Society can be found at www.woolmerforest.org.uk

2.5 Unlike many other Hampshire towns, Whitehill Bordon lacks a historic town centre. Instead the town grew in a piecemeal fashion with small scale Edwardian ribbon development of shops and homes along the route of A325, and Chalet Hill. Housing along Liphook Road is Victorian, this was followed by rapid housing expansion in the 1970-80s when a series of estates east and west of the A325 and were built and a new shopping and community centre was created on Forest Road. Figure 2.2 derived from Historic maps, reveals how the development of modern day Whitehill Bordon has been closely linked to the presence of the military base.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

N

Settlements pre 1759 Development 1760-1874 Railway Roads Rivers

Figure 2.2a 1759

Figure 2.2b 1874

1759: surrounding villages of Oakhanger, Lindford and Headley existed. The masterplan area is labelled

1810: White Hill labelled and the route of the current day A325 appears possibly as a turnpike road.

Wutmere Forest.

1874: Signs of some development of the town with new roads laid out, Bordon Inclosure and Alexandra Park labelled and the Prince of Wales pub in existence, although the majority remains largely undeveloped with some small farmsteads and mills.

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N Settlements pre 1759 Development 1760-1874 Development 1875-1910 Development 1911-1962 Railway Roads Rivers

Figure 2.2c 1910

Figure 2.2d 1962

1900-10: With the arrival of Bordon Camp comes the construction of a military railway to Longmoor Camp and later a passenger line to Bentley station (opened in 1905), the completion of Quebec, Louisburg, St Lucia, Martinique and other barracks and the Army fire station (completed in 1904). Whitehill and Bordon develop as separate centres along the route of the A325, with ribbon development along Liphook Road

1935-36: Quebec barracks rebuilt in brick and Prince Philip Barracks constructed. The parade ground Sandhurst block and Sergeants’ Mess date from this period.

and Chalet Hill.

1962: Limited growth of the civilian areas of the town during the mid C20th and by 1969 all aspects of the railway have closed.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Population characteristics 2.6 In 2001 the five wards of Whitehill had a population of 13,95017, making Whitehill Bordon the third largest settlement in East Hampshire. Over 12.5% of East Hampshire’s population live in Whitehill Bordon and 1.1% of the County’s population. (See appendix C for further population data sourced by Hampshire County Council). Taking into consideration the adjacent ward of Lindford the population in close proximity to the Eco-town rises to 16,218 people. Further population statistics are available in the Baseline Report. 2.7 Baseline population is forecast to gradually decline during the masterplan period18(this excludes population growth from new development and reduction relating to MoD personnel).

N Figure 2.2d 1998 Settlements pre 1759 Development 1760-1874 Development 1875-1910 Development 1911-1962

1998:During the 1970s and 80s the town grew rapidly with new residential estates (generally designed in cul-de-sac layouts) the Forest Centre and Bordon and Woolmer Trading estates developed.

Development 1963-1998 Railway Roads Rivers

17 18

2001 Census, Office for National Statistics Forecasts by Hampshire County Council demographers, 2009

2.8 There is a higher than average proportion of younger people (aged 0-44), and lower proportion of older and elderly residents (45 years +) although the hinterland remains an attractive retirement location. The high proportion of young people is likely to be influenced by the number of MoD trainee’s resident at Bordon. Further work is needed to understand in more detail how the military’s presence impacts on the population age statistics and use of services.

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AECOM JUNE 2010

Landscape character and existing green infrastructure Alice Holt Forest

2.9 The landscape of Whitehill Bordon dominates the character of the town. Undulating topography, pine plantations and broadleaved woodlands, streams and man-made landforms have created a unique setting within which the Garrison and town have developed

Holybourne

over time.

The Wider Area

• To the north of the town, approximately 110m from the MoD disposal sites at Louisburg Barracks at its nearest point is Broxhead Common Local Nature Reserve, which is 42 hectares of dry heath land and secondary birch/oak woodland, part of the Wealden Heaths SPA (Special Protection Area designated under the European Birds Directive). Kingsley

Road Farnha m

d Camp Ro a

Figure 2.3 The landscape bioregion of Whitehill Bordon

Lindford

Headley Down

Headley

Whitehill Bordon t

Greensan

Stre e

South Downs National Park boundary

High

Existing Urban areas

ad

Special Protection Areas/ Special Areas of Conservation Alice Holt Forest Main Road East Hampshire Landscape Greensand Terrace Mixed Farmland and Woodland Character Types Park boundary MixedNational Farmland and Woodland National Park proposed extension

Wealdland ExistingFarmland urban areas and Heath Mosaic Parks? Greensand Hills

East Hampshire District Landscape Character Assessment, Land Use Consultants, July 2006

A3

Liphook

Wealdland Farmland and Heath Mosaic

Greensand Terrace Greensand Hills

Main Road

19

Mixed Farmland & Woodland

d Ro

in parallel to the masterplanning process.

Greensand Terrace

Wealdon Farmland & Heath Mosaic

sfiel

2.11 The town lies near to a number of European protected habitats and as a result a Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA) is required and has been undertaken

Kingsley

East Worldham

Pete r

2.10 Whitehill-Bordon lies within the Whitehill to Liphook landscape character area as defined in the East Hampshire District Landscape Character Assessment (2006)19. This area consists of gently undulating hills on sandstone cut through by small rivers. The area is generally well wooded with scattered heath lands and farms with small to medium sized pastures and fields.

Alton

N

A3

40


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Common, approximately 930m to the north of the MoD disposal land also forms part of the Wealden Heaths SPA. • To the south of the town, behind the properties on Drift Road and 230m from the properties on Liphook Road is Woolmer Forest SAC (Special Area for Conservation designated under the European habitats Directive) which consists of 667 hectares of dry and wet heaths and ponds. Woolmer Forest is also part of the Wealden Heaths SPA. • To the north west of the town, approximately 410m from the MoD disposal land at Gibbs Lane is Shortheath Common SAC a 59 hectare area of woodland and heath land noted for its valley mire. • Approximately 7km to the north of Bordon is the Alice Holt Forest, an 850 hectare area of accessible ancient woodland and conifer plantation managed by the Forestry Commission. The forest offers a range of recreation and learning based activities and a visitor centre. 2.12 Bordon is a gateway to the recently designated South Downs National Park which stretches from Winchester in the west to Eastbourne in the east. The boundary of the park is located close to the southern boundary of the town.

Within the town 2.13 A strongly wooded character exists within the town itself with many streets having wooded edges keeping much of the MoD training land hidden from view. The town is built on undulating topography ranging in height from 60m+ to 120m+ above sea level with high points including the Chalet Hill corner offering long distance views terminating in a wooded skyline. 2.14 Existing public green spaces include the wooded Deadwater Valley local nature reserve (LNR) which includes Alexandra Park and a 10m wide strip of Jubilee Park, the LNR is located to the east of the main residential areas and Jubilee Park recreation ground. The MoD land contains a number of major wooded green spaces including the Hogmoor Inclosure (currently used for tank training) and Bordon Inclosure. Hampshire County Council own Eveley Wood and Standford Grange farmland at the rural edge of the existing town, to the east of the Deadwater Valley. 2.15 The River Wey and Deadwater Valley form blue corridors within the town (the Environment Agency flood zones 2 and 3 for these watercourses suggest flood risk to a small number of properties on Standford Lane, Hollywater Road and Hollybrook Park only). In the wider area the River Slea, Oakhanger, Kingsley and Oxney Streams are notable watercourses. 2.16 Environmental designations within the town include Local Nature Reserve at the Deadwater Valley, and a number of Sites of Importance to Nature Conservation (SINC) including Hogmoor Inclosure and Eveley Wood.

2.17 Within the residential areas of the town, most properties have private front and rear gardens, many including mature trees. There are a number of small play areas and games areas in and around the housing estates, small areas of amenity grass and allotments (Mill Chase Road). In estates where flats and maisonettes are common (e.g. around Essex Close) there are considerable grassed areas surrounding the four storey blocks with stands of mature pine trees. 2.18 Sports pitches used by the MoD are located at Budds Lane with public pitches at Mill Chase Road although public provision is very limited for the size of population. A recent scheme at the Forest Community Centre has introduced a new public square, but otherwise the town lacks civic spaces or a public town square. 2.19 Chapter 8 contains details of the proposals for green infrastructure.

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AECOM JUNE 2010

A walk around the town today reveals the following (see figure 2.4 for locations): Watercourses 1. A non-main river crosses the Bordon Camp before becoming Oxney Moss near the Louisburg Barracks and joining the Oxney Stream to the north of the town. 2. To the east of the town the Deadwater stream flows northwards through the Deadwater Valley Nature Reserve (a Site of Interest for Nature Conservation or SINC) before joining the River Wey near Lindford. The Deadwater Valley is heavily wooded and marks the edge of the existing built-up area of Conde Way. It contains a linear footpath which is an attractive recreation route. 3. The River Wey is the major watercourse in the local area, running further to the east of the town close to Standford Lane where pools create an attractive setting for individual dwellings. The Wey acts as a barrier between Bordon and Lindford, before heading north through Bordon Inclosure. The ford and old mill building on Mill Chase Road are characterful features at the edge of the town.

Green spaces 4. To the east of the town and south of Mill Chase Community Technology College and Hollywater School is Standford Grange Farm, with arable fields, pastures and the ancient broadleaved, Eveley Wood (the latter is a SINC). The land here undulates with two plateau areas adjacent to Mill Chase Road and to the north east of Eveley Wood with sloping land between. Close to the Deadwater Valley and adjacent to Woodlea Primary School in the southern part of the town near Liphook Road is Walldown, earthworks which are thought to be remnants of an Iron Age Hill Fort, which are now clothed in mature trees. Walldown is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and SINC. It forms one of the town’s highest points at 120m above sea level. 5. To the west of Walldown, across the A325, is another SINC, the Hogmoor Inclosure. This large pine plantation on former heath land is used as a military vehicle driver training area. Fragments of heath land survive and there are a number of sandy tracks. It is rich in wildlife, particularly reptiles and invertebrates. 6. To the west of the Hogmoor Road, which marks the western boundary of the Hogmoor Inclosure, beyond a block of suburban housing is the Blackmoor Golf Club, which still has fragments of heath. 7. To the immediate south is Blackmoor Fruit Nurseries. 8. To the north of Blackmoor Golf Course is the Slab and the Warren, both military vehicle training areas and very similar in character to Bordon Inclosure, Photo top right: Deadwater Valley (feature 2),

Figure 2.4 Landscape features within Whitehill Bordon. Non Designated Landscapes Semi Natural Areas - Woodland / Heathland - Tree alignments / hedges Intensively Managed Landscape - Recreation & amenity - Farmland G: Grazed - A: Arable Designated Landscapes - Special Protection Area / Special Area of Conservation - 400m buffer zone to SPA / SAC - Site of importance for Nature Conservation


Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

12

L IA

85m

S TA

80m

80m

14

Barracks m

90

2

Alexandra Park

75m

3

Weyford Infant & Junior School

m

LL

YB RO OK

PARK

Forest Centre

Tesco

FOR ES T RO

AD

90m

m

85

G

Cemy

A

4

Eveley Wood

2

m

G

m 75

m

85

W H IT E

OAD H ILL R

R

FO RE ST

Local shops

110 OAD m 115 m

105m

5

Woodlea Primary School

N OW LLD WA

Hollywater

AD RO

G

OK RO AD

Woolmer Forest SPA / SSSI

OAD

LIP H O

LD R

AD R RO

95m

100m

SF IE

M OO

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Standford

85

H OG

Chase Community Hospital C ON DE W AY

100m

m

80

LY W A TE

O

School

m

75

H OL

RE E T

H

3

LANE

HILL LE T

ter wa

90

ad

Woolmer Trading Estate

C HA

Hollywater Primary School

AD

STA ND FORD

De

Local shops

O AS E R

Mill Chase Community School & Leisure Centre

m

95

70m

CH MILL

15

1

H ST

HOGMOOR ROAD

Prince

85m Philip

AD RO

3

River Wey

OK

C AMP R OAD

HO

Sewage Works

75m

oad

an R

OV E R OAD

T F L IP

Bordon Infant & Junior School

80m

Rom

D F IR GR

School

16

Quebec Barracks

Lindford

Hogmoor Inclosure

7

8

T N

A R

100m

6

Bordon Camp

85m

O C

N

1

F N

9

Golf Course

90mm 85 80m

13

H IG

OAKHANGER ROAD

The Warren

T ION

Recycling Centre

95m

Slab

D ROA

E D I

10

B ordon Trading Estate

The Pheonix Centre Fire Station

ROAD

RD LAN E

1

80m

D LIN DF OR

ND F O

B.O.S.C.

Louisburg Barracks

F AR NH

Shortheath Common SAC / SSSI

RR OAD

11 m

80

S TA

AM ROA D

3

HO


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AECOM JUNE 2010

with plantations, fragments of heath land and areas of bare sand. Beyond to the west are arable farms. These areas are also SINCs. 9. To the north of the Slab across Oakhanger Road is another large pine plantation (with some broadleaved woodland) which screens the Bordon Trading Estate (which is on the former site of a military railway station) and nearby detached residential properties and military cemetery. In the northern part of this plantation are the playing fields of the Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club (BOSC). In the south, across Station Road the woodland is known as The Croft. 10. Further mixed woodland (broadleaved woodland and pine plantation) surrounds and screens the Louisburg Barracks. This area of mixed woodland is another SINC.

12 South of the Lindford Road is a large area of broadleaved woodland known as Bordon Inclosure. This woodland is bounded on the east by the River Wey and is contiguous with another wooded area known as Alexandra Park (another SINC).(14) 13. The Bordon Camp includes woodlands, mature trees and playing fields to the north and south of Budd’s Lane with strong wooded edges to Budd’s Lane. The woodlands and Hogmoor Inclosure enclose the flat, built up expanse of the Trade Training Area screening it from view. 14. South of the built area of Prince Philip Barracks is a further area of woodland and plantation which is currently used as a MoD assault course.

11. The A325 marks the eastern boundary of this area and separates it from Broxhead Common a more open area of heat hland.

Photos left from top: Hogmoor Inclosure tank tracks; view over playing fields towards Standford Grange farmland

Photos near to far: mature pine tree stands Bordon Camp; Bordon Inclosure


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

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AECOM JUNE 2010

Townscape character 2.20 The town currently functions in two halves – MoD and civilian – roughly defined by the route of the A325. • To the east of the A325 are the civilian post-war residential neighbourhoods generally constructed in winding, cul-de-sac arrangements accessed off the loop road of Conde Way/ Chalet Hill. Properties are mostly brick built, of two storeys and commonly terrace or semi-detached typology. Due to the internalised street layouts, permeability for pedestrian movement is reduced, and in several locations property rear fences form a poor street scene on key routes such as Conde Way. • To the west of the A325 the town is dominated by the secure MoD barracks and training areas, MoD sports pitches and Hogmoor Inclosure woodland. Much of the Prince Philip Barracks, Louisburg Barracks and Training Area is underlain by concrete or tarmac hardstanding and relatively clear of vegetation, however woodland and mature trees edge the areas of hardstanding, separating the MoD training sites into a series of parcels which are screened from the road and providing a strong landscape structure. Buildings vary in quality from substantial brick barrack accommodation at Prince Philip Barracks, terrace form barracks and stables at Louisburg, to massive, steel frame sheds and temporary buildings housing the MoD engineering training, storage facilities and plant.

2.21 There are strong contrasts between the looping cul-de-sacs, the natural landscape of the Hogmoor Inclosure and the formal lines of Prince Philip Barracks and parade ground and Louisburg Barracks. 2.22 Beyond the Hogmoor Inclosure, Hogmoor Road has a number of small residential estates and caravan sites which are relatively cut off from the rest of the town due to the barrier created by the secure MoD land. To the east, Hollywater Road contains a number of detached and cottage properties set within large plots and adjacent paddocks which have a more rural characteristic.

High Street 2.23 The High Street corridor (A325) is blighted by a number of poorly conceived late 20th century developments which present blank fences to the street; the rears of light industrial units; Tesco’s car park and a number of low grade retail units which

Figure 2.5: Existing landuses and character Town Centre / Retail Light industrial / business uses Community and education MOD training, barracks and facilities Residential character areas Late C20th cul de sac layout Early C20th ribbon development Late C20th MoD family housing estates

Photos left from top: housing to the east of the A325; MoD barracks at Louisburg

Individual properties within large plots

N

Utilities/Infrastructure

N

0m

100m

500m


The Pheonix Centre

ST

r on rd Bordon Bord r ding ra Tra Trading e Estate

Late C20th Officers’ Mess building set in pine woodland

MoD cemetery

Officers’ Mess

D ROA ION A T IO

D AD D ROA

Fire Station

ng Recycling Recyclin re re Centre

Lindford L indford

Sewage Works

Quebec s acks arrra Barracks B

L IP HO

River R iv er W Wey ey

OK

C AMP R OAD

AD OA O ROA R ER ROAD GER HA NG K HAN AKHA OAK O

AD RO

Late C20th MoD family housing estate comprising 2 storey terraces and 4 storey maisonettes in a loose Radburn layout

OR FO LIIN DF L

F AR NH

Louisburg s r cks ra Barra Barracks

Late C20th light industrial estate. 1-2 storey sheds in inward facing layout

HO H OGM GMOO OOR R RO OA O AD AD

Bordon Infant & Junior School

Prince Philip Barracks early C20th 3 storey barracks building arranged around parade ground with later C20th halls accommodation

Slab

Weyford Infant & Junior School

e r nce ri Pri Prince Philip r acks rr Barracks Barr

LL MIIL

E CH AS

ROAD

Hollywater School

Mill Chase Community School & Leisure Centre

RR OAD

O

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H IG IG

RK ARK PA P

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an R

H ST

RE E T

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School S

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ILL HIL

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Chase Community Hospital Hospital

Golf Course Cours r e rs

C ON

FO F OR O RE ES S T RO ROA AD D

Tesco

Standfo Standford f rd fo

H OG

DE W AY

M OO AD R RO F IR IR GR

Late C19th - mid C20th residential ribbon development. Generally 2 storey, detached and semi detached houses

FO RE ST

RO AD

AD ILL RO IT E H IL W H IT

Local shops

Woodlea Primary School

OV E R OAD

LLD WA

N OW

Hollywater

AD RO

OK RO AD

P ET

ER S F

IE IE LD

R OA D

LIIP PH O

School S

Blackmoor B lack kmoor

N 0m

100m

500m

ANE LAN LA L

LE T C HA

ter wa

Rom

oolmer o Wo Woolmer Trading Estate

Local shops

LY W A TE

ad

Hogmoor Hog og gmoor Inclosure In nclo n osure re

RD OR D FO NDF A AN TA T ST S

De

The Warren

Community & retail uses at Chalet Hill and the Forest Centre. Fragmented arrangement. No critical mass or “heart”

Predominantly late C20th residential estates in cul-de-sac layouts. Generally 2 storey, terraces & semidetached houses

AM ROA D

Louisburg Barracks, late C19th residential / stable blocks and hardstanding

SEME / REME training area. MoD industrial uses. Massive sheds, 1 - 2 storeys, utilities and hardstanding

47

WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

HOLLY H OLL LY YW WATE WA A TE R R ROAD OA O AD


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AECOM JUNE 2010

create a poor quality streetscape. The width of the A325, traffic and associated signage and highways infrastructure creates an uncomfortable environment

Military sites:-

for pedestrians.

• Louisburg Barracks:

Landmarks and buildings for retention

• Camp School

2.24 The corner of Chalet Hill and the A325 marked by the copper dome of the former Frisby’s shoe shop, is a notable landmark in a town which otherwise has few civilian buildings of historic or architectural significance and no listed buildings. In comparison to other towns within Hampshire, and surrounding villages, there is little evidence of local vernacular detailing within the town core that might be expected such as tile hanging and decorative brick or flint work.

• Sergeants’ Mess

2.25 However there are a number of attractive early 20th century buildings within the MoD sites which have potential for retention and would lend maturity and distinctive character to the development. Woolmer Forest Heritage Society has identified 15 key buildings which they would like to see retained within the town in particular. The masterplan supports this finding and has sought to provide flexibility for the retention of these buildings where possible:-

• Sergeants’ Mess

Civilian areas:-

• Fire Station – Camp Hill

• Broxhead House

• Garrison Church • Stable Road • Amhurst House (Commandants House) • Prince Philip Barracks • Martinique House • Parade ground & barracks building

• Military Cemetery • Daly Sports Ground • Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club In addition many of the existing MoD training, office and barracks buildings have potential to be reused in the short term as training or cheap employment space to kick-start economic growth in the early years of the project. Over time these sites would be redeveloped in line with the masterplan.

• Frisby’s shoe shop (Chalet Hill) • Phillips stores (Chalet Hill)

Photos right from top: Broxhead House, Louisburg; Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club


4

Sergeants’ Mess, Louisburg

6

Garrison Church, Louisburg

Bordon Camp

Golf Course

Weyford Infant & Junior School

H ST

RE E T

OV E R OAD

H IG

Forest Centre

LD R

OAD

Tesco

P ET

School

FE OR RS ES FTIEROAD

500m

H OG

Blackmoor

HILL LE T

H

O

LL

Chase Community Hospital C ON DE W AY

E CH AS

R

Mill Chase Community School & Leisure Centre Woodlea Prim School School

YB RO OK PARK

oad

N N

C HA

ter wa

an R

Rom

Hogmoor Inclosure

Woolmer Trading Estate

Local shops

ad

F IR GR

Other MoD buildings with potential for short term reuse

Local shops

A

De

Bordon

The Warren

MILL

Whitehill

10

14 Quebec barracks

100m

AM ROA D

River Wey

11

12 Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club (BOSC)

0m

Chase Community Hospital C ON DE W AY

FO RE ST

Parade ground, Prince Philip Barracks Oakhanger Sports11 Club (BOSC)

Slab

HOGMOOR ROAD

10 Sergeants’ Mess, Prince Philip Barracks

some historic / architectural could be retained to give acter to the development

14

AD R RO

9 Military cemetery nd, Prince Philip Barracks

acks

Quebec Barracks

M OO

rince Philip Barracks 7 Martinique House

Ground

7

Bordon Infant & Junior School

Stable Road, Louisburg

Forest Centre

Tesco

H OG

Amherst House and stables, Louisburg

13 Daly Sports Ground

Hogmoor Inclosure

13

5

8

Recycling Centre

Woolmer Trading Estate

LIP H O

OK RO AD

RR OAD

Broxhead House, Louisburg

4 6

Sewage Works

OAK HANGER ROAD

HILL

LY W A TE

3

LE T C HA

N OW LLD WA H OL

Barbados House (Phoenix theatre)

A

Local shops

T ROAD

9

Officers’ Mess

Bordon

F OR ES

ad

2

AD N RO

Trading Estate

2

10

RO AD

n Ro

metery

Bordon

1

Fire Station

D ROAD LIN DF OR

RE E T

a Rom

Louisburg

Fire Station

T IO S TA

The Pheonix Centre

11

H ST

12

interest that could be retained to give historic character to the development

1

14

H IG

The Warren

Key landmark buildings outside MoD land:

Buildings of some historic / architectural interest that could be retained to historic character /toarchitectural the Buildings ofgive some historic development:

3

8

use & Stables, Louisburg 15

Quebec barracks Frisby’s Shoe Shop & Phillips Stores A Former

Louisburg Barracks

F AR NH

Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club (BOSC)

Figure 2.6: Key buildings with potential for retention or reuse Daly Sports Ground

House

5

Slab

C AMP R OAD

Parade Ground, Prince Philip Barracks

HOGMOOR ROAD

ouse, Louisburg 13

urch, Louisburg 16

Q Ba

Bordon Infant & Junior School

Sgts Mess, Prince Philip Barracks

14

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WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

13

12 ol (Phoenix Theatre)

ouisburg

Bordon Camp

Military Cemetery

11

Station

OAK HANGER ROAD

Stable Road, Louisburg

10

es

9

Martinique House

9

ner

Recycling Centre

Officers’ Mess

C AMP R OAD

Estate

R

M OO R


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AECOM JUNE 2010

Legibility 2.26 The gateways to the town at the Lindford Road/ A325 and Liphook Road/ A325 currently present a poor first impression of the town, with highways infrastructure dominating the townscape and several poor quality and derelict properties on the southern stretch of the A325. The wooded characteristic along the A325 as it enters the town is a strong feature and the townscape less so, which limits the sense of arrival at a ‘town’.

2.30 Linear views along the A325 are enclosed by the rise and fall of the land, and the wooded road edges, while Chalet Hill offers views fronted by residential and retail properties out towards the wider countryside.

2.27 These areas have potential to be enhanced by measures to mark the entrance to the Eco-town such as public art, greater emphasis on pedestrian priority at junctions and the removal of street clutter, and the reuse / renovation of poor quality buildings and a stronger townscape at key junctions. 2.28 Headley Mill and ford are attractive landmark features marking the eastern edge of the town.

Figure 2.7: Urban design analysis Enclosure by mature trees or hedgerows

2.29 Within the town the junctions of Oakhanger Road/Station Road/Budds Lane, Chalet Hill/High Street, Budds Lane/ High Street and Conde Way/High Street are major nodes. Due to the amount of tree cover / wooded road edges and long, straight roads with few landmarks, it can be difficult for the visitor to orientate themselves. Legibility towards the existing district shopping centre is also poor due to its location away from the A325, within the post-war housing estates.

Enclosure by woodland Key gateways to the town Key nodes/junctions A325 - poor quality pedestrian environment Poor quality frontage onto key route High quality frontage onto key route Key view corridors High quality landmarks visible from the street Potential landmarks located within secure MoD areas Archaeological sites

Photos left from top: vacant former pub at the southern gateway to the town, the Chalet Hill corner showing the former Frisby’s shoe shop

N

N

0m

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AM ROA D

WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

The Pheonix Centre

S TA

r on rd ord Bo r ding ra Tra T Estate MoD cemetery

Officers’ Mess

IO T IO

F OR D LIIN DFO L

F AR NH

ou Louisburg L s r cks ra Barra

AD N RO

ROAD

Fire Station

ecycling ec Re re re ntre en e Ce

Lindford

age wage ewage Sew Works

Quebec s cks ac ra B arra Bar Ba

L IP HO

Riv er Wey

OK

C AMP R OAD

AD OA AK HA NGER RO OAK O

AD RO

H OGMO MOO OOR OR RO OA AD AD

Bordon Infant & Junior School

Slab

51

Weyford Infant & Junior School

e r nce ri Pri P Philip r acks rr Barr

MILL

E CH AS

Hollywater School

ROAD

Mill Chase Community School & Leisure Centre

LL

YB RO OK

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RR OAD

School

Cemy

H OL

O

P ARK

H ST

RE E T

H

ANE LA L

HILL LE T

ter wa

C HA

LY W A TE

ad

mer ollm Woo Trading Estate

Local shops

A ND FORD TA ST

De

Ho ogmoor og In nc clo c osurre e

Forest Centre

C ON

Standfo f rd fo

M OO

S TA

H OG

DE W AY

ND F O

Golf Cours r e rs

AD R RO F IR GR

D LL ROA H ILL

FO RE ST

RO AD

W H IT E

Local shops

Woodlea Primary School

OV E R OAD

N OW LLD WA

Hollywater

AD RO

OK RO AD

P ET

ER S F

IE LD IE

R OA D

LIP IP H O

School

Black kmo oor

RD LAN E

Chase Community Hospital

F OR ES

T ROAD

Tesco

H OLL LY YW WA A TE R RO OA AD


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Housing 2.31 The 2001 Census (table 2.1) reveals that Whitehill Bordon and Lindford wards had 5,969 existing units, with a high percentage of properties with 3-5 habitable rooms and a lower proportion of properties with 6 habitable rooms or more in comparison to the District average. 2.32 In terms of unit type, it has a similar mix to that in Alton (table 6.3) with a high proportion of terraced and smaller semi-detached properties as a result of the rapid expansion of the town during the post-war period. What Whitehill Bordon lacks in comparison to Alton is flats and maisonettes which are attractive to first time buyers. This is supported by the Central Hampshire and New Forest Housing market assessment21 which identified a need for housing focused on smaller units (1-3 bedrooms) across the region reflecting the wider issues of housing shortage and lack of affordability. 2.33 However in comparison to the District and Petersfield, Whitehill Bordon lacks detached properties and the perception of Whitehill Bordon as a starter home or more affordable family housing location in comparison to the rest of the District has also emerged from consultation. This is supported by the findings of the Whitehill Bordon Parish Profile 2006/2007 which identifies that the town has a low proportion of dwellings within the higher value Council Tax Bands F, G and H (around 2% in 2003 in comparison to 11% in Alton and 18% in Petersfield). This reflects the high proportion of terrace properties which is almost twice the district average, and low proportions of flatted and detached accommodation.

Whitehill Bordon & Lindford Wards Existing stock (bedroom equivalent derived from habitable rooms (hr))

2001 Census unit numbers

% of overall mix

2001 Census unit numbers

% of overall mix

Studio (1 hr)

35

1%

221

1%

1 bed (2 hr)

113

2%

830

2%

2 bed (3 hr)

492

8%

2973

7%

3 bed (4 hr)

1,350

23%

6,885

16%

3-4 bed (5 hr)

1,764

30%

10,091

23%

4 bed (6 hr)

1,028

17%

7,762

18%

5 bed (7 hr)

619

10%

5403

12%

6 bed + (8+ hr)

568

10%

9460

22%

Total

5969

21

43625

Table 2.1: Whitehill Bordon and Lindford existing housing size mix, derived from Census 200120

Detached

Semi-Det

Terraced

Flats/ Maisonettes

EHDC

45%

25%

18%

13%

Alton

23%

30%

24%

23%

Petersfield

32%

24%

24%

20%

Whitehill Bordon

24%

28%

35%

13%

South East

29%

29%

23%

18%

England

23%

32%

26%

19%

Table 2.2: Whitehill Bordon existing mix of unit types,Census 200122

080613 FINAL Household Mix - tailored to predicted needs, EHDC draft document, 2008 Central Hampshire and New Forest Housing Market Assessment, DTZ, Nov 2007 22 Census 2001 20

East Hampshire District


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

2.34 Residential values in Bordon are significantly less than surrounding towns such as Alton, Haslemere and Farnham. In Q1-Q3 2007, prices in Bordon averaged £257,000, compared with £335,000 in Alton, £387,000 in Farnham and £428,000 in Haslemer23. As a result the town remains relatively affordable in comparison with the rest of the district, attracting first time buyers, young families and lower income earners. 2.35 As a result there is a community led aspiration for the introduction of some larger units and ‘executive homes’ to redress the balance and provide greater choice at the top end of the housing range.

Photos: examples of the variety of housing types in Whitehill Bordon today 23

All housing statistics sourced from Whitehill Bordon Opportunity, Revised baseline report: main report, GVA Grimley, September 2008.

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Existing tenures and level of affordable housing 2.36 Within East Hampshire there is a shortage of affordable housing – both in terms of the availability of Housing Association properties but also people’s ability to access the private rented sector (which is in short supply) and owner occupation. 2.37 To access owner occupation, figures for August 2008 from Hometrack found that the first time buyer purchase income threshold for East Hampshire was £53,000. This is the minimum household income required to buy a typical first time buyer home. It is calculated using the lower quartile house price and assumes that purchasers can afford a 18% deposit and a mortgage multiplier of three.24 2.38 The current tenure mix of properties in Whitehill Bordon is as follows: • Owner Occupation

70%

• MoD (Annington Properties Ltd)

9%

• Private Rented

4%

• Housing Association (Affordable) 17% 2.39 In comparison Alton has 19% affordable housing and Petersfield 14%.

non-market housing, provided to those whose needs are not met by the market. It can include affordable rented housing but also low cost home ownership schemes and intermediate rentals. 2.41 Based on the existing tenure mix, more private rented accommodation, intermediate rented and affordable rented accommodation will be needed to meet the needs of the younger population that is currently residing in the area but also the needs of those new households which will be attracted to the area through employment opportunities generated by the creation of new jobs.

Town centre

2.44 Other local shopping areas include a large Tesco’s on the A325 and several local shops/services on Chalet Hill and the A325 High Street. Although the town has reasonable provision of convenience shopping, comparison shopping e.g. clothing and furniture is limited for a town of its size, with most residents travelling to other nearby centres including Petersfield and Guildford. 2.45 Commercial leisure, culture and night life are all limited within the town with few restaurants and pubs or evening activities apart from the successful Phoenix Arts Centre and theatre. The centre hosts more than thirty professional shows per year and runs theatre and arts courses.

2.42 The need for a new town centre and better quality community facilities was a key priority that emerged from the masterplan consultation events (see chapter 4 for details). 2.43 Existing town centre functions are housed at the Forest Centre, an inward facing local mall containing local shops and small supermarkets plus community centre, a church and a modern and well used public library. The centre now looks dated and lacks the sense of place or civic focus of traditional town centre layouts. The location off the main route, with large car parks and the surrounding cul-de-sac housing layout, encourages car based trips to access the shops and services.

2.40 The tenure of ‘affordable housing’ is defined as

Photos clockwise from right: Forest Shopping Centre, shops on the High Street reflect the presence of the young MoD trainees; Tesco on the High Street; Chalet Hill local shops. B&W hsg needs, EHDC Housing, August 200921 Central Hampshire and New Forest Housing Market Assessment, DTZ, Nov 2007

24


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

55


Forest Centre

2

Tesco Superstore

AECOM JUNE 3 2010

Parade of Shops, Lindford

28

Sa

29

Ho

5

Richard Eade Furniture House

30

W

31

Mi

32

Bo

33

Wo

34

Sa

AM ROA D

Petrol Station

Parade of Local Shops

26 Sports

25

Church

26

Sports

Cemy

38 1 27

Forest Centre

37

Fir

Leisure 38

Lib

39

Co

40

So

41

Wh

Standford 42

Pin

RD LAN E

39

Chase Community Hospital C ON DE W AY

Fir

36

Ale

44

Ba

45

Bo

S TA

43 OAD H ILL R

41 6 Local

F IR GR

7shops 35

OV E R OAD

5

Woodlea Primary School

Hollywater

33 N OW LLD WA

LIP H O

AD RO

OK RO AD

HOLLY WATE R ROAD

P ET

School

ER S F

IE LD

Sports

YB RO OK

School

W H IT E

45 Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club

Welfare Centre

24

LL

31

36

R OA D

2523 Church

O

Po

ND F O

RE E T

Golf Course

22

24 Pitches

29

LANE

23 Welfare centre Medical Centre

H

AD R RO

Football Ground

21 22 Medical centre

2

ROAD

STA ND FORD

4

40

12

11

44 Barbados House/Phoenix Arts centre 2020 Community Community Centre Club 21 Football ground

AD RO

43 Alexandra Centre

Gym

8

13

E CH AS

M OO

19 Gym

Local shops

Tesco

H OG

42 Pinewood Village Hall

19

Hogmoor Inclosure

HILL LE T C HA

MILL

35

Hollywater School

Mill Chase Community School & Leisure Centre

43

34

Whitehill Village Hall

18 Bars/Social Club

OK

Bars / Social Club 41

HO

1718 Pitches

28

PARK

40 Social Club

30

ter wa

16 Pitches

Pitches

19

Weyford Infant & Junior School

ad

39 Community Centre

17

Prince Philip Barracks

Woolmer Trading Estate

Police Fire D

River Wey

The Warren

15 Swimming pool

23

32

18

38 Library

20

Quebec Barracks

De

Pitches

Slab

15

Leisure

oad

1416 Pitches

17

22

Bordon Infant & Junior School

37 Former MoD Fire Station

Swimming Pool an R

MoD

36 Fire Station

Rom

15

21

35 Police Station

Pitches 14 12 Co-op Convenience store 13 Local Shops

14

Police/Fire Departments

11 Shell petrol station

42

16

L IP

31 Mill chase Technology College 6 Local shops Shell Petrol Station and Mill Chase Leisure Centre 11 7 Local shops 32 Bordon Junior and Infant School Co -op Convienience Store 12 8 Chalet Hill shops, Job 33 Woodlea Primary School Centre Sacred Heart Nursery High Street Shop 34 Parade 13 9 Post office, Lindford Lloyds Tsb 10 MOD

10

OAKHANGER ROAD

RR OAD

30 Weyford Infant & Junior School

LY W A TE

Richard Eade Furniture

10 House Loyds Tsb

Lindford

Sewage Works

FOREST ROAD

5

3

Recycling Centre

Officers’ Mess

29 Hollywater School

9

37

D ROA

H OL

Education

Post office 4 9 Petrol Station

S

Bordon Trading Estate

44

RO AD

Local shops, Lindford

ION TA T

ROAD

The Pheonix Centre Fire Station

FO RE ST

8

26

25

24

Tesco Superstore Chalet Hill Shops, 28 JobSacred CentreHeart Church

D LIN DF OR

F AR NH

45

C AMP R OAD

Religious

Parade of Local Shops 1 7 Forest Centre 27 St. Marks Church

H ST

Retail

Louisburg Barracks

H IG

6

3

St

4

Figure 2.8 Existing community facilities

2

27

Education

HOGMOOR ROAD

56

1

Blackmoor

Whitehill Bordon O Existing Commun


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Community facilities and socio-economic baseline Healthy living 2.46 Chase Hospital provides adequate provision of acute health services and performs many of the functions of a ‘Polyclinic’ however there is a shortage of more localised non-acute health service provision particularly as Chase Hospital may be a considerable distance from newly developed houses. 2.47 Current provision of doctors and dentists will not meet the demands of the existing and new population in the long term but could struggle to be retained when the MoD leaves. 2.48 Sports facilities are undersupplied within the town with the majority of existing facilities belonging to the MoD and as a result having limited (for example the MoD swimming pool, Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club) or no public access (for example the Daly Ground sports stadium). Mill Chase Leisure Centre provides a public four lane swimming pool, gym, four court sports hall and artificial turf pitch but these facilities are shared with Mill Chase Technology College during the day.

Education

The economy

2.49 Bordon Junior and Infants, Weyford Primary and Woodlea Primary provide primary education within the town, with a children’s centre located at Bordon Junior School. Hollywater School provides special needs primary education. Mill Chase Community Technology College provides comprehensive secondary education for 11-16 year olds.

2.53 Unemployment is low in comparison to the District and national averages; however there is a higher proportion of young unemployed people than the District or national averages.

2.50 There is no sixth form college within the town and poor public transport links are a barrier to school leavers accessing further education elsewhere. Opportunities for residents to access adult educational, vocational and non-vocational courses are also limited. 2.51 Educational attainment is improving; however in comparison to the rest of the District, Whitehill Bordon has a higher percentage of residents with no qualifications or Level 1 and 2 qualifications and almost half the number of highly qualified people at Level 4 and 5. Residents of Whitehill Bordon are less qualified than their counterparts in the rest of the District both at school leaver level and throughout adulthood. The Baseline Report25 provides further detail on educational attainment. 2.52 Continuing to improve existing education provision and provide high quality new schools will be important in making Whitehill Bordon an attractive location for families and increasing the level of attainment of the town’s young people.

Whitehill Bordon Opportunity, Revised baseline report: main report, GVA Grimley, September 2008. Whitehill Bordon Economic Potentials Study, SQW Consulting, 2009 27 Page 56, Whitehill Bordon Opportunity, Revised baseline report: main report, GVA Grimley, September 2008. 25 26

2.54 It is estimated that the MoD contributes to around 2,522 jobs directly (including around 1830 military personnel and trainees)26 and estimated induced expenditure of £28.6m in the area which could be lost from the area when the MoD relocate27. 2.55 Whitehill Bordon is significantly underrepresented in the higher value business services and financial intermediation sectors (which together employ 1,100) in addition to the hotels and restaurants sector, (the latter is reflected in the perceived shortfall of social and leisure facilities within the town). 2.56 Existing employment areas within the town include Highview Business Park and Woolmer Trading Estate on the A325, Bordon Trading Estate on Oakhanger Road and the Forest Centre with a focus on distribution, catering and retail, public administration and manufacturing. 2.57 Whitehill Bordon is a relatively self-contained town, with 43% of its employed local residents working within the town (Census, 2001). However it is nonetheless a net exporter of labour with many people commuting to neighbouring towns and the nearby Western and Blackwater Valley (WCBV) to access employment.

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Access and movement Roads & Traffic 2.58 Though the town is easily accessible by car, it is not well served by public transport. Whitehill Bordon is accessed via the A325 from the north via the A31 and from the south via the A3, both part of the strategic highway network. The A325 runs through the centre of the town north-south and limits the ease of pedestrian movement east-west. 2.59 The A325 at Bordon carries approximately 16,000 vehicles per day, with approximately 40% of this is being through traffic. 4% of the traffic along the A325 is HGV’s. Up to 60% of traffic on the A325 is generated by people moving between surrounding local villages and facilities currently within the town. It is estimated that 10% of traffic on the A325 is generated by internal trips and the remaining 50% is generated by those living or working within Whitehill Bordon (origin/ destination traffic). Following opening of the Hindhead tunnel, traffic flows on the A325 are forecast to reduce by approximately 8%.

WHITEHILL BORDON

Figure 2.9 Traffic flows on key routes in the wider area Motorway A-Road B-Road Minor Road


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

highlights the need to maintain a local employment focus in the long term, albeit with a shift to non-car based modes of travel.

Public Transport 2.63 The town is currently poorly served by public transport, with only 5% of residents estimated to use the services provided. There are currently two bus routes operating through Whitehill Bordon serving destinations north to Alton, Farnham and Aldershot and south connecting with Liphook rail station and Haslemere. Each route operates to a frequency of one bus per hour in each direction, which is not considered conducive to encouraging use of the bus as a sustainable travel option.

Figure 2.10 Existing movement profile.

Figure 2.11 Summary of all trip purpose modal split (to 2007 base year)

How do people currently move?

Where are people currently travelling to?

2.60 Figure 2.10 shows the existing modal split that has been derived for all journeys within Whitehill Bordon based on the 2001 census travel to work data and travel survey data (2006).

2.61 Figure 2.11 shows the destinations that people currently living in Whitehill Bordon are travelling to, which is extracted from census data (2001). 2.62 This indicates that currently, 51% of all movements are internal, within the town. This is likely to be due to the high proportion of residents living and working within the town due to the MoD and

2.64 The closest rail station to Whitehill Bordon is Liss station (9km) offering 1-2 trains per hour to London and Portsmouth. Bentley (12km), Liphook (12km), and Haslemere (17km) stations are also accessible and can offer more frequent services. Haslemere station generally runs four trains every hour. The route of a disused rail line runs through the MoD land at the edge of Hogmoor Inclosure and the B.O.S.C although no infrastructure remains and the original station in the north of the town has been redeveloped as the Bordon Trading Estate. There are a number of disused rail lines running through the MoD estate leading north to Bentley and south to Liphook. 2.65 Investigations into the feasibility of reopening this corridor for rail or other public transport options are being carried out, but are currently at an early stage.

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Cycling & Walking Figure 2.12 Strategic connections

To London Waterloo via Woking To London Waterloo Ash

Local bus route (stopping in surrounding villages)

Wanborough

Aldershot Guildford Farnham

Godalming Bentley Milford

Witley

Alton

Bordon

Haslemere

Liphook

Liss

Rowland’s Castle

Havant

To Portsmouth

Strategic bus route (fast service, infrequent stops) Leisure cycle route

Farncombe

To Alresford (Watercress Line )

Rail Stations

Potential route adjacent to disused rail corridor Commuter cycle route

2.66 There are various national and local cycle routes linking Whitehill Bordon with surrounding villages, and intermittent sections of on and off road cycle routes towards Bentley, Liss and Liphook railway stations. These are mainly leisure routes, and currently do not cater for commuters. Provision of cycle routes and facilities within the town are sporadic, consisting of short sections of shared cycle and footways with on road cycle lanes on some streets. A more comprehensive and connected network within the town, linking to key facilities is necessary in order to encourage cycling. 2.67 There is a network of footways adjacent to carriageways throughout the residential areas of Whitehill/Bordon and along the A325 High Street and leisure walks including the Deadwater Valley. Due to the cul-de-sac layout of many streets, walking routes are often indirect to key facilities such as the Forest Centre, High Street and local bus stops. The secure sites of the MoD create a barrier to movement in the western part of the town, and the masterplan presents an opportunity to reconnect these areas.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Existing Utilities Infrastructure Electricity 2.68 An electrical substation is located to the north of the site, in the south western corner of the playing fields to the west of Louisburg Barracks, along Station Road. A further major substation is located in close to the A325, just south of the community centre (Martinique House). Ideally neither sub-station should be moved. 2.69 Baseline studies suggest that the electrical infrastructure currently serving Bordon is near capacity. Discussions with the MoD are ongoing and it is currently unclear whether all the existing capacity serving the MoD site will be required by the MoD when development begins. The availability of any spare capacity from the MoD site will determine whether additional capacity infrastructure will have to be installed to serve Whitehill Bordon. This will require further detailed discussions

• Glass to a Basingstoke sorting facility • Residual waste to one of the energy from waste (EfW) facilities in Hampshire (Portsmouth, Chineham and Marchwood) • Green waste to composting facilities in Chilbolton (south of Andover); Down End (Fareham); and Little Bushy Warren (Basingstoke) • Commercial waste is disposed of by private waste management companies in compliance with Defra guidance.

Water

with the MoD as their plans are progressed.

2.72 An outline water cycle study has been completed by Halcrow for EHDC27. It states that all water in the area is currently drawn from local groundwater supplies. The MoD currently uses the St Lucia borehole, located just to the west of the Bordon Sewage Works and the Quebec artesian well to the north of Alexandra Park. The study states that enough water should be available to serve the Whitehill Bordon development. It states the following supply options:

Waste

• South East Water resources,

2.70 A household waste recycling centre (HWRC) is located on Station Road, which takes a variety of wastes (e.g. glass, metal, plastic, clothes, paper, furniture, fridges and freezers, green waste).

• the MoD borehole and well (pending licensing approval) or

2.71 Domestic waste is collected by road and taken to the following off-site locations for sorting, processing and disposal: • Paper, cardboard, cans and plastic bottles to the Alton Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) 27

Outline water cycle study, Halcrow Group, 2009

• a combination of the two. 2.73 Water towers and reservoirs are present on the north edge of the masterplan site, to the west of the A325. It is expected that these will be retained. 2.74 The Bordon Sewage Treatment Works (STW) is located just north of Bordon, in the village of Lindford. The sludge produced during the treatment process is

currently being transported by road to the Farnham Sewage Works. Thames Water, who run the site, predict that the facilities will have to be extended to accommodate the increase in population from the Ecotown. It is currently thought that there is sufficient space on site to increase capacity without requiring a new site however this can only be confirmed at a later stage. 2.75 A foul water pumping station is located slightly to the west of the Louisburg Barracks to the north of the playing fields. It is envisaged that this pumping station would be retained.

Other 2.76 A telephone exchange has been identified in the town centre, just to the north of the Highview Business Centre. The information available at this stage does not allow us to assess whether it would be possible to relocate this facility; therefore it has currently been considered a fixed constraint for the masterplan.

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AECOM JUNE 2010

1

2

3

5 6 4

Figure 2.13 Key existing utilities infrastructure

10 7

Electricity Electricity Waste Waste

8

Water Water Water pumping Water pumpingmain main Electricity main 9 1

Water towers and reservoir

2

Foul water pumping station

3

Waterpumping main, connecting to reservoir

4

St Lucia borehole

5

Electricity substation

6

Existing household waste recycling centre

7

Electricity main

8

Major electrical substation (66KV)

9

Quebec artesian well

10 Bordon sewage treatment works 11 Telephone exchange

11


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Land ownerships

Hampshire County Council

Annington Property Ltd (APL)

Ministry of Defence

2.79 HCC has the freehold of considerable greenfield sites to the east of the town, of which 58.5 hectares (including Eveley Wood) have been identified for potential inclusion within the masterplan. HCC own other greenfield land east of the town which is part of the Deadwater local nature reserve (19.2 hectares), plus school sites in the town (amounting to 19.3 hectares) and the recycling centre on Station Road (1.3 hectares).

2.82 APL own around 22.5 hectares of land which was originally in MoD ownership for married couples accommodation and contains around 540 residential units. The quality and style of housing varies from four storey maisonettes to semi-detached properties but all sites are low densities (11-29 dwellings per hectare) and much of the land occupies a central position relative to the existing town and MoD disposal site. The majority of properties within the APL estate are currently leased back to MoD for family housing; however a small number have been released from MoD lease, sold on the private market and are now owner occupied.

2.77 The MoD is the major landowner in the town and surrounding countryside. Around 231 hectares are identified as potential surplus land which is to be disposed of including Louisburg, Quebec and Prince Philip Barracks, the technical training area for SEME/ REME and tank training area (Hogmoor Inclosure). The dates and phasing plan for release have not been formally agreed. For the purpose of this study it has been assumed that the entirety of the MoD surplus land will be released in 2014, although there is potential for some sites (namely Quebec) to be released as early as 2010 subject to operational requirements (which are included as early projects in the indicative phasing given in chapter 12). 2.78 In addition the MoD has considerable landholdings which are not included for disposal, but which may be strategically important. In particular they own considerable wooded areas which could provide a source of bio-fuels. They own many of the Special Protection Areas that skirt the town, providing opportunities for EHDC to agree closer management of the biodiversity. The MoD also own some of the disused railway routes which EHDC propose to safeguard.

2.80 In addition they have control over highways land which abuts the A325 and which provides opportunities for safeguarding new public transport, walking and cycling routes. In total HCC control around 98 hectares of land within the town.

East Hampshire District Council 2.81 EHDC own the freehold of a number of relatively small sites across the town including many small areas of verge/ grassed recreation spaces within the residential areas. The most notable sites include: • Freehold of Woolmer Trading Estate on the High Street and a number of leaseholds. This amounts to 10.5 hectares of land in the centre of the town. Other leases vary in ownership and length. • Freehold of parts of the Forest Shopping Centre and car parks, the Town Council offices / Forest Community centre and adjacent empty plot (around 2.3 hectares). • Open spaces including woodland off Oakley Road (4.6 hectares) and playing fields off Mill Chase Road (2.1 hectares)

2.83 The release of the remaining homes back to APL is tied to the MoD programme and on release housing may be refurbished and sold on the open market or considered for redevelopment. APL have confirmed that in order for the land to be brought forward for redevelopment within the masterplan it would need to be shown that the scheme would achieve a development value (for the cleared land) in excess of the existing value as housing stock. Generally this equates to increased density or reduced planning gain (e.g. S.106). 2.84 The masterplan excludes this land at the present time given the uncertainty around its availability for redevelopment and places no reliance on it becoming available. However, there is potential for this land to come forward for development in the future within the agreed housing targets for the town, subject to proposals being consistent with Whitehill Bordon Eco-town policies and densities.

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Other Ownerships

Ownership

2.85 The remaining areas of the town are covered by multiple ownerships. Where privately owned sites are identified as being critical to the successful delivery of the masterplan EHDC will investigate potential options for land purchase and relocation of any existing premises.

Major land holdings assessed for potential inclusion in the masterplan

Ministry of Defence

231 ha

Hampshire County Council

~98 ha

East Hampshire District Council

~20 ha (plus many smaller sites)

Annington Properties Ltd 22.5 ha Table 2.3 Major land holdings within the masterplan study area

2.86 The masterplan proposes some new uses for these sites and recommends that further feasibility and discussion with site owners should commence in light of the new masterplan and the need to accommodate a greater mix of uses. 2.87 The masterplanning process has assessed the potential for all of these sites to deliver different elements of the masterplan including built development and new open space. In total around 310 hectares of land are identified for potential change of use or redevelopment within the masterplan.


Broxhead Common

65

Broxhead WHITEHILL BORDON Farm DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN Cricket Ground

Poultry Houses

AM ROA D

Broxhead Trading Estate

Highland Farm

Wolfe House

D ROAD LIN DFOR

Sports Ground

F AR NH

Louisburg Barracks

St Lucia Lodge

Wolfe Lodge

Broxhead House

Lindford Farm

ES LOW

The Phoenix Centre

Lindford

CL

Hatch House Farm

RO AD E

Orchard House

A H C

TAYL O RS

BLUEB ELL ROAD

Subway LAND S EN D LANE

LY W A TE

LAKE DRIVE

ALMA ROAD

VARNA ROAD

RR OAD

WATERSIDE CLOSE SO N RO AD BRAN

CRES IL E S AV

AD FOR ES T RO

Stan

FIEL D

H HU RST

ROAD

W H IT E CHA SE

ATHOLL AL P IN

RO AD

ON S UTT

HEA THE R CLO SE

NEY CLO SE

Mattswood Farm

E

RO AD

M

O

N

U

Forest Lodge

T EN M

AD RO

N OW

R OA D

OK RO AD

AD RO

Passfile Commo

Whitehill Park Modden Farm

ER S F

IE LD

DFOR D HILL

Woodlea Primary School

Morrington House

LIP H O

STAN

Walldown

LLD WA

E OS CL

OAD H ILL R

Hollywater Farm

Hollywater Green

P ET T IF DR

RD LAN E S TA

E

CHA MP

LEMO N GROV E

ROAD

Standford Grange Farm

OS CL

Y ROAD

AD RO

NE LA

School

ND F O

Standford Grange

Fire Station

HE RG

SO UT

Gardeners Cottage

Eveley Wood

OVE GR

EE TR

OV E R OAD

WAY

N KE AC BR

500m

IS CU S

ON AV E

K OA

TION PLA NTA

100m

HIB

U

LINKS THE

F IR GR

EY EL EV

YB RO OK

ROAD

CLOSE

NE W

Local shops

Blackmoor Nurseries

Cemy

APOLLO DRIVE

HE NDON

Whitehill

DUDLEY

East Hampshire District Council land Annington Properties Ltd and leaseholders

Reynolds house

The Old Corn Mill

ROXB

AD R RO

Ministry of Defence land

0m

AVE

Playing Field

Standford Mill

Chase Community Hospital C ON DE W AY

MALM SB UR

STUB BINGT

Apple Packing Station

TON

M OO

WS

AD

Eveley Corner

Blackmoor

LI NG

Hollywater School

PINEHI LL ROA D

RO AD

FO RE ST

RE AND

Ministry of Defence Land to be included in the masterplan

W EL

H OG

ST RO

Recently developed areas

N

RA ND A

Whitehill Chase

Golf Course

Hampshire County Council land

CA

CLOSE

Hogmoor Inclosure

AD

Forest Centre

TON ROAD

Slab

Deadwater Valley Local Nature Reserve

CE NT

ET K ST RE P AR

RE E T

LYNTON ROAD

H ST H IG

WOOLMER WAY WARREN

E RO CH AS

Headley M Farm

Post Off ice

Library

Hall

LL

MILL

E N CL OS

LANE STANDFORD

Tesco

O

TO HAMIL

Mill Chase Community School & Leisure Centre

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Boundary of the Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation

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Weyford Infant & Junior School

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Figure 2.14 Major landownerships

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Woolmer Trading Estate

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Caravan Site

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Collects Spreads

Prince Philip Barracks

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The Watermeadows Small Industries Watermeadow Farm

River Wey Essex Close

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Bordon Infant & B UJunior School DD S LA Lamerton NE Close

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Quebec Barracks

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Bordon Camp

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Saint Lucia Park

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A unique opportunity for Sustainable Development 3.1 Since the Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, the sustainable development agenda has been an increasingly strong driver in shaping new development proposals and influencing the way we will live and work to reduce our impact on the natural environment. 3.2 The challenge of climate change and the need to reduce greenhouse gases and stabilise carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has intensified. There is now a raft of policy and regulation at all levels promoting climate change mitigation, alongside wider environmental interventions to help, for example, adapt to the predicted climates of the future, encourage biodiversity and better manage our natural resources. 3.3 Through careful masterplanning of large new developments there is an opportunity to consider sustainable development in a holistic and integrated way. This has always been a stated objective for the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity – its selection as an Eco-town supports this ambition and will ensure a continued focus on delivering development that is truly sustainable. 3.4 The Town and Country Planning Association’s Eco-towns ‘energy worksheet’ states: ‘Eco-towns can be beacons of best practice in new zero carbon development - creating communities that

are environmentally, socially and economically sound. Eco-towns should be exemplar developments in terms of effective approaches to the holistic provision of energy and other services, and they should draw from the latest advances in promising low and zero carbon technologies in the UK and around the globe’.29 3.5 As is highlighted by the energy worksheet, the scale of Eco-towns – defined as new, linked settlements of 5,000 - 20,000 homes with a good range of associated facilities such as schools, community and commercial buildings, and public and green spaces – means that there are opportunities to implement development wide approaches to sustainability. The diversity of energy demand profiles from the range of proposed land uses at Whitehill Bordon will, for example, contribute to the commercial viability of decentralised low carbon networks. The use of local biomass (wood fuel) and possibly organic food and farm waste could also allow developers to employ innovative strategies to deliver zero carbon energy to homes. 3.6 Whitehill Bordon will be exemplar in terms of supplying energy efficiently, promoting renewable energy generation and minimising energy consumption throughout the year by increasing carbon awareness (i.e. the relationship between energy use, transport choice and carbon emissions) amongst the town’s residents.

Image: street SuDS and bicycle storage, Malmo waterfront, Sweden

Developing energy efficient and zero carbon strategies for eco-towns - ecotowns energy worksheet (Initial draft by AECOM, published by TCPA, 2009)

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3.7 The PPS1 supplement on Eco-towns30 requires What does sustainability that Eco-towns as a whole are zero carbon. This means that over a year the net carbon dioxide emissions from mean? all energy use within the buildings in the Eco-town 3.10 Sustainability is principally about balancing our development are zero or below. Whitehill Bordon’s Green Town Vision31 set out an aspiration for the whole economic aspirations within our environmental limits in a way that best meets our social needs. As such it town to be carbon neutral by 2036. covers a wide range of topics that have traditionally been looked at in isolation but are increasingly 3.8 The growth of Whitehill Bordon presents a great recognised as being interrelated and in need of a opportunity. Through the masterplanning of the site we can design with a focus on renewable energy, and put in place suitable infrastructure to enable people to live more sustainably. Our consultation has shown that people care about the environment and we hope that with good physical provision of facilities for recycling waste, reducing energy use and improving transport choice, people’s behaviour will shift, encouraging more environmentally conscious decision making. 3.9 The masterplan shows how measures can be integrated into the design of new neighbourhoods and retrofitted into older areas to make it easier for the town’s residents to mitigate and adapt to changing climate.

holistic approach.

3.11 The key sustainability topics are set out at a national level in Securing the Future - the UK Government’s sustainable development strategy32 through five guiding principles: • Living within environmental limits • Ensuring a strong, healthy and just society • Achieving a sustainable economy • Using sound science responsibly • Promoting good governance

Figure 3.1 The UK needs to shift from three planet living to one planet living (source Bioregional) Planning Policy Statement: eco-towns - A supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1 (Communities, Local Government, 2009) 31 A green community vision – Whitehill Bordon EcoTown (Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Group, August 2008 update) 32 Securing the future - delivering UK sustainable development strategy (Defra, March 2005) 33 The Living Planet Report (WWF, 2008) 30

One Planet Living 3.12 The concept of One Planet Living helps explain the principles of sustainability. It is a vision for a future in which everyone can enjoy a high quality of life, while living within their fair share of the Earth’s resources and leaving space for wildlife and wilderness. Humans rely on the Earth for the resources needed to sustain our economy and lifestyles and as a result, our well-being is inexorably linked to the well-being of the planet. Living unsustainably means exceeding the rate at which the Earth’s resources naturally regenerate and renew themselves, resulting in the degradation of our environment. The WWF Living Planet Report33 shows that it now takes the Earth one year and four months to regenerate what we use in a year and if everybody lived as we do in the UK, we would need three planets to support our lifestyle.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

The Eco-towns Agenda 3.13 In acknowledging the need for a shift towards a more sustainable way of living whilst realising the ambitious growth plans for providing everyone with access to decent, affordable homes, the Government has outlined plans for a number of ‘Eco-towns’. In July 2009, the Government announced the locations of four places with potential to be part of the first phase of Eco-towns. Whitehill Bordon is one of these locations. 3.14 Accompanying the announcement of proposed Eco-towns, the Government provided additional planning guidance outlining the environmental, social and economic standards it expects an Eco-town to achieve covering 16 topic headings. Many of the Eco-town targets line up with the Green Town Vision proposals, which were developed by East Hampshire District Council specifically for Whitehill Bordon in advance of the Eco-town policies.

and viability of reintroducing rail. Safeguarding the corridor within the masterplan provides flexibility in terms of future transport choice, with the aim of reducing reliance on the private car. Shorter term transport alternatives to the car such as bus network improvements and provision of high quality cycle routes are also being promoted through the masterplan (See section 10 of this report).

3.18 The EHDC bid to Communities and Local Government (CLG) (September 2008) identified four areas for which Whitehill Bordon would be an exemplar. Practical examples of best practice that will contribute to realising an exemplary status for Whitehill Bordon in these four areas (carbon, water, transport and biodiversity) are set out overleaf.

3.17 The planning policy statement on Eco-towns states that: ‘ecotowns [should be] exemplars of good practice and provide a showcase for sustainable living’ 34. PV panel array, Freiburg Germany

3.15 The Eco-town targets have been tested through the masterplanning exercise, specifically the masterplan shows the location of linked green space which is intended to be multi-functional (e.g. accessible for play and recreation, walking or cycling safely, and support wildlife, urban cooling and flood management), it identifies places for recycling, a low carbon energy centre and biomass fuel delivery. 3.16 Further to this, the long term aspiration for Whitehill Bordon is the reintroduction of a railway station. The masterplan has allowed for the safeguarding of the historic rail corridor running north south through the town, as well as a possible location for a new station. A number of feasibility studies have been commissioned to review the feasibility 34

Page 1, Planning Policy Statement: eco-towns - A supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1 (Communities, Local Government, 2009)

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Why is carbon important? 3.19 Increasingly the sustainability debate is being led by the unprecedented need to reduce the amount of greenhouse gasses, particularly methane and carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. The proliferation of these gasses in the atmosphere prevents the sun’s heat from dissipating, causing a greenhouse effect which impacts on global weather systems causing climate change. Although methane and carbon dioxide are naturally occurring, the volumes in our atmosphere have been exacerbated by human activity including fossil fuel energy generation, industrial processes, motorised transport and waste disposal. Climate change does

not happen immediately, it lags behind the period from which emissions were released into the atmosphere and as a result inevitable climate change is now locked into the system. 3.20 The UK Climate Programme 2009 (UKCP09) has modelled different emissions scenarios to develop probability based predictions as to what the likely changes to our climate will be. Given moderate level of emissions, the South East of England is most likely to experience an increase in average winter temperatures of 2.2°C and average summer temperatures of 2.8°C. Peak summer temperatures are likely to be some 3.7°C hotter than today. Total rainfall is likely to stay constant,

but it will fall 16% more heavily in winter and 19% less during summer. The UK has committed to reducing its carbon emissions by roughly 80% by 2050 to contribute its share of the global emission reductions needed to limit climate change to less than a 2°C average temperature increase37. 3.21 The threat of climate change places further importance on the need to create more sustainable places. In particular we need to ‘mitigate’ climate change by developing communities less reliant on fossil fuels and where waste to landfill is reduced as far as is possible. There are a number of things being promoted through the Whitehill Bordon masterplan to reduce

Table 3.1 Whitehill Bordon Eco-town exemplary areas

Carbon

Biodiversity

Water

Transport

Carbon:

Biodiversity:

Water:

Transport:

The Whitehill Bordon masterplan promotes exemplar energy efficiency in new homes and cost effective improvements to existing homes in the town. In addition renewable energy will be provided by biomass combined heat and power and biomass boilers with photovoltaic panels. Raising awareness will also be promoted as part of the masterplan delivery to make sure residents operate their homes with energy efficiency in mind.

over 40% of the Eco-town’s total area will be allocated for public and private green space with around 175 hectares of land set aside for new public open space and wildlife areas, supporting the Green Town Vision’s objective of a net gain in indigenous biodiversity.

The proposed new development will be water neutral (i.e. the new town will not exceed the current water demand from the existing town). This will be achieved through a combination of demand reduction and reclamation from grey water recycling and rain water harvesting.

The Whitehill Bordon masterplan safeguards the historic rail corridor to allow future flexibility in transport provision. The masterplan also promotes improved bus networks, cycle and pedestrian links.

See chapter 11 for more details.

A Habitats Regulations Assessment has been carried out alongside the masterplan and measures identified to mitigate against potential negative impacts on nearby SPA/ SAC habitats. See chapter 8 and the Habitats Regulation Assessment35 for further details.

35 36

Building on the existing Local Biodiversity Action Plan, the approach is to conserve woodland and restore heath land, to link these with the wider countryside and to integrate these habitats into the Whitehill-Bordon green infrastructure network (the proposed ‘Green Loop’). This approach will benefit protected reptiles, bats, birds and rare invertebrates and enable people to enjoy wildlife wherever they are in the town.

See chapter 11 and the Water Cycle Study36 for more details.

Appropriate Assessment for the Draft Masterplan, UE Associates, 2009 and Visitors Survey, UE Associates, 2009 Outline water cycle study, Halcrow Group, 2009

See chapter 10 for more details.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

carbon emissions from the proposed development. Aside from the exemplar energy efficiency in new homes, the energy efficiency upgrade in existing properties and the renewable energy generation, the masterplan also promotes increased recycling of waste products, re-use of construction materials and greater transport choice through improved bus networks and cycle and pedestrian routes. Improved facilities and employment opportunities within the town will also reduce the need for people to travel (see chapter 7, 9 and 10 of this report). Figure 3.4 identifies a selection of opportunities for residents of Whitehill Bordon to reduce their carbon footprint. 3.22 Given that some impacts from climate change can no longer be avoided, the masterplan has also been used to plan for some of the expected impacts, such as flood risk and summertime overheating. Key measures included in the climate change adaptation strategy for Whitehill Bordon are: • Sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) to reduce risk of flooding • Linked green roofs and other green infrastructure to increase water permeability, improve biodiversity and provide the summer cooling effect through evapo-transpiration.

Carbon Footprint 3.23 It is clear that developing a truly sustainable town requires intervention in all areas: buildings, green space, transport infrastructure, employment and community facilities, lifestyle etc. The Eco-town targets aim to ensure that the masterplan provides the facilities necessary to achieve a sustainable town e.g. homes that have low energy demand, public transport, cycle lanes, local job opportunities and amenities etc. However, development and planning alone will not ensure long term sustainability – to achieve this there will also need to be behavioural changes. Residents will need information and education as well as the facilities to ensure they make sustainable lifestyle choices. East Hampshire resident's carbon footprint (tonnes of CO2 per peson per year) 3.24 Bioregional38 has provided an indicative carbon footprint for an average East Hampshire resident based on nationally available REAP data39, which is a useful starting point to understand the level of change that may be required to deliver a carbon neutral development. Analysis shows that the average resident in East Hampshire has an annual carbon footprint of 13.6 tonnes CO2, which is 12% higher than the UK average. The breakdown of these emissions is shown in Figure 3.2.

Capital assets, 0.6 Government, 0.9 Services, 1.4

Housing, 4

Consumer goods, 2.1

Transport, 3.4 Food, 1

Figure 3.2 East Hampshire residents carbon footprint (REAP) Climate Change Act, 2008 Modelling of carbon and ecological footprint reductions in East Hampshire, Bioregional 2009 39 Resource Energy Analysis Programme (REAP) 40 Living Planet Report, (WWF, ZSL, Global Footprint Network, 2008). 37 38

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3.25 Transport impacts are 20% higher than the national average whilst consumption of consumer goods is 40% higher and use of services is 19% higher. For comparative purposes, research on the productive capacity of the Earth indicates that to live within a fair share of the Earth’s natural resources individuals would need to limit their personal carbon footprint of 2.37 tonnes of CO2 per person per annum. 40 3.26 Green living can be economical, more socially integrated and enjoyable. The Whitehill Bordon development will be designed in a way which makes it easy to ‘go green’. Ultimately though, carbon savings will be achieved through a mix of technical interventions at local level (e.g. waste recycling provision and renewable energy systems), national interventions (e.g. decarbonisation of the national grid) and behavioural change (e.g. energy efficiency and personal transport choices). 3.27 There are a number of measures that can be implemented to reduce Whitehill Bordon’s carbon footprint and the potential CO2 savings are not necessarily directly proportional to either the cost or effort required to implement them. As an illustration, figure 3.3 shows a series of measures that could be delivered as a result of the masterplan at Whitehill Bordon with their respective predicted CO2 savings. The measures include things which may result directly or indirectly from the proposed eco-town development. The figure clearly shows that certain measures have the potential for saving significantly more CO2 than others and therefore should be prioritised where this is possible.

Figure 3.3 : Relative CO2 savings from implementing different measures in Whitehill Bordon (*Against a base case assuming that the new buildings would be built to today’s Building Regulations, with no energy saving improvements) (source: AECOM – using data from various sources)

CO2 reductions from different measures at WB Infrastructure 18,000 16,000 14,000 tonnes CO2 per year

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12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

Behavioural change


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

3.28 As a result of this CO2 saving comparison, the following five measures are considered to be top priorities to achieve CO2 reductions at Whitehill Bordon: • Zero carbon new buildings to reduce the energy demands in buildings and increase efficiency • Retrofitting energy efficiency to existing housing to reduce the energy demands in buildings • Achieve 80% waste recycling rate to reduce impacts from landfill • Reuse concrete from demolition to reduce demand for new, energy intensive, concrete production • Encourage better energy management in homes (e.g. turn down the thermostat by 1oC) 3.29 The analysis also showed that air travel accounts for significant CO2 emissions; this may be difficult to affect through the masterplan but by raising carbon awareness residents may begin to re-consider their holiday and business travel choices. 3.30 In addition, there are other important measures with considerable environmental benefit that are proposed for Whitehill Bordon even if the savings associated with them are not easily quantifiable in terms of CO2 savings. These include the following: • Improve facilities to achieve a modal shift in transport away from the private car • Reducing the need to travel for work and leisure • Grow and consume food locally to reduce CO2 associated with transportation of food • Achieve net water neutrality to reduce the need for energy intensive water treatment 41

3.31 In the masterplan we have focused on: • Designing a framework layout, strategic design principles and urban design criteria which allows flexibility for a mix of land uses to come forward, within walkable neighbourhoods offering diversity of services, access to education and employment opportunities, • Allowing for a range of densities and housing typologies to accommodate local needs and future demands, • Creating a block structure that will enable detailed design to respond to passive design principles to improve energy performance of future buildings • Identifying priorities for carbon reduction during future design stages • Indicating potential sources of renewable energy and energy saving including a combined heat and power plant; promoting water neutrality and creating a strategy for waste. • Protecting important habitats within and outside the site and identifying opportunities to enhance and create new habitats including wildlife and water corridors • Identifying land for new accessible green and open space throughout the development in line with local and national standards • Identifying potential locations for SuDS corridors which make best use of natural drainage paths that collect, absorb, treat and store water to reduce flood risk and the need for mechanical treatment, • Promoting a network of green infrastructure including green roofs, trees, parkland and ponds which all act to help control water run-off and have a cooling effect as part of a climate change adaptation strategy and an ecological role in increasing biodiversity

Modelling of carbon and ecological footprint reductions in East Hampshire, Bioregional 2009

• Promoting a shift towards less reliance on the car and a reduction in vehicle emissions through provision of a range of public transport initiatives • Engaging with the community in the process of developing the design to encourage a shift in thinking to more sustainable ways of living and involvement in local governance and decision making • Reducing the need to travel 3.32 BioRegional’s modelling of the carbon and ecological footprint of the proposed Eco-town at Whitehill Bordon41, shows that the ecological footprint could be reduced by 40% and carbon emissions by 45%. It also, however, recognises that measures within specific developments form only part of a bigger picture of changes required if a reduction to a proposed target of 4.7 tonnes CO2 is achievable. Further national and sub-regional interventions would need to be delivered in addition to measures promoted through the masterplan.

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Monitoring 3.33 The masterplan has been designed to deliver the Eco-town sustainability targets, but in reality the masterplan can only provide a part of the solution. Also key is how the residents live within the development and how steps taken through the masterplan can help facilitate a move towards more sustainable lifestyle choices. Long term monitoring will be required to feed back on progress and create focus on areas that may need to be improved. Carbon footprinting is one method of quantifying the performance of a person, town or country in terms of sustainability and could be used as means of assessing long term change at Whitehill Bordon, especially in moving towards carbon neutral aspiration set out in the Green Town Vision. It is accepted that not all aspects of sustainability can easily be quantified in carbon (e.g. the benefit of local food production); however this could be one indicator used to measure the town’s performance. A sustainability monitoring framework should be established to underpin the development and this should remain active throughout construction and during the operation.

Image: building social capital through for example, allotment schemes


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Building Social Capital 3.34 Creating a just society that is resilient through adaptation of behaviour and culture, and which finds joy in living within the bounds of nature and in the wellbeing of neighbours is a tough challenge. Truly sustainable places cannot be created where people have no empathy with the land, with water and with the essential spirit of nature. This empathy, together with raised awareness and education, is needed to shift consumption behaviour to favour the purchase of more sustainable goods and services.42 3.35 Social capital is defined as the trust and connectedness that people feel for each other, for their neighbours, who may not be nearby, but whose welfare is important to their own sense of wellbeing, and to the capacities of future societies to be able to live and prosper in an atmosphere of caring, of empathy, and of compassion. The cost of the breakdown of social capital can be huge. It comes in the form of neighbourly strife, violence, distrust, anger and lack of cooperation. It leads individuals to become indifferent to others’ welfare, to damage to property and to people, and produces growing requirements for security and surveillance. It is expensive in resources, such as welfare benefits, child protection, youth care, the social justice system, and the health costs of depression, absenteeism, truancy and general surveillance of those apparently out of step with the mainstream of society. 3.36 The Whitehill Bordon Eco-town project will help to build social capital through the community engagement process (see section 4 of this report), its push to encourage the existing residents to adopt low carbon lifestyles through retrofit of existing homes with energy efficiency measures, a move towards local 42

food production and reduced need for travel. This will be further enhanced through early demonstration projects which will help to secure consensus for the proposals from the local community. The creation of community hubs and improved routes for cycling, walking and other recreation will also help to connect people to their community.

Creating a Sustainable Community 3.37 Creating sustainable communities is a priority area of the Government’s Sustainable Development Strategy. They have identified the following elements which they believe are critical to successful and sustainable places: • Active, inclusive and safe - Fair, tolerant and cohesive with a strong local culture and other shared community activities. • Well run - with effective and inclusive participation, representation and leadership. • Environmentally sensitive - providing places for people to live that are considerate of the environment. • Well designed and built - featuring a quality built and natural environment. • Well connected - with good transport services and communication linking people to jobs, schools, health and other services. • Thriving - with a flourishing and diverse local economy. • Well served - with public, private, community and voluntary services that are appropriate to people’s needs and accessible to all.

Foresight – Land Use Futures. Discussion Paper: A Perspective on Sustainable Land Use

• Fair for everyone - including those in other communities, now and in the future 3.38 Consideration of these issues needs to take place early in the planning and design of new settlements to ensure that the layout of development does not compromise sustainability objectives and maximises the potential within the site. All of the aspirations for a sustainable community as set out above have been considered and tested through the masterplanning process. Further work will be required by the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive to monitor the process against these key objectives throughout the planning process, and specifically in making arrangements about future governance of the Eco-town.

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4.1 The development of a framework masterplan to guide the co-ordination of proposals for future development in Whitehill Bordon was undertaken in parallel with a series of dialogues with local community and stakeholders. The intention of the process was that both the masterplan team and community would be able to learn from each other, progressively improving their combined knowledge and understanding of the issues. Meaningful consultation with a broad cross section of the community was a key element of our brief from the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive and our method responded to this.

Consultation and engagement process

4.2 The approach was deemed to fit – and follow from - previous consultative processes, and also to exemplify good practice.

• Set up a progressive learning process for all, including the design team • Provide a vehicle for communication

• Economy and Town Centre – Chair Cllr Ian Dowdle

4.3 Kevin Murray Associates were engaged as independent facilitators of a series of events, alongside the EHDC and the AECOM design team, at different stages of the masterplan process. This is a summary of the events, to be read in conjunction with the full Consultation Report42 (available as a separate document) which sets out the details for each stage of the process.

• Build awareness and confidence

• A further group was set up during the process to look at active leisure and sport, this is chaired by Nigel Welch.

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4.4 The ‘place momentum’ approach employed by the consultant team is a progressive learning and participation process that runs in tandem with, and contributes to, the technical development of the masterplanning process. It was designed to enable people to engage in an open and collaborative way, helping participants understand the propositions and content of the proposed Eco-town, inputting constructively and without apprehension at any stage. 4.5

The Masterplan consultation process aimed to:

• Re-engage with previous consultees and introduce new ones

• Take the project ‘to the people’ • Engage residents and other stakeholders in the process in a creative manner • Build new relationships, dialogue, aspirations and some consensus around the regeneration of the area

Whitehill Bordon Framework Masterplan, Consultation Report, Kevin Murray Associates, March 2010

4.6 Prior to the start of this commission East Hampshire District Council had already consulted with residents and stakeholders in preparation of the Green Town Vision and via the Core Strategy Issues and Options. The Opportunity Group had already set up four thematic Policy Advisory Groups (PAGs) which consisted of volunteer members including local residents, stakeholders, Councillors, and EHDC officers and one WTC Coordinating Officer, whose role was to report back on more detailed issues to the Opportunity Executive. The consultant team attended a number of PAG meetings and specific PAG events were held as part of the consultation process. 4.7

The PAG groups are:

• Transport and Infrastructure – Chair Cllr Philip Drury • Housing and Culture – Chair Cllr Adam Carew • Biodiversity and Environment – Chair Cllr Dr Chris Wain

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The issue of climate change was covered by all groups. 4.8

The key stages of consultation were:

• Stage 1, October – December 2008 Scene setting and orientation - to input issues, themes and opportunities for the area • Stage 2, April 2009 – Masterplan Choices -to review the emerging approaches, Big Ideas and options • Stage 3, November 2009 Presentation of the draft masterplan - to present and discuss the emerging preferred plan

Engagement methods 4.9 To enable participation, in these various stages of the process, letters were sent to known residents and stakeholder parties, using a database that grew with the process. In addition emails were sent to those with email addresses, again growing with the process. Posters and fliers were disseminated to the local area in advance of each stage and further information was communicated to the local community through newsletters and the local press. All the information was made available on a dedicated website set up by EHDC. This can be viewed at www.whitehillbordon.com. 4.10 The events were planned and held at various times of the day and week to ensure that everyone could find a suitable time to attend and at accessible centrally located venues. Separate events were held in nearby villages to ensure that impacts outside the town could be discussed with outlying residents.

4.11 There were events held early in the morning and at lunchtime for businesses and in the evenings and on Saturdays to enable greater attendance by the local community. Daytime sessions were held for officer and organisational stakeholders, again to optimise attendance. Sessions were also conducted during school lessons to allow young people to participate. In addition, postcards with a short series of questions were used as a means to gauge views from those unable to attend the events (or as follow up to those attending events). 4.12 Generally these events took the form of a combined presentation/discussion workshop, to enable a closer scrutiny of the plans, photos, the model, ideas and options in smaller groupings. This was usually accompanied by plenary question and answer sessions and discussions. Site visits, allowing residents and stakeholders a rare view within the MoD estate, gave people a greater appreciation of the area. The full details, with attendance and photos, are provided in the Consultation Report.

4.13 A session for East Hampshire District Council’s Policy Advisory Groups (PAGs) was held in late October to explain the process and to draw out the issues and aspirations for the masterplan. This was followed in November by a series of events including, a stall at the Bordon Garrison firework display, attended by more than 80 people. There were also two Stakeholder sessions (daytime and evening), a Business Breakfast and an Investors Lunch. A Family Fun Day was held on a Saturday with attractions for children and participatory activities such as storytelling relating to the future of Whitehill Bordon. A large model of the area was created to encourage active participation by sticking flags with issues and ideas into the model. At all these sessions the consultant team presented their initial analysis, drawing on the issues already raised by the PAGs and community input from previous consultation exercises. All these sessions were well attended by officers and members of the partner organisations and local authorities. 4.14 There was strong, good quality participation from stakeholders, businesses, and local residents particularly given the time of year and poor weather. (There were nearly 200 postcards returned in addition to participation).


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

4.15 Attendance at the events was as follows. (This is based only on those who signed the registration sheets, so is a conservative estimate).

4.16 Feedback suggested that there was an element of enthusiasm for the Eco-town/Green Town Vision approach, particularly from local people. There was particular support for: • better local shops and community services and facilities

Table 4.1 Attendance at November 2008 consultation events

Session

Numbers

Date

PAG Preview (Hollywater School)

c30

29th Oct

• a strong town centre function, serving a wider catchment (with a possible preference to build around the existing square) • the protection and enhancement of open space, environment and wildlife

Fireworks Night c 80 Consultation (Bordon Garrison)

5th Nov

• creating new jobs locally by using skills available already and including specialist construction

Stakeholders sessions (AM & PM) (Mill Chase School)

90

6th Nov

Business breakfast (Woodlark Inn)

26

7th Nov

• the level of confidence, profile and prestige the Green Town Vision/Eco-town approach could bring to Whitehill Bordon.

Investor’s lunch (Havannah Officers Mess)

5

7th Nov

Family Fun Day (Hollywater School)

103

8th Nov

Schools Session (Mill Chase School)

20+

11th Nov

4.17 Concerns and worries clearly existed, in particular around: • the transport and traffic impacts and the need for a good public transport system (bus, rail and tram were all frequently suggested) • the severance caused by A325; the risk of a split community, with a lower standard of design and energy efficiency in existing neighbourhoods and therefore lower house values • the projected housing numbers

Photos from top: Community day; business breakfast both November 2008

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• the infrastructure, both old and new and whether it would be adequate for all the new housing and facilities • the impact on the (geographically) wider wildlife and environment through the development • that there was not enough local economic activity coming from the proposals which might lead to the creation of a dormitory town • the uncertainty surrounding the MoD and whether or not it was actually relocating, and therefore concern about how and when the masterplan might be delivered; • the image and brand of Whitehill Bordon; the current image was perceived to be very poor. 4.18 Some of the concerns about wider impact appeared to come from residents of the wider subarea, whilst those about fear of non-delivery were more locally biased. 4.19 In response to this the masterplan team developed the strategy, ideas and draft proposals to an interim level. These were then prepared for an Options and Choices stage of consultation in the spring of 2009.

Stage 2: April 2009 4.20 Drawing on the findings of the site assessment and stage 1 consultation, a series of structuring principles or ‘Big Ideas’ for the masterplan were presented alongside alternative options for the location of the town centre, a new through route, schools and employment uses. Two alternative spatial scenarios indicated how these alternatives could be brought together in the masterplan. The emerging ideas were discussed with a core group of local Councillors and the Executive Group prior to public consultation. 4.21 The proposals were presented in the form of a public exhibition, with consultant team presentations and question and answer sessions, community focus groups and stakeholder workshops. 4.22 In total, over 300 people registered (signed in and left details) at the various events (listed in table 4.2) which were held in April 2009. There were many more that visited the exhibition which took place in the Forest Shopping Centre, for which there were no sign-in forms. We estimate that approximately 80-100 viewed the exhibition and talked to our team in the shopping centre itself. Taking account of those who did not sign-in the estimated total contact was in the range of 400-450 people.

Session

No. signedin at events

Date

A

Parish Event A, Kingsley Centre, Kingsley

24

1st April

B

Stakeholder and Agency Session (AM), Forest Community Centre

70

2nd April

C

Stakeholder and Agency Session (PM), Hollywater School

29

2nd April

D

Parish Event B – Old Thorns 21 Hotel, Liphook

2nd April

E

Young People’s Session, Mill Chase School

19

3rd April

F

‘Over 60’s’ Jubilee Club, Whitehill Community Centre

14

3rd April

G

Representatives of Faith Groups, St Mark’s Church

5

3rd April

H

Family Day, Forest Community and Shopping Centres

121

4th April

Table 4.2 Attendance at April 2009 consultation events

4.23 Some 150 people also responded to a detailed questionnaire that was made available at the various sessions and on the website. 4.24 Generally there was support for the principles, big ideas and proposed direction of the masterplan, as an expression of the Green Town Vision. The positive approach to greenery, wildlife and ecology

Figure 4.1 (right) 12 Big Ideas as presented in April 2009


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

O

SPA Kingsley Common

REEN TOWN NE G

SPA Broxhead Common

10

mi

SAC Shortheath Common

nw alk

C

M

O

town centre

M

UN

Bordon Inclosure

ITY SPINE The Slab

Eveley Wood The Warren

Hogmoor Inclosure Deadwater

Big Idea No. 1: One Green Town Big Idea No. 2: If you’ve got it flaunt it!

Big Idea No. 3: A central heart

Stations to Reading

Big Idea No. 7: Wildlife Corridors

5

Woking & stations to London Aldershot & stations to Ascot

BASINGSTOKE

GUILDFORD FARNHAM

BENTLEY

Road

es

on Stati

ALTON

HASLEMERE

LISS

MIDHURST e Cond

Deadwater

Firgrove

Rd

HAVANT

SOUTHAMPTON

SPA Woolmer Forest

Big Idea No. 8: The Green Loop

CHICHESTER

fu

Hogmoor Inclosure

nc

tio

oo

em

Eveley Wood

ay W

ad

PETERSFIELD

ad

ase Ro

Stree t

LO O P

e

wat er R o

N

The Slab

an

High

WINCHESTER

ix of hom he a leisure ca re productiv e landscapes shops sc h sports rt ls spo pl n a r oym t ent

m Mill Ch

Hogmoor Road

LIPHOOK

sL

Holl y

EE

dd

lt h

GR

Bu

d

WHITEHILL BORDON Bordon Inclosure

an

SAC Shortheath Common

civi c

SPA Broxhead Common

The Warren

SPA Woolmer Forest

A32

SPA Kingsley Common

Big Idea No. 4: The Community Spine Big Idea No. 5: Create a strong, mixed economy in the town Big Idea No. 6: Create great places to live that are distinctive and varied.

nal hi

r nte

l

Littlehampton, Brighton & stations to the South East

PORTSMOUTH

Indicative green loop / grid Indicative local street network disperses local traffic

Big Idea No. 9: Excellent public transport Main bus connections Rail connections Potential future rapid connection Destinations

Big Idea No.10: A place for people, not through traffic

Big Idea 11: Making it easy to go green Big Idea 12: Change starts today!

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was supported, as was a new town centre. An educational cluster and other new community facilities were also encouraged. These views were echoed in the questionnaire responses.

Employment uses focused around Woolmer Trading Estate, former REME and Louisburg Barracks are accessed from a new commercial street.

FARN HAM ROAD

AECOM JUNE 2010

4.25 Of the alternative options presented:

The old fire station is developed as a discovery & heritage centre.

ROAD

LINDF ORD

BOSC retained for public use ‘Green roots’ housing character in the woodland around BOSC

Bordon Trading Estate

ST AT

ION

ROAD

Quebec Barracks becomes a new skills centre. Some former MoD housing estates on Camp Road are redeveloped.

LIP HO

OAKHANGER ROAD

OK

Mill Chase School becomes a hub for 0-19 year education.

D SE ROA MILL CHA

ROAD

PARK

Employment uses focused around Woolmer Trading Estate, former REME and Louisburg Barracks are accessed from a new commercial street.

A new country park linked into the town via the Green Loop. It could include playing pitches and green burial plots.

HOLL YWAT ER

YB RO OK

HIGH

ST RE

ET

HOGMOOR ROAD

LL

LANE

O

STANDFORD

H

ter wa

HILL

ad

T CHALE

De

The town centre runs from Prince Philip Barracks to Tesco, past Chalet Hill

Forest Centre

The Forest Centre area is used for community and employment once the new town centre is opened.

COND E WA Y

OOR ROAD

Hogmoor Inclosure is protected as a public green space for the town linked into the Green Loop.

WHITEH

OVE ROA D

W AL

ROAD

FIR GR

LIP HO

PETE RSFIE LD

• The preference for through traffic was to provide a new street through the development rather than routing traffic along Hogmoor Road,

River Wey

Existing MOD sports facilities and Daly Ground are upgraded to create a sports hub

HOGM

• Prince Philip Barracks was viewed as the best location for the town centre making use of the Sandhurst Block to create an attractive backdrop,

ROAD

• Scenario A was the most popular preference for the overall direction of the masterplan,

Whitehill Club land is developed for sports & leisure

LD OW

D ILL ROA

AD N RO

OK ROA D

N 500m

Commercial street

FARN HAM ROAD

The town’s employment Community and leisure Town scale energy centre is focused at a new Public green spaces Public transport hub Eco-business park at Green loop Louisburg Barracks. Improvements to the main entrances to the town Existing industrial North-south wildlife corridors Existing built up area businesses on the High Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation Street are relocated here.

Bordon Trading Estate

ST AT

ION

Most of the former MoD housing estates on Camp Road are redeveloped for higher quality High Street housing.

ROAD

D SE ROA MILL CHA

ROAD

NE LA

PARK

Forest Centre

A new town centre is created on the old High Street.

HOLL YWAT ER

ST RE

YB RO OK

RD

HIGH

LL

FO ND

O

S TA

H

ter wa

HILL

ad

T CHALE

De

The disused rail line is used for part of the strategic public transport corridor.

A larger country park and visitor facility linked into the town via the Green Loop. It could include playing pitches and a green burial site. The Forest Centre area is used for community and residential uses once the new town centre has opened.

COND E WA Y

ROAD

Leisure facilities at Viking Park on the Green Loop.

The secondary school moves to the Prince Philip Barracks area, and the land is redeveloped for housing.

River Wey

ET

A new education and skills campus is based at Prince Philip Barracks, Bordon Junior School and the MoD sports facilities.

OOR

Photos (from top) Over 60s session; Community day at the Forest Centre; working with school children at Mill Chase School

The old fire station is developed as a discovery & heritage centre.

ROAD

OAKHANGER ROAD

Hogmoor Inclosure is protected as a public green space for the town linked into the Green Loop.

Figure 4.2 (right from top) Scenarios A and B as presented in April 2009

LINDF ORD

Boundary of the Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation

BOSC retained for public use.

HOGM

• transport, both in terms of the credible provision of an adequate public transport system (currently very weak), but also alleviating the traffic impacts arising from new development (both housing and business), particularly on outlying villages and narrow rural

Indicative local public transport route

Employment

LIPHOOK ROAD

• the scale and quantum of new housing (up to 5,500 units) which was perceived by some to be too high for this area;

Strategic public transport corridor

Residential

WH ITE

FIRGROV

E ROA D

Whitehill Club land becomes new employment location.

W AL

ROAD

4.26 However there were still a number of concerns around:

Mixed use town centre

PETE RSFIE LD

• Mill Chase Road was the most popular choice for the location of an education cluster.

HOGMOOR ROAD

82

LIP HO

LD OW

D HILL ROA

AD N RO

OK ROA D

N 500m

Mixed use town centre

Strategic public transport corridor

Residential

Indicative local public transport route

Employment

Commercial street

Community and leisure

Town scale energy centre

Public green spaces

Public transport hub

Green loop

Improvements to the main entrances to the town

North-south wildlife corridors

Existing built up area

Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

roads which was still perceived to be a problem that had not been adequately resolved; • the nature and deliverability of adequate employment, both to retain economic wellbeing after the Army has left, but also to avoid the creation of an out-commuting dormitory town with more traffic and carbon impacts; • the phasing of the infrastructure and development was identified as being crucial to ensuring that the existing community do not feel they are losing out. The provision of jobs, skills, green infrastructure and community facilities early in the process was considered paramount to guaranteeing support from the community. 4.27 At the time of the events, before the award of Eco-town status, there was also some concern that there would be a ‘new town’ type approach imposed on the community. 4.28 Notwithstanding these well articulated concerns – there was also considerable support for a progressive, thorough and detailed approach to improving the town’s current economic and social position, and overall facilities, providing any negative impacts were minimised and mitigated. 4.29 There was a broadly held view that surplus MoD land should be used for new development and that the opportunity should be taken to generate positive impacts for the existing community, its facilities and economy. 4.30 Around this stage in the process, a vocal opposition group emerged - the Bordon Area Action Group (or BAAG). The Whitehill Bordon Opportunity

Group responded by inviting some of their members to join Policy Advisory Groups, while officers at EHDC and HCC sought to respond to their detailed queries and held a number of meetings with their representatives. 4.31 BAAG does not necessarily oppose all development or regeneration of the MoD site, but it does appear to disagree with the Eco-town and masterplan concept about the scale, quantity and infrastructure implications of the development that is proposed, not least in the surrounding rural area.

Stage 3: November 2009 4.32 In light of the preferences and comments received during the stage 2 consultations, ongoing technical work and workshop sessions with local councillors, a draft masterplan was produced for comment in late 2009. 4.33 In addition to the AECOM design team work, Hampshire County Council Education Department undertook a feasibility study to compare the potential of two sites within the town as potential locations for the reprovision of Mill Chase Community College. Further comments were sought on this issue. The consultation took place in conjunction with the wider EHDC Core Strategy preferred policies consultation, and findings from this wider process have informed the development of the final framework masterplan. 4.34 At around this time (12th November) the Secretary of State for the Environment, Hilary Benn MP, announced the South Downs National Park and published the final boundaries.

4.35 Between 11th and 14th November 2009, six sessions were held:• a session with PAG members and town and district councillors, • a stakeholder session, • a session with the opposition group • two open community sessions • an event for residents and parish councillors from adjacent villages. 4.36 This series of events were focused on reporting back the evolution of the plan following previous consultation. 4.37 Once again the sessions were well attended. Over 400 people signed in and we estimate that a further 100 or more visited the exhibitions and events which involved a detailed exhibition, a brief presentation of the emerging preferred masterplan and plenary discussions. 4.38 A postcard feedback mechanism was also operated by the Council, not only for those who attended, but available to others in the wider community. 4.39 There were several themes that were specifically supported, including new town centre facilities, the green eco theme in new development, wildlife proposals, and the regeneration of the Army site in the future. Many of these were also picked up in the postcard feedback.

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AECOM JUNE 2010

4.40 There were a number of points and concerns raised in the plenary discussion, including: • the need for further, more detailed testing of traffic impacts, especially on the A325 • the safety and security issues of a major road going through the town • adequate parking provision, both for residential properties and in the town centre • the provision of sustainable transport as an alternative to the car • housing numbers and heights were still believed to be too high

Table 4.3 Attendance at the November 2009 consultation events

Session

Signed in

Date

PAG Chairs, Town & District Councillors (Forest Community Centre)

18

11th Nov

Stakeholder Session (Forest Community Centre)

98

12th Nov

Bordon Area Action Group (CAP Studios)

6

12th Nov

Community Session 1 (Hollywater School)

132

12th Nov

Community Session 2 (Forest Community Centre)

149

14th Nov

Parishes Event (Budds Lane Junior School) (20)

8th Dec

• concern about the impact on existing facilities, such as the Forest Centre, with the development of a new town centre • protection from further encroachment into Hogmoor Inclosure and concern about Standford Farm and Hogmoor Inclosure becoming ‘manicured parks’ • concern was expressed at what appeared to be the proposed demolition of the Catholic Church and the nursery. The retention of a local post (and sorting) office were deemed to be very important • worry regarding the impact and benefits the development will have on neighbouring villages and outlying areas • continued anxiety over the capacity and capability of the existing infrastructure to cope with any new development • many people were still not convinced that the MoD would relocate and therefore questioned the deliverability of the masterplan

Photo: discussing transport opportunities with community members in November 2009


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Postcard feedback 4.41 Some 637 postcard responses were received. Of these 392 came from within the wards of Whitehill, Bordon and Lindford. In the 2001 census, the population of these wards totalled approximately 13,000 residents. Therefore the responses from within the town could be seen to represent around 3% of the population. A good spread of responses came from surrounding villages as well. 4.42 41% of respondents had viewed the final stage masterplan exhibition. Some 39% of respondents had been to previous consultation events. Therefore the majority were responding to the basic levels of information supplied (or possibly none). 4.43 Within Whitehill, Bordon and Lindford 54% of respondents support the masterplan and 46% do not support the masterplan. Support is stronger from those wards that are closest to the MoD site. 4.44 The people who sent postcard responses from Headley (53%) and Selborne (68%), expressed a greater level of opposition the masterplan. 4.45 Respondents were split on their general view of the framework plan at this stage, with many seeking more detail. 47% of the respondents said they do not support the masterplan and 45% of respondents said they do support the masterplan. (Within this balance there was a higher SUPPORT vote from within the town and a higher NEGATIVE view from outside the town). 4.46 The key factors and reasons given for both are listed in rank order in table 4.4, in terms of numbers of post card respondents.

Table 4.4 Leading support and opposition factors

Leading support factors & reasons (in rank order)

Leading concern & opposition reasons (in rank order)

Protection of wildlife/green and open spaces

Increased traffic/ congestion

New town centre

Poor transport links/ provision

Everything

Not enough detail

Improved/increased facilities

No of new houses is too many

Employment opportunities

Lack of certainty about railway station

Rail station/link/service

What will happen to the Forest Centre

Improved schools/ education

Lack of employment opportunities / how jobs will be created

Will improve current poor image of area / bring new life to it

New facilities limited

More shops / retail

No site for railway station shown

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AECOM JUNE 2010

The masterplan response 4.47 Throughout the masterplanning process the views of stakeholders and residents have been

used to inform Council decision making and choices around the masterplan design. The table below summarises how the consultation feedback has informed the masterplan.

You Said

We Did

During April 2009 Big Ideas •

Support for most of the 12 Big Ideas and the aspirations of the plan so far. Especially the Green Loop, protection of heritage and landscape, new public transport and central town centre.

Less support for the community spine concept and the housing mix

Used the Big Ideas as the basis for developing the masterplan, but re-thought the housing mix and provision of community facilities.

Used Scenario A as the starting point for the masterplan design. Investigated the viability of reducing the housing area.

Worked with the local education authority (Hampshire County Council) to look at whether Budds Lane or Mill Chase / Hollywater to look at options for both sites.

Developed a design for the town centre based on the preferred location.

Layout Scenarios •

The layout shown in Scenario A was preferred.

The layout shown in Scenario B less so, but many were more comfortable with the location of housing in this scenario

Education hub •

Preferred the location of the education hub at Mill Chase School – but also good support for the Budds Lane location

Less support for the other possible locations.

Town Centre •

Preferred the Prince Philip Barracks to Chalet Hill / Tesco location for the town centre.

Less support for the other possible locations.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Employment •

Supported dispersed locations for employment across the new development area

Disliked a zoned approach where all employment is at Louisburg.

Concern for Woolmer Trading Estate leaseholders

Concern about generating enough employment as Army leaves

Included a variety of locations for new employment uses within the plan.

Indicated that Woolmer Trading Estate will remain.

An additional study by consultants SQW has been undertaken and identified four new economic roles for the town to focus on.

Developed a new street layout which protects Hogmoor Road and Station Road but which can accommodate through traffic while remaining pedestrian and cycle friendly.

Reduced the proposed height of development to generally 2-4 storey.

Have reviewed the character, design, density, environmental capacity and deliverability of the scheme. Housing numbers reduced on the MoD site as a result.

New traffic route •

Supported the idea of routing through traffic onto a new street and taking traffic off the High Street/A325.

Disliked the idea of routing through traffic along the existing Hogmoor Road.

Green character •

Liked the green roots and green streets housing character ideas

Disliked the 6 storey apartments shown overlooking the park

Amount of housing •

Worried about the scale of up to 5,500 new homes

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AECOM JUNE 2010

You Said

We Did

During November 2009 Green character

The Croft green corridor has been widened to approximately 125m and the housing boundary set back. The detailed boundary will be confirmed through further ecological survey work, but Whitehill Bordon Executive has agreed the principles of a consistent boundary line

Concern about encroachment of development at the edge of The Croft and Hogmoor Inclosure.

Concern that the labels ‘Hogmoor Park’ and ‘Standford Country Park’ are misleading as they suggest a different kind of use and patronage

Removal of ‘Park’ and ‘Country Park’ from the Standford Grange and Hogmoor Inclosure labels.

Concern over impact of development on SPA’s and protected species

EHDC has commissioned a Habitats Regulations Assessment which ran in parallel with the masterplanning. This study has identified the quantum of greenspace that would be required to mitigate against any negative impacts and has placed a no-housing boundary of 400m from the SPA’s The masterplan respects these requirements.

This work at present sets an upper limit of housing at 5,300 units.

Adjustment of the indicative block structure in the town centre drawings to show more clearly the potential to retain the Nursery and Catholic Church. Other buildings for potential retention including the post office are shown more clearly on the plan.

The square has been expanded in size to cover around 1/3 of the existing parade ground.

Further work is required by the local education authority and the masterplan retains both options (see chapter 7 for further detail).

The masterplan shows the core strategy existing development boundary, extended development boundary and Eco-town policy boundary, noting that these are correct as at Nov 2009 and subject to change as the Core Strategy develops.

Hampshire County Council has commissioned a series of more detailed transport studies which will take place during 2010 – including feasibility studies for a new rail station.

An ‘Early Action’ package includes a series of early interventions which will start to improve transport infrastructure and monitor its positive impacts immediately

Town Centre •

Not clear about what is happening to the post office, the Catholic Church and the Nursery.

Concern that the indicative town square outside the Sandhurst Block is too small.

Secondary School Location •

36% of responses preferred Budds Lane while 32% supported Mill Chase Road/Hollywater Road.

Boundary •

Need to clarify the boundary of the development

Traffic impacts & public transport Concern about traffic impact in town and surrounding villages Concern about dependence on very weak public transport system


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Future consultation 4.48 Although consultation on the current strategic masterplan has now closed, a longer term programme of community and stakeholder engagement will continue as increasing levels of detailed planning and design work are developed. It is important to note that the process undertaken to date does not affect the statutory rights of any party within the formal planning process, once any application/applications is/are lodged.

Consultation Headline Summary 4.49 The key findings of the consultation process have been: • The engagement process in masterplanning Whitehill Bordon has been intensive, progressive and demanding on all parties. • The process itself has been generally welcomed and often supported – though not everyone could make all meetings. • The process has genuinely informed the design and prospective outcomes in several areas and themes – which would have been materially different or absent without such engagement.

• The process has engaged and informed many people and bodies about the potential future role and opportunities of the area. Many are behind positive change. However, not all are fully supportive of either the concept or all the detail, and may not become so.There are different levels of support, concern and opposition, including: i. broad support for the process and emerging masterplan outcome, this appears from the stage 3 postcards to be highest within Whitehill Bordon itself ii. uncommitted support or opposition until more specific detail is available on the design of buildings, spaces, roads, infrastructure and public transport. (Some may have mistakenly expected much greater detail at this stage. This was not available; however an understanding was developed that this would come later). iii. opposition to the outcomes, some from within the town, but strongest from those outside the town in villages and rural areas. There was particular concern about the environmental impacts, mainly on grounds of traffic impacts, effect on the existing green infrastructure and quantum, height and density of development.

Key aspects to consider in moving forward are i. the precise policy status of the different areas of land ii. the status, if any, of the masterplan components, in guiding/controlling future development iii. what changes, design evolution might still be applied to the masterplan or its successor documents iv. what the detailed phasing plan is; which components may be developed first and any implications for intermediate and later phases. • There may be scope in the future to get a stronger perspective from outside the area.

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Part 2: masterplan proposals


5

L A I

The framework masterplan for Whitehill Bordon

F N

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O C

T N

D

A R

T F


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

5.1 The framework masterplan provides a broad strategic plan setting out how growth and change could take place in Whitehill Bordon over the next 25 years. It identifies locations for new housing, schools, employment and a new town centre. It shows how the existing green spaces of the town will be connected with new public green spaces to form a landscape setting for the town, and how new cycling and walking routes will join the east and west of the town together. 5.2 The framework plan is intended as a starting point from which detailed proposals can be developed and tested. Over time the plan may change and evolve in response to more detailed technical work, changing markets, new opportunities and local community needs.

Our vision – ‘One Green Town’ 5.3 The overarching objective for Whitehill Bordon must be to deliver ‘One Green Town’ – a place where the quality of life, opportunity and environment are raised for both existing and new residents to the town. The challenges of adapting to climate change and the need for one planet living apply equally to those living in older homes as well as new homes. Whitehill Bordon has the opportunity to show what is possible in both contexts and be an exemplar for existing towns and areas experiencing growth across the country.

Introduction to the masterplan 5.4 The masterplan aims to deliver on a range of policy targets, community priorities, aspirations and viability considerations. These are not always without conflict, and the masterplan aims to provide a solution which balances the targets to create a well-rounded development framework. 5.5

The key priorities include the need to:-

• protect European Habitats (SPA/SAC) and provide SANGS and retain green spaces within the town including Hogmoor Inclosure and Standford Grange • provide land for employment growth to secure a new role for the town when the MoD leave • provide housing to meet South East Plan and Eco-town PPS growth targets • meet Eco-town PPS and Green Town Vision sustainability targets • provide a new town centre, community facilities and sports pitches (the top priorities emerging from public consultation) • create a public transport system that will offer a real alternative to car travel and avoid traffic impact in the town and on nearby villages • create a commercially viable scheme that can be delivered and most importantly, to create a place where people enjoy a high quality of life and a cohesive community.

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F AR NH

AM ROA D

AECOM JUNE 2010

Executive eco-homes homes built to lower than normal densities within the existing wooded landscape around B.O.S.C.

D LIN DF OR

ROAD

B.O.S.C. primary school S TA

B ordon Trading Estate

A variety of housing areas containing a range of housing types and styles. Based on average densities around 4000 new homes would be built in these areas.

T ION

Bordon Park

D ROA

Lindford

HO OK

primary school

L IP

C AMP R OAD

OAKHANGER ROAD

AD RO

Bordon Infant & Junior School BU DD S LA

River Wey NE

Weyford Infant & Junior School

MILL

E CH AS

RE E T

Tesco

RR OAD LY W A TE

YB RO OK

Cemy

H OL

LL

Forest Centre AD

H IG

Standford Grange

FOR ES T RO

Hogmoor Inclosure

C ON

Eveley Wood

M OO

DE W AY

S TA

H OG

Chase Community Hospital

RD LAN E

H ST

O

PARK

Employment and leisure uses at Viking Park with some new homes fronting the High Street

H

AD R RO

Standford

F IR GR

Woodlea Primary School

FO RE ST

Local shops

RO AD

W H IT E

OV E R OAD

LLD WA

P ET

ER S F

IE LD

R OA D

LIP H O

N 0m

Woolmer Forest SAC 100m

500m

LANE

HILL LE T

ter wa

Woolmer Trading Estate

ad

C HA

Hollywater Primary School

ROAD

STA ND FORD

primary school

De

A new town centre with shopping for clothes and shoes (comparison shopping) as well as food shops and markets. Potential for a new hotel in the Sergeants’ Mess.

Alexandra Park

ND F O

Town centre locations for office developments, leisure or cultural uses HOGMOOR ROAD

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Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

Shortheath Common SAC / SSSI

Whitehill Club

N OW

OAD H ILL R

Hollywater

AD RO

OK RO AD

Woolmer Forest SPA / SSSI


E

WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

A range of employment locations to replace the 1500 jobs lost when the MoD leave and provide at least one new job per new home

Figure 5.1 The framework masterplan proposals plan for Whitehill Bordon Key (striped areas indicate a mix of uses)

High Street/Camp Road becomes a strategic public transport corridor

Mixed use town centre core Employment Community and education Commercial leisure

Two locations under consideration for the location of the new secondary school or sports hub

Residential character areas: - Green roots - Green streets - Green views Buildings for potential retentionwithin development areas Existing built up areas Strategic public transport corridor Public transport hub - connecting with local bus routes Disused rail corridor safeguarded for potential future use - Green loop town wide recreation routes - Natural and informal open space, parks and recreation areas Green infrastructure:

- Sports Creation of new public greenspaces at Hogmoor Inclosure, Bordon Inclosure and Standford Grange

5.7 The majority of built development is proposed on land currently occupied by MoD built training facilities and hard standing, plus a number of private sites including Viking Park. These will be greened by the introduction of new local green spaces, gardens and wetlands. Some additional built development will take place at the edge of Hogmoor Inclosure to provide a strong frontage to the new through route connecting the development sites together and relieving congestion from the High Street. The woodland around B.O.S.C. will also see some development, of larger homes within the woodland setting, and community ownership of the sports club facilities.

- School pitches - Wildlife corridors - Indicative locations for allotments - Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of

Existing and new greenspaces connected by the Green Loop footpath and cycle route

5.6 The masterplan strives to make efficient use of land and resources by increasing densities in central areas, creating walkable neighbourhoods with a critical mass of population to support local facilities and a town centre, supporting connection into the district heat and power network, supporting public transport routes and stops and reducing the need to travel by car.

Conservation

- 400m buffer to SPA / SAC - South Downs National Park boundary Core strategy, emerging policy boundaries, correct at November 2009: - Existing development boundary - Extended development boundary - Eco-town Policy Zone

5.8 The need to provide sufficient land for SANGS (to mitigate against potential negative impacts on the nearby SPA/SAC habitats) has ensured that the areas of green space at Hogmoor Inclosure, Standford Grange and Bordon Inclosure are made publicly accessible and form a major recreational resource for the town.

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Key design features 5.9 In summary the masterplan proposes: • A new mixed use town centre with around 30,000 sqm of retail and a range of supporting uses, • Up to three new primary schools and early years centres and a new children’s centre • Re-building of Mill Chase Community Technology College on a new site with room for later expansion • Skills training and further education facilities • Sites for new commercial leisure facilities • Around 4000 new homes within identified new residential neighbourhoods and the town centre built to a zero carbon standard • A public sports hub with leisure centre and pitches, • Local healthcare and emergency services

• Around 70,000 sqm Eco-business park floorspace and opportunities across the masterplan for the creation of approximately 5500 jobs • Around 127 hectares of new public greenspaces which provide Suitable Accessible Natural Greenspace (SANGS) to mitigate against human impacts on nearby European protected habitats • A central public transport hub and modern public transport systems including a safeguarded rail corridor • Retrofitting of existing homes and businesses to improve energy and water efficiency and reduce utilities bills • A biomass powered combined heat and power plant (CHP) expanded recycling centre and community ‘swapshop’

5.10 The following key spatial features explain the structure and layout of the proposals and the way in which the town as a whole will function in the future: • A central heart: the new town centre will be located at the geographic heart of the town, linking Prince Philip Barracks to the existing shops at Chalet Hill providing a new focus for the town. Its strategic location will make it within easy walking distance of most residents, and land availability will ensure that a wider selection of retail and facilities can be developed. Visual connections will be made between the landmark buildings at Frisby’s corner and former MoD buildings at Prince Philip Barracks to create a legible centre with a civic character. • A central public transport hub: a new transport hub in the town centre to facilitate interchange between strategic, local and town wide public transport and be a focus for information on a wide range of sustainable travel choices. The hub will include a highly visible landmark building containing a range of community and real-time travel information and services. It will benefit the town by ensuring that public transport options are accessible, functional and attractive – offering a real alternative to car travel. • Safeguarded future rail corridor: the approximate route of the former railway line at the edge of Hogmoor Inclosure has been set-aside to allow for a rail link to be potentially reinstated in the future. This will benefit the town by providing


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

the opportunity to connect into the national rail network and avoid the need for car travel for longer distance journeys and commuting. • Linear town park: a linear town park linking the location set aside for a future rail station with the heart of the town centre is a key feature in the plan providing a gateway to both the town centre and Hogmoor Inclosure. This will provide an attractive green space at the centre of the town, creating a setting for housing and a legible and pleasant route from the station to the town centre. • High Street traffic diverted: traffic on the A325 High Street will be diverted onto a new through route designed to accommodate traffic, pedestrians and cyclists happily. The High Street will become a public transport priority route, closed to private vehicles at the town centre. This will allow for much greater pedestrian access between the east and west of the town and reduce the impact that traffic congestion currently has on the centre of town. • The Green Loop: a major new walking and cycling route looping around the town, connecting the natural green spaces of Hogmoor Inclosure, Deadwater Valley, Bordon Inclosure and Standford Grange with schools, sports facilities and homes. This will encourage healthier lifestyles by providing recreational walks and easy walking routes to key destinations. • Wildlife corridors: north-south green space corridors where public access will be limited and a range of habitats will be encouraged to flourish. This will help to ensure that the town achieves a net gain in biodiversity.

• Community spine and hubs: town wide secondary education, sports hub and healthcare provision will be concentrated in a spine running east-west connecting the existing and future neighbourhoods. Primary schools and small scale community facilities will be provided within the neighbourhoods creating local community hubs. This will ensure that all homes are close to high quality facilities. • Dispersed employment: employment uses are spread between three main sites and the town centre and located along public transport routes to encourage easy walking, cycling and bus travel to work. This will provide a range of opportunities within the town for investment, business growth and job creation. • Characterful neighbourhoods: neighbourhood densities will vary and broadly increased towards the town centre and central transport hub, creating opportunities for a range of distinctive neighbourhood characters: Green Roots, Green Streets and Green Views. The town will benefit from an increase range and quality of housing, with a greater density of population close to central facilities supporting shops and businesses. • Buffer to European habitats: no residential development within a 400m buffer zone of Special Protection Areas and Special Areas of Conservation. This will help to avoid cat predation on these important habitats and is a key mitigation measure discussed in the Habitats Regulations Assessment (for more information see chapter 8).

• Retention of landmark buildings: historic MoD landmark buildings including Prince Philip Barracks Sandhurst Block and Sergeants’ Mess, Martinique House, Broxhead House, Amherst House and the former fire station will be retained and found new uses. This will add maturity and character to the development. Public spaces will provide a setting to these buildings, embodying the heritage of Whitehill Bordon and helping to create a strong sense of place. 5.11 The components and design features of the masterplan are explored in more detail in the chapters that follow.

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6

Great places to live


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

6.1 The aim of the masterplan is to create high quality neighbourhoods that are enjoyable to live in, with a strong sense of community and distinctive character rooted in the landscape setting. A wide range of housing types, styles and tenures are envisaged to increase housing choice in the area and provide opportunities for local people to stay within the town whatever their housing needs.

Proposed level of housing growth

6.2 However it should be noted that this is a strategic plan and the individual design of housing, and in fact all architecture, will come when individual sites are being considered. In addition a further piece of work will be commissioned by EHDC to explore further design principles for the town. This work will also be subject to public consultation.

• the suitability of available sites for residential development

6.3 The aim is that all residents of the town will have the opportunity to live in a new or refurbished eco-home. Alongside the Eco-town standards of high energy and water efficiency that will be required for all new properties, the masterplan proposes that arrangements are made and funding set aside for existing owners and occupiers to retrofit their homes to improve their performance. EHDC has already been successful in securing £900,000 from the Department of Energy and Climate Change to start this process immediately.

• landtake requirements for non residential uses including green space.

44

6.4 The South East plan identifies Whitehill Bordon as a location that could support growth to an indicative figure of 5500 homes. The masterplan has tested in greater detail the capacity of the available land to accommodate housing development considering:

• the environmental capacity of the site assessed by the Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA)

• appropriate housing densities given the preferred housing mix, design aspirations of the local community and the character of the existing town • financial viability

6.5 In total around 4000 homes are proposed within new residential neighbourhoods and the town centre as shown on the masterplan, resulting in a town of around 10,000 homes and 22,000 residents by 2028. 6.6 However, based on previous iterations of the masterplan which included housing at higher densities than is now proposed and total redevelopment of Annington Properties Ltd estates, the Habitats Regulations Assessment44 assessed the impact of 5,300 homes in the area and a series of measures

Appropriate Assessment for the Draft Masterplan, UE Associates, 2009 and Visitors Survey, UE Associates, 2009

including SANGs and a buffer zone were proposed. In response to the HRA, EHDC have proposed an upper cap of 5,300 units. They are currently commissioning further studies that will inform this work. See chapter 8 for further details. 6.7 The amount of proposed SANGS mitigation land has remained the same and is protected in this latest version of the masterplan, and therefore the figure of 5300 homes is taken as an indicative upper cap on the ultimate growth of the town, beyond which the impacts on SPA/SAC habitats may not be successfully mitigated. It allows flexibility for the total number of new dwellings in the town to increase beyond 4000 if detailed design shows that increased densities of housing can be achieved while maintaining high standards for open space and other uses, avoiding unacceptable traffic impacts and meeting the affordable and market housing needs. 6.8 It allows flexibility for Annington Properties Ltd and other private landowners of previously developed land within the town to bring forward proposals for residential development subject to an appropriate provision of supporting uses (including local green space, employment and community facilities), densities in line with the masterplan and conformance with EHDC Core Strategy and Eco-town PPS policies.

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The impacts of housing growth 6.9 Providing new homes and increasing the population at Whitehill Bordon is important to: • Underpin future economic vitality following the MoDs departure, by increasing the available workforce and attracting employers to the town • Bring increased spending power to support local businesses and shops • Support the business case for increased or improved facilities such as healthcare and education which will also benefit the existing population • Broaden the housing offer in Whitehill Bordon to give greater choice of properties and an increased quality of housing stock built to high environmental standards • Provide funding for the provision and management of new services, facilities, and green spaces. 6.10 As well as assessing benefits, there is a need to assess any potential negative impacts arising from population growth and housing development and ensure these are successfully mitigated. Impacts could include: • an increased population requiring community services such as schools and healthcare, overburdening existing provision. Chapter 7 provides details of the range of new and enhanced community facilities that will be required to be developed alongside or in advance of new homes to match the increasing population

45

• an increased number of journeys within and out of the area impacting on traffic levels and air quality levels. Chapter 10 provides details of the significant enhancements to public transport and the restrictions to car use that will be put in place as part of the masterplan to mitigate against this. The creation of walkable neighbourhoods with a mix of uses, a new town centre and significant employment opportunities within the town will encourage cycling and walking and reduce the need to travel out of the area for work or leisure • use of resources in the construction of new properties – the need for new materials will be limited by maximising the potential for reusing existing buildings and reusing or recycling demolition materials produced on site. The need for energy and the generation of waste during the construction process will also be limited as much as possible by implementing best practice construction site management systems. • disturbance to green infrastructure and habitats – the Green Town Vision promotes a net gain in indigenous biodiversity which will be achieved through the protection and enhancement of existing green spaces within the town, the replacement of existing MoD hardstanding areas with a mix of homes, gardens and parks and the creation of wildlife and blue corridors to increase habitats and habitat connectivity. These are detailed in Chapter 9.

Appropriate Assessment for the Draft Masterplan, UE Associates, 2009 and Visitors Survey, UE Associates, 2009

• increased visitors to nearby European habitats (SPAs/SACs), predation of protected species by domestic cats, and increased air pollution resulting in a degraded environment. A Habitats Regulations Assessment45 has been carried out to assess the masterplan and ensure that the necessary provision of mitigation measures is in place within the masterplan. Mitigation includes the provision of publicly accessible SANGS and a restriction on residential development within 400m of the masterplan. Further HRA work is required to assess the impacts of the development on air pollution and agree the required mitigation measures to address this. Chapter 8 contains further details of the HRA.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Proposed mix and tenure of new homes 6.11 The proposed mix of housing has been informed by an assessment of the existing housing stock within the town, the need for affordable housing and a commercial market perspective. Chapter 2 provides detail on the current mix of housing types and the level of affordable housing. 6.12 In summary the key issues are: • The high percentage of smaller, terraced and semidetached properties, and lower proportion of flats and maisonettes and larger properties in comparison to the district • The perception of Whitehill Bordon as a starter home or more affordable housing location, in comparison to the rest of the District and a lack of housing catering for the ‘executive home’ and top end of the housing market. • Whitehill Bordon currently has greater housing association affordable housing at 17% than Petersfield (14%) but less than Alton (19%). • An aspiration emerging from consultation to redress this imbalance by increasing the range and quality of housing stock available. • However, within the district there is a shortage of affordable housing and a need to provide a range of affordable housing solutions including private rented accommodation, intermediate rented and affordable rented.

• The potential re-letting or sale of Annington Properties Ltd estates following the departure of the MoD may introduce additional affordable or rented properties onto the market in the early phases of development.

Policy guidance on housing tenure 6.13 The South East Plan gives an overall regional target for affordable housing that 25% of all new housing should be social rented accommodation and 10% intermediate affordable housing, amounting to 35% in total. The EHDCs current Local Plan (adopted May 2006) requires 35% affordable housing, while the Core Strategy Preferred Policies on affordable housing47 seeks to achieve an overall provision of 35% of all dwellings provided over the Plan period as affordable housing, with 40% affordable housing proposed for residential sites. 46

6.14 The Whitehill Bordon Preferred Policies48 for housing propose a tenure mix of 35% affordable and 65% private. In Whitehill Bordon a substantial scale of new housing is being proposed, therefore, a higher level than 35% affordable housing could alter the balance between market and affordable housing. In addition, 35% meets the policy targets and is a sufficient provision of affordable housing for the Whitehill Bordon settlement.

Masterplan proposals 6.15 In line with the requirements of the South East Plan and emerging Local Development Plan, it is proposed that 35% of homes will be affordable

Page 58, Policy H3: Affordable Housing, The South East Plan Regional Spatial Strategy for the South East of England, GOSE, May 2009 47 CP28 PREFERRED AFFORDABLE HOUSING ON QUOTA SITES POLICY, EHDC Core Strategy Preferred Policies, 2009 48 WH8 PREFERRED POLICY APPROACH FOR HOMES, EHDC Core Strategy Preferred Policies, 2 46

consisting of a range of alternative tenure types: • 20% affordable rented • 5% low cost home ownership • 10% intermediate rented 6.16 This will deliver between 1400 and 1855 new affordable units (as a proportion of 4000 or 5300 total new homes). Affordable housing will be focussed on 1-3 bed properties reflecting the needs of the population. 6.17 The remaining 65% will be privately owned with the aim of providing around: • 60% owner occupation • 5% market rented

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6.18 The provision of good quality private rented housing will be encouraged in the Eco-town in order to facilitate a more mobile workforce.

6.19 Emphasis in private housing mix will be placed on the provision of larger family homes with around 74% of private properties being of 3 bedrooms or more. This will address the shortage of larger homes and provide an opportunity for self-build plots and executive homes to widen the range of housing types and sizes on offer in the town, attracting households with larger incomes as well as supporting first time buyers and those seeking affordable housing options.

6.20 In light of the existing mix of housing in Whitehill Bordon, advice from EHDC regarding the needs for affordable housing and advice from GVA Grimley regarding an appropriate mix for private housing in this location, the following housing mix was derived relating to a figure of up to 5500 units (table 6.1):

Table 6.1 Proposed residential mix for up to 5500 units

Affordable Mix*

Masterplan Target Overall Mix

Private Mix

HA rented

Low cost home ownership

intermediate rent

total

% mix

private rented*

owner occupied

total

% mix

overall unit mix

% of mix

1bf

200

80

185

465

24%

100

260

360

10%

825

15%

2bf

0

80

180

260

14%

100

355

455

13%

715

13%

2bh

500

75

100

675

35%

35

60

95

3%

770

14%

3bh

300

40

85

425

22%

40

800

840

23%

1265

23%

4bh

100

0

0

100

5%

0

1110

1110

31%

1210

22%

5bh

0

0

0

0

0%

0

715

715

20%

715

13%

1100

275

550

1925

275

3300

3575

5500

20%

5%

10%

35%

0%

5%

60%

65%

100%

flats

38%

flats

23%

flats

28%

houses

62%

houses

77%

houses

72%

*affordable and private rented split provided by EHDC

TOTAL UNITS 5500

overall


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

6.21 Applying the split to 4000 units the proposed mix of housing types is as follows:

Table 6.2 Proposed housing mix for 4000 units

Affordable Mix

total

Private Mix

% mix

Masterplan Target Overall Mix

total

% mix

overall unit mix

% of overall mix

1bf

338

24%

262

10%

600

15%

2bf

189

14%

331

13%

520

13%

2bh

491

35%

69

3%

560

14%

3bh

309

22%

611

23%

920

23%

4bh

73

5%

807

31%

880

22%

5bh

0

0%

520

20%

520

13%

1400

2600

4000

35%

65%

100%

flats

38%

flats

23%

flats

28%

houses

62%

houses

77%

houses

72%

Total dwellings

4000

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Housing density 6.22 The density of residential development can be measured in a number of different ways and can be a useful shorthand for understanding the intensity of development in different areas. In this project the housing density has been expressed as the number of dwellings per hectare of land (dph).

6.25 Within the proposed Whitehill Bordon residential neighbourhoods, private, communal and public green spaces, allotments/gardens, children’s play facilities and sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDs) will be locally provided alongside cycle and car parking. There will be flexibility for small scale employment, retail and community uses to meet local needs as well as housing.

6.23 The masterplan housing densities are neighbourhood based, in line with the definition of net densities in PPS 3: Housing: ‘Net dwelling density is calculated by including only those site areas which will be developed for housing and directly associated uses, including access roads within the site, private garden space, car parking areas, incidental open space and landscaping and children’s play areas, where these are provided. 49 6.24 However densities alone do not provide a full guide to the layout, design or height of housing areas. There can be a range of alternatives neighbourhood layouts and housing typologies that achieve similar densities. In addition housing density becomes a less useful measure in areas of mixed use, where the density of buildings, rather than housing numbers is often used.

Photo left: contemporary townhouses set within green spaces creating a medium density layout at Accordia, Cambridge (winner of the 2008 RIBA Stirling prize for architecture)

49

Page 26, Planning Policy Statement 3: Housing, Communities and Local Government, 2006

Figure 6.1 illustrates the net densities of two existing residential estates in Whitehill Bordon: Essex Close and Atholl Road, showing how densities can result in a variety of housing types and layouts.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

105

Buildings Private gardens Public gardens

N

Roads

0m

N 50m

200m

0m

Essex Close

Atholl Road

29 dwellings per hectare

37 dwellings per hectare

2-4 storeys, terrace and maisonettes

2 storeys, terraces and semi-detached houses

High proportion of public non-equipped grassed areas & parking

Cul-de-sac layout, high proportion of space used for roads, parking and turning circles

Poor definition of public-private boundaries, poor security

Inefficient layout

50m

200m


Figure 6.2: Location of residential character areas within the masterplan Residential character areas: - Green roots - Green streets - Green views


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Characterful neighbourhoods 6.26 The scale of growth proposed within the masterplan offers potential for a varied range of different housing types, sizes, styles and layouts to be developed. To understand the capacity of the site and explore what different densities of housing development could look like, the masterplan indicates three neighbourhood character types: Green Streets, Green Roots and Green Views. 6.27 The proposed building heights and densities of housing areas have been reduced since April 2009 following EHDC Councillor and community feedback resulting in a greater emphasis on lower rise properties and an overall reduction in the total housing numbers to around 4000 new units.

6.29 Broadly speaking, it is anticipated that housing densities will increase towards the mixed use town centre and public transport hubs to create a critical mass of population within short walking distance of these facilities. Towards the edges of the town and where areas of woodland are to be protected, much lower densities may be more appropriate offering opportunities for larger plot sizes. This should not discourage a range of different house sizes and a split between private and affordable housing being provided in every neighbourhood to encourage mixed and balanced local communities.

6.28 The densities proposed are designed to deliver the required housing mix which has an emphasis on family housing and allow for a good level of private garden space and public green spaces within the neighbourhoods in keeping with the Green Town Vision. Density ranges are proposed for each neighbourhood character area to allow flexibility. It is anticipated that in some areas, the build densities may be towards the low end of the range, while in others they may be towards the high end of the range to deliver a grander sense of scale and massing for example. The final densities and final number of homes will be determined through detailed design work.

Photo: Eco-family housing at Freiburg, Germany

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Green Roots Neighbourhoods 6.30 Around 22 hectares of land is proposed for Green Roots neighbourhoods, towards the edge of the town close to Bolley Avenue and parts of Louisburg Barracks. The emphasis in these areas will be on larger houses of 4-5 bedrooms and of 1-3 storeys in height. House types could range from larger villas and semi-detached properties through to small cottage terraces. Larger plot sizes and gardens will be appropriate in some areas, while in others, public open space will be more appropriate to retain areas of existing mature trees, creating a distinctive wooded setting for streets and homes and offering opportunities for play and recreation. 6.31 An indicative density range for these areas is 2030 dph, with 25 dph taken as an average. This would deliver around 550 homes. 6.32 In these lower densities areas, connection to the proposed Combined Heat and Power plant may not be viable, so energy generation would be provided by microgeneration (such as rooftop photovoltaic panels) and individual low carbon boilers such as biomass boilers. South facing sunspaces or winter gardens could provide natural insulation and heat regulation, while small wind turbines could be accommodated within back gardens. 6.33 Properties would have private gardens with room for growing vegetables and biomass storage, and on-

Photos from top: East Hampshire eco-home example from Zedfactory Ltd; large semi-detached properties with sunspaces at Upton, Northampton

plot parking or car share schemes. Street layouts could be informal with access via shared surface homezones or more formal streets lined with trees, SuDs swales and footpaths and cycleways. 6.34 The sports fields and club house of B.O.S.C will be renovated and could become a more multifunctional community facility, integrated into the new neighbourhood. The opportunity to develop a small number of homes at the edges of B.O.S.C. will be explored through detailed design, potentially lending the cricket field a village green characteristic. The design of the area around Gibbs Lane will manage and restrict traffic to avoid the creation of a ‘rat-run’ to Alton via Shortheath Common. 6.35 North of Station Road the red brick Officers’ Mess may have potential to be retained and converted to a hotel or conference use. Alternatively the site could be redeveloped for housing as shown on the masterplan. At Louisburg, Amherst House and stables will be retained as an attractive larger family home.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

‘Green Roots’ neighbourhoods •

Around 100% houses

Emphasis on 4 - 5 bed houses

1 - 3 storeys in height

Around 20 - 30 dwellings per hectare: 25 on average

Around 22 hectares of this character provides about 550 new homes The countryside edge around B.O.S.C will be particularly low density

Cottage mews street

Organic arrangement of lanes & streets

Larger detached & semi-detached properties with larger gardens

Figure 6.3: Indicative layout and character collage for the Green Roots neighbourhood character

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Green Streets Neighbourhoods 6.36 Around 39 hectares of land is allocated for Green Streets neighbourhoods which again have an emphasis on family housing, in particular 3-4 bedroom properties. This character is proposed for the majority of the existing Technical Training Area, Louisburg Barracks and north of Budds Lane. The extent of these neighbourhoods offers potential for a range of different character sub-areas and typologies. 6.37 An indicative density range of 40-55 dph is proposed, which gives 47.5 dph on average to make efficient use of land while allowing for a range of housing typologies and layouts. The Green Streets neighbourhoods have the potential to deliver around 1850 new homes. 6.38 House types in these neighbourhoods could include townhouses, terraces, mews, duplexes and apartments with a smaller number of larger detached and semi-detached properties. Heights of generally 2-3 storeys are anticipated with potential for some 4 storey properties. Around 85% houses to 15% flats is the target mix for these neighbourhoods to ensure a good balance across property sizes. 6.39 Although it is anticipated that the majority of properties would have private rear gardens, roof gardens or outdoor spaces, a greater emphasis will be placed on public greenspaces, allotments and children’s play areas than in the Green Roots neighbourhood and housing plot sizes will be reduced accordingly. 6.40 Car share and car clubs will be promoted with car parking associated with groups of dwellings

or individual units. Secure cycle parking will be prioritised close to front doors to encourage use, along with space for storing retail deliveries to avoid the need to use the car. 6.41 Homes will be connected to the District Heat Network and some will have rooftop photovoltaic panels providing additional energy. Solar shading systems and large south-facing windows will provide good levels of light and passive solar gain while linked green roofs will provide opportunities for biodiversity gain. The layout of proposed residential streets could be elongated eastwest to maximise south facing windows and rooftops. 6.42 Alternative development models such as community self-build and the Danish co-housing model could be accommodated successfully adding to the range of housing on offer in the town. 6.43 Three potential new primary school locations are identified in the MoD Technical Training Area and Louisburg barrack sites which would act as local community hubs offering potential community use out-of-hours and associated facilities in line with the extended schools model. Small scale local retail, doctors and other local services could be provided adjacent to the schools. At Louisburg the school sites adjacent to the retained Garrison Church fronting onto Station Road forming a cluster of community uses serving the new homes to the north and the existing estates to the south. 6.44 There may be potential to retain a number of the Louisburg barracks blocks for conversion to residential accommodation around a community garden, forming a historic set-piece at the centre of the neighbourhood.

6.45 The edge of residential development with Hogmoor Inclosure and The Croft is marked by the route of the Green Loop providing an attractive walking and cycling route connecting neighbourhoods north and south. Residential frontage to the Green Loop will offer passive surveillance and friendly activity at the edge of the green space. 6.46 Allotments are located alongside the Green Loop to encourage local food production and healthier lifestyles, but pockets of allotments can be located elsewhere in the neighbourhoods as well.


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

‘Green Streets’ neighbourhoods •

Around 85% houses and 15% flats

Emphasis on 3 - 4 bed homes

2 - 4 storeys in height

Around 40 - 55 dwellings per hectare: 47.5 on average

Around 39 hectares of this character provides about 1850 new homes

Pocket parks

Allotments integrated into block

More regular layout of streets and alignment of buildings

Figure 6.4: Indicative layout and character collage for the Green Streets neighbourhood character

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Green Views Neighbourhoods 6.47 An increased intensity and scale of development is appropriate close to the town centre and transport hubs with access to major green spaces. Some car free areas may be appropriate in blocks immediately adjacent to the town centre. We have identified around 17 hectares with potential for this type of neighbourhood character, with an indicative density range of 50-70 dph (60 dph on average) delivering around 1020 new homes. 6.48 Heights of 2-4 storeys in general will be appropriate with a grander scale of property proposed to provide, for example, a strong active frontage to the new route of the A325 and take advantage of views across Hogmoor Inclosure and the new town park.

6.50 Homes in these central areas will be connected to the district biomass CHP, supported by photovoltaic panels. South facing winter gardens on apartment buildings, large south facing windows, solar shading and linked green roofs should all be considered. 6.51 The route from the town centre to Hogmoor Inclosure, where the proposed rail station site is located, could become a focus for a mix of uses including employment and retail. To enable long term flexibility, generous ground floor ceiling heights should be provided on this street to accommodate future adaptability and change of use.

Town Centre Housing

649 The emphasis in these neighbourhoods is on smaller family homes of 2-3 bedrooms with around 70% houses and 30% flats. Apartments, terraces and townhouses are likely to be the more dominant housing types many with small private gardens, roof gardens, balconies or courtyards. Smaller units have the potential to be delivered as sheltered or senior living accommodation, while apartments may attract both first time buyers, single people and people who are downsizing.

6.52 Around 580 new homes are proposed within the town centre area, the majority of which will be flats, although some townhouses could be provided outside the core retail area. This will help to create a critical mass of people close to the town centre to support facilities and promote activity and animation. In the town centre core, homes will be provided as part of a vertical mix with active ground floor retail and offices and other commercial uses on the lower floors. Careful design will be required to ensure appropriate access, servicing and privacy is provided to different uses. The retained Sandhurst block in Prince Phillip Barracks also offers potential for conversion to residential uses.

Photos from top: apartment living at Freiburg, Germany; making good use of the communal green space at Amersfoort, The Netherlands

6.53 Car parking in this central area adjacent to the main public transport hub will be limited and private outdoor space will consist of roof gardens, courtyards and balconies, with a greater emphasis on the use of the civic


WHITEHILL BORDON DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

‘Green Views’ neighbourhoods •

Around 70% houses and 30% flats

Emphasis on 2 - 3 bed homes

Mostly 2 - 4 storeys in height

Around 50 - 70 dwellings per hectare: 60 on average

Around 17 hectares of this character provides about 1020 new homes The new town centre will provide a further 580 flats/ townhouses approximately

Townhouse typology

Greenloop recreation route

Strong street frontage giving views over green space

Figure 6.5: Indicative layout and character collage for the Green Views neighbourhood character

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squares and new town park for leisure. People will still live within easy walking distance of public parks, play areas and allotments. 6.54 Town centre housing helps to animate the town at night making it feel safer and providing good overlooking of public spaces to protect against antisocial behaviour.

Existing Residential Properties 6.55 Under the objective of achieving ‘One Green Town’ East Hampshire District Counci is preparing a package of grants and assistance to allow owner occupiers to benefit from opportunities to improve the environmental standards of their properties, resulting in reduced energy and water demands and lower fuel bills. Details of the potential retrofitting opportunities are provided in chapter 11. 6.56 Through more detailed masterplanning it will be possible to focus on the regeneration of the existing housing stock. Opportunities should be explored for selective redevelopment or reconfiguration of poorly performing clusters. Retrofitting or redevelopment could result in reconfigurations which provide a better aspect for passive solar gain and improved architectural and urban design quality. 6.57 As these minor changes are made, improvements can be made to connectivity via an adjustment of the arrangement between houses and communal green spaces and parking. This would improve passive surveillance and property security. As part of the Green Loop and Grid proposals the public realm of existing streets and footpaths will be improved to encourage walking and cycling to the new town centre and other key destinations.

Quality standards

Space Standards

6.58 The Eco-town PPS sets out standards for new development to ensure high quality and flexible housing design as well as high levels of energy and water efficiency and the TCPA Eco-towns worksheet on housing50 provides advice on the application of these standards.

6.62 The Eco-town PPS requires that new homes should be built to minimum internal floor area space standards as set out by the English Partnerships (now Homes and Communities Agency) Quality Standards, November 2007. The masterplan supports this target to ensure that internal property layouts are thoughtfully designed to ensure maximum usable space, whilst increasing overall housing densities.

6.59 The masterplan supports the following standards (appendix A provides further background to these quality standards):

Building for Life 6.60 The Eco-town PPS requires new housing to meet Building for Life Silver Standards (achieving a score of 14-15 out of 20 against the 20 building for life criteria). Our recommendation would be for Whitehill Bordon to go beyond that and assume a target of meeting the Building for Life Gold Standard (16+ out of 20) to emphasise the importance of achieving the highest quality of design.

Lifetime Homes 6.61 The Eco-town PPS requires that all new homes should conform to the 16 Lifetime Homes design criteria which cover space and wheelchair access considerations and potential for properties to accommodate adaptations such as hand rails and chair lifts. The masterplan supports this target to ensure that residents can continue to live in their homes as needs change.

Code for Sustainable Homes 6.63 The Code, first published by Communities and Local Government in April 2007, measures the sustainability of a home against nine design categories, rating the ‘whole home’ as a complete package. 6.64 The Eco-towns PPS requires that all homes achieve a minimum of code level 4, while the Green Town Vision increases that target to code level 6. Achieving Code Level 6 can be very challenging depending on the characteristics of the individual dwelling, however the target will continue to be pursued as technologies improve and costs are reduced in the run up to the major phases of development post 2014. This includes making the buildings ‘zero carbon’ plus achieving best practice in other areas including water consumption, ecology and use of materials.


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Housing summary 6.65 ‘The Government is committed to ensuring that everyone has access to a decent home at a price they can afford, in a place where they want to live and work. The Government has set a target to build 240,000 new homes per annum by 2016 and to reduce CO2 emissions by 80 per cent below 1990 levels by 2050.’51 6.66 In response to this challenge, the masterplan identifies sites for housing which have the potential to deliver around 4000 new homes in new residential neighbourhoods and the town centre in a range of neighbourhood net densities from 20-70 dph. Additional areas for development that may be identified (for example privately owned land), or detailed design showing that increased densities could be appropriate across the proposed neighbourhoods, could increase the number of new homes to up to 5300 in total. 6.67 Three neighbourhood characters are proposed: Green Roots, Green Streets and Green Views providing opportunities for a wide range of housing characters, set in attractive leafy neighbourhoods within easy walking distance of shops and services.

6.68 All homes will be required to meet Lifetime Homes standards, Building for Life gold standard, code for sustainable homes level 4 minimum with a target to achieve level 6, and Homes and Communities Agency space standards. 6.79 Having agreed the framework principles, at the next level of design detail, design codes are envisaged to provide detailed guidance which could include the appropriate scale, massing, materials and arrangement of residential blocks, the design of Suds and landscape within the neighbourhoods and the hierarchy and design of streets. Detailed masterplanning at a neighbourhood or site level will test the density assumptions against the housing typologies proposed, informed by more detailed survey information on site constraints. Demonstration projects will be created as a means of stimulating community dialogue around design quality and character and encouraging involvement in the detailed process of design.

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Supporting the community

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7.1 Providing an appropriate level of community, retail and leisure facilities as the town’s population changes is of critical importance to the delivery of a sustainable community. 7.2 The feedback we have received during consultation indicates dissatisfaction among residents with the way in which community facilities and town centre uses have been provided in the past and the current level of provision. Chapters 2 and 3 provide details of the main issues raised by the baseline studies and community consultation. Key issues to be addressed include: i. The need for a new town centre with a better range of shopping, to provide an identifiable focus for the community ii. The need to provide a range of higher quality new facilities including schools, further education, healthcare and sports facilities and pitches in response to existing shortfalls and needs arising from an increased population iii. Ensuring that facilities are delivered in good time so that they deliver real benefits to the existing community as well as new residents 7.3 The masterplan seeks to address these issues through the provision of new facilities and services in line with the estimated population growth. As well as quantity and quality of facilities, locating shops and facilities in the right place is vital to the successful functioning of the town. Facilities should be located within walking distance of the people they serve

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public transport stops.

future residents. Therefore where appropriate we have looked to provide enough facilities to make up shortfalls in existing provision as well as meeting the needs of the new development. The predicted population change is shown in table 7.1 below.

How does population influence the provision of facilities?

7.6 It is important to bear in mind that demand arising will be incremental and based on the phasing of housing development, so not all facilities will be required in the first stages of development.

7.4 To determine the amount of community facilities and retail provision that is appropriate, an estimate of likely future population has been made based not only on the proposed number of new dwellings and their tenure and size; but also on how the existing population baseline of the town is forecast to change over time (a small decline). Appendix A provides details of the methodology and data sources.

7.7 Should further housing development come forward up to a maximum of 5300 units overall, on sites currently outside the masterplan but within the Core Strategy development boundary – for example on land belonging to Annington Properties – the population could be further increased up to an estimated 24,840 by 2031. The locations for town wide facilities for example the

wherever possible to avoid the need to undertake local journeys by car. This is aided by urban design which provides safe, direct walking routes and ensuring the facilities are placed close to centres of population and

7.5 Under the objective of achieving ‘One Green Town’ the masterplan aims to improve the access and quality of facilities for both existing residents as well as

secondary school, therefore need to be large enough

to allow for future expansion if necessary while more localised facilities – children’s play areas, healthcare etc would require further sites to be identified.

Population arising from the proposed 4000 new homes by 2028 and forecast baseline population change date

baseline population

population from new development

total population

2001

13,953

0

13,953

2028

12,524

9,413

21,937

Table 7.1 Population forecast


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Short term population decline 7.8 It is difficult to estimate the impact on services that the departure of the MoD may have. On one hand, a reduction in service personnel and their families in Whitehill Bordon over a short period of time will undoubtedly impact on school rolls and other services. However it is likely that the majority of accommodation currently occupied by families will be re-let or sold on the open market, so the dip in population may be short lived. For that reason calculations of social infrastructure in this report relate to the needs associated with the masterplan and baseline population, and exclude changes as yet unknown as a result of the departure of the MoD. Careful monitoring of population change will be required to ensure that services are provided to match needs.

Determining the appropriate provision of facilities 7.9 In summary, the masterplan proposals for town centre uses and community infrastructure which follow have been developed in response to: • the nature and quality of existing provision within the town • community and stakeholder feedback • an assessment of the likely future population generated by new development • an assessment of commercial viability • national and local policy context and previous technical studies • liaison with key service providers, particularly Hampshire County Council • outputs of population modelling using the AECOM social and community infrastructure planning model and HCC demographic projections

Image: contemporary primary school which is integrated into the residential block, Upton, Northampton


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Masterplan proposals Town Centre: A central heart What makes a successful town centre? 7.10 Successful and sustainable town centres are dynamic and active places that exhibit a thriving economy, a diverse mix of uses and a high quality retail offer. The masterplan can set the scene for the town centre to develop over time by ensuring that it is located close to as many people as possible, with convenient access and opportunities to catch passing trade. Promoting attractive public realm and open spaces and distinctive, high quality architecture all contribute to creating a place where people will want to linger and which has the potential to become a real focus for the community. Creating a mix of different uses including business, leisure and residential ensures that the town centre is active throughout the day and evening and a safe and pleasant place to be.

A new heart for Whitehill Bordon 7.11 The need for a new town centre or ‘heart’ for Whitehill Bordon, located centrally where all the community can come together and access shopping, facilities and town events, was identified as one of the Big Ideas behind the masterplan. It received strong public support in April 200952. 7.12 As part of the April 2009 community engagement events, alternatives for the location of the town centre were presented and a community preference of nearly 52

half the community (46%), was indicated for a location linking the MoD site of Prince Philip Barracks to the existing shops of the High Street and Chalet Hill. This location is central to the existing and proposed neighbourhoods (within 10-15 minutes walking distance of most residents) and provides an opportunity for phased growth complementing the existing shops and the potential to make use of landmark MoD buildings. 7.13 Around 16 hectares including the existing shopping areas of Chalet Hill and Tesco are identified within the masterplan for a new mixed use town centre at this central location. Sufficient land has been allowed to include a range of facilities and a substantial increase in the town’s retail and leisure provision, community and civic facilities, housing and employment uses. There is flexibility for a variety of different elements to come forward, depending on operator interest, local need and opportunities that may emerge. 7.14 The growth of the town centre will be phased, driven by the spending power of the increasing population. It is envisaged that the early phase of the town centre will take place in phase 2 (2015-2019) with a second stage in phase 3 (2020-2024). Chapter 12 contains further details. 7.15 The masterplan also includes the potential to reconfigure existing uses on the eastern side of the High Street, taking forward elements of a premasterplan study prepared by Atisreal53, for a mixed use commercial and residential scheme south of Frisby’s Corner.

See the Consultation event reports, Kevin Murray Associates, 2010

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Figure 7.1 (clockwise from below left): illustrative artist’s impression for the new market square outside the Sandhurst Block; new town square and conversion of Sergeants’ Mess to hotel; plan illustrating the town centre design proposals.

N 0m 250m 500m

Central public transport hub - a new corner landmark Protection of historic Frisby’s Corner

Wooded town park connecting the town centre to the entrance of Hogmoor Inclosure

Potential for a new link from Chalet Hill to the Sergeants’ Mess subject to land owner discussions


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

High quality public realm and open space 7.16 High quality public realm will form a setting for the new town centre. The existing A325 will be transformed into public transport priority corridor, with easy crossings for pedestrians and the removal of street clutter. 7.17 Two new public squares are proposed providing flexible outdoor space for markets and public events. Outside the Sandhurst Block a civic space will be created occupying the central section of the existing MoD parade ground. The MoD Sergeants’ Mess, which has potential to be converted to a hotel or tourism use, will benefit from fronting onto a new south facing square at the core of the retail area offering opportunities for spill out café or restaurant uses. The Mess’s existing gardens and adjacent woodland area (MoD assault course) will be reconfigured to form part of a new town park linking the town centre to the entrance of Hogmoor Inclosure.

A well connected centre 7.18 The potential to create a new east-west connection into MoD land at the Chalet Hill / A325 corner is being explored seeking to connect the existing landmark buildings at Frisby’s Corner, via new retail streets to the Sergeant’s Mess and then towards the retained MoD Sandhurst Block and clock tower.

53

7.19 The core retail streets in the town centre will have limited or no vehicle access in the day time, to create an attractive environment for pedestrians and cyclists and allowing for shops and cafés to spill out onto the streets.

7.22 A mixed use street alongside the linear town park links the town centre core to the possible location for a future rail station at the entrance to Hogmoor Inclosure. A second public transport interchange would be provided at this location.

7.20 Budds Lane will provide access into the retail core from the north, while the new through street running to the west of the town centre will provide access for commercial vehicles and servicing. In the early years of the town centre, interim surface car parking will be provided off Budds Lane to encourage visitors and make use of empty plots. In the longer term as public transport and home delivery services improve and the immediate population grows, the level of car parking will be reduced and consolidated (potentially in a multi-storey car park) although the exact level is yet to be determined.

Urban structure and retention of existing buildings

7.21 A new public transport hub is proposed as a key element of the town centre providing interchange between strategic and local services. This is likely to be located on the High Street (A325) in conjunction with a bus-only section of road, allowing for easy pedestrian access across the A325 at Chalet Hill and preventing the use of the A325 for through traffic. The building will be designed to act as a distinctive landmark, highly visible on the approach to the town centre from the north.

Redevelopment of High Street & Chalet Hill Area Whitehill/Bordon – Comprehensive Development Study, Atisreal, November 2006

7.23 The military buildings of the Sandhurst Block and Sergeants’ Mess, dating from the late 1930s, are buildings of good architectural quality and historic value and have the potential for retention and conversion to tourism, residential, civic or commercial uses. The integration and reuse of key existing buildings is a sustainable approach which will promote a sense of identity linked to the military heritage of the town. 7.24 The masterplan identifies a number of other town centre buildings which have potential to be retained and integrated into the new town centre in the short or long term. These include the Catholic Church, nursery, telephone exchange and the existing MoD gym. A critical next step for the masterplan is to work with all existing owners and occupiers of premises and homes in the area potentially affected by the town centre proposals to understand their long term plans and needs. In some cases existing uses may be relocated to an appropriate new site, in others the existing uses can be integrated successfully with new development and help to bring maturity and activity to the town centre from an early stage.

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7.25 The scale of new development should be complementary to the retained buildings while creating a strong frontage enclosing streets and squares and an intensity of uses to encourage a critical mass of activity. Heights of around 3-4 storeys would be anticipated for the central areas.

Mix of uses 7.26 The town centre will be a mixed use zone with a focus on retail and commercial development supported by a range of other uses which could include arts and community spaces, skills training and further education, commercial leisure, housing, and a central public transport hub on the High Street.

Retail and commercial floorspace 7.27 The proposed amount of retail and commercial floorspace provision within the new town centre core has been derived from the findings of the Nathaniel Lichfield (NL) Town Centre, Retail and Leisure Study for EHDC54. This study assessed the capacity of the Districts’ towns to accommodate increased town centre uses, based on the existing provision, the town centre catchments and likely need arising from changes in population. It also provided guidance on the appropriate mix of other commercial uses to support retail in the district’s town centres.

Photos: a greater range of comparison shopping and spaces for markets and community events are important priorities for the town centre 54

7.28 Around 40,000 sqm of gross, retail and commercial floorspace is proposed in the masterplan, of which 60% is retail and the remaining 40% is split between restaurants, food, takeaways, pubs (10%), offices (23%) and financial and professional services including banks (7%) following guidance in the NL study. 7.29 Within the office mix there may be potential for both professional and civic offices subject to HCC, EHDC and Town Council operational requirements. 7.30 Around 80% of the retail floorspace proposed is for comparison shopping (i.e. clothes, furniture, electrical goods etc), which addresses the current imbalance noted within the town between convenience (food, newsagent etc) and comparison retail. 7.31 In addition to these figures an allowance has been made for the relocation of around 5300 sqm retail floorspace into the new town centre from the Forest Centre, as recommended by the GVA Grimley Baseline Report 200855. 7.32 The proposed retail and commercial provision appropriate to a growth of around 4000 new homes is summarised in table 7.2 and derived from the AECOM population forecasts and NL study. 7.33 The table also indicates how the town centre might grow in the longer term if housing numbers reach the maximum figure of 5300 units as a result of additional land within the town being redeveloped, however this would be dependent on the success and viability of earlier phases and impacts on other existing retail centres. (See chapter 6 for further details of housing numbers).

Town centres, retail and leisure study, Nathaniel Lichfield and Partners, April 2007


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Commercial leisure

Table 7.2 Proposed town centre floorspace

7.34 Smaller footprint commercial leisure uses could be accommodated within the core of the town centre, but to allow space for larger footprint uses such as cinema, health club or bowling alley, sites at the edge of the town centre, to the west of the Sandhurst Block have been identified. Viking Park is also identified in part for leisure uses which could be linked to the Green Loop and Hogmoor Inclosure. In total outside the town centre core around 2.5 hectares for commercial leisure uses are identified.

Supported by the masterplan

Longer term

date

2028

2031

homes

4000

5300

development population*

9413

12475

51291

54353

9975

10645

19370

21668

population zone 5**

Retail (A1) convenience gross floorspace sqm*** comparison gross floorspace sqm

Total gross A1 retail floorspace sqm *** 29346

32313

Non Retail Uses A3-A5 restaurants, food, takeways, pubs

4008

B1 Offices 9218 A2 financial/prof services 2805

10355 3151

Total non retail uses sqm 16030

18008

Total gross floorspace (sqm) 45376

50321

* population derived from AECOM SIF Model ** includes zone 5 catchment baseline population (NLP) at 2026. Forecasts beyond 2026 unavailable. *** includes reprovision of 5300sqm Forest Centre retail floorspace 55

4502

Table 5.2, The Whitehill/Bordon Opportunity, DRAFT Revised Baseline Report Volume 2, GVA Grimley, April 2008,

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Other uses

The Forest Centre

7.35 The area identified for town centre uses will remain flexible to accommodate a range of alternative uses that may come forward including:

7.36 The existing shopping centre and community facilities at the Forest Centre will continue to operate until such time as the retailers/operators can be relocated to the new town centre location to form a critical mass of activity in one main location. However, it is likely that the Forest Centre will continue to provide local retail and community facilities to meet the needs of the immediate population as part of a mixed use development.

• Residential: around 580 dwellings could be accommodated within the town centre core, predominantly as flats above shops, or as part of a vertical mix with offices. • Arts and community spaces: flexible community space for events, classes, and performances could be provided with potential links to existing facilities such as the Phoenix arts centre. • Skills training and further education: the town centre is under consideration as a location for the provision of either or both of these educational uses. • Hotel and tourism uses: the Sergeants’ Mess has potential for conversion to a hotel or youth hostel, and tourist information could be provided at the central transport hub. • Public transport: The central transport hub will be an iconic structure within which information about sustainable travel will be provided but it could have a wider role as a centre for community and civic information.

Figure 7.2 Location of proposed community facilities and town centre

Renovation of Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club

Up to 3 new primary forming local community hubs Primary care centre

Community facilities 7.37 The masterplan includes a range of community facilities covering education, health, sports and other services to meet the needs of the population as the town expands. It is important that these facilities are provided concurrently with the development of housing to meet needs as they arise. We would recommend that the delivery of new facilities phased to match housing growth should be a key performance indicator to measure the success of the development.

Community spine and neighbourhood hub model 7.38 The east-west spine of Mill Chase Road and Budds Lane is the location for a number of existing community facilities including Bordon Junior and Infants School, Weyford Primary and Weyford Junior school, Hollywater School, Mill Chase Community Technology College, Mill Chase Leisure Centre and MoD facilities including Bordon Garrison Pool and the Daly Ground Stadium. The masterplan proposals strengthen this ‘community spine’ with the provision of a new public sports hub, secondary school, children’s centre and

Community focused mix of uses at the Forest Centre Leisure and employment uses at Viking Park Mixed use town centre Commercial leisure (mixed with employment uses) Indoor and outdoor sports and leisure Other community facilities Education: - Existing primary schools - New primary schools, early years centres and children’s centre. Dashed circles show an approximate 5 minute walk. - Locations under consideration for the new secondary school buildings OR the new sports hub.


Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

Shortheath Common SAC / SSSI

F AR NH

AM ROA D

WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

D LIN DF OR

Retention of the Garrison Church

ROAD

Phoenix Theatre

B.O.S.C. primary school S TA

B ordon Trading Estate

T ION

Bordon Park

D ROA

Former firestation becomes a Museum of the Future

Lindford

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Alexandra Park

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Weyford Infant & Junior School

SPINE

Town Centre

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De YB RO OK

Cemy

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LL

H IG

PARK

Tesco

Forest Centre AD

Woolmer Trading Estate

O

Standford Grange

FOR ES T RO

Hogmoor Inclosure

Eveley Wood

M OO

S TA

H OG

Chase Community Hospital C ON DE W AY

AD R RO

Standford

F IR GR

FO RE ST

Local shops

RO AD

WH

Woodlea Primary School

OV E R OAD

N OW LLD WA

R OA D

LIP H O

P ET

ER S F

IE LD

St Matthew’s Primary School

N

100m

500m

Secondary school location option 2: Mill Chase/ Hollywater Road.

LANE

H

ter wa

HILL LE T

LY W A TE

ad

C HA

Hollywater Primary School

ROAD

RD LAN E

LA

River Wey

STA ND FORD

primary school

S

ND F O

HOGMOOR ROAD

DD

RR OAD

BU

AD RO

Bordon Infant & Junior School

OK

primary care centre

Secondary school location option 1:Budds Lane.

HO

primary school

L IP

C AMP R OAD

OAKHANGER ROAD

0m

125

Woolmer Forest SAC

Whitehill Club

L ROAD IT E H IL

Hollywater

AD RO

Leisure or tourism at Whitehill Club

OK RO AD

Woolmer Forest SPA / SSSI


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primary care centre alongside the new town centre. The east –west spine contains the public transport hub at its centre, while the Green Loop provides easy walking and recreational routes, connecting the east and west of the town together through the use of shared facilities. 7.39 At the neighbourhood level, three new primary schools will act as community hubs at the heart of the new communities, with potential to co-locate other local services and offer a range of out-of-hours community uses under the extended schools model.

Education 7.40 Hampshire County Council, the education authority covering Whitehill Bordon, has provided advice on the requirement for new secondary and primary schools as a result of the proposed development.

P re-school and Primary Education 7.41 The four existing schools that serve Whitehill Bordon and the adjacent village of Blackmoor are retained and will continue to serve the existing neighbourhoods, although catchments may be adjusted in light of the location of new development. The number of primary age pupils arising from the development of around 4000 is estimated at around 1020 (calculated as 0.3 primary pupils per dwelling excluding one bed properties as advised by Hampshire County Council). Should a development of 5300 homes occur, this figure would increase to around 1,351 children. This equates to the need for between 5 and 7 new forms of entry at primary level.

7.42 Due to the layout of the development sites and the need to ensure easy walking distances between schools and homes and allow for long term flexibility, three sites for primary schools are indentified at the heart of the new residential neighbourhoods. 7.43 Pre-school childcare facilities will be provided at each of the new schools, and as part of a new children’s centre (0.65 ha) for which possible locations include to the west of the town centre or at Mill Chase Road. The final location will depend on catchments and need analysis. 7.44 It is proposed that two primary schools of two form entry plus pre-school facilities (requiring approximately 2.25 hectares per site), and one primary school of three form entry primary plus pre-school facility (requiring approximately 3.05 hectares) could be provided to meet the needs arising from up to 5300 homes (7 forms of entry in total). 7.45 The primary and pre-school facilities will include school halls available for community use out of hours, and will form local community hubs alongside small scale retail, employment, places of worship and other community uses.

Secondary education 7.46 It is proposed that Mill Chase Community Technology College will be rebuilt on a new site forming the single secondary school serving the whole of the Eco-town. Two sites are being considered within the masterplan. This proposal is aimed at promoting good educational achievement across the town under the ‘One Green Town’ objective bringing both communities together

through a shared education vision. Proposals are under development to deliver the initial relocation of the existing school during the early stages of the development (subject to funding by the government’s Building Schools for the Future programme), ensuring that modern high quality facilities are available for town residents before the majority of new homes are completed. This will act as an attraction to families looking to relocate to the area and nearby families, boosting school rolls. 7.47 As the population of the town continues to grow over the course of the development, the Secondary School will be expanded to accommodate an increased number of pupils. For a growth of 4000 homes (calculated as 0.21 secondary pupils per dwelling excluding one bed properties as advised by Hampshire County Council) plus the 800 pupil existing baseline demand, approximately 1514 secondary age places could be required in the town. This increases to 1714 secondary age pupils for 5300 homes. To allow for a potential wider catchment and uncertainties regarding pupil participation rate and pupil yield, Hampshire County Council has advised that provision should be made for a minimum of 1800 pupils. 7.48 An extended schools model is proposed, which could provide extra curricular activities, including adult education and internet learning, study support, play/ recreation, music, arts and crafts and other special interest clubs, volunteering and business and enterprise activities. Extended schools can also provide parenting support including family learning, swift and easy access to targeted and specialist services such as speech and language therapy and community access to facilities including ICT and sports facilities. The school will have sports facilities, such as an all weather pitch and sports hall that will be available for community use out of hours.


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7.49 Additional community facilities such as healthcare could be co-located with the school, although management arrangements would need to be established to maintain school security and ensure uses are compatible. These arrangements have been successfully set up in other new schools. 7.50 Building Bulletin 98 (BB98)56 provides guidance on the appropriate site area for secondary schools on unconstrained sites.

7.53 Reflecting these top two preferred sites, and given the requirement for efficient use of land and protection of green space, Hampshire County Council is working with Mill Chase Community Technology College to explore the potential for the delivery of a much more compact school design at one of the following locations:

The location of the secondary school 7.51 The decision on the location of the secondary school is of major importance to the successful planning and implementation of the Eco-town and notably its educational, community and economic development.

7.52 Four potential locations for the main education i. hub for the town were tested with the community in ii. April 2009: Budds Lane, around Mill Chase School, Quebec Barracks/west of the A325 and The Croft. 49% of responses preferred Mill Chase School, whilst 25% preferred Budds Lane57.

North of Budds Lane Mill Chase Road / Hollywater Road

Table 7.3 Predicted demand for secondary school places and BB98 site requirements

Homes

Town wide pupil numbers (0.21 per dwelling excluding 1 bed properties)

Assumed minimum pupil spaces required, allowing for uncertainty of demand

Likely site area from: (ha)

To: (ha)

Of which sports pitches and games: (ha)

4000

1514

1800

10.5

12.2

7.7

5300

1746

2000

11.8

13.4

8.5

Building Bulletin 98, Briefing Framework for Secondary School Projects Revision of BB82: Area Guidelines for Schools (Secondary section), DFES, 2004 57 Whitehill Bordon Masterplan consultation event reports, Kevin Murray Associates, 2010 56

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North of Budds Lane 7.54 This site, adjacent to the Bordon Junior and Infants School is currently MoD sports pitches including the Daly Ground stadium. It sits close to the proposed town centre and public transport hub and would help to provide a critical mass of activity at the heart of the town. he new location would help to emphasise the step change in quality and break away from negative perceptions relating to the existing school. However due to the proximity of the site to the town centre, the demands on the land for other uses including housing and the proposed through route connecting the town centre to Louisburg are more intense, resulting in a constrained site of around 7.7 hectares.

statutory playing field woodland/ habitat hardplay

existing pitch

access/ car parking children’s centre

7.55 The County Council wishes to provide a zero/ very low carbon design located so as to form an integral part of the new development of the town. In that respect the Budds Lane site with close proximity to the town centre is well located but is currently too small to provide the range of facilities required.

Bordon Junior and Infant school

Weyford infant & junior school

access/ car parking

Hollywater School

outdoor social space town council playing fields STP

existing Mill Chase School site reused for leisure or skills training

MUGA

school playing fields

Figure 7.3 Indicative proposals for the secondary school at Budds Lane (top), and Mill Chase Road (below). (Source Hampshire County Council)

potential wind turbine


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Mill Chase Road / Hollywater Road 7.56 Under this option the existing secondary school on Mill Chase Road would be relocated to the east of Hollywater Road, utilising existing school playing fields and farmland within Hampshire County Council’s ownership. The site available in this location is less constrained and the secondary school would sit adjacent to both the Hollywater Special School and Weyford Infants and Junior School. A site of around 8.3 hectares is shown in figure 7.2. It is unlikely to be viable in operational terms to relocate the school within the current school grounds as there would be a requirement to maintain functionality of both the leisure centre and school facilities throughout the build. There may be potential to explore greater site reconfiguration including Hollywater Road, the existing Mill Chase School site and Mill Chase recreation ground. However, this site is located at the periphery of the town and away from the central public transport hub and main access routes. By redeveloping the school adjacent to its current site, the opportunity for a perceived ‘fresh start’ may be missed. 7.57 Indicative proposals for both locations were tested with the community in November 2009. 36% of responses preferred Budds Lane while 32% preferred Hollywater Road, which reflects the fact that each site has positive and negative aspects. 7.58 It is intended that no immediate decision should be made on the location and that the options of a site close to the town centre or Hollywater Road should be kept open. The site selection will

be influenced by a number of factors including the desires of the Mill Chase School parents, local schools partnership and educational authority, the availability of sports facilities, alternative sites and central government funding together with the statutory processes involved with the re-provision of the secondary school and the extent of the grouping of 14-19 years education and skills training. 7.59 As a result the two alternative locations are shown in the masterplan at this time.

Sixth form/further education provision Sixth form 7.60 The provision of sixth form facilities is being considered as part of the strategic planning of education for 11 to 19 year olds. The development of 14-19 education means the planning for pupils education is no longer separated into 11-16 and 16-19, therefore any facility related to education post 16 has a relationship with pre 16. 7.61 Any sixth form will need to be of a suitable size to provide the high quality facilities and education opportunities for its students. The opportunity to work with local colleges on such provision will be pursued. It is essential that any provision reflects the identified needs for local students reflecting the aspirational nature of the Ecotown development and education provision to serve Whitehill Bordon

Skills training 7.62 Skills training currently takes place in former school classrooms at Mill Chase Community Technology College and in the early stages of the development it is proposed that this arrangement will continue and expand. The Mill Chase Community Technology College is keen to expand the skills centre which serves a much wider catchment than Whitehill Bordon alone. Following the departure of the MoD a facility of around 2,000-3,000 sqm could be provided either in a purpose built facility at Quebec, within the new town centre, or utilising one of the former MoD engineering training facilities south of Budd’s Lane alongside employment uses. 7.63 The County Council has also highlighted the potential to continue to provide skills training alongside secondary education to create an education hub at either Budds Lane or Mill Chase Road. 7.64 The form and location of the sixth form and further education will be determined as detailed proposals for the town are worked up in greater detail and clarity emerges on the demand and funding of these facilities.

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Supporting Healthy Communities 7.65 POLICY S1 of the South East Plan58 identifies the role of development planning in addressing the causes of ill health, by providing access to open spaces for physical recreation, cultural facilities, high quality affordable housing for all social groups and healthier forms of transport. 7.66 The Eco-town will have the potential to improve residents’ health along with carbon footprint reductions. Eating local and fresh produce is just one area of overlap. We recommend that the links between better housing, better diet and more exercise are investigated and that people are encouraged to take advantage of this excellent win-win situation.

Health 7.67 The AECOM Social Infrastructure Model has identified a requirement for around 5 additional GPs and 4 additional dentists to serve the new population from 4000 new homes, the majority of which could be located in a new primary care centre (PCC). This would increase to 7 GPs and 5 dentists should 5300 homes be built. Land has been identified to the west of the town centre for this facility adjacent to schools, the existing MoD leisure centre and higher density residential neighbourhoods for this facility to enable easy access and linked trips. There may be potential for co-location of this facility with the children’s centre. Healthcare could also be provided within the neighbourhoods as part of local community hubs.

7.68 The GVA Grimley baseline report (page 77) based on consultation with the PCT has identified that the local Chase Hospital provides adequate provision of routine health services and performs many of the functions associated with a ‘Polyclinic’. Additional acute services should be easily accommodated at this facility, though at present the Health Authority has no plans to provide it. This will need to be the subject of further consultation as it is an issue of concern for local people. 7.69 The proposed new primary care centre is located away from Chase Hospital thereby ensuring Whitehill Bordon is well covered geographically to meet the healthcare needs of the new and existing population. 7.70 Additionally, consultation with key stakeholders and service providers have identified a growing requirement for at home social care. New housing will be required to meet Lifetime Homes standards to assist with the care of people within their homes and sheltered housing could be provided as part of the residential mix.

Photos: local produce markets will offer healthy food choices, while facilities will be within easy walking distance of residents 58

Page 181, The South East Plan Regional Spatial Strategy for the South East of England, GOSE, May 2009


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Arts and Culture 7.71 The potential for attracting a more diverse and vibrant mix of activities and facilities to the town is one of the potential benefits to the local community of a growing Eco-town. This dimension (town centre provision in particular) has received a high level of support in our consultation feedback, including from people who may have reservations or concerns about other aspects. The key issue is around how much can be provided over time, and how readily different commercial operators can be persuaded to come to the town. The statistics of investment and the critical mass of planned new housing and jobs may be a strong motivational factor here. 7.72 The modern library at the Forest Centre will be retained in the short to medium term, but in the longer term the potential to relocate the facility to the new town centre could be explored to offer a wider range of services and links to other arts and cultural activities. 7.73 The Phoenix Theatre will also be retained on its current site on Station Road providing a range of arts and education events. The Phoenix is actively seeking grant aid to improve the disabled access and heating services, upgrade the building, extend the theatre space and build a new café. 7.74 The PAG groups have identified the potential for provision of a local museum. This could have a range of functions including temporary and permanent exhibition space covering town heritage, Eco-town information and demonstration projects. EHDC has recently purchased the former Fire Station on Camp Road and are developing a ‘Museum of the Future’ concept for the building. Early design studies indicate that the building

could provide space for a natural history collection and interpretation, a local history collection and the ecostation exhibition which will provide a large temporary exhibition space in the appliance hall and a 25 person lecture theatre. Meeting rooms and office space can also be provided from this building. 7.75 The town centre will of course provide a location for a whole new series of arts and cultural activities both public sector aided as well as commercially led. 7.76 The NL town centres study59 identified the potential scope for a small cinema in one of the main town centres in the District i.e. Petersfield or Whitehill Bordon. Given that as a result of growth, Whitehill Bordon will become the largest town in the district it would be well placed for this facility. This would require a commercial backer.

The Faith Community 7.77 Discussions were held with representatives from different Faith Groups, including on one occasion as a collective grouping. They provided views on the general community and their concerns and future needs. The provision of facilities for the different faith communities is viewed as an important part of the overall community infrastructure and will need to be met through a combination of existing facilities and some new build within the masterplan area. This is a matter for detailed dialogue in the next stages.

Photos: cultural events and festivals could occupy the new town squares and green spaces. This example is taken at ‘the Sultan’s Elephant’ a travelling arts event.

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7.78 The Garrison Church on Station Road will be retained with potential to continue to provide space for worship or other community activities. Flexibility within the detailed neighbourhood and town centre planning will allow for other religious proposals to come forward where appropriate.

7.83 The standards highlight an undersupply against all other categories most notably parks, sports and recreation of which 50% should be formal sports pitches. Currently only Mill Chase leisure centre and Mill Chase Recreation Ground provide public pitches and changing facilities.

Leisure and Recreation 7.79 EHDC’s Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study (2008)60 sets out the local requirements for provision of recreational open space and built sports and leisure facilities. A strong theme emerging from public consultation has been the shortage of sports facilities within the existing town and the need to improve this situation for the existing residents.

7.84 It should be noted that all MoD recreation sites have been excluded from these figures because ‘ the casual nature of the use licences (where available) mean that longer term access to facilities by an outside user cannot be assured. Therefore, although MoD facilities have been recorded in the audits underpinning this report, they are not considered to be sufficiently ‘available’ at this time to count towards local community provision.’ 62

Table 7.4 Existing quantity statistics for the Whitehill/ Bordon area only Based on a population of 13,418

Typology

Existing quantity (ha)

Required quantity (ha/1000)

Required quantity (ha)

Level of provision against requirements (ha)

Supply

Allotments

0.39

0.20

2.68

-2.29

Under Supply

Children’s Play Space

1.43

0.25

3.35

-1.92

Under Supply

Informal Open Space

5.82

1.00

13.42

-7.60

Under Supply

Sports and open space 7.80 The open space study has assessed the existing quantity, quality and accessibility of open space and facilities within Whitehill Bordon identifying shortfalls in a number of areas which the masterplan has sought to address in addition to the needs arising from the new population. 7.81 Table7.4 summarises the existing and required standards of open space drawn from the EHDC study.61 7.82 Highlighting the richness of the natural landscape setting of the town, and walking routes including the Deadwater Valley, Alexandra Park and other nearby areas, the town is clearly extremely well provided for in terms of natural greenspace.

Natural Greenspace 189.23

1.00

13.42

175.81

Sufficient Supply

Parks, Sport & Recreation Grounds (50% for sports) 3.18

1.00

13.42

-10.24

Under Supply

Parks, Sport & Recreation Grounds (limited access)

0.00

0.00

2.32

N/A

2.32

Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study, East Hampshire District Council, 2008 Page 6, Part 2: Area Profiles , SUB AREA 4 Whitehill, Bramshott & Liphook, Grayshott, Headley, Lindford: Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study, East Hampshire District Council, April 2008

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7.85 Future town wide requirements based on a population of 21,937 (estimated population arising from up to 4000 new homes, plus baseline population forecast to 2026) are given in table 7.5. These figures have formed part of the green space targets for the masterplan, noting that this goes beyond the requirements relating to the new homes and looks to meet existing shortfalls where possible through improvement of existing facilities and provision of additional new facilities. For a development of 5,300 homes identified green space provision can be accommodated in the current masterplan. 7.86 Chapter 8 sets how the masterplan proposals have met these standards as part of the network of proposed new green infrastructure and their relationship to other policy targets in particular the requirement to provide SANGS.

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Table 7.5: Target provision of open space, sports and recreation

Typology

Required quantity standard (ha per 1000 popn)

Required for 4000 new homes, 9413 population only (ha)

Required for whole town, 21937 population minus existing provision (ha)

Allotments

0.20

1.88

4.00

Children’s Play Space

0.25

2.35

4.05

Informal Open Space

1.00

9.41

16.12

Natural Greenspace

1.00

9.41

0

Parks, Sport & Recreation Grounds (50% sports)

0.50

4.71

9.38

Parks, Sport & Recreation Grounds (50% non sports)

0.50

4.71

9.38

TOTAL

Â

32.47

42.93

Page 29, Part 1: Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study, East Hampshire District Council, 2008

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Table 7.6 EHDC standards for built facilities, existing and proposed provision, derived from East Hampshire Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study

Built Sports and Recreation Facility

Adopted standard per 1000 pop.

Proposed facilities per no. population

Required no. facilities for 4000 new homes, 9413 population only (ha)

Required no. facilities for whole town, 21937 population (ha)

Existing public Existing MoD built sports facilities facilities at Mill Chase Leisure Centre (shared use with Mill Chase Technology College)

Indicative masterplan provision (noting that all existing facilities will be retained in the short-medium term)

Sports halls with community access

40m² (.07 of a 4 badminton court hall)

1 per 15,000

0.63

1.46

1 x 4 court sports hall

Bordon Garrison Pool (BGP) 1 hall (MoD use only)

Provision of sports hall at sports hub

Swimming pools with community access

13m² (.04 of a 25m x 1 per 25,000 6 lane pool)

0.38

0.88

24m x 4 lane pool plus learner pool

25m x 4 lane BGP with limited public access

A new six lane swimming pool plus learner pool

Fitness Gyms all provision

4 stations (16m²)

37.65

87.75

32 gym stations

15 stations at BGP Around 100 gym (proposed 2008) stations at various plus Prince Philip locations Barracks MoD use gym

Synthetic turf pitches all provision

354m² (0.05 of a full 1 per 20,000 size pitch)

0.47

1.10

1 full size floodlit pitch

1 public outdoor floodlit pitch

Outdoor tennis courts

0.8 courts

2 per 2,500

3.77

8.77

2 courts

4 outdoor courts at BGP; 2 outdoor courts at B.O.S.C.

4 tennis courts and 4 squash courts

Indoor Bowls

0.05 rink

1 rink per 20,000

0.47

1.10

2 outdoor bowls rinks

Community halls (informal standard)

approx 80-160sqm

approx 1 per 2500-5000

3.77

8.77

B.O.S.C club house leased from MoD (run down facility);

1 large town centre multi-purpose community hall (1200 sqm) plus use of 3 primary school halls, 1 secondary school hall, renovation of B.O.S.C and Whitehall Club

1 station per 250

Whitehill Club (derelict); Forest Community Centre, Whitehill Village Hall, Pinewood Village Hall.


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Built sports and recreation facilities

Sports and built facilities proposals

7.87 Built facility standards including the provision of community halls are also provided in the EHDC Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study. Table 7.6 details the adopted standards per 1000 population and the resulting requirements for new facilities at Whitehill Bordon relating both to 4000 new homes and the town as a whole.

7.91 An Eco-town is a more healthy town because people will be encouraged to take exercise as part of their daily lives through the provision of new facilities and easy walking and cycling routes. Regular walking can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease by up to 50% and the Department of Health recommend two 15 minute walks a day for good health63. This is the equivalent of walking from the B.O.S.C. neighbourhood to the town centre. By providing attractive and easy walking routes and reducing the need to travel by car to access facilities, everyone in the town will have the opportunity to improve their levels of exercise and overall health.

7.88 Current provision within the town is focussed at Mill Chase Leisure Centre (which shares a site with Mill Chase Technology College). There has been mixed feedback from the community on this arrangement, with some arguing that the shared facilities make good sense, while others noting that the association between school and leisure centre can be off putting for young people. The adjacent Mill Chase Recreation Ground provides a pavilion and grassed pitches. 7.89 There are a number of existing community hall facilities within the town that will be retained: including Whitehill Village Hall, Pinewood Village Hall and the Forest Community Centre and the Phoenix Theatre. 7.90 As with the provision of pitches, the MoD site contains several built sports and leisure facilities which have limited or no public access including the Bordon Garrison Pool. Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club is leased from the MoD and provides both outdoor pitches and built facilities including squash, meeting hall pavilion and ground maintenance building which are in a poor state of repair. Access is limited and via the Club.

7.92 The masterplan proposes the creation of a new sports hub to provide a major new facility for the town as a whole. The facility would be fully public allowing access throughout the day and evening. The details of the sports hub will be determined at a later date, but indicative proposals include: • A new 6 lane swimming pool and learner pool • A sports hall • Up to 100 gym stations (may be split across a range of local sites) • An outdoor synthetic turf pitch • 4 tennis courts and 4 squash courts • 2 outdoor bowls rinks • Around 7 hectares of sports pitches / outdoor courts

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Ramblers Association Get walking plan 2009

7.93 Two locations are being considered for the sports hub: • North of Budds Lane • Mill Chase Road / Standford Grange. 7.94 These sites are identified on the masterplan for either sports or education use as it is proposed that the alternative use of the site would be for the new secondary school. The school itself is likely to require a synthetic turf pitch, playing fields, and sports hall which will be made available to the public where possible in addition to the new sports hub. Both sites have strengths and weaknesses for the sports hub and further testing, hand-in-hand with the development of proposals for the secondary school is required to determine the most appropriate location for the hub.

North of Budds Lane 7.95 This location makes use of the existing MoD sports fields and Daly Ground stadium and would require a limited level of change to be brought into public use at a basic level. On the opposite side of Budds Lane, the Bordon Garrison Pool provides swimming and gym facilities and it is proposed that in the short to medium term this facility would be retained and form part of the sports hub, acting as a front of house facility for the pitches. The site has good proximity to the town centre and central public transport hub encouraging access by sustainable modes of transport. However the same aspects also make the site attractive for the location of the secondary school.

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Mill Chase Road / Standford Grange 7.96 This location makes use of farmland owned by Hampshire County Council, which would require some land modelling to form a series of terraced pitches and outdoor sports courts. Under this option Mill Chase School would be relocated to Budds Lane but the existing leisure centre would continue to operate in the short to medium term and provide supporting built facilities for the new pitches. The site is adjacent to Mill Chase Recreation ground offering potential for a larger scale of facility than at Budds Lane. However, it is further from the central transport hub and the higher densities of population, reducing accessibility. 7.97 The final decision regarding the location of the sports hub will be taken in consultation between the community, stakeholders and the responsible authorities involved particularly sports council, WTC, HCC and EHDC. The location is inextricably linked to the provision of schooling and the timetable for the MoD departure. It is also dependant on further work needed to agree what type and range of facilities are to be provided.

7.99 Whitehill Social Club to the south of the town sits within the recently designated South Downs National Park. The site offers potential for a mix of new sports uses and potentially also an interpretation or visitor information centre for the National Park to provide facilities at the southern end of the town. The shadow Park Authority is only now getting started but we recommend that further discussion is held with them to identify opportunities for the Park and for the Eco-town. 7.100 In addition to the existing community halls that will be retained, community use will be available at three new primary and one secondary school halls out of school hours. A large multi-purpose community space (around 1,200sqm) is proposed for the town centre to host town scale events, activities and meetings.

Other sports and community facilities 7.98 In addition to the proposed sports hub, the built facilities, pitches and tennis/squash courts at B.O.S.C will be renovated to provide a focus for the new residential community around Gibbs Lane.

Photos from top: Budds Lane MoD pitches; Sloping fields at Standford Grange, Mill Chase Road 64

Active Design, Promoting opportunities for sport and physical activity through good design, Sport England (date unknown)


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Local sports provision 7.101 Neighbourhoods will be designed to the principles set out in Sport England’s Active Design guidance64 which highlights the importance of integrating sports and play into neighbourhoods and raising the profile of sports facilities. The three key objectives promoted by the strategy are: • Improving Accessibility: providing easy, safe and convenient access to a choice of opportunities for participating in sport and physical activity and active travel for the whole community;

• Mixed use town centre including civic, commercial, arts and culture, retail, housing, services, public squares etc (approximately 16 ha) • New secondary school (1800-2000 pupils) • Sixth form • Skills training centre • 3 primary schools and pre-schools forming local community hubs • Children’s centre • Primary care centre (5 GPs, 4 dentists)

• Enhancing Amenity: promoting environmental quality in the design and layout of new sports and recreational facilities, their links and relationship to other buildings and the wider public realm;

• Sports hub and renovation of B.O.S.C and Whitehill Club

• Increasing Awareness: raising the prominence and legibility of sports and recreation facilities and opportunities for physical activity through the design and layout of development.

7.104 These will form the basic facilities that will be delivered as part of the masterplan development. As the town grows gradually, additional voluntary sector and commercially led operations are likely to be attracted to the town enhancing the range of community and social facilities on offer further. The enhanced facilities will also attract visitors from a wider catchment, who will benefit from the enhanced public transport services to access the town. The detailed neighbourhood and town centre planning should remain flexible to accommodate new opportunities and block layouts / architecture should be adaptable to accommodate changing uses over time.

7.102 Informal kick-about areas, private gardens and communal spaces will provide opportunities for local play and activity, while all neighbourhoods will be connected to the Green Loop and grid recreational network of footpaths and cycleways to provide easy access to sports and leisure facilities.

Summary of Community Facilities Provision 7.103 The masterplan proposes the following community facilities to support new and existing residential neighbourhoods in addition to the existing facilities in the town such as the Phoenix theatre:

• Land for commercial leisure uses (2.5 ha)

Photos: working with local community groups (Mill Chase School and faith representatives shown here) to discuss community facilities provision will continue as the project details are developed.

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Images for Chapter 8: Green infrastructure

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Green space

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F N

L IA

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8.1 Protection of the environment lies at the heart of the Green Town Vision. The landscape setting of Whitehill Bordon is one of the town’s unique selling points and should exert a strong influence on the way in which the town grows in the future, its character and the quality of life and community facilities that is on offer for residents and employees. 8.2 The qualities of the existing landscape and green spaces within the town are described in chapter 2, paragraph 2.9. This section sets out proposals for how green infrastructure in the town will be created, enhanced and protected through the masterplan for the benefit of both humans and wildlife. It also explains how the masterplan has been designed alongside a Habitats Regulations Assessment and how the outcome has influenced the proposals and will continue to do so as further work to assess any impacts on air quality is completed.

Green Infrastructure 8.3 Green infrastructure (GI) is an all encompassing term used to describe networks of green spaces and other features that are necessary to provide fresh air, drainage, food, wildlife habitat and places to exercise, roam and play. High quality green infrastructure is likely to become increasingly important due to

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South East Green Infrastructure Framework, GOSE, 2009

climate change with soil and vegetation playing an important role in flood alleviation and providing a cooler microclimate during heat waves. Green infrastructure should permeate urban areas and form links with the wider countryside in order to allow people easy access to green spaces wherever they live.

• Outdoor sports facilities including sports pitches, golf courses and playing fields • Amenity greenspace - including areas in and around housing • Play areas • Allotments

8.4 The masterplan proposed that green space is formed into a network of natural green spaces and watercourses which enables people and wildlife to connect to the countryside. This type of planning encourages healthier lifestyles, ensuring that people have good access to recreation and relaxation spaces, sports areas and the opportunity to grow their own fresh produce.

8.7 Green Infrastructure is promoted by national planning policy.

8.5 The South East Plan and the South East Green Infrastructure Framework defines green infrastructure as:

• PPS12 (Local Spatial Planning) requires local authorities to plan green infrastructure

“sub-regional networks of multi-functional open space”65 and adds that these networks should be managed and designed to support biodiversity and wider quality of life, particularly in areas undergoing large scale change 8.6

Green infrastructure includes the following:

• Parks and gardens - including urban parks, country parks and formal gardens • Natural sites- including woods and heaths • Green corridors - cycleways, and rights of way

• Cemeteries and churchyards • Green roofs and walls • Blue corridors- including watercourses and wetlands

• PPS1 (Sustainable Development) and its Climate Change Supplement recognises how GI will form part of our strategies to address climate change mitigation and adaptation • PPG17 (Open Space Sport and Recreation) requires that authorities seek to improve open space network • PPS9 (Biodiversity and Geodiversity) requires that habitats are protected and extended

Also relevant is PPS25 which deals with flood risk

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Green infrastructure priorities 8.8 The key issues and considerations that have been addressed in preparing green infrastructure proposals for Whitehill Bordon include: • National and local policy standards • The quality and character of the existing landscape and the opportunities this brings, in particular local, national and European landscape designations • The findings of the Habitats Regulations Assessment process • The impacts and demands on green space arising from an increased population • Opportunities to improve the existing provision and access to green spaces for the existing population • Opportunities to better connect green infrastructure within the town and to the wider area

Green infrastructure objectives for Whitehill Bordon 8.10 The following paragraphs summarise the key design objectives and policy drivers that have been addressed in the masterplan:

1. The need for access to green infrastructure for the population of the town 8.11 There are a number of national and local policies which provide guidance on the appropriate amount of GI of different types that new development should include to ensure residents have the opportunity to interact with nature, encourage recreation, sports and healthier lifestyles.

• The needs of both wildlife and humans, supporting a net gain in biodiversity • The need to support healthier lifestyles 8.9 The TCPA worksheets covering biodiversity and green-infrastructure for Eco-towns have provided additional guidance which has informed the development of proposals66.

Images: examples of high quality accessible open spaces The essential role of green infrastructure: eco-towns green infrastructure worksheet and Biodiversity positive: eco-towns biodiversity worksheet, both TCPA, 2009

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National Standards:

Local Standards:

8.12 Planning Policy Statement:Eco-towns requires that 40% of the total land in an Eco-town should be green infrastructure and that at least half of the GI should be publicly accessible, while the other half can be private space including gardens. It also echoes PPS9 in requiring that there is a net gain in local biodiversity.

8.15 Locally, East Hampshire District Council has produced guidance on the appropriate amount of recreational open space and allotments that should be provided for new developments in their ‘Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study’, October 2008. This has been used as the starting point for determining an appropriate amount of sports and recreational open space within the masterplan based on future population projections and giving consideration also to national standards. Chapter 7, paragraph 7.5 provides details of the requirements for open space arising from these standards. Table 8.1 at the end of this chapter explains how these targets have been resolved alongside other targets in the masterplan proposals.

8.13 Natural England has published standards for Accessible Natural Greenspace (ANGSt)67 as follows: • Sub regional provision (sites or habitats over 500 hectares): Within 10km • County scale provision (sites or habitats over 100 hectares): Within 5km • District scale provision (sites or habitats over 20 hectares): Within 2km • Neighbourhood scale sites (sites or habitats over 2 hectares): Within 300m 8.14 The Sustainability Appraisal / Habitats Regulations Assessment68 undertaken by Scott Wilson for CLG to accompany the Draft Eco-towns PPS recognised that ‘the standards of greenspace provision (both in terms of proportion of greenspace to be given to ‘Accessible Natural Greenspace’ and ratio of greenspace to population) in the PPS represent a minimum and that Whitehill-Bordon is likely to require a level of provision significantly greater than that minimum.’ This reflects the need for Whitehill Bordon to provide SANGS land alongside other targets for provision.

8.16 The study notes that currently the town has an overly sufficient supply of natural green space having around 189ha in the nearby area. The undulating topography and tree cover in the area makes provision of sports pitches less easy and the town is currently undersupplied in this area as well as in the other categories of allotments, children’s play space and informal open space. The need to improve sports and leisure facilities has been highlighted strongly through the PAG groups and community engagement as an important priority. 8.17 There are overlaps in the different standards and space requirements and the masterplan has looked to make best use of the spaces available, considering the needs of the existing and future population, the needs of wildlife and the inherent character of the existing

A space for nature, Natural England (former English Nature), 1996 Page 42, Eco-towns sustainability appraisal and habitats regulations assessment of the draft planning policy statement:eco-towns addendum, Scott Wilson for CLG, July 2009

67 68

landscape. For example, natural greenspace within the town provides a variety of places for children and young people to play, create dens and have imaginative adventures as well as providing places for adult recreation and wildlife.

2. The need to protect internationally important wildlife sites (SPA/SAC) 8.18 The Habitats Regulations have a requirement that no harm should come to the European sites (the SPAs and SACs) as a result of the development. Due to the proximity of Whitehill Bordon to a number of European Sites, namely Broxhead Common, Kingsley Common, Woolmer Forest and Shortheath Common, a Habitat Regulations Assessment (HRA) has been undertaken by UE Associates for EHDC in parallel with the development of the masterplan to assess potential impacts and determine the appropriate mitigation measures. 8.19 AECOM has worked closely with UE Associates, Natural England and other stakeholders to ensure that appropriate mitigation measures are in place within the masterplan to avoid negative impacts on the SPAs and SACs. UE Associates have acted as a ‘critical friend’ to the masterplanning team to help shape the development proposals69.

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8.20 The HRA process to date has included: • Production of a scoping report identifying potential impacts that require testing and may require mitigation • Discussion with the masterplanning team and stakeholders about the likely type of mitigation required based on current best practice. This included the best practice approach agreed for the Thames Basin Heathlands which requires 8ha of Suitable Accessible Natural Green Space (SANGS) per 1000 population as mitigation land, and the need for a no-residential zone buffer to protected sites. These findings informed the masterplan capacity studies and options testing. • Visitor surveys to assess the existing numbers of visitors to protected sites and forecast the likely level of visitors and other impacts arising from future development • Interim report and Appropriate Assessment of the draft masterplan during Summer – October 2009 which informed the final draft masterplan development and provided information on mitigation requirements. Stakeholder meetings during this period were held and the various discussions held informed testing and the findings of the study. • Finalisation of the package of avoidance and mitigation measures that will be required within and outside the masterplan study area. This includes the provision of around 127hectares of SANGS mitigation land, and a 400m no-residential buffer to SPAs/SACs. This level of provision is designed to mitigate against impacts arising from a development of up to 5300 homes. The location and character of the SANGS spaces are detailed in the masterplan proposals section (paragraph 8.30 onwards) 69

8.21 Natural England is supportive of the work carried out by UE Associates to date on the Habitats Regulations Assessment, however the HRA does not currently include an assessment of air quality which is due to be undertaken in December 2010. This may place additional avoidance and mitigation requirements on the development proposals. As the Appropriate Authority, EHDC has provided a statement in relation to the Appropriate Assessment for Whitehill Bordon which is provided in Appendix D. 8.22 The HRA is a continuing process and will reassess the masterplan as it is developed in more detail.

3. The need for multi-functional spaces 8.23 Open spaces should be designed and managed to be multi-functional. For example a cyclepath can also be a footpath, a utility corridor, be combined with a drainage ditch and constitute an important connection in an ecological network.

4. The need to make green infrastructure accessible 8.24 The GI network needs to be designed to be accessible to all people living in the town to encourage healthier lifestyles, connect residential areas with community facilities and the town centre and reduce the need to use the nearby European protected habitats for recreation.

Appropriate Assessment for the Draft Masterplan, and Visitors Survey, UE Associates, 2009

5. The need to provide a net gain in biodiversity 8.25 The principle of a creating a net gain in biodiversity as the town grows is a requirement of the Ecotown policies and was a key component of the Whitehill Bordon Green Town Vision. The local Environment Conservation Group has produced Wildlife of Whitehill (WoW), a Local Biodiversity Action Plan (2008) which has described the diverse range of sites, habitats and species which occur in the Whitehill-Bordon area and made recommendations for their conservation. 8.26 Wherever possible opportunities to increase biodiversity and improve ecological connectivity have been included in the masterplan in order to meet these targets.

6. The need to protect the existing landscape character 8.27 The town is fortunate in being graced by an exceptionally large number of mature trees and it is important that this wooded character is maintained as the town develops. It is recommended that a masterplan wide tree survey is undertaken prior to detailed development proposals being advanced to ensure that important trees are retained.

7. The need to connect into wider green infrastructure networks 8.28 Green infrastructure within the town will not sit in isolation but will form part of a wider regional green infrastructure network. Connections between the town and the adjacent South Downs National Park and nearby Alice Holt Forest should be promoted


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

for example through linked visitor facilities, energy (biomass) resource use and recreation connections such as the proposed long distance cycle link between Alice Holt, Whitehill Bordon and the South Downs Way.

8. The need to mitigate against and adapt to climate change 8.29 Government now advises that communities should plan for climate change and make adaptations which will help us to cope with hotter and drier summers and wetter winters. Green infrastructure will be critically important in helping Whitehill-Bordon cope with climate change by helping to alleviate flooding and provide summer cooling. Also, changes in climate mean that flora and fauna may need to move through GI networks to find new habitat. Whitehill Bordon has made a commitment to be an exemplar in water, and has a target of achieving a water neutral development

Masterplan Proposals

The Green Loop

8.31 The green infrastructure plan for Whitehill Bordon has been developed in light of the principles already described including the need to provide SANGS and a range of open space functions. Two Big Ideas are the Green Loop – continuous, multi-functional belt of greenspace that will unite new and old parts of the town and Wildlife Corridors and Blue Corridors which will make the town more permeable to wildlife. These big ideas have received support in earlier public consultation and have strongly influenced the arrangement of the land uses within the masterplan as a whole.

8.33 The Green Loop will create a continuous, circular,

8.32 Inevitably there will be some compromise between the provision of accessible intensively used areas for people and the provision of quiet areas for wildlife, however the various GI types will be combined to form a well-integrated whole.

8.34 The Green Loop will run past and through new and existing sports fields, leisure facilities, parks, play areas, schools and the town centre to provide an attractive way to get around town without the need for a car.

(discussed in chapter 11).

9. The need to introduce sustainable drainage 8.30 In accordance with Construction Industry Research and Information Association guidance (2004) on creating sustainable drainage systems (SuDS), new drainage should mimic nature, so that rainfall is allowed to soak into the ground (where conditions permit) and kept out of underground pipes wherever possible but instead channelled into woodland, swales and ponds before entering watercourses. This improves the microclimate, reduces the likelihood of flooding and improves water quality. The masterplan identifies indicative SuDs corridors which will be confirmed through more detailed studies early in the planning process to ensure there is sufficient land available for attenuation basins and other SuDs features.

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Image: illustrative artist’s impressions of natural green space (SANGS)

walking, cycling and recreation route around the town which is within easy access for the people of Whitehill Bordon, wherever they live. Existing greenspaces of the Deadwater Valley Nature Reserve and Alexandra Park (included within the Deadwater Valley LNR, along with a 10m wide strip of Jubilee park) and Jubilee Park will be linked with new and improved public parks and natural areas within what is currently the MoD Bordon Camp, Hogmoor Inclosure, Bordon Inclosure and the fields of Standford Grange Farm.


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8.35 For those who do not wish to follow the entire loop, a series of access points (acting like spokes on a wheel) will enable people to easily access part of the Green Loop, linking into the town wide green grid of streets and footpaths. 8.36 The Green Loop will have a varied character in response to the environment through which it passes and will include some sections on existing residential streets which will be improved through cycle lanes, signage and tree planting. 8.37 A consistent palette of wayfinding elements and street furniture should be utilised to make the Green Loop highly legible and give it a strong brand identity. 8.38 Recreation areas on the route of the Green Loop include:-

Natural and Informal Green spaces 8.39 As part of the development of the Green Loop, Bordon Inclosure, Hogmoor Inclosure, parts of Standford Grange Farm and Eveley Wood will be opened up to the public for walking and recreation. Each site is larger than 20 hectares, offering the potential to act as District or Neighbourhood scale ANGst (ANGst is Natural England’s Accessible Natural Greenspace Standard). Together they provide around 113 hectares of new publicly accessible natural space (which excludes land set-aside for wildlife corridors see paragraph 8.46 below). These new public natural spaces will be managed to provide a similar experience to that which people seek when they visit European sites close to the town and will form the major component of the required SANGS mitigation land under the Habitats Regulation Assessment. Some

areas will be suitable for dogs to be let off the leads, but this will be carefully managed.

Parks and town squares 8.40 The Green Loop will be connected into a green grid of local footpaths, streets and green spaces across the town. In the new town centre, a new linear park and woodland will provide an attractive green link between the former Sergeants’ Mess and town square and the entrance to Hogmoor Inclosure and possible location for a future rail station.

Sports, Leisure and Healthy Living 8.41 Two locations for major new sports hub with public sports fields and associated leisure centre buildings are being considered – Budds’ Lane or Mill Chase Road. The location of the sports hub is tied to the decision on the secondary school location which is the alternative use for these parcels of land. 8.42 At Budds Lane the sports facilities could make use of existing MoD sports pitches including the Daly Ground which is not currently publicly accessible, and the MoD swimming baths. At Mill Chase Road the sloping site would be terraced and linked to the existing Mill Chase leisure centre and swimming pool but this location is further from the centre of town and the central transport hub. In the longer term the existing built facilities could be rebuilt to increase the quality and range of activities available. Chapter 7 contains further details.

8.43 The alternative use for these sites is for the relocation of the secondary school. The school will also require significant sports fields and the aim would be for these to form additional public facilities use out of school hours where feasible. 8.44 In addition to the sports hub Whitehill Club and Bordon and Oakhanger Sports Club will be renovated to provide new sports and leisure facilities to the north and south of the town a short distance from the Green Loop. 8.45 In the short term, as MoD land becomes available, the existing MoD pitches off Budds’ Lane including the Daly Ground will have increased public access to help fill the existing shortfall in facilities.

Allotments 8.46 Indicative locations for allotments, community orchards or gardens are indentified at five locations close on the Green Loop and close to existing and proposed residential neighbourhoods. Education programmes in the town, potentially linked with schools could encourage uptake of allotments and healthy food choices.


Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

Shortheath Common SAC / SSSI

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Wildlife Corridors 8.47 The Green Loop will improve ecological connectivity both between sites which comprise the Loop and with the wider countryside. In addition two north-south wildlife corridors running through the parks and greenspaces of the town have been identified which may have more limited public access. 8.48 Improved ecological connectivity and biodiversity gain will be achieved in these wildlife corridors and across the town through habitat creation, restoration and enhancement. Plantations will be cleared in order to create more heath land habitat, which will facilitate the movement of heath land wildlife into the town, especially where the Hogmoor Inclosure is improved and connected with new sites to the north. 8.49 Habitat creation and biodiversity gain will also be possible in those sections of Bordon Camp where existing hardstanding wilL be removed as part of development and replaced with a mix of buildings and landscapes including SuDS corridors, green roofs and private gardens. 8.50 Large scale change will result in the reduction of biodiversity in some small areas, but the strategy will encourage an increase in the quality, range and connectivity of habitats through habitat restoration, habitat creation throughout the development areas and improvements to existing areas. 8.51 The Wildlife of Whitehill Biodiversity Action Plan should be revised so that it sits alongside the emerging masterplan, provides targets relating to net gain in biodiversity and helps to guide the detailed planning of the development of the town.

The retained Croft area and land at the east of B.O.S.C. could have potential for designation as Sites of Importance to Nature Conservation subject to more detailed surveys.

Disused Rail Corridor 8.52 A corridor for future reinstatement of a rail link is to be set aside at the edge of the built up area. This corridor will represent an important green corridor and the verges of this rail corridor will continue to constitute a valuable ecological link, connecting the town centre with the wider countryside even if the railway is reinstated.

8.55 In line with the outline water cycle study, other ephemeral streams and floodable areas are proposed as part of the Sustainable Drainage Strategy. The masterplan shows the location for potential wetland corridors running through and to the edge of the residential neighbourhoods, where new pools and attenuation basins could be created.

Local Green Infrastructure 8.56 In addition to the Green Loop, Wildlife Corridors and Blue Corridors, the following features will be provided throughout the town and will be designed through detailed neighbourhood masterplanning:

Blue Corridors

Local Parks and Allotment Gardens

8.53 The watercourses of the River Wey and Deadwater Valley are attractive and important habitats located to the east of the town, however some areas of stream corridor are poorly accessible and the streams create a barrier to pedestrian movement. The masterplan proposes the creation of new links along, between and over theses watercourses as part of the Green Loop to encourage their use for walking and recreation.

8.57 A number of local parks, to include children’s play facilities, will be created within new areas of development, especially where development is particularly dense or where the Green Loop is not immediately adjacent. They will make use of existing spaces such as the BOSC where appropriate to form a green focus for the community. New allotment and community gardens will be created within the residential area in addition to those identified along the Green Loop to offer the opportunity to grow food or to link into local produce markets.

8.54 A channelized stream exists within the Technical Training area. This will be naturalised and form a blue corridor running between the main residential neighbourhoods and the town centre. There may be opportunities to introduce meanders and other features in order to improve flood storage capacity and to introduce ephemeral wetland areas increasing the range of habitats.

8.58 Within the existing residential areas there may also be opportunities to improve the quality and accessibility of existing play areas in line with Sport England’s Active Places guidance.


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Figure 8.2 Structuring elements of the green infrastructure plan Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

Shortheath Common

Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

Shortheath Common

Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

Woolmer Forest SPA / SSSI

Woolmer Forest SPA / SSSI

Woolmer Forest

Woolmer Forest

Green Loop:

Striped areas indicate a mix of uses

Green loop town wide recreation routes Public parks and green spaces (SANGS)

a circular network of footpaths and cycleways linking the parks, sports facilities and town centre. Sports and leisure - indoor and outdoor School pitches

Wildlife corridors

Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation 400m buffer to SPA / SAC

New and improved pocket parks, gardens, play areas and green roofs across the masterplan area

Wildlife Corridors:

Striped areas indicate a Whitehill Bordon Opportunity mix of uses Green infrastructure

Green loop town wide recreation routes Public parks and green spaces (SANGS) Sports and leisure - indoor and outdoor

Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Green infrastructure

a mosaic of restored heathland, wetland and woodland habitats in corridors to the east and west of the town. School pitches

Wildlife corridors

Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation 400m buffer to SPA / SAC

New and improved pocket parks, gardens, play areas and green roofs across the masterplan area

Blue Corridors: Whitehill Bordon Opportunity new and restored watercourses, pools, swales and

Striped areas indicate a mix of uses

Green loop town wide recreation routes

Public parks and green spaces (SANGS)

Green infrastructure

wetlands providing wildlife habitats and flood control. Sports and leisure - indoor and outdoor School pitches

Wildlife corridors Special Protection Areas & Special Areas of Conservation 400m buffer to SPA / SAC New and improved pocket parks, gardens, play areas and green roofs across the masterplan area

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Green Roofs and Living Walls 8.59 Green roofs can vary from accessible roof gardens and terraces to inaccessible, extensive, lightweight green roofs. Green roofs should be incorporated into residential, commercial and institutional buildings wherever possible. Extensive green roofs can be vegetated with heath land species to complement similar habitats at ground level. Living walls can add drama and provide summer cooling in some of the more densely developed area.

Sustainable Drainage 8.60 The removal of large areas of impermeable hardstanding as part of the redevelopment of the Bordon Camp will represent an opportunity to restore a more natural drainage system, much of which can be integrated into the new GI network. Streets and local green spaces may contain swales and floodable areas, as well as wetland areas.

Private Gardens 8.61 The majority of new homes will have some form of private outdoor space including rear and front gardens, balconies, courtyards and roof gardens. A ‘best wildlife garden’ or ‘Whitehill Bordon in bloom’ competition could become an annual event to encourage the greening of private outdoor spaces.

Summary of HRA Mitigation Proposals SANGS 8.62 Table 8.1 summarises how SANGS relate to other classifications of green space that are proposed as part of the masterplan. The new natural open spaces of Bordon Inclosure, Standford Grange and Hogmoor Inclosure described above will form the major components of the SANGS network. These sites are located adjacent to existing and proposed new neighbourhoods allowing for easy access and can be developed concurrently or in advance of major residential development. The sites have the potential to include a range of semi-natural habitats including grassland, heath land and woodland that will attract people who might otherwise wish to walk their dogs on the European sites. Bordon Inclosure and Hogmoor Inclosure contain wildlife corridors, which have been excluded from the SANGS calculations due to the potential for these areas to have more restricted access, however they will add to the character and ecological quality of the sites as a whole. 8.63 The Green Loop linear park and recreation route links together these major semi-natural areas to further enhance access and offer a range of walking routes including longer, circular routes. Other parks and informal open spaces within the town (excluding sports pitches, play areas and allotments) are included in the potential SANGS network offering a connected network of SANGS spaces across the town. In total around 127.5 hectares of publicly accessible SANGS will be created of which the three major new natural spaces provide 113 hectares.

8.64 The Green Loop will also link up the existing natural spaces within the town including Alexandra Park and Deadwater Valley to further enhance the potential to attract local visitors away from the European Sites for walking and recreation.

Additional protection for European designated habitats 8.65 The masterplan promotes a 400m buffer between the edge of the SACs/SPAs to the north and south of the town and any new residential development. Other types of development such as employment uses are included within this buffer zone, for example at Louisburg, as the buffer relates mainly to domestic cat predation associated with homes. 8.66 These proposals have been assessed as part of the HRA by UE Associates and Natural England is supportive of the work carried out to date.


Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

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Summary of green infrastructure proposals

Delivering Green Infrastructure

8.67 By 2026 the residents of Whitehill Bordon will have access to a great range of new green spaces within the town’s boundary as listed in table 8.1.

8.69 The masterplan provides a broad strategy for the provision of Green Infrastructure within Whitehill Bordon which will be developed alongside the new homes, community facilities and employment uses. Inevitably, as with the built environment, more detailed design, planning and survey work will be required which could include the following:-

8.68 In total over 175 hectares of strategic new green infrastructure for wildlife and humans is identified by the masterplan. Existing public open space within the masterplan study area amounts to more than 60 hectares, bringing the total public greenspace in the town to around 235 hectares (or 36%), of the total land area of 650 hectares. Private gardens and neighbourhood open spaces provide additional green infrastructure, resulting in a proportion of total green infrastructure significantly in excess of the minimum 40% required by the Eco-towns PPS. Further calculations are required to confirm the level of public green space within the wider EHDC Core-strategy Ecotown policy boundary.

• Continuing detailed ecological surveys • Tree survey • Revision to the Wildlife of Whitehill Biodiversity Action Plan and an identification of targets by which ‘net gain in biodiversity’ will be measured • Preparation of a detailed green infrastructure strategy for Whitehill Bordon to support the district wide Green Infrastructure Strategy, linking Whitehill Bordon into the wider sub-regional network of spaces • Detailed landscape design of the green loop, wildlife corridors, SANGS and recreation facilities as well as green spaces within the residential areas

• Creation of a maintenance plan for all GI to include long term funding and management arrangements. There is the potential for the maintenance of the new green infrastructure to provide additional job opportunities and be managed in part by the local community. • Design guidance for SANGS • Conservation management plans • Visitor access management plans • Projects to assist with behavioural change and reduction in visitor numbers to SPA/SAC for example through signage and advertisements highlighting the location and need for SANGS 8.70 Alongside the continuing development of the green infrastructure strategy, early work can be commenced straight away in order to start to make the changes which will encourage people (and dog walking) away from the SPA’s and to start using the internal town green routes and loops. EHDC has earmarked part of the CLG Eco-towns funding that has recently been awarded, to kick-start work on the Green Loop and SANGS open spaces.


WHITEHILL BORDON CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Table 8.1 Summary of green infrastructure proposals and SANGS

Typology

Required for whole Masterplan proposals town, based on a population of 21,937 minus existing provision (ha)

Allotments

4.00

4 ha of allotments (3.4 hectares provided along the Not compatible with SANGS green loop plus neighbourhood provision)

Children’s Play Space

4.05

4 ha of new children and young people’s play space (2 ha within new parks and along the Green Loop plus 2 ha within residential areas) and improvements to existing play areas

Not compatible with SANGS

Informal Open Space

16.12

113 ha of public natural and informal green spaces

Natural Greenspace

0

Form the major component of the SANGS network

Parks, Sport & Recreation Grounds (50% non sports)

9.38

14.5 ha + of public parks, and recreation areas (including around 15 km of linked Green Loop recreation routes ) and additional local green spaces and gardens within residential areas).

Form a linking element in the SANGS network ensuring good accessibility to major natural spaces

Parks, Sport & Recreation Grounds (50% sports)

9.38

Around 12.5 ha of sports pitches plus a range of built facilities (see chapter 7)

Not compatible with SANGS

Wildlife corridors

No EHDC standards

Around 29ha of protected wildlife corridors

Not included within SANGS calculations, although they sit within the major SANGS elements

TOTAL

42.93

175 ha +

127 ha + (13.5 ha per 1000 population in

Included within the SANGS network

relation to 4000 new homes; or 10.2 ha per 1000 population in relation to 5300 homes).

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9

A new economic role

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9.1 One of the biggest challenges and key objectives for the masterplan is to ensure that Whitehill Bordon becomes a vibrant and strong employment location, realising the potential to attract local, regional, national and international companies by building on the town’s ‘green credentials’ and attractive setting and providing a high quality workforce and employment space offer. 9.2 We have worked closely in this section with SQW Consulting who have advised on the economic potential for exogenous employment at Whitehill Bordon (i.e. jobs that are created through the production of goods and services that are externally traded). 9.3 Promoting a strong mixed use economy is important to: • Create a vibrant place which has a visible economic function and is not just a dormitory settlement or commuter town • Provide good quality local employment opportunities that residents can walk or cycle to • Replace the jobs that will be lost when the MOD leaves

The existing employment base 9.4 To understand the requirements for future economic development at Whitehill Bordon it is important to assess the current strengths and weaknesses of the town’s economic base. Chapter 2, paragraph 2.46 provides details of the current employment structure, specialisms, premises and labour force. In summary the key issues to be addressed by the employment strategy are: • The significance of the MoD on local jobs, with around 2,522 jobs provided directly by the MoD, of which 692 are contracted or civilian staff70 and 571 induced jobs supported by an estimated annual spend £28,569k in the local economy71. The loss of MoD related jobs and the associated output would represent a significant loss to the local economy and requires significant realignment of economic activities to focus on existing strengths and sub-regional opportunities. • The high levels of out-commuting to access employment, despite the presence of Bordon Garrison • The need for economic development to go hand in hand with public transport improvements, as a key factor in attracting new employers to the area • A lack of available business space in the town, in particular facilities for small-medium sized businesses

• Generate demand for services and facilities that will benefit the residents of the town

• The lack of higher level skills in the local labour force and an under-representation in higher value business services and financial sectors revealed by the 2001 Census.

• Fully benefit from the economic potential that has been created by the publicity surrounding Eco-town status

Photo: Garrison buildings offer potential for reuse as flexible employment space

• Generate demand for housing

70 71

SQW Consulting, Whitehill Bordon Economic Potentials Study, 2009 Page 56, Whitehill Bordon, Revised baseline report: Main report, GVA Grimley, September 2008

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Economic objectives: To create a strong, mixed economy in the town. 9.5 The planned departure of the MoD from Whitehill Bordon will remove a significant source of employment from the town. Given the need to support the economic prosperity of the existing population and the level of housing growth planned for the town, it is essential that sufficient employment space is provided to meet the needs of local growing businesses and businesses seeking to start-up in or relocate to the town. 9.6 The alternative is that the local population becomes increasingly dependent on employment sites located outside of the town, increasing car dependency and reducing the desirability of Whitehill Bordon as a place where people choose to live. While this would be undesirable in any growth context, such an outcome would fail to meet the requirements of Eco-towns to ensure that a sufficient level of employment is accessible by residents via sustainable forms of transport. 9.7 The scale of the population and employment growth associated with the Eco-town development provides a significant opportunity for diversifying the local economy and shifting its emphasis towards higher value skills and activities. The relocation of the MoD illustrates the risks of promoting an economy dependent on a single larger employer and therefore the objective is for a ‘mixed economy’. Although the attraction of a new large employer would of course bring benefits, this should be as part of a more rounded and varied employment base, to avoid becoming overly dependent on a single sector.

9.8 Underpinning the transformation of the local business base will be the growth of existing businesses through the provision of grow-on space and through the promotion of business start-ups. The typology of new business premises should support the aspirational vision for the town. However they must also cater for the requirements of local growing businesses in order to support indigenous business growth and ensure that the occupation of these sites is not wholly dependent on attracting inward investors. 9.9 The housing growth will be associated with the relocation of smaller companies to the town and an increase in business start-ups; particularly if the town is promoted as a location for establishing lifestyle businesses. This concept of life-style businesses will be encouraged through the provision of flexible spaces for working within new homes.

Economic Targets 9.10 The masterplan proposes a target for the creation of 5500 new jobs within Whitehill Bordon. These would be delivered in a phased approach in line with growth of housing. This target figure has been arrived at in consideration of the proposed number of new homes, the availability of land for employment and the commercial viability of provision. There is a longer term strategy to provide up to 7000 jobs, as a result of a shift towards higher density employment typologies. 9.11 The target figure: • Promotes one new job per new home (i.e. 4000) as required by the Eco-town PPS. Should the upper limit of 5300 homes be reached, employment would be required to increase accordingly through the provision of additional employment land or intensification of the currently identified employment sites. The PPS requires that these jobs should be accessible by sustainable methods of transport, however our target goes further by providing that new employment spaces are within walking distance of most residents. • Promotes an additional 1,500 new jobs within the town to mitigate the loss of civilian employment associated with the relocation of Bordon Garrison. 9.12 In addition the planned improvements to public transport will enable residents to have enhanced access to the wider range of existing and future employment opportunities in Hampshire and beyond via sustainable methods of transport.


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

‑9.13 The proposed employment mix has been

determined after reviewing the existing local and subregional employment base and considering research undertaken by GVA Grimley72 and Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners73. It has been developed alongside research undertaken by SQW Consulting for EHDC74 which discussed the potential future economic roles of Whitehill Bordon. 9.14 Specifically, the employment mix proposals consider: • Growth opportunities within the existing business base • The potential for Whitehill Bordon to exploit opportunities arising from Eco-town designation. • The role of Whitehill Bordon within the sub-regional economy.

Images: the Eco-town development brings opportunities for a range of jobs in construction and maintenance of homes and green spcaes Whitehill Bordon Baseline Report, GVA Grimley 2008 Town centres, retail and leisure study, Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners Ltd, 2007 74 For further details see ‘Whitehill Bordon: Economic Potentials Study’, SQW Consulting, 2009 72 73

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Future Economic Roles 9.15 Four potential economic roles have been identified for Whitehill Bordon around which employment proposals and training programmes could be developed. • An exemplar for sustainable development and green industries or ‘the town that builds itself’: making the most of opportunities associated with the construction of the Eco-town including the need for solutions for sustainable energy, sustainable urban drainage, and green transport, in addition to the significant opportunities associated with the potential to retrofit the existing housing stock. Such a role would be dependent on the availability of land to accommodate low carbon manufacturing businesses, phased such that they could contribute to the development of the 4,000 new homes. In the longer term the town could look to export this expertise more widely. • Innovation and technology cluster with links to the Blackwater Valley: Whitehill Bordon currently supplies the aerospace and high value engineering cluster at the Blackwater Valley with labour. Under these proposals a more synergistic role would develop between the existing cluster and the expanded town, with the development of supporting employment space in Whitehill Bordon. • A tourism and leisure hub at the gateway to the newly designated South Downs: Reflecting the quality of the woodland and countryside surrounding the town and the designation of the South Downs National Park, Whitehill Bordon has potential to provide hotels plus attractions such as tourism

information, a museum or interpretation centre. The creation of a new town centre and improvements to the appearance of Whitehill Bordon will also enhance the visitor experience and attract additional spending to the town. • A hub for post-16 education and technical skills training: Building on the suggestions for a Skills Centre incorporating training facilities targeting local 16-19 year olds Not in Education Employment or Training (NEETs), sixth form provision, adult learning provision, and activity building on the engineering training activities currently undertaken for MoD SEME by Vosper Thornycraft.

Masterplan employment space provision 9.16 Reflecting these potential future economic roles, the masterplan proposes the following employment sites and initiatives:-

Kick starting the economy: reuse of MoD buildings 9.17 In the initial years of the masterplan, a low cost employment space offer is likely to be crucial to attracting businesses requiring start-up units, small workshop units, and larger light industrial units. The MoD will leave vacant a number of buildings currently used for engineering, training, accommodation or office use, which could be put to a new employment use in the short to medium term. In the longer term a denser typology would be sought, to provide a higher quality employment offer and former MoD land will be redeveloped for housing and community uses.

9.18 MoD reuse opportunities include: • Introducing cellular office uses within converted Edwardian villas and barracks • Buildings appropriate for industrial uses. These range from building H-043 (24,400 sq m) to former stable blocks (360 sq m). • Other buildings appropriate for light industrial uses.

Eco-business Parks 9.19 Around 2480 jobs would be provided through the development of new Eco-Business Parks and office accommodation totalling approximately 70,250 sqm of floorspace (B1a,b,c). 9.20 It is important that the masterplan allows a flexible and aspirational approach to providing employment in the town. In the short term the reuse of existing buildings will play a key role in delivering employment in the town. In the medium term higher end environmental technologies and contemporary high tech businesses could provide significant local employment opportunities, reflecting the local employment base and potential growth sectors. This will include a significant element of small business space (including incubation and grow-on / managed workspace) to support indigenous growth as well as facilities for high-tech businesses. Much of the employment will be associated with the Eco-town and be based within high-technology and sustainable sectors, with the town attracting ‘over spill’ from the nearby Blackwater Valley. 9.21 The provision of employment land and floorspace should be flexible enough to provide for the


Broxhead Common SPA / SSSI

Shortheath Common SAC / SSSI

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WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Figure 9.1 Employment proposals

F AR NH

Louisburg eco-business park

D LIN DF OR

ROAD

B.O.S.C.

Bordon Trading Estate

S TA

T ION

Bordon Park

D ROA

Lindford Quebec mixed use

L IP HO OK AD RO

C AMP R OAD

OAKHANGER ROAD

Bordon Infant & Junior School

River Wey

HOGMOOR ROAD

DD

S

LA

NE

Alexandra Park

Weyford Infant & Junior School

Town Centre

MILL

E CH AS

YB RO OK

H IG

Tesco

AD

Forest Centre

Standford Grange Country Park

FOR ES T RO

Hogmoor Park

H OG

Viking Park mixed use

Cemy

H OL

RE E T H ST

LL

PARK

Woolmer Trading Estate

O

ter wa

H

LY W A TE

ad

HILL LE T

M OO

Chase Community Hospital C ON DE W AY

Eveley Wood

AD R RO

Town centre jobs in retail, offices and services

Stand

F IR GR

New employment areas at Quebec, Viking Park, Louisburg and around the town centre

FO RE ST

Local shops

RO AD

WH

Reuse of existing MOD buildings in the early years of the development as cheap employment space Opportunities to work from home : we estimate that 1 in 10 homes could contain a ‘homeworker’

Woodlea Primary School

OV E R OAD

LLD WA

Existing business areas retained

P ET

ER S F

IE LD

R OA D

LIP H O

0m

N

100m

500m

LANE STANDFORD

De

C HA

Hollywater Primary School

ROAD

RR OAD

BU

Woolmer Forest SAC

Whitehill Club

N OW

L ROAD IT E H IL

Hollywater

AD RO

OK RO AD

Woolmer Forest SPA / SSSI


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relocation of larger workplaces in response to specific opportunities; however it is likely that provision will be broadly focused on small–medium units providing a mixture of general and high-tech industrial units. 9.22 Around 18.4 hectares of land is allocated in the masterplan for these employment uses in four main locations dispersed around the town. The following locations benefit from good access via public transport and road networks and short walking and cycling distances from existing and future residential communities: a. Development of the eastern part of Louisburg Barracks. Close to the existing employment use at Lion Court, this location will create a new gateway to the town on the route of the proposed through street. The setting of development within woodland and the potential to retain and reuse former MoD buildings (for example the Louisburg Barracks Officers’ Mess as an Incubator / Innovation Centre) will provide an attractive, high quality location for business. This location is unsuitable for residential development due to proximity to the European protected habitats, however the impacts of all forms of development in this location will require careful monitoring and design to avoid adverse effects on the environment.

Images from top: high tech small-medium business space; free WIFI will enable residents to work more flexibly

b. At Viking Park and wrapping around Woolmer Trading Estate, employment led mixed use development is proposed. This area towards the south of the masterplan and on the route of the new through street already benefits from an extant consent for employment and commercial leisure uses at Viking Park. The masterplan proposes to continue to support these uses alongside a smaller element of residential fronting onto the High Street and green spaces forming an entrance to Hogmoor Inclosure. New business park development at this location will form an extension to Woolmer Trading Estate, where over time improvements to the quality of the built fabric will be sought. c. To the west of the town centre core, employment space is proposed as part of a mixed use development with commercial leisure. The form of development in this location close to the higher density town centre will be most suitable for office and small business premises. d. At Quebec Barracks employment uses will be developed as a mixed use scheme alongside residential. This site could be released for development as early as 2010 and would be developed as a first phase project. In addition, the masterplan proposes to retain the Woolmer and Bordon Trading Estates.


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Town Centre Employment

Public Sector Employment

9.23 The development of a new town centre offers considerable employment potential. It is estimated that around 2070 jobs could be provided as a result of the following town centre uses:e. Retail (A1)

9.24 Around 10% of new jobs could be based within the public sector and concerned with the administration of the growing town and the provision of social infrastructure (e.g. doctors surgeries, community centres, and schools). This is consistent with the existing level of employment in this sector.

f. Restaurants, Food, Takeaways, Pubs (A3/A5)

Home-working

g. Financial / Professional Services (A2)

9.25 Based on current levels of home working within East Hampshire it is estimated that around 1 in 10 new homes could contain a home-worker. As detailed proposals are progressed, ways to encourage homeworking and entrepreneurial activity within the town could be encouraged by providing flexible spaces within homes for potential home-working, introducing highspeed broadband, and providing support facilities.

h. Office (incorporating managed business space) (B1a). A range of flexible office space will be provided within and close to the town centre. Office space must meet the needs of startup and small growing businesses and adequate grow on space should be phased appropriately to support the growth of local businesses. Within the town centre office space may be provided above retail units or within retained former MoD buildings. There is also the potential for Council services to be accommodated in office space within the town centre. i. Hotel / tourism. To support the development of the tourism sector within the town. One potential option would be the conversion of the Sergeants’ Mess into a hotel.

9.26 Table 9.1 summarises the employment proposals for providing around 5500 new jobs. In the longer term a more intensive mix may be appropriate with a greater emphasis on office and high-tech typologies to increase the provision of jobs to around 7000. This would need to reflect market demands. Table 9.2 provides a breakdown of the land identified within the masterplan for employment uses outside the town centre. 4.2.

j. Commercial Leisure. Big box leisure such as cinema, or bowling alley could be developed at the edge of the town and within Viking Park

Image: example of contemporary office space at Chiswick Park, London

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Planned for within town centre core. Offices above retail.

Eco-Business Parks

Other

Retail

A3/A5 Restaurants, Food, Takeaway, Pubs

A2 financial/ professional services

Town Centre Offices

Hotel

Edge of centre / Viking Park Commercial Leisure

Light Small Industrial Business Units

High Tech

Office Homeworking (relating to 10% of 4000 new homes)

Public sector employment (10% of total employment mix)

Total Employment

1,002

308

140

506

50

62

853

589

400

640

400

550

% of total employment (exc public sector & live / work)

18%

6%

3%

9%

1%

1%

16%

11%

7%

12%

7%

10%

Employment Density (jobs per sq m)

24

13

20

20

n/a

n/a

34

32

29

20

n/a

n/a

Gross Internal land Requirement (sq m)

24,046

4,008

2,805

10,113

n/a

n/a

29,000

18,848

11,600

n/a

n/a

Number of stories

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

1

2

2

3

n/a

n/a

External Land Coverage

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

30%

50%

40%

50%

n/a

n/a

Total Employment Footprint / Land Coverage

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

96,668

18,848

14,500

8,533

n/a

n/a

Assumptions % Whitehill Bordon employment in Police, Fire, GPs, Dentists, Education, Social Work = 9% (Annual Business Enquiry) Assumed % of employment housed in social infrastructure / public sector employment = 10% Net Retail Employment Density=20 (EP Guide to Employment Densitie)s

Town Centre jobs

2,068

Eco-Business Parks jobs

2,482

Other jobs

950

%

38%

%

45%

%

17%

total floorspace

40,972

total floorspace

72,248

landtake outside town centre (ha)

14

gross area (133%) ha

18.43

total jobs

5,500

Gross to Net Assumption=20% (Employment Densities: A Simple Guide (English Partnerships))

Table 9.1 Summary of employment proposals for providing around 5500 new jobs

total 113,220 floorspace


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Creating a setting for business

Table 8.2 Land assumptions for masterplan employment areas outside the town centre (5500 jobs, 4000 homes scenario)

The proposals for employment space should not be considered in isolation. Creating a location for robust and competitive businesses requires consideration of all forms of economic infrastructure including transport and communication connectivity.

Eco-Business Parks

Net to gross area (hectares)

Light Industrial

Small Business Units

High Tech

Office

Total Employment

853

589

400

640

Employment Density (jobs per sq m)

34

32

29

20

Gross Internal Land Requirement (sq m)

29,000

18,848

11,600

12,800

Number of stories

1

2

2

3

External Land Coverage

30%

50%

40%

50%

Total Employment Footprint / Land Coverage

96,668

18,848

14,500

8,533

TOTAL

133%

12.86

2.51

1.93

1.13

18.43

Locations

TOTAL

0.75

0.33

0.50

0.10

area (ha)

9.80

0.83

0.96

0.11

%

0.00

0.37

0.00

0.75

area (ha)

0.00

0.80

0.00

0.82

Viking /Quebec / Edge % of Woolmer area (ha)

0.25

0.30

0.50

0.15

3.06

0.88

0.96

0.20

5.10

2.51

1.93

1.13

18.43

Edge of town centre

Total area (ha) 12.86

Key next steps to take forward the economic strategy include:• Establish a skills centre • Establish business support networks

%

Louisburg

In addition to the physical elements of economic infrastructure, a range of softer interventions should be delivered that support the growth of the existing business base and promote Whitehill Bordon more broadly as an investment location. While these fall outside of the remit of the masterplan they are likely to include: business start-up and growth support, training programmes, and targeted inward investment support. In many cases these softer interventions may be situated within the premises proposed here, including business support services located within incubator space and training initiatives in the new secondary school.

11.70

• Prepare and implement an inward investment strategy

1.62

• Step-up the level of marketing and promotion to the key sectors identified above.

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Transport and movement

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10.1 The movement of people to, through and within towns provides a life blood to successful and vibrant places. It is therefore fundamental that suitable movement networks, services and infrastructure are provided to support movement created by the people living and working in Whitehill Bordon. This chapter summarises the objectives and proposals of the town-wide transport and movement strategy which is provided in full in the accompanying transport technical report.75

10.2 Transport and movement within the town cannot be considered in isolation of the wider local and regional networks. Joined up thinking around public transport provision is needed to ensure routes remain viable and intelligently serve local populations. Traffic flows on streets within Whitehill Bordon are linked to the surrounding local roads and strategic network. Concerns relating to the potential growth in traffic as a result of development and the negative impacts that these could have on neighbouring villages such as Lindford and Kingsley and rural roads, have consistently been a major issue aired at consultation events. To address these concerns, detailed work to assess the sub-regional public transport opportunities and determine the necessary mitigation against traffic impact in the wider area are being undertaken in parallel to this commission by Hampshire County Council.

10.3 The following strategies are being progressed by Hampshire County Council during 2009, 2010 and 2011 to inform the next stages of the masterplanning project:• Sub-regional Transport Links: - Potential for Park and Ride: Exploring the potential for park and ride facilities to serve the Eco-town - Bus Study: exploring the services that are required to meet the town’s predicted demand for public transport. - Pre-feasibility Study of Rail Route Options: exploring the engineering feasibility of connecting Whitehill Bordon to the national rail network by train or tram. • Rail Feasibility (GRIP): Following the rail pre-feasibility study and assessing in detail the possible rail route options, leading to the preparation of an Outline Business Case for submission to National Rail. • Transport Baseline Model and Transport Assessment: based on extensive survey work undertaken in late 2009 onwards, the model will test a range of development scenarios and options the impact of future proposals and mitigation measures leading to a detailed Transport Assessment. 10.4 Consultation will continue with local residents to inform these studies and explain their findings.

75

Whitehill Bordon transport and movement strategy, Alan Baxter and Associates, 20109

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Existing transport and movement in Whitehill Bordon 10.5 Chapter 2 and the supporting technical transport and movement strategy provide detail of the existing access to the town, public transport routes, modes of travel and destination patterns which form the basis of understanding what will be required to deliver the step change in transport and movement that is required. In summary the key issues that the transport strategy seeks to address are: • The impact of the A325 on the character and eastwest connectivity of the town. The route carries approximately 16,000 vehicles a day, of which 40% are through traffic but 60% are local journeys • The level of car based journeys. Currently 74% of existing journeys within Whitehill Bordon are made by car, with only 4% by train or bus reflecting the low levels of public transport (2001 census travel to work data and 2006 travel survey data) • The concerns of residents in surrounding villages about the potential for increased volumes of traffic arising because of development and the need for measures to be put in place to avoid impacts on village roads and lanes • The lack of public transport options. Two bus routes one to the north and one to the south which each provide one bus an hour which do not offer an attractive alternative to the car. The town does not have a rail station, but there is a disused rail line running through MoD land at the edge of

Traffic at the A325 / Chalet Hill corner

Hogmoor Inclosure. Investigations into the feasibility of reopening this corridor for rail or other public transport options are being carried out, but are currently at an early stage. The closest rail station to Whitehill Bordon is Liss station offering 1-2 trains per hour to London and Portsmouth. Bentley, Liphook, Alton and Haslemere stations are also accessible and can offer more frequent services. • Improving the walkability of the town. Existing culde-sac estate layouts and the barrier created by the MoD land in the western part of the town are

not conducive to walking. However many residents enjoy walking in nearby natural areas and the scale of the town offers potential for most local trips to be within walking distance. • The lack of clear cycle routes within the town and for commuting. Whitehill Bordon is linked into national and local cycle routes but these are tailored towards leisure rather than commuting and are sporadic within the town..


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Transport Strategy Proposals Objectives for movement in the future? 10.6 Movement profiles as currently observed at Whitehill Bordon will change as the MoD move out. Although total movement generated by the town may initially drop once relocation starts, it will then rise following redevelopment of the MoD site, informed by the masterplan.

How much future movement could there be? 10.7 The transport strategy tested the likely impact of up to 5500 new homes and 7000 jobs in line with the SE plan and Green Town Vision. It estimated that this level of development could increase the overall movement within the town by up to 80%. However, the masterplan currently estimates that a lower level of development of around 4000 homes and 5500 jobs is more appropriate and therefore this figure would be reduced. The movement estimates will continue to be refined further as detailed work is undertaken.

How will people move? 10.8 It is not appropriate to assume that people living and working in the town in the future will travel in the same way as residents and employees within the town do today. It is also important to think about the sort of place we want Whitehill Bordon to be following development and the choices that people living and working within the town should have to travel.

10.9 As led by National and Local policy, a fundamental objective for growth of towns is to enable a significant reduction in our future carbon footprint through appropriate measures. As personal transport accounts for approximately 25% of a persons’ annual carbon footprint*, providing low carbon and sustainable forms of transport choice is an opportunity to significantly reduce overall carbon footprint. 10.10 With this in mind the aims of the transport strategy are to: • establish sustainable patterns of movement to and within the town • minimise use of the private car • provide appropriate, appealing and realistic alternatives, so that people living within Whitehill Bordon will not be reliant on the private car, as is currently the case.

The transport strategy will include the provision of high quality footpaths and cycling routes

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Target Modal Split 10.11 The following modal split targets have been developed for Whitehill Bordon. These targets are considered aspirational, but achievable with the correct investment in sustainable travel infrastructure. 10.12 The reintroduction of a railway at Whitehill Bordon is subject to further investigation. While it remains uncertain two future modal split targets have been developed based on: (i) no rail station at Whitehill Bordon (ii) rail station at Whitehill Bordon 10.13 The following sections describe proposals which are aimed at achieving these modal split targets.

Figure 10.1 Summary of overall target modal split at 2036 without railway

Figure 10.2 Summary of overall target modal split at 2036 with railway


surrounding larger towns

At this stage, the opportunity for the introduction of rail services at Whitehill Bordon is unknown, therefore the focus of the transport strategy is on providin WHITEHILL BORDON 167 high quality bus routes to cater for movement by public transport. FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN The following bus services are suggested:

10.14 The aim is for it to be a real possibility to live in Whitehill Bordon without the need to own a car. In order to do this, a high quality and reliable public transport system linking to surrounding towns and villages is required. At this stage, the likelihood of the re-introduction of rail services at Whitehill Bordon is unknown, therefore the focus of the transport strategy is on providing high quality bus routes to cater for movement by public transport between homes, employment and recreational destinations.

Buses 10.15 The target modal share for use of the bus is 17% of all journeys by 2036 (9% if a rail station at Whitehill Bordon can be delivered). Clearly this is an aspirational target, but if significant investment in the provision of bus services and infrastructure can be achieved over the next 20 years, this aspiration can be achieved, as the majority of journeys taking place both to, through and within the town could feasibly be carried out by bus. 10.16 Three tiers of bus services are suggested to meet a range of needs: • Strategic routes serving longer distance journeys: at least 2 buses per hour, i.e. 1 bus every 30mins. High quality, low emission, single decker bus vehicles are suggested to operate on these routes.

10.17 The routes shown are proposed to serve • Local routes serving surrounding villages: at leastConcept 4 Bordon and surrounding areas, towith link with buses per hour, i.e. 1 bus every 15mins. High quality, WithinWhitehill the town, this could mean the following, the strategic routes havin • Public transport focus along High Street, with section south of Chalet Hill to be key surrounding destinations. Service timetables low emission,down minigraded bus type vehicles (approx. 30 to bus only the opportunity to either utilise the railway corridor, orwill use the A325. need to be linked to provide successful integration seats) suggested to operate on these routes. • Upgrades to existing bus routes and frequencies of services. It is intended that the proposed new bus • Town wide routes serving key facilities around the routes are introduced in a phased way in advance of • Addition of new public transport routes to link Whitehill Bordon with Alton Aldershot/ town: at least 6 buses per hour, i.e. 1 bus every development completion to enable travel patterns for surrounding larger towns 10mins. High quality, low emission, mini bus type Farnham new residents and employees at Whitehill Bordon to be vehicles suggested (approx. 20 seats) to operate onof rail services at Whitehill At this stage, the opportunity for the introduction influenced from day one. Bordon is unknown, therefore the focus of the transport strategy is on providing these routes. high quality bus routes to cater for movement by public transport. The following bus services are suggested:

Concept

West of Town Loop

• Greatham Selborne Within the town, this could• mean the following, with the strategic routes having • West Worldham the opportunity to either utilise the railway corridor, or use the A325. Figure 10.3 Indicative bus routing diagram • Kingsley • Oakhanger Alton Aldershot/ • Bordon Farnham

East of Town Loo 4.0 Proposed Transport Strategy

Excellent public transport

Town wide West of Town Loop • • • • • •

Greatham Selborne West Worldham Kingsley Oakhanger Bordon

East of Town Loop

• Sleaford Liss / Petersfield

Town wide

Liss / Petersfield

• • • • •

Churt Headley Standford Lindford Bordon

Liphook/ Haslemere Strategic bus routes Long distance - serving larger towns. Infrequent stops. Local bus routes Medium distance - serving local villages. Stops at each village centre. Town wide route Serving all key destinations and services within town.

• • • • • •

Sleaford Churt Headley Standford Lindford Bordon

Liphook/ Haslemere

Strategic bus routes Strategic bus routes Long distance - serving larger towns. Infrequent st

Local bus routes Medium distance Local bus routes- serving local villages. Stops at e village centre.

Town wide route Town wide bus routes Serving all key destinations and services within tow Frequent stops.


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Bus stops – introducing the ‘hub’ concept

• Bank

10.18 In order to encourage people living and working within Whitehill Bordon to use the proposed public transport services, it is vital to provide bus stops in convenient locations close to people’s homes and facilities within the town.

• Café

10.19 A central transport hub is proposed within the town centre along the existing High Street where all bus routes serving the town should stop. The building will serve as a focus for changing people’s perceptions of traditional travel by public transport and will include state of the art journey planning information centre introducing innovation to public transport. Real time passenger information, information on bus routes, cycle routes, cycle hire, walking routes, car clubs, car share schemes could be provided as well as a high tech community message board including adverts. 10.20 Ideas for other services to be provided at the Whitehill Bordon Central Transport Hub: • Bike parking/cycle hire • Tourist information centre • Sustainable living information centre • Social community meeting place • Internet access Images from top: example of an iconic information centre; clean, green buses

• Library

• Bike shop and repair centre (with free air pump for bike tyres) 10.21 The central transport hub should be provided as soon as possible, to provide a focus for changing travel patterns immediately for residents and employees in Whitehill Bordon. 10.22 Sub hubs will be located close to the main employment locations. All bus routes will stop at these sub hubs, where sheltered waiting facilities, and real time information on routes will be provided. 10.23 Bus stops will be located within 5 minutes walk of all existing and proposed new homes at Whitehill Bordon, local bus routes serving all the main facilities in the town should stop here. 10.24 Figure 10.4 summarises the locations of all ‘hubs’ and bus stops within the town and indicative routes for strategic, town and local routes.


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Figure 10.4 Proposed indicative bus routes and stops within the town Strategic Route Strategic Route Local loop Local loop North-South Town Route East-West Town Route Central Transport hub - served by all routes to heart of town centre Transport sub-hub - served by all routes to employment destinations Bus stop on town wide routes 5-min walk from bus stop

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Early Projects

Rail

10.25 Investment needed to achieve these targets is significant. It should start immediately through

10.28 The long term aspiration for Whitehill Bordon remains for the reintroduction of a railway station. A target of 17% of all journeys being carried out by rail should a station be reintroduced forms part of the strategy. Hampshire County Council is currently carrying out various feasibility studies, including an engineering pre feasibility study of rail route options. The masterplan has been designed so that the historic rail corridor through the town running north and south is safeguarded, and identifies a location for a possible station at the edge of Hogmoor Inclosure, within easy walking distance of the town centre. This approach allows the town to remain flexible for accommodating rail in the future.

improvements to: • frequencies of existing services • provision and simplification of information relating to which services go where and when • this information can be provided at the transport hub as well as advertised • real time information being available at bus stops, via the internet and mobile services (which some already are) • improved waiting facilities, starting at the transport hub in centre of town, using available technologies to communicate and enhance the public transport experience.

Medium - longer term opportunities 10.26 There is an opportunity in the longer term to upgrade the strategic bus routes to become fast transit routes or guided buses. This would involve creating a dedicated bus only route, potentially via the disused rail corridor or adjacent to the A325. This could improve speed and reliability of the services, encouraging further patronage. 10.27 A feasibility study is being carried out by Hampshire County Council to review the way an improved public transport system could be introduced through surrounding areas, to link Whitehill Bordon with surrounding larger towns and growth areas.

10.29 The decision was taken not to plan a heavy rail corridor through the centre of the town. This is to balance the risk between the uncertainty of delivering a railway, along with the significant severance and development constraints heavy railway infrastructure can create in the urban environment. 10.30 A second transport hub at the station for bus/ rail/cycle interchange would be provided as part of any station proposals. 10.31 Varying levels of rail technologies are available, from heavy to light rail systems. ‘Ultra light’ rail systems are now an option for some areas, such as the ‘Parry People Mover’. This operates successfully on previously disused rail corridor in Stourbridge in the West Midlands. Light or ultra light rail can be a cheaper alternative to heavy rail, providing similar passenger connections,

without the freight carrying capacity. The masterplan has been designed to be flexible to accommodate such systems within the town in the future.

Walking 10.32 The aim for the town is to increase the overall modal share of trips on foot from the existing 20% to 25%. This is considered a very reasonable target for the town, particularly with the creation of new jobs in close proximity to the new homes. The town is being designed with genuine walkable neighbourhoods to make walking a more attractive and safer option for local residents. 10.33 A network of pedestrian routes, the ‘Green Loop and Grid’, is proposed throughout the town linking up with existing town wide and long distance routes via new streets and footpaths. The green loop and grid will connect all facilities from homes, schools, employment and community facilities together. Streets and footpaths through the town will be designed to be direct, overlooked, well lit and well maintained. 10.34 In addition:

• All new homes will be within 400m (5 minute) walking distance from regular and reliable public transport systems. • Initiatives such as walking to school through ‘walking buses’ will be encouraged • Internet shopping and delivery services from local shops to make shopping without a car much easier


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Cycling 10.35 The aim for the project is to increase the modal share of trips by cycle from 2% to 12%. Cycling as a mode of transport provides a real opportunity in this area for both leisure and commuting purposes. Opportunities for promoting cycling in order to achieve the modal share targets are:WW • Provision of safe and secure cycle parking facilities adjacent to, or at the front door of residential units, providing an immediate option to use instead of the car • Provision of safe and secure communal cycle parking facilities adjacent to, or at the front door of employment and commercial hubs and transport interchanges along with appropriate change and showering facilities • Improved cycle infrastructure on the road network including good surfaces and safe, well-lit routes including a main cycle route along the existing High Street. • Facilities for taking cycles on buses and trains • Provision of showers, changing rooms and lockers at work places, delivered through commercial Travel Plan obligations.

Figure 10.5 Strategic cycle links Leisure Routes Potential route adjacent to disused rail corridor Commuter Route

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• Community bike rental initiatives and ‘bikeability’ training programmes. Including the provision of bike hire schemes (potentially with electric power assistance) at the central ‘transport hub’ on the High Street and possible rail station • Delivery bike loan schemes from local supermarkets to transport goods home without a car • The enhancement and extension of cycle route networks connecting Whitehill Bordon to the National Cycle network and to surrounding railway stations at Bentley, Liphook and Liss.

Vehicular movement and parking strategy

• The traffic management system will make car use a less attractive choice for journeys • Cycle parking facilities and access to bus stops should be easier for residents than accessing their car • Working from home facilities within residential units can help reduce the need for commuting to work • The opportunity for selling car parking spaces separately to residential dwellings should be investigated. • 17% of all journeys are related to shopping, the introduction of the delivery systems for goods to people’s homes, along with reduced parking at main retail facilities will encourage people not to drive.

10.36 Reducing usage of the private car as a carbon intensive form of transport is one of the principle aims for the masterplan. The modal split targets the strategy aims for are between 25% - 30% of all journeys to be carried out by car (with and without a rail station at Whitehill Bordon) 10.37 The following measures are proposed to enable people to live and work in Whitehill Bordon without the need to own their own car by using other more sustainable forms of transport to get about: • The street network has been designed for the benefit of pedestrians, cyclists and public transport uses, with priority in favour of these users rather than private vehicles, and includes a car free area in the town centre Images left: examples of car parking / car club solutions


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Parking 10.38 Providing the correct balance of parking to support development is a vital aspect towards the success of any new development. The suggested approach to parking provision for new development at Whitehill Bordon is to reduce existing maximum parking standards by up to 50%, once the public transport infrastructure is in place. Existing parking standards allow for up to 3 car parking spaces per house to be provided. This should be reduced progressively to 1 parking space per dwelling for new development and can eventually go below this where alternative sources of transport are convenient and appropriate. In addition new car parking spaces should be designed so that they can function for other uses should car ownership reduce further in the future. It is considered important that this provision is reduced in order to encourage travel by more sustainable modes of transport. The reduction in parking will need to be phased in line with increasing improvements to public transport. 10.39 An adaptable parking strategy is required to effectively cater for new developments with different types and levels of parking suitable for different styles of development. The aim is to integrate parking facilities sympathetically within the new development, so that cars do not dominate the local streets. Cycle parking should be generously provided closer to front doors than car parking, to encourage use of cycles over cars. 10.40 In order to encourage a pedestrian focus for the central area, a car free zone is suggested within the heart of the town centre. No parking will be permitted

in this central zone, and streets will be designed to accommodate access for servicing vehicles only at certain times of the day.

A Network of Streets 10.41 A new network of streets connecting with existing streets within the town will be designed to create a hierarchy where different street typologies serve different functions. Streets will range in design from the main through route, which will carry diverted traffic from the High Street down to local residential access streets which may include shared surface routes (for pedestrians and cyclists) or homezones. Further information on street design is provided in the supporting technical transport strategy.

High Street and Through Street 10.42 One approach to traffic management within the town centre is to provide a new through street to divert the A325 away from the town centre. The new through street will replace the function of the A325 and will be designed to provide a pleasant environment while catering for the future forecast levels of traffic. 10.43 The existing High Street (A325) will be downgraded to provide a better environment for pedestrians and cyclists and promote better connectivity between the east and west of the town. Where appropriate the carriageway will be narrowed and converted to ‘shared space’, where pedestrians take priority, but vehicles can also pass through at very slow speeds. The central section of the existing High

Street from Chalet Hill to Lynton Road is proposed to become a public transport only link, where buses (and potentially trams in the future) and taxis will be the only vehicles allowed through. This is to discourage use of the High Street for through traffic. 10.44 The detailed layout of the new through route will be designed to minimise impact on mature trees and the historic drover’s route at Viking Park where possible.

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Figure 10.6 Street hierarchy and indicative street widths

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Traffic management outside the town

Next Steps

10.45 Hampshire County Council is currently collecting detailed information relating to traffic in the local area. Shortly, they will be carrying out detailed trip generation work and a traffic modelling exercise which will identify if there are any highly sensitive areas where traffic may have an undue effect on the town and neighbouring villages. Once this exercise is complete, traffic management measures at specific locations may need to be designed and implemented, to mitigate against the impact of additional traffic on surrounding local routes. Examples of successful traffic management measures which have been successfully implemented in rural locations are shown as an indication to what may be feasible for areas surrounding Whitehill Bordon.

10.46 Changing travel patterns of people living and working in Whitehill Bordon can start now. Integration of existing transport systems in the town is required as currently, the main travel opportunity is use of the private car. Real projects can be taken forward now to make a real start to encourage a change in travel patterns including:-

Central transport hub

Bus network improvements

Rail feasibility study

Cycle routes and facilities

Green loop and grid

Personal travel planning for existing residents.

10.47 The emerging transport strategy has informed the Masterplan development to date. The final transport strategy will be developed following significant further work by Hampshire County Council as referred to earlier in this chapter. This will test a range of development scenarios and options on transport networks both in and around the town.

Images right: examples of traffic calming solutions

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Outline strategies for Energy, Waste Management, Water & Climate Change Adaptation

• Whitehill Bordon Energy, Waste and Climate Change Adaptation Strategies, AECOM, 2010

11.1 Strategic town wide infrastructure is required to deliver the necessary energy, water and waste utilities for any significant development. For an Eco-town strategies are also required to show how buildings and development will be designed to deliver the

Existing Infrastructure

challenging Eco-town sustainability targets. 11.2 Given the extent of redevelopment that is planned for Whitehill Bordon, the majority of the utility services distribution networks will have to be relocated and upgraded. This section sets out, under the three key headings of energy, waste and water, the main identified utility constraints which have informed the masterplan development and the outline strategies for delivering low carbon energy, reducing waste to landfill and supplying water efficiently. Separately this section sets out steps that have been taken through the masterplan to: • adapt to the now inevitable impacts of climate change, • encourage sustainable retrofit of existing properties • encourage a shift towards more sustainable lifestyles. The chapter provides a summary of the technical proposals set out in the following supporting documents:

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Outline water cycle study, Halcrow Group, 2009

• Whitehill Bordon Outline Water Cycle Study, Halcrow, 2009

Chapter 2, paragraph 2.68 provides details of the existing infrastructure provided within the masterplan area. The key aspects that the masterplan has sought to address are: • The likely need to retain the two existing electricity substations, water tower and reservoirs to the north of the site, foul water pumping station to the west of Louisburg Barracks and telephone exchange on the High Street • That the electricity infrastructure is near capacity, however ongoing discussions are required to understand their future operational requirements for electricity and the availability of spare capacity • The potential to relocate and enhance the existing household waste recycling centre on Station Road following further discussions with HCC • The need to make effective use of existing services and networks for domestic and commercial waste processing and recycling but to bolster these services where necessary • All water in the area is currently drawn from groundwater supplies. Three options are available to supply the town in the future: South East Water resources, the MoD boreholes and well or a

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combination of the two. Further detailed work is required to assess most appropriate option76 • The likelihood that Bordon Sewage Treatment Works will require additional capacity to serve the increased population, but that this is likely to be provided within the existing site although further technical studies are required to confirm this

Infrastructure proposals 11.3 In order to ensure that Whitehill Bordon can meet the challenging Eco-towns PPS targets, the current utilities and infrastructure will have to be significantly supplemented to reduce the town’s impacts on the environment and facilitate a shift in residents’ behaviour towards more sustainable living. Given below are the infrastructure changes being proposed as part of the masterplan. 11.4 Note: A full energy study has not yet been undertaken for the Whitehill Bordon Eco-town and will be the subject of further work. The scenario proposed below takes advantage of opportunities that exist at the moment and is AECOM’s recommendation at this early stage. There are many uncertainties associated with the development of an energy strategy, such as: technological improvements and reduction in costs, future changes in the security of fuel supply and fuel prices, and expectations for the national grid to decarbonise. 11.5 The masterplan has set aside enough land for the infrastructure likely to be required to deliver the strategy outlined below and assumptions on required infrastructure costs have been included within the project viability model.


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a biomass fuelled combined heat and power (CHP) engine. As well as heat, the engine will produce 11.6 New buildings (both domestic and non-domestic) electricity that will be used locally, therefore avoiding will be designed to have energy efficient envelopes and, the high distribution losses associated with the standard where appliances are provided, these will be specified approach of centralised electricity generation. An to have low energy consumption (e.g. A+ rated fridges, indicative location for the CHP is identified within the washing machines etc.). These measures will ensure employment area of Louisburg, where visual impact that the energy demand associated with the new on adjacent development will be minimal and access buildings is significantly reduced compared to buildings for fuel delivery can be provided via the A325. This meeting current Building Regulations standards. Homes location requires further testing, in particular through constructed post 2016 will need to deliver a minimum the Habitats Regulation Assessment to understand standard for energy efficiency to ensure that heat and any potential impacts on the nearby SPA habitats and electricity is not wasted, even when it is generated by ensure they can be mitigated. Other locations within the low or zero carbon technologies. Post 2016, the design employment areas could be considered if this site is not of flats and mid terraced houses will have to ensure deemed appropriate. that no more than 39kWh/m2/year will be needed for heating and cooling of the dwelling. End terraces and 11.9 It has been assumed that the CHP system will detached houses will have to limit space heating and be managed by an Energy Services Company (ESCo), cooling demand to 46kWh/m2/year or less. who will be responsible for operation, maintenance and

Energy

11.7 A smart grid will be considered. This may enable greater control of the network to minimise peaks and troughs and allow for a more efficient use of local micro and CHP generators. As well as smart meters (required by the Eco-towns PPS), a smart grid would include dynamic demand control77 of appliances (i.e. controls so operation cycles for fridges, air conditioners etc. avoid peak demand periods) and possibly grid enabled backup generators78 to come online at peak times and avoid the risk of blackouts.

billing arrangements. 11.10 In the early phases a series of smaller heat networks, which may be associated with power generation will be installed and a variety of different technologies will be tested (e.g. network utilising biogas from anaerobic digestion at Blackmoor Estate). The intention is to use these phases as pilots and to learn from them. In the longer term these networks could be joined together to create a more expansive network.

Biomass CHP 11.8 It is anticipated that new buildings in the higher density areas of the masterplan (i.e. town centre, green streets and green views neighbourhoods) will be heated by a district heating system powered by 77 78

BNXS41: Dynamic demand control of domestic appliances, DEFRA Market Transformation Programme (January 2008) Sustainable Community Infrastructure, UKGBC and Zero Carbon Hub (February 2010)

Biomass Boilers 11.11 In lower density areas towards the edge of the town (e.g. green roots neighbourhoods), where it is not financially viable to extend the district heating network, biomass boilers will be used for heating individual buildings or blocks. As described above these building systems are essentially small networks which may later be connected to wider heat networks. 11.12 Biomass is a renewable resource as long as forests providing the wood fuel are managed sustainably. The location of Whitehill Bordon in one of the most wooded regions of the country and the proximity to the Forestry Commission at Alice Holt presents a great opportunity to rationalise local forest management in order to maximise sustainable wood fuel generation. The Biomass Energy Centre - which has a remit to encourage the use of wood as fuel - is located at Alice Holt and is keen to support EHDC in establishing a secure and local supply of biomass fuel.

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Solar Photovoltaic Panels

Evolution of the energy strategy

11.13 In order to meet the zero carbon definition stated in the Eco-towns PPS, the district heating system will be supplemented by the installation of solar photovoltaic panels (PV) on the roofs of most buildings to generate renewable electricity. This will provide the additional required savings to meet the Eco-town zero carbon target.

11.17 Whilst a high level energy strategy for Whitehill Bordon has been set out, it is accepted that, given the proposed phasing of the development the strategy must remain flexible to respond to changes in, for example, energy policy, technologies and fuel price. New technologies are being tested all the time and technology costs reduce at different rates depending on technology learning.

Potential for Wind Energy 11.14 Preliminary investigations suggest that there may be the potential to install a medium size wind turbine on or near the site to boost the renewable energy generation and reduce the need for PV panels, which have a higher capital cost. Site constraints mean that it is unlikely that sufficient space can be set aside in the masterplan for a reasonably sized turbine, however the employment area proposed to the north of the site may accommodate a small/medium turbine, depending on the detailed layout of the area. 11.15 The installation of a wind turbine would provide a valuable contribution to reducing the CO2 emissions from Whitehill Bordon and would be a visible statement of the town’s pledge to “green living”. A community owned solution may even provide a source of revenue that could be reinvested for other CO2 saving measures in the town and would help build social capital by connecting residents with their community. 11.16 There may be potential to use other areas of the MoD estate for power generation either using wind power or a crop of solar panels. This could potentially provide extra income for the MoD and will continue to be explored by the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Executive.

11.18 In the first instance the opportunities presented by local supplies of biomass will be exploited, but this technology will not be used at the expense of testing other systems that may present other opportunities to deliver long term sustainability. The assessment of carbon emissions associated with the Whitehill Bordon development requires the consideration of many variables, which will not be constant throughout the lifetime of the project. These include the characteristics of low and zero carbon technologies (e.g. operation efficiency, capital cost), but also the characteristics of the standard energy generation technologies (e.g. national grid electricity) against which the development’s proposals are being compared. This means that the energy strategy for Whitehill Bordon needs to be flexible enough to take into account changes in these variables and always aim for the most sustainable option at the time. 11.19 At present the carbon emissions associated with grid electricity are far greater than those associated with gas and biomass because electricity is generated by the inefficient burning of coal and oil. This means that technologies such as heat pumps that use electricity (albeit very efficiently), do not appear to be very effective at reducing CO2 emissions compared to technologies such as biomass heating and power


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

generation. However central Government is working towards reducing the CO2 emissions associated with grid electricity by the integration of more wind and nuclear power into the mix. This process is called decarbonisation of the grid and Ofgem report a number of scenarios showing how quickly this process could occur depending on a number of variables, such as Government policy, market uptake, state of the economy etc. Figure 11.2 shows the four scenarios given in the report, with the Green Stimulus option showing the biggest level of decarbonisation and the Slow Growth option the lowest. 11.20 The fact that electricity generation is predicted to emit progressively lower levels of CO2 means that there may be a point in the future when technologies that use electricity, such as heat pumps, could prove better at reducing CO2 emissions than technologies using biomass. As an illustration of this point, figure 11.3 shows if and at what point in time a typical dwelling with a very energy efficient fabric, solar thermal, solar PV and an air source heat pump (ASHP) could have a lower CO2 emission rate than the same dwelling served by biomass CHP. Each graph is based on a different grid decarbonisation scenario from the Ofgem report.

Photos: Sustainability solutions around the home: far left, woodchip fuelled biomass boiler; top left, cycle storage; below left, water butt

11.21 This analysis shows that at present CO2 emissions from the air source heat pump option are greater than for the biomass CHP option (i.e. green line above the blue one). However, if the best predictions for decarbonisation of the grid materialise (i.e. Green Stimulus), by 2016 the air source heat pump option will be a more effective strategy for saving CO2 than connecting the dwelling to a biomass CHP (i.e. green line below the blue one). On the other hand, if decarbonisation does not occur as quickly (e.g. Slow Growth scenario), biomass CHP will still be more effective at saving CO2 than air source heat pumps in 2025 and beyond. 11.22 This analysis illustrates that no technology can be excluded from the Whitehill Bordon energy strategy at this stage, and that the approach needs to be revised on a regular basis to take into account future changes in the energy sector.

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Slow Growth ‐ emissions

Electricity emission factor scenarios Total CO2 emission rate (kgCO sion rate (kgCO2/m²/year)

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Figure 11.2 (above) four scenarios given in Ofgem report,79 with the Green Stimulus option showing the biggest level of decarbonisation and the Slow Growth option the lowest.

Figure 11.3 (right) Emissions for biomass CHP option vs. Air source heat pump option for Slow Growth and Green Stimulus decarbonisation rate scenarios Biomass CHP: dwelling connected to a biomass combined heat and power district system EE+ASHP+SWH+PV: dwelling designed with highly energy efficient fabric, air source heat pump for space heating, solar water heating and solar PV electricity generation

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Waste 11.23 When considering ways to reduce the environmental impacts of waste management, the biggest step that can be taken is to avoid the generation of unnecessary waste in the first place. This can be achieved mainly by changes in behaviour rather than by specific facilities or infrastructure. This section focuses on infrastructure improvements that are being proposed to reduce the impact of waste management from generation to treatment and disposal. 11.24 In order to make it easy for Whitehill Bordon’s residents to dispose of waste in the most sustainable way, all new buildings will be provided with suitable facilities for the storage of waste at point of generation. Homes will be provided with internal and external bins for segregating different waste streams, non-domestic buildings will also be provided with sufficient space to accommodate waste segregation.

affordable prices. Further discussions with HCC will be required to develop these proposals. 11.26 With regards to the treatment of waste, dry recyclable streams (e.g. paper, plastic, metal, glass) will continue being recycled via the Alton MRF facility, as this is a successful system that has put East Hampshire in the top 20 Councils in the UK with the highest recycling rates. There may be opportunities to increase recycling rates by widening the range of materials collected and sorted at the MRF facility, however this will depend on whether Veolia (who are responsible for the delivery of EHDCs waste management strategy) can find suitable ways of treating the additional materials. 11.27 Another way of increasing recycling rates will be the implementation of educational campaigns in conjunction with the provision of additional recycling facilities such as neighbourhood collection points for a wide range of recyclable waste.

Recycling and Swapshop

Organic Waste

11.25 It is proposed that the waste recycling centre will be relocated to the proposed employment area at Louisburg Barracks, adjacent to the CHP to form a sustainability hub. It is proposed that the existing service could be extended to include a facility for exchanging items a ‘freecycle’ or ‘swapshop’ and possibly repairing items therefore diverting items that could be reused from landfill. This scheme could build on the existing services offered by The Furniture Helpline operating from Woolmer Trading Estate. The Helpline was set up to support low-income families in North East Hampshire, Waverley in Surrey and West Sussex by redistributing previously owned, good condition furniture and electrical appliances at

11.28 All houses with gardens will be provided with compost bins so that organic waste (i.e. food and garden waste) can be disposed of where it is generated without needing to be transported elsewhere. Flats and non-domestic buildings will also be provided with the space for storing organic waste, although it is predicted that the waste will have to be treated elsewhere. 11.29 In the case of food waste from flats, the installation of food disposal units in the kitchen sink should be explored in more detail as the scheme develops, as this solution would have the benefit to allow for transfer of waste via the foul water treatment network rather than by road. Installing food disposal units is only a viable

option if a strategy is in place at the treatment facility for processing food waste combined with sewage waste. The potential of this option will be reviewed with Thames Water at a later stage, when more information will become available on likely number of households to be served and therefore likely size of system required. 11.30 It is proposed that garden and other green waste that cannot be composted at source is transferred to a central composting facility located to the north of the town alongside the CHP and recycling centres. The compost generated will then be used for the maintenance of the town’s green spaces and/or sold to local allotment holders. 11.31 Where on site composting of organic (food and landscaping) waste is not possible, it is proposed that food waste is collected for anaerobic digestion (AD) and biogas generation. Food waste is an energy rich material that can be digested to produce biogas that can then be burned for energy generation. The amount of food waste generated by Whitehill Bordon would not be sufficient to make a town facility financially viable, however preliminary investigations found two local initiatives interested in using Whitehill Bordon’s food waste for anaerobic digestion. 11.32 Local brickworks supplier Tower Brick and Tiles Ltd (3.3 miles from Bordon town centre) is currently seeking planning permission to develop a biogas digester at the brickworks and use the biogas to fire the kilns; food waste from the town would be a free and local fuel source for them. Blackmoor Estate to the south of Whitehill is also considering the development of an anaerobic digester to dispose of the cattle slurry being produced on the farm, they may be interested in taking food waste from Whitehill Bordon to increase their biogas production.

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11.33 With the exception of organic waste to be composted in the gardens of houses, the majority of waste generated in the town will have to be collected from the points of generation and transported to the treatment/disposal facilities. Innovative ways of transferring waste are available, such as the underground Envac collection system, and their viability will be considered against standard transfer methods (i.e. road transport), as the design of the development progresses. A rail link will also be considered although it is unlikely to provide sufficient flexibility for waste collection. Another way of minimising the environmental impact and nuisance of waste transfer will be the use of electric vehicles, where possible.

Energy from waste 11.34 The residual waste that cannot be recycled or treated in the town is currently being burned for energy generation at one of the energy from waste facilities in Hampshire. This is proposed to remain the case for the Eco-town, however the target is to progressively reduce the amount of residual waste generated by increasing the uptake of recycling and other lifestyle changes.

Construction waste 11.35 The generation of construction waste during the demolition and construction phase will also be reduced by retaining as many buildings as possible and reusing some for transition uses. Materials from demolition will be reused in construction where possible and otherwise recycled off site.

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Outline water cycle study, Halcrow Group, 2009

Water 11.36 The outline water cycle study for Whitehill Bordon carried out by Halcrow80 includes recommendations for measures that could be implemented to achieve the policy targets set out in the Eco-towns PPS and Green Town Vision.

Water meters 11.37 It is proposed that all new buildings will be fitted with water meters and, where possible, meters will be retrofitted to existing buildings. The Halcrow study states that homes with meters use significantly less water than homes without, due to the increased awareness of the residents. It is proposed that meters will be installed in combination with an awareness campaign to maximise their impact.

Water efficiency 11.38 In order to minimise water demand within buildings, all new development will be fitted with water efficient sanitary ware, e.g. dual flush low capacity WCs, aerated taps, showers with flow regulators, low capacity baths, low water use washing machines and dishwashers. New dwellings will be fitted with greywater recycling systems, which will ensure that the water from the showers, baths and taps is reused to flush the toilet before being transferred for treatment. 11.39 Rainwater will be collected in water butts for houses and centralised tanks for flats and other building types. This will mean that potable water, which is costly and energy intensive to treat, will not be wasted for low grade uses such as irrigation and car washing.

Water treatment and anaerobic digestion 11.40 It is likely that the Bordon Sewage Treatment Works (STW) will be expanded on its existing site to process waste water from the additional population. The installation of an anaerobic digester (AD) for onsite treatment of sludge should be considered as part of the expansion works. AD is an effective way of treating the sludge and generates energy to power the plant; furthermore an AD plant on site will avoid the CO2 emissions currently associated with transporting the sludge to the Farnham STW, and would produce some biogas that could be used for energy generation. 11.41 Initial investigations suggest that Whitehill Bordon does not generate sufficient waste water to make investment in an AD plant financially viable, however Thames Water are interested in AD (including co-digestion of food waste) and intend to consider the viability of integrating this technology as part of the STW extension works that are likely to be required as the new homes are built.


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Climate Change Adaptation

Sustainable drainage systems

Passive Cooling / Heating

11.42 Climate change will have increasing impacts on life in the UK and Whitehill Bordon with changes such as more frequent storm events, more frequent water shortages and higher temperatures in summer. A number of design measures are proposed to allow the town to adapt to these changes.

11.45 Sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) will be integrated throughout the development site in the form of wetlands, ponds, swales, infiltration basins etc. to ensure that surface water runoff is slowed down and water is diverted rather than cause overflows in the sewer system. The location of the SuDS will be established when a more detailed plan is developed for the site however the masterplan indicated a network of blue corridors in line with existing drainage patterns where it is anticipated SuDS features will be concentrated. SuDs can also provide a range of other benefits, including areas for ecological habitats and biodiversity, and can provide space for informal recreation and play spaces. More information is available in chapter 8.

11.47 In designing individual buildings the risk of overheating in summer will be taken into account by facilitating natural ventilation, designing for optimum buildings orientation, introducing shading measures such as shutters or careful landscaping. The use of vegetation within the built environment will also minimise the risk of the urban heat island effect by making the most of the cooling effect of evapotranspiration and shade from vegetation.

11.43 No new development will take place in the River Wey flood plain and measures will be implemented to minimise flood risk from increasingly frequent storm events.

Permeable surfaces 11.44 The aim is for 66% of development area to be permeable, to allow easy rainwater infiltration and reduce the urban heat island effect. This will be achieved through maintaining large areas of green space including private gardens, the Green Loop, woodland etc., using permeable paving for cycle paths, pavements and other suitable hard standing areas; and introducing green roofs throughout the site.

11.46 The risk of water shortages will be reduced by minimising the demand for water from efficiency measures (see water section) and by the integration of SuDS, which increase the water retained in local groundwater reservoirs by avoiding surface water being diverted away from the site via the sewer system.

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Retrofitting 11.48 The existing buildings in Whitehill Bordon that are to be retained will benefit from the introduction of a series of retrofitting measures to improve their energy performance, water efficiency and reduce running costs. EHDC is preparing a package of grants and assistance to be made available to home and business owners for improvements to their properties. 11.49 Not all solutions will be appropriate for all homes although the ‘Passiv Haus’ model remains a target. EHDC is currently setting up a team of Eco-fit advisors who will be able to assess homes on an individual, cluster or street basis. They will provide advice to residents as to the most effective and appropriate solutions for their homes and provide grants and interest free loans to help them pay. For example the use of PV panels is only appropriate where roofs are orientated broadly southwards.

Energy 11.50 Preliminary calculations suggest that retrofitting energy efficiency and some renewable generation to existing homes has the potential to save nearly as much CO2 as would be emitted by building the new homes to current standards (i.e. were they not built to be zero carbon). Improvements could include: roof and wall insulation, double glazing, gas boiler replacement, installation of solar water heating and installation of biomass heating. 11.51 Connecting existing buildings to the proposed district heating network is going to be costly and unlikely to be viable in most cases, however this option will be considered for buildings where it is

likely to be cost effective and will be considered as an option for those homes located adjacent to the demonstration projects.

Water 11.52 Water saving measures could include for example: • Installing ‘hippos’ in WC cisterns to reduce the volume of water used per flush • Retrofitting flow regulators to showers and taps. • In cases where major refurbishment is planned, there may be potential to retrofit grey water recycling, although this is a significant undertaking and is unlikely to be feasible in many cases. • Water butts could be installed in private gardens to collect and use rainwater.

SuDs 11.53 Retro-fitting of SuDs to retained parts of the town will be challenging due to space limitations, however green and permeable surfaces will be increased where possible. Funding will also be available to promote the use of permeable paving instead of standard paving methods where homeowners want to increase the hard standing on their land (e.g. paving of driveways).

Figure 11.4 Potential retrofitting measures


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Apollo Drive plan of possible houses (those within 20degrees of a North-South orientation) that can be retro-fitted 188

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Dri ve

Apollo Drive

Apollo Dri

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Figure 11.5 Property orientation affects the potential for effective use of photovoltaics.

Apo llo

This example from Apollo Drive, Whitehill Bordon illustrates suitable properties where roofs are within 20o of south facing orientation.

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Apollo Drive

Examples of other possible retrofitting measures are given below (this is indicative only).

Apollo Dri

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Housing Upgrades

Apollo Drive Southern facad

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Denotes suitable Photovoltaic positions

Housing Upgrades Apollo Drive Southern facade

Denotes suitable Photovoltaic positions


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Lifestyle changes 11.54 The proposals discussed in this and previous sections will ensure that Whitehill Bordon is well equipped to allow its inhabitants to live a more sustainable life. However the infrastructure provided is only effective if it is used and managed properly and this can only happen if the town’s residents embrace changes in their lifestyle. For example the masterplan can introduce cycle lanes, a public transport link and local amenity spaces, but these will not reduce the town’s carbon footprint unless Whitehill Bordon residents choose to leave their car at home and cycle or take a train to work, or choose to spend more of their leisure time in the local countryside and less time driving a long way for an outing. 11.55 Part of CLG’s £10.69 million fund this year will be used to fund advisors, to encourage and support users of both new and existing buildings to ensure that they have a clear understanding of how the services in their buildings work and how their performance can be optimised. As well as encouraging residents to use their new or improved homes in the most effective way, advice will also be provided to inform people about such issues as responsible purchasing and behaviour. There is an opportunity to engage children and young people as these issues are already in the school’s curriculum. For example young people could be better informed about the energy consumption of appliances such as computer game consoles, lap tops, plasma screens etc.

11.56 The masterplan aims to encourage lifestyle changes through attractive and effective design, for example in the improved walking and cycling networks, and the careful work that has been done to ensure that schools and facilities are all within walking distance of housing and jobs. 11.57 Given below are a series of measures that should be introduced as part of the development process to encourage a change in behaviour amongst existing and future Whitehill Bordon residents: • Include a visitor and education centre as part of the energy centre housing the biomass CHP system. This will increase awareness of where the energy used in our homes comes from and why it is important not to waste it. • Support the expansion/creation of local businesses that use recycled materials to produce new goods (e.g. stationery out of recycled plastics). If recyclable materials are attributed a value as raw material for a new industry, recycling rates will increase. • Promote the reuse of goods before they are disposed of (e.g. swap shop, freecycle system), therefore reducing the amount of waste generated. • Promote a shift towards growing food locally and buying locally produced goods and food, therefore reducing the amount of waste generated from packaging of goods bought in supermarkets as well as reducing “food miles”. • Campaign for a reduction in air travel in favour of rail travel. For flights that cannot be avoided consider setting up a fund to allow residents to offset their air travel CO2 emissions by investing in the local installation of green energy systems.

Monitoring 11.58 Having provided the infrastructure and the awareness to ensure the development of an Eco-town, it is important to monitor the town’s performance to establish whether it truly is sustainable in practice. The best approach to doing this would be to carry out a detailed carbon footprint exercise for the town prior to development and then to repeat it at regular intervals following development, to assess whether the improvements introduced are having the desired effect. 11.59 An initial assessment could focus on energy being consumed (and generated) on site, e.g. in buildings, transport and services. The results of data analysis should then be advertised as part of a periodic campaign. This would maintain the residents’ awareness of sustainable living and encourage them to progressively introduce changes in their daily lives to keep reducing Whitehill Bordon’s environmental impacts and achieve the Green Town Vision aspiration for a carbon neutral town.

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Summary 11.60 The following table provides a summary of how the proposals respond to the needs of the Eco-towns PPS and Green Town Vision:

Energy

Waste

• New homes will exceed the PPS requirement for Code for Sustainable Homes Level 4 as a minimum; the energy strategy will keep developing to ensure that buildings are zero carbon (i.e. equivalent to energy credits for Code Level 6);

• The waste strategy aims at achieving zero waste to landfill;

• Homes will achieve carbon reductions (from regulated energy uses) of at least 70% against 2006 Part L target emission rate (TER);

• Waste generated on site will be treated on site wherever possible (i.e. organic waste being composted), however a fully closed-loop system is not going to be viable given the effective waste treatment methods already in place in Hampshire;

• Homes will have real time energy monitoring systems and high speed broadband access Green Town Vision standards:

• The potential for using waste for on or near site energy generation will be considered as the development progresses;

• Once more information becomes available on non-domestic uses on site, it will be possible to address in more detail the issue of co-management of municipal, commercial and industrial waste;

• The masterplan proposals for low and zero carbon design will help the town towards its aspiration for carbon neutrality by 2036, however central changes • The waste strategy includes as a first step the reduction of waste generation, which will be achieved by educating residents and promoting changes in outside the control of the masterplan, such as national grid decarbonisation, behaviour; will also be necessary; • Construction methods and materials will be carefully selected with the aim to achieve the aspiration for all new construction to be carbon neutral; • The masterplan design has been developed with the aim to allow all homes to achieve Code for Sustainable Homes Level 6; the energy strategy will keep developing to ensure that this remains the case as the design develops; • Plans are currently being developed by EHDC to maximise the potential for energy efficiency retrofit in existing dwellings (including suitable funding mechanisms) with the aim to achieve PassivHaus standards, where possible.

• The development is too early stage to establish whether it will be possible to meet the target for an average annual waste growth per capita in Whitehill Bordon to be 0.5% compared to the UK annual average increase in waste arising of 2.5%.


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Water

Climate change adaptation

Lifestyle changes

• The water strategy will include measures to avoid the deterioration of the status of ground or surface waters;

• The masterplan includes measures to address flood risk. Further work is required to calculate current and future flood risk and therefore assess whether the targets are being met;

• Awareness campaigns and financial support will be required to promote behavioural change. These are outside the scope of this masterplan report but are being considered elsewhere by EHDC;

• Sustainable drainage systems and green infrastructure will reduce the risk of surface flooding and the risk of contamination; • All new homes will meet the water consumption requirement of Level 5 of the Code for Sustainable Homes via water efficient sanitary ware and grey water recycling. New non-domestic buildings will meet similar standards of water efficiency. Green Town Vision standards: • The masterplan proposals allow for the new town not to exceed current water usage.

• SuDS are being proposed. A detailed Surface Water Management Plan will be carried out at a later date; • The green space provided will meet the requirement for 40% of the Eco-town’s total area to be allocated to green space, of which at least half should be public.

• It is too early in the development process to determine how progress in low carbon living, transport and waste will be monitored.

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Part 3: delivery and conclusions


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12.1 Delivery of the masterplan involves the complex co-ordination of a range of tasks that will require committed involvement of all the public sector stakeholders. In this section we detail the governance proposals and show how the programme can be implemented. We outline key actions that will be required and provide an overview of the financial parameters of the masterplan.

12.4 As with any large scale development, however, the pre-development period can be considerable as the development partners organise themselves. This will probably mean that the timing of the MoD land release will not impact significantly on the overall implementation programme for the project, and will, in fact, allow the partners to plan properly for implementation. During this period the partners will also be bringing forward a series of early development projects as well as the retrofitting program for the existing properties.

12.5 The recent economic problems, besides readjusting land values, have had significant effects on the developer industry and its capacity to finance 12.2 To date, the masterplan proposals for Whitehill and deliver major sustainable urban extensions. Bordon have been advanced by a public sector led Presently there is no private developer involvement consortium involving East Hampshire District Council, Hampshire County Council, the Ministry of Defence and in the masterplan and in the current economic the HCA. Besides the MoD, the County Council also has climate, the public sector parties have decided significant land holdings within the masterplan area. East to take the proposals forward themselves, taking Hampshire District Council also has a small landholding. advantage of the long lead-in time of the masterplan implementation to allow the developer market to return to more “normal” conditions. 12.3 The proposals for Whitehill Bordon have now reached the stage where the emphasis will switch 12.6 Currently, the public sector partners are from planning to delivery and a key element of this will investigating the opportunities for formalising be the governance of the project. Each of the current their current participatory arrangements through partners is committed to the delivery of a quality and financially viable Eco-town and recognises that they will establishing some kind of development trust delivery have to be proactively involved over the next few years model which will be responsible for shaping the development over the planning and development in bringing the masterplan to fruition. This delivery phases. This approach will involve the land assets is complicated by the timing of land release by the of the MoD, HCC and EHDC being kept within the MoD which essentially means that the majority of the masterplan proposals cannot even start to be delivered delivery model to allow them to gain from future value enhancement as public sector investment until a few years have passed.

Governance

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and improved market conditions leads to enhanced values. This approach also involves targeted public sector support for early win projects coupled with the establishment of the policy framework through the Core Strategy and an SPD for the masterplan area.

Financing 12.7 The establishment of the Development Trust is still at an early stage and as ideas develop they will need to address a series of development challenges. In particular, any large scale development such as this, has a requirement for significant up front infrastructure investment and usually has a short/medium term negative cash flow. Although the Whitehill Bordon Eco Town has recently been supported by further CLG funding, private development investment in the current climate is limited, while in the near future, there may be severe restrictions on public sector investment. This will mean that the development partners will need to be innovative in securing the necessary resources and demonstrating the correct blend of expertise in advancing the masterplan Important considerations include: • How it can raise the finance for the early upfront investment including securing the commitment from other public sector funding agencies • The extent it will be able to use approaches such as prudential borrowing, tax increment financing (or similar models) or access to private equity funding in meeting these needs • How it supplements its current skills and resources with additional development and financial expertise


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• When it looks to introduce private developers into the scheme and how these are introduced. • How other landowners, such as Annington Properties Ltd and the owners of Viking Park are engaged in the delivery process.

Development Viability 12.8 The issue of development viability is critical to the delivery of Whitehill Bordon Eco-town. GVA Grimley’s assessment of the masterplan for Whitehill Bordon has built upon the knowledge and findings of previous development viability work undertaken in July 2008 which was submitted to Communities and Local Government (CLG) to inform the Eco town selection process. 12.9 A Microsoft Excel Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) model based on the development appraisal method was used to assess viability. All known or estimated development revenues are assessed, and from these revenues the total known or estimated development costs are deducted. These include, for example, build costs, infrastructure costs, fees and finance. An allowance was also made for a developer’s return for risk and profit. 12.10 Development appraisals of emerging options for the masterplan were undertaken by GVA Grimley in 2009, culminating in a full financial assessment of the masterplan (assuming around 4000 dwellings, a new town centre and a range of supporting activities encompassing retail, commercial and employment uses in line with the final masterplan). The financial assessment involved four phases of development spread over a 15 year build period and this indicated that the scheme achieves a positive residual land value with the following baseline level of public funding support:

• An Affordable Housing Grant (AHG) provided by the HCA to assist the developers in the delivery of the affordable housing element; • Funding for a secondary school comprising six forms of entry (reprovision of the existing Mill Chase School from DfES/Building Schools for the future funding); and • The cost of retro-fitting existing homes to PassivHaus standards (where possible) from other public sector funding sources (and is not met by private sector developers/ house builders).

Findings 12.11 The results of the development appraisal analysis are presented in the form of a ‘Net Present Value (NPV) which takes account of all revenues received from the development, the costs incurred, alongside phasing and finance costs throughout the development period. Hence, the NPV provides an indication of the potential ‘residual value’ of the entire scheme, and therefore indicates the development viability of the master plan as a whole. 12.12 Where a negative land value is generated, the appraisal indicates that either gap funding, and/ or adjustment to the cost value assumptions are required. In contrast, a positive NPV/ residual land value indicates that the landowners will receive a positive receipt for their land. However, it does not necessarily follow that a positive NPV/ residual land value is ‘viable’, as the NPV produced must be sufficiently above the value of the land in its existing use, to incentivise the landowner to release the land for development. It is, therefore, critical to assess whether the NPV/residual land value produced is acceptable from the landowners perspective. .

12.13 Adopting the assumptions about public funding noted in paragraph 12.11 above, the development appraisal of the masterplan shows a positive Net Present Value (NPV) or residual land value in the order of £32m. This figure assumes estimates of both cost and values in current day prices. Whilst no allowance has been made for general inflation in costs and values, the baseline scenario assumes an uplift in residential sales values to reflect the increased attractiveness of Whitehill Bordon as a place to live, as the MoD vacate, a town centre is provided and the area becomes generally more attractive to potential purchasers. 12.14 The appraisal indicates that, the NPV/ residual land value produced, whilst in positive territory, produces a small value when compared to the overall development value, and sensitivity testing showed that small changes to the assumptions could significantly increase or decrease the land value. However, the updated appraisals do show improved viability since the earlier appraisals undertaken in August 2008, which is encouraging in the light of prevailing market conditions, the aspirations to deliver a town centre of significant scale, and the aspirations/ requirements of the sustainability agenda. 12.15 In light of the findings, the following factors are also worthy of note: • The scale of development proposed at Whitehill Bordon is large, with total development costs of over £1bn. • The residual land value of £32m is, therefore, small in comparison and as a result it is sensitive to small changes in costs and values. A full sensitivity analysis was undertaken to test different scenarios (see below).


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• The development appraisal was undertaken using values and costs in current day prices. As part of the sensitivity testing, estimated inflationary increases in values and costs were allowed for. This showed a likely significant increase in residual land values. Bearing in mind the scale of development proposed and the lengthy timescale involved it is likely that the scheme would be developed in phases with different developers chosen for each phase with land values calculated separately for each phase reflecting values and costs current at the time. • The development appraisal was undertaken with costs and values current as at mid 2009. It should be stressed that this was close to the low point in the economy and property market, with strongly deflated land values. Since this low point economic conditions have improved, property values have risen and building costs have reduced. Over the next few years this upturn is likely to gather pace and should add significant value to the scheme over time. 12.16 A key issue is whether the baseline scenario tested provides sufficient land value (and therefore an incentive) for all three major landowners to bring forward and release their land for development. Whilst this is a subjective issue, it is critical to the delivery of the masterplan proposals at Whitehill Bordon. Two of the three major landowners are local authorities and the third, Defence Estates, is under an obligation to achieve best value reflecting current planning policy. The three major landowners will continue to work together to refine the masterplan and delivery assumptions to ensure that values are enhanced where possible and that land values can be optimised.

12.17 The comprehensive proposals for Whitehill Bordon have been drawn up on behalf of the three main landowners in response to the aims of the Whitehill Bordon Opportunity which have reflected local aspirations to improve the town. A carefully coordinated and managed approach to the assembly and release of land for development, rather than release in a piecemeal fashion as land is vacated, is far more likely to achieve the expected enhancement of value to the landowners and thereby facilitate delivery of the regeneration and enhancement aims of the Green Town Vision. 12.18 The development viability findings also support the decision by the stakeholders to explore potential delivery models/mechanisms, and to examine how they will look to realise their asset value over the long term, thereby allowing them to gain from increased values as the development becomes established, particularly in the context of the prevailing (albeit improving) market conditions. It is therefore likely that the public sector intervention and funding will be required to deliver the Eco-town. 12.19 Whilst an assessment of the masterplan indicates that further work is required to enhance viability, the assessment should be regarded as a ‘position statement’ on which to build upon and identify next steps. Further work will therefore be imperative to refine the cash-flow of development and consider the potential mechanisms for the development’s delivery.

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Development Viability Next Steps 12.20 The quantum and timing of the infrastructure Section 106 liabilities and a Community Infrastructure Levy (if fully implemented) will be crucial, and viability is particularly sensitive to changes in these assumptions. Any reductions, deferment of payments or cost savings which could be made would enhance viability and increase the incentive to bring land forward for development. 12.21 As the scheme is worked up in greater detail, the partners will also need to work to attract other sources of public funding into the development. These could include: • Significant levels of Government funding over the life of the project for pilots and new technologies; and • Funding for all public transport improvements. 12.22 In addition, potential savers of private sector funding will need to be explored together with new means of delivery such as Tax Incremental Finance/ Accelerated Development Zones. 12.23 Further work will therefore be required to refine the financial parameters of the scheme including: • Reviewing the quantum and timing of infrastructure and Section 106 liabilities; • Examining the opportunities for public sector finance to fund all or part of the upfront infrastructure burden, some of which could be recouped later on by enhanced values; • Maximising the appropriate level of return for landowners to achieve ‘best value’; and • Finalising the development strategy for the masterplan.


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Development Timescale 12.24 The overall comprehensive implementation for the masterplan is driven by the timing of the MoD withdrawal from the site. Currently, this is assumed to be around 2015-2016. Based around this assumption, the implementation timeframe can be divided into two main phases; prior and post MoD occupation.

Prior to MoD Withdrawal Phase 1: Up until MoD withdrawal (assumed to be 2015) 12.25 As noted throughout this document, both planning for the MoD withdrawal and achieving momentum through a series of early win projects are vital in ensuring wider stakeholder support to the masterplan. Over the next few years up until the MoD withdrawal from the Bordon Camp there are two key elements of activity. The first is to set up the governance and delivery mechanism and the second is to deliver a series of early projects (partly funded through Eco-town financial support from CLG) including: • Exemplar leisure, housing and employment projects for a series of sites including the former fire station, Quebec Barracks (assuming early release by the MoD) and Viking Park • The creation of a public transport hub and subsidised additional sub regional bus services to improve connectivity with important centres. • The creation of sections of the Green Loop and SANGS in order to commence the process of protection of the Special Protected Areas.

• Reuse of the former fire station as an Eco-station including interpretation, information offices and training facilities

Post MoD withdrawal up to 2026

• Provision of free internet access via broadband and Wi-Fi across the town

12.28 These phases represent the major focus of development activity and are timed to coincide with the requirements of the South East Plan and Ecotown policies. The rate of development and its detailed location will relate to the market demand and to different patterns of withdrawal by the MoD and will vary overtime. Currently conventional wisdom and market evidence would indicate an average build out rate of 300 dwellings per annum, over the lifetime of the development but these rates will vary from year to year and could be higher, particularly if exceptional economic and employment growth is achieved and or as the cache of the Eco-town is established.

• Retrofitting the existing housing stock to improve sustainability including energy and water efficiency • A comprehensive programme of economic development initiatives including promotion, skills training and business support activities. • Detailed design and planning to ensure the implementation of the masterplan, including the development of design codes and detailed masterplanning within the current land use framework. 12.26 These projects will demonstrate to existing residents that the vision of the masterplan, after years of gestation, is being delivered, whist demonstrating to developers that a range of exciting new investment opportunities exist in Whitehill Bordon. During this period a high level of piloting and testing will occur. During this pre-MoD withdrawal phase, these activities could create an additional 350 homes, a population increase of nearly 1,000 people, new employment space for around 800 jobs, leisure and open space within the town. 12.27 This will help to re-balance early losses that might occur from MoD withdrawal.

12.29 The phasing shown below also makes the assumption that the MoD would withdraw over only a few years, thus making the site available immediately. If this were not to be the case, then the phasing over this period may be different. Key issues like making SANGS available early and providing continuity of ownership to enable the link roads and other infrastructure to be developed should be considered.


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Phase 2: 2015-2019 12.30 Following the withdrawal of the MoD, the intensity of development activity will increase. Over the following five years, Whitehill Bordon will experience significant change particularly through development in the northern and central parts of the town as major development occurs, including: • The new through road will be created and the A325 will be restricted to public transport close to the new town centre. • The first phase of the town centre will be developed including a range of new shops, leisure and commercial office space. • The reprovision of the secondary school on a new site, providing a modern facility for existing residents and additional capacity for the early new housing residents • Provision of the sports hub pitches • Provision of the first new primary school • Focused employment activity including an Eco Business Park and the reuse of MoD buildings for new businesses in the Technical Training Area • Continuing programme of Green Loop delivery and creation of new green spaces at Hogmoor Inclosure, Bordon Inclosure and Standford Grange. It should be noted that all SANGS must be secured before major development takes place. • Provision of the first phase of the site wide CHP network and link-ups with existing heat networks.

12.31 Through these activities, it is estimated around 1,400 new homes will be built, including high value residential homes, increasing the town population by 3,000 to 17,000, whilst the previous economic development activities will underpin economic growth resulting in the creation of circa 2,800 jobs. In parallel both existing and new residents will benefit from increased range of shops and facilities located in the new town centre as well as new community and educational facilities elsewhere in the town.

phased provision of the site-wide CHP will continue.

12.32 The population growth assumptions assume that the residential population in the Annington Homes estates remain constant even after the withdrawal of the Bordon Garrison as it is assumed that either the MoD would allocate other military tenants to these properties or the estate is vacated and subject to rapid disposal. A further alternative is that Annington Homes could decide to redevelop the site. On withdrawal there will also be a significant loss of jobs, circa 1,500, so during Phase 2 net job growth will be around 1,300 positions.

Phase 4: 2025 onwards

Phase 3: 2020-2024 12.33 During Phase 3, residential and economic growth will continue as development occurs in the central area of Whitehill Bordon and low density, high value residential development occurs at BOSC. owards the end of this period, further development is also anticipated in the core town centre area. Completion of the core town centre will, in all likelihood, attract certain occupiers, previously trading at the Forest Centre, which will gradually lead to a changing role for this area to a more local shopping facility alongside the existing community elements. Employment growth will continue at Louisburg Barracks Eco Business Park and the

12.34 Overall, around 1,400 additional new homes will be built resulting in a further increase in the population of 3,500 to over 20,000 people whilst a further 900 jobs will be created. To support this level of growth, the second primary school and pre-school facility will be provided along with the expansion of the secondary school. Elsewhere, additional health and community facilities will be provided to support the expanding population.

12.35 Building on the development momentum, further residential development is anticipated in the southern part of the Technical Training Area and at BOSC. Additional residential development will also occur in areas adjacent to the town centre, which contained a range of MOD buildings, previously used as temporary employment space. A further primary school will be provided. The southern part of this area will be developed for bespoke employment uses. 12.36 Through new development, the population of Whitehill Bordon will increase by a further 2,300 residents to around 22,000 people and a further 800 jobs will be created through the office and commercial developments. Elsewhere, throughout Whitehill Bordon further growth could occur as the older residential areas experience residential infilling and intensification.

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2010 - 2014

2015 - 2019

Figure 12.1 Early projects:

Figure 12.2 MoD land released:

Museum of the Future at the old firestation, Quebec and Viking Park employment, leisure & housing, Standford Grange Country Park, Central transport hub

New through route goes in, First phase town centre, New neighbourhoods around town centre and Louisburg, Reuse of the vacant MoD buildings for employment space, New secondary school, Hogmoor and Bordon Inclosure opened up for public access

Key (striped areas indicate a mix of uses)

Residential character areas:

Strategic public transport corridor

Mixed use town centre core

- Green roots

Employment

- Green streets

Public transport hub - connecting with local bus routes

Community and education

- Green views

Commercial leisure

Buildings for potential retention within development areas Existing built up areas

Disused rail corridor safeguarded for potential future use


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2019 - 2024

2025 onwards

Figure 12.3 Growth in the centre:

Figure 12,4 Green Town Plan completed:

New neighbourhoods around BOSC and the former Trade Training Area, Expansion of town centre and Louisburg employment areas

New neighbourhoods around Station Road and the former Trade Training Area, Second phase town centre

Green infrastructure:

- Wildlife corridors

- Green loop town wide recreation routes

- Indicative locations for allotments

- Natural and informal open space, parks and recreation areas

- Special Protection Areas & Conservation

- Sports

- South Downs National Park boundary

- School pitches

- 400m buffer to SPA / SAC

Core strategy, emerging policy boundaries, correct at November 2009: - Existing development boundary - Extended development boundary - Eco-town Policy Zone

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Summary and Further Work 12.37 The viability analysis has demonstrated that the masterplan achieves a positive residual value which provides the base position from which to build a deliverable and implementable solution. Given the current depressed state of the market and the tribulations of the development industry this is a position which can be improved on. Furthermore as the Eco-town establishes its quality agenda, diversifies its economic base and creates a new sense of place values will increase as demand is created for residential and employment space. In the short term however significant public sector investment will be required to underpin the implementation of the masterplan and transformation of the existing housing stock. The development trust procurement model allows the public sector landowners and stakeholders to benefit from making up front public investment. 12.38 Consequently one of the key early tasks in moving into the implementation phase is to establish the long term delivery mechanism and governance for the project through the Development Trust work stream. A key element of this work stream will be the presentation a more detailed Business Plan for the project. In parallel, following the funding decision from CLG, the continued scoping and implementation of the short term projects must continue to be advanced. 12.39 In parallel, establishing the quality agenda for the masterplan through establishing Design Codes, undertaking the detailed design of the early development parcels and bringing forward the high quality innovative pilot projects such as built projects at Quebec Barracks/ Viking Park, reinforcements to the green environmental network and the retrofitting of the existing housing stock to PassivHaus standards will provide the impetus

for positive change. It will also be important to build on the momentum developed during the stakeholder engagement process and the continued involvement of the PAG’s during the formulation of the masterplan. This should involve addressing the key transportation, environmental and economic, delivery of services and facilities and development density/capacity issues which remain and demonstrating to the general public how these remaining concerns can be overcome. This will require continued proactive engagement with local residents including those groups such as BAAG who are actively opposed to the proposals. 12.40 Therefore over the next few years in taking the masterplan forward significant further detailed design and development work will be required, including: • Bringing forward a series of demonstration projects which will pilot some of the technologies, typologies and densities in order to establish the attractiveness and viability of development. These demonstration projects will also give the community further opportunities to test out the ideas and continue their input into the process. • The refinement of the masterplan content and phasing • Establishment of the delivery mechanism and public sector delivery partnership including further levels of business planning to refine the financial position of the masterplan • Development of design guidance to frame the masterplan, including further consideration of street, block and building typologies and densities, leading to the preparation of Design Codes • Capacity building including site visits to best practice housing examples with residents, Council officers

and Councillors to encourage informed debate around densities and typologies. • Preparation of an inward investment strategy and complimentary marketing and promotional strategy. • To compliment the above, the preparation of a detailed economic development plan for the town to bring about the anticipated levels of employment growth • Establishment of a business support network, including a business start up centre • Preparation of a detailed strategy (including funding) for the retrofitting of the existing properties • Preparation of a detailed implementation plan to take the Eco-town energy strategy forward including a detailed carbon footprinting exercise to form the basis for later monitoring. • Ongoing ecological surveys, tree survey and preparation of a revised Biodiversity Action Plan and detailed Green Infrastructure Strategy. • Confirmation through the ongoing transport testing that the sub regional transportation impacts are acceptable as part of the evidence base for the Core Strategy. • Preparation of a detailed feasibility studies and implementation strategies for the Modal Shift transport proposals, including LRT and heavy rail options • Preparation of and implementation of a progressive engagement programme. This should include a programme of public consultation activities to build on the momentum developed through the masterplan engagement process, particularly on how opponents can be engaged in a proactive debate.


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Delivering Design Quality 12.41 Considerable guidance is available on the creation of successful towns and a wealth of best practice available in the UK and in Europe which can be drawn on. The Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) maintains a library of best practice publications and case studies from around the UK available at www.cabe.org.uk. CABE also has a role in maintaining the design standards of Eco-towns through the Governments’ Challenge Panel and design review process which the masterplanning team has engaged with. 12.42 To build capacity in the community, it is recommended that study visits to exemplary housing developments, new town centres and employment sites, be undertaken by the client with local stakeholders, PAG members and community representatives to promote greater collective awareness of high quality design and encourage further debate and informed critique of detailed schemes as they are developed. 12.43 To test the densities and standards for new housing in the Eco-town, demonstration schemes will be built on a series of immediately available sites, many of which can be viewed from the A325. An architectural competition chemes for these sites which the PAGs and community could be involved in assessing. Early discussion with the housing Policy Advisory group has resulted in the recommendation that scale of housing plots are limited to say 80 homes per developer so as to be able to control the quality and delivery of housing more closely.

12.44 We recommend the development of design codes to provide guidance on the appropriate built scale, form, massing, architectural expression, materials and the character of streets, open spaces and the town centre. This should be prepared in advance of detailed applications to guide architects and developers.

Continuing Community Involvement 12.45 As noted in chapter 4, building on the Green Town Vision consultation and engagement process focused through the PAGs, the masterplan has been developed through a proactive engagement process with stakeholders, including the general public as well as focused topic sessions with the PAGs. This engagement process has been vital in informing key decisions and establishing parameters for the masterplan. Fundamentally, it has provided the forum for debating decisions and exploring alternative options. Naturally this process has not been able to address all the issues and choices to everybody’s satisfaction but as an important engagement forum it has allowed individuals and groups to express and debate their particular points of view. As the masterplan moves into the implementation phase it is vital that this proactive engagement process is continued and used as a tool in maintaining stakeholder and resident’s involvement in future decisions, providing the opportunity for explaining decisions and the vehicle for providing further information. 12.46 Looking ahead, besides the statutory planning consultation on the Core Spatial Strategy it is recommended that this engagement continues, and takes a variety of forms including:

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• Continued engagement with the PAGs to provide residents with a local structured process to input into the design and masterplanning decisions as the plans for Whitehill Bordon are advanced. • Specific stakeholder event activities linked to key points in the masterplan evolution process over the next few years to allow involvement, debate and explanation of emerging ideas on for example on the quick win projects or detailed information on the transport strategy. • The proactive engagement with the key opponents of the scheme when information on their key concerns such as the wider transport impacts is available. These sessions should be also used to continue to debate their concerns and explain the mitigation measures that will be put in place 12.47 An early task going forward will be to prepare a future engagement strategy which looks to complement the statutory Core Strategy regulation 25 and 26 engagement. This engagement strategy will need to focus on how residents and stakeholders can continue to be involved in decisions and informed about emerging information to maintain confidence in the implementation of the Eco Town Vision and masterplan. In achieving this it will also be essential to ensure that this engagement continues to be objective and realistically details outcomes to build stakeholder and public support in the process.


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Generating inward investment

Monitoring

12.52 The indicators focus on the following priority areas:

12.48 A further important delivery component will be stimulating developer and occupier activity and interest in investing in the Eco town. The innovative and exemplar credentials of the masterplan and Eco town Vision will provide an ideal basis for achieving this particularly in attracting residential developers. Attracting investor and occupier interest in the town centre and employment areas will in particular require a considerable focus over the short to medium term to establish Whitehill Bordon as a place to invest. This approach must address both supply and demad factors including:

12.49 The importance of monitoring is recognised in the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 which places a duty on every local planning authority to keep under review matters affecting the planning and development of its area, and to carry out surveys where necessary in order to test the effectiveness of the policies. Targets set out within this masterplan document will be formalised through the EHDC Core Strategy, or through the preparation of an AAP document for the masterplan. A monitoring framework will be required to enable the tracking of progress against core indicators. Indicators will cover a range of aspects to ensure the delivery of ‘One Green Town’. EHDC will be required to monitor the implementation Core Strategy policies and assess the extent to which the objectives and policies are being achieved.

• Priority area: sustainable consumption and production (including indicators for climate change and energy)

• Establishing a training and educational program which will create a skilled workforce capable of meeting the needs of the new economy • Establishing a business support network to promote indigenous business growth and support entrepreneurship • Developing a promotional and marketing campaign to change investors and occupiers perceptions of Whitehill Bordon as a place to live and do business • Developing a strategy and programme for the short term re use of the employment space which will be vacated once the garrison relocates • Establish an organisational structure to coordinate the inward investment activities

12.50 An Eco-town policy boundary is defined by the emerging EHDC Core Strategy. This is based on a 2km radius from the centre of Whitehill Bordon. Given that most historic indicator data is ward or district based, further consideration is needed to determine the most appropriate data collection boundary to monitor the impact of Eco-town policies. 12.51 Sustainable Development indicators are monitored by DEFRA on a UK wide and regional basis81. They cover socio-economic aspects of sustainable community development and could be used as a basis for the development of a monitoring framework for Whitehill Bordon.

• Priority area: protecting our natural resources and enhancing the environment • Priority area: creating sustainable communities and a fairer world 12.53 Targets for Whitehill Bordon should have particular emphasis on the four exemplar priorities of the EHDC Eco-town initiative: • Carbon neutrality: chapter 3 of this report details the initial carbon footprint study findings. In order to monitor progress against this priority, a detailed baseline carbon footprinting exercise for the town would be required. This should cover behavioural change and uptake of retrofitting alongside targets for new development. • Water neutrality: the Outline Water Cycle Strategy (Halcrow, 2009) and chapter 11 of this report set out proposals to achieve water neutrality. • Biodiversity: the Wildlife of Whitehill Biodiversity Action Plan could be updated to determine the key indicators to be monitored against this priority. • Transportation: chapter 10 of this report provides details of the proposed modal splits which could form the basis of the monitoring framework for this priority. It is recommended that a Framework Travel


WHITEHILL BORDON FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

12.54 Other key indicators that could be considered: • Housing delivery including affordable housing • Housing mix, density targets • Design quality targets (see appendix A) • Employment land supply / job creation • Town centre delivery / retail floorspace targets • Delivery of community facilities to match population growth • Provision of green space against emerging core strategy and SANGS targets • Level of community engagement in decision making • House prices • Resident satisfaction levels (for example through the bi-annual district wide mirror survey).

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For details see http://www.defra.gov.uk/sustainable/government/progress/regional/factsheets.htm

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13.1 As an Eco-town, Whitehill Bordon will be an exemplary project showing how communities can be developed with high levels of sustainability and a reduced impact on resources and the environment. In addition to the national Eco-town policies, EHDC’s Green Town Vision set out local aspirations for the development, highlighting the regeneration benefits that town growth will bring to the existing community and the need to secure a strong economic role for the town in the future.

13.2 The masterplan proposals have been

developed through collaboration with the local community, PAGs, stakeholders, politicians and council officers. The findings of the consultation have materially altered the final design of the masterplan. Chapter 4, paragraph 4.47 lists the key findings of the consultation process and the resulting changes that have been made to the masterplan. 13.3 The provision of a new town centre was a key priority emerging from consultation, which the masterplan supports alongside provision of a wide range of community facilities to match the increasing population. These are detailed in Chapter 7.

13.4 The masterplan has tested the South East Plan, Eco-town and Green Town Vision targets and aspirations and provided a spatial framework for the growth of the town over the next 20-25 years. It forms part of the Core Strategy evidence base supported by a range of technical documents. Chapter 6, paragraph 6.4 presents the findings of the capacity study and Habitats Regulation Assessment (HRA) explaining the rationale behind the estimated housing development level of 4000 homes set out in this document (with the potential to increase this to 5300 subject to achieving higher densities and increasing the development area). Chapter 8 details the mitigation measures that will be required under the Habitats Regulation to avoid negative impacts on SPAs and SACs in close proximity to the town. Mitigation measures include the provision of around 127 ha of SANGS and a 400m buffer between residential development and the SPAs and SACs. SANGS form a major element of the green

infrastructure strategy for the town, which provides around 175 ha of new publicly accessible greenspace. 13.5 In collaboration with SQW Consulting an economic strategy has been developed, identifying four potential economic roles for the town post-MoD to deliver a minimum of 5500 new jobs, and a longer term aspiration for 7000 jobs. Chapter 9 provides details of the findings. 13.6 Table 13.1 summarises how the framework masterplan proposals respond to the Eco-town policies and Green Town Vision objectives at the strategic level, providing a framework within which more detailed proposals can be delivered.

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Table 13.1 Summary of Eco-town and Green Town Vision targets and masterplan reponse

Zero carbon in Eco-towns

Eco-towns PPS

Green Town Vision Targets

Masterplan Response

Development to be zero carbon, i.e. over a year the net CO2 emissions from all energy use within the buildings on the Eco-town development as a whole to be zero or below.

New buildings will be built to zero carbon status. All new construction as carbon neutral.

General The masterplan supports the aim of achieving zero carbon development through a range of proposals to ensure that the strategic infrastructure is in place for zero carbon, and the design of a framework layout which supports walkable neighbourhoods and encourages more sustainable lifestyles.

The carbon footprint of the town in 2050 will not exceed the carbon footprint of the town today.

A detailed carbon foot printing study is necessary to understand the town’s existing footprint and allow for monitoring over time.

Achieve a holistically carbon neutral town by 2036.

Climate change adaptation

Eco-towns should be planned with both climate change mitigation and adaptation in mind to ensure long term resilience.

Green Infrastructure Potential SuDS corridors, permeable surfaces and green roofs identified to reduce rainfall run-off and flooding risk. Summer overheating will be minimised through the provision of 175 ha of green spaces plus private gardens and green roofs. Building design measures such as careful orientation and shading systems will also be used. No built development is proposed within the floodplain.


DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Homes

Employment

Homes in Eco-towns should: (a) achieve Building for Life Silver Standard and Level 4 of the Code for Sustainable Homes at a minimum (b) meet lifetime homes standards and HCA’s space standards (c) have real time energy monitoring systems; real time public transport information and high speed broadband access. (d) provide for at least 30% affordable housing. (e) demonstrate high levels of energy efficiency in the fabric of the building. (f) achieve, through a combination of energy efficiency and low and zero carbon energy generation on site, carbon reductions (from space heating, ventilation, hot water and fixed lighting) of at least 70% relative to current Building Regulations (Part L 2006).

Every new house will be built to Code for Sustainable Homes Level 6

There should be access to a minimum of one employment opportunity per new dwelling that is easily reached by walking, cycling and/or public transport.

Target to provide modern premises for up to 7,000 new jobs in a mixed economy, not reliant upon one industry.

An economic strategy should be produced to demonstrate how this will be achieved.

Encourage investment by businesses and industries that share the vision of a sustainable, environmentally-friendly community.

Existing houses retrofitted up to Passiv Haus standards, where possible. Focus on providing affordable quality homes for local people and a range of housing for new residents that will attract them to live and work in the town.

Great Places to Live / Making it easy to go green Masterplan supports the PPS requirement of achieving Code Level 4 and the Green Town Vision aspiration to push this to Code Level 6 where possible. The densities of housing proposed support CHP in the central areas and will require individual or block based energy sources in lower density Green Roots neighbourhoods plus photo-voltaic panels. Lifetime homes and HCA space standards will be required. 35% affordable housing is proposed. All existing homes within the Eco-town Policy boundary will be eligible to benefit from the retrofitting scheme being run by EHDC. Masterplan recommends that Building for Life Gold should be the standard for residential development Implementation High speed broadband is being provided across the town as an early project funded by CLG,

A new economic role Around 5500 jobs are proposed in line with the housing figure of 4000 homes (1 job per home plus 1500 additional to mitigate against the loss of the MoD related jobs) which could increase to around 7000 jobs relating to up to 5,300 homes as development intensifies at the end of the project. Employment is dispersed and close to residential neighbourhoods to allow for easy walking and cycling. A range of different business premises are proposed to attract varied employment types and avoid reliance on a single sector. This will include the provision of Eco-business parks to attract businesses which share the Eco-town ethos. Transport and movement Proposed areas for employment within the masterplan are adjacent to the proposed public transport priority route along the existing A325. Transport stops ‘hubs and sub hubs’ are proposed within close proximity of the employment areas. Provision of parking will be significantly reduced at employment areas and car share schemes and cycle to work schemes are proposed. Improvements to cycle routes adjacent to the A325 are proposed with the aim of encouraging commuter cycling to Whitehill Bordon.

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Priority should be given to access by walking, cycling, public transport and other sustainable options, thereby reducing residents’ reliance on private cars. Homes should be within ten minutes’ walk of (a) frequent public transport and (b) neighbourhood services.

Transport

Development should be designed to enable: (a) at least 50 per cent of trips originating in Eco-towns to be made by non-car means, with the potential for this to increase over time to at least 60% (b) good design principles e.g. Manual for Streets, Building for Life, and community travel planning principles (c) transport choice messages, infrastructure and services to be provided from ‘day one’ of residential occupation, (d) the monitoring of carbon impact of transport in the Eco-town. Schemes for low carbon vehicle options, including electric car schemes, will be required to show that (a) sufficient energy headroom to meet the higher demand for electricity, and (b) the scheme will not add so many additional private vehicles to the local road network that these will cause congestion. There should be a maximum walking distance of 800m from homes to the nearest school for children aged under 11, except where this is not a viable option due to physical landscape restrictions.

Every house will be within 10 minutes walk of a bus stop. Develop a town centre that is pedestrianfriendly and is interconnected with residential and commercial areas. Promote the best quality public transport (cheap, convenient, frequent, stylish, comfortable, fast and reliable.) to provide communication links both within our town and to other destinations in order to encourage alternatives to the car. Target to reduce car trips to 25% by 2036 in the ntire town.

Transport and movement The transport strategy prioritises walking, cycling and public transport through the following interventions: •

Public Transport spine along High Street

Pedestrian priority area along High Street and in town centre, incorporating ‘Transport Hub’

Green Loop and Grid for pedestrians and cyclists connecting all residential areas to key facilities

Overall parking reduction to existing EHDC standards to be phased to suit development coming forward - matched by increasing public transport accessibility and improved cycle facilities

All homes will be within 5 minutes walk of a bus stop served by frequent bus routes

Food and retail delivery services will be introduced/enhanced to reduce the need to drive to the supermarket

Longer term car free zone within heart of town centre, where no parking will be permitted

High quality bus routes serving long distance, local and town wide journeys

Safe guarded rail corridor for future development into rapid transit public transport system

Clear and direct cycle routes connecting Whitehill Bordon with surrounding towns, villages and stations

The modal split targets the strategy aims for are for between 25% - 30% of all journeys to be carried out by car (with and without a rail station at Whitehill Bordon) Implementation Rail feasibility studies are to be undertaken by Hampshire County Council alongside detailed implementation studies for bus routing and multi-modal traffic modelling.


DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Healthy lifestyles

Eco-towns should be designed and planned to support healthy and sustainable environments and enable residents to make healthy choices easily.

Development will be planned on a human scale to a higher density. It will be easy to walk about.

Transport and Movement The masterplan proposes a network of streets designed with a hierarchy to reflect the needs of pedestrians and cyclists to encourage these health modes of transport over the use of the private car for short journeys around the town. Providing cycle storage and cycle parking close to the front doors of new homes and at shops and work places will be important to encourage health travel. Supporting the Community A sports hub is proposed including leisure centre and pitches A primary care centre is proposed to complement the existing Chase Community Hospital Green infrastructure Around 4 hectares of new allotments are proposed to serve new and existing residents and encourage activity and healthy eating.

Local services

Services should be provided that are proportionate to the size of development including: leisure, health and social care, education, retail, arts and culture, library services, sport and play facilities and community and voluntary sector facilities.

Create an attractive built environment where people want to live, work, shop and play as well as a balanced mix of housing, community facilities, leisure and employment opportunities.

Supporting the Community A new town centre is proposed, with a mix of uses appropriate to the scale of the future town including retail, commercial leisure, cultural and civic facilities. A sports hub is proposed including leisure centre and pitches Existing successful community enterprises such as the Phoenix Theatre are supported

Green infrastructure

40% of the Eco-town’s total area should be allocated to green space, of which at least half should be public.

Guarantee to protect the SPA’s and all important green space.

There should be a range of types of green space, which should be multifunctional, e.g. accessible for play and recreation, walking or cycling safely, and support wildlife, urban cooling and flood management.

Create quality civic and public open space and set aside over 200ha of land for new public open space.

Green Infrastructure The masterplan provides around 175 hectares of new public space, resulting in an overall new and existing town where around 36% of the land is public green space. Private gardens, green roofs, SuDs and local green spaces across the development area and within the existing residential neighbourhoods result in an overall % of green infrastructure far in excess of the minimum 40%.

Particular attention should be given to land to allow the local production of food from community, allotment and/ or commercial gardens.

A range of green spaces are promoted in line with local and national policy guidance. Around 4 hectares of new allotments are proposed to serve new and existing residents and encourage activity and healthy eating. Around 127 hectares of SANG and a 400m no residential buffer to the SPA/SAC are proposed to mitigate against any negative impacts. An initial Habitats Regulation Assessment has found these solutions to be appropriate.

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Landscape and historic environment

Biodiversity

Development should complement and enhance the existing landscape character and historic environment.

Eco-towns should demonstrate a net gain in local biodiversity. Planning permission may not be granted for eco town proposals which have a significant adverse effect on internationally designated nature conservation sites or Sites of Special Scientific Interest. A strategy for conserving and enhancing local biodiversity should be produced setting out priority actions in line with the England Biodiversity Strategy and Local Biodiversity Action Plans.

Develop and improve the built environment in the town so that it complements the superb landscape that surrounds us.

General The masterplan supports the retention of a number of significant Mod buildings which will add maturity to the development sites and a link to the area’s military heritage. Green Infrastructure The Green Loop promotes a strong relationship between built areas and the landscape and encourages residents to access and enjoy the attractive landscapes within the town. Site wide tree surveys will be required to inform the development of detailed proposals. Green Infrastructure It is recommended that the local Biodiversity Action Plan be updated to provide the strategy for the delivery of a net gain in biodiversity. Hard standing will be removed across the MoD sites and green infrastructure introduced to increase biodiversity. Habitats restoration and creation will occur across the development, with particular emphasis in the SANGS and wildlife corridors.


DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Water

All Eco-towns should develop a water cycle strategy that provides a plan for the necessary water services infrastructure improvements. Development should: • include measures to limit additional demand for water • not result in a deterioration in the status of any surface waters or ground-waters affected by the Eco-town; • improve water quality and avoid surface water flooding from surface water, groundwater and local watercourses. • incorporate sustainable drainage systems (SUDS) and avoid connection of surface water run-off into sewers and ensure long term maintenance, management and adoption.

Target is for a completely water neutral development. That means that the new town will not exceed current water usage.

Making it easy to go green An outline water cycle strategy has been produced for EHDC which has informed the masterplan development. Water saving measures will be introduced in new and existing properties. Green infrastructure SuDs and blue corridors are identified across the development and areas of hardstanding are to be removed.

Eco-towns in areas of serious water stress should aspire to water neutrality, i.e. achieving development without increasing overall water use across a wider area.

Flood risk management

The location, layout and construction of Eco-towns should reduce and avoid flood risk wherever practicable. All of the built-up areas will be fully within Flood Zone 1 – the lowest risk. Flood Zone 2 (medium risk) should, as far as possible, be used for open spaces and informal recreational areas that can serve as multi-functional spaces, for example, those used for flood storage.

General No built development is planned within the floodplain.

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Waste

A sustainable waste and resources plan is required covering both domestic and non-domestic waste. Targets should be set for residual waste levels, recycling levels and landfill diversion, all of which should be substantially more ambitious than the 2007 national Waste Strategy targets for 2020; The use of locally generated waste as a fuel source for combined heat and power (CHP) generation for the Eco-town should be considered. No construction, demolition and excavation waste is sent to landfill, except for those types of waste where landfill is the least environmentally damaging option.

Masterplanning

All Eco-towns should develop and overall masterplan and supporting documents to demonstrate how the Eco-town standards will be achieved, developed with a high level of community engagement.

Making it easy to go green An initial waste strategy accompanies the masterplan and aims to achieve zero waste to landfill; The potential for using waste for on or near site energy generation will be considered as the development progresses; Once more information becomes available on non-domestic uses on site, it will be possible to address in more detail the issue of co-management of municipal, commercial and industrial waste. The waste strategy includes as a first step the reduction of waste generation, which will be achieved by educating residents and promoting changes in behaviour.


DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Transition

Transition planning should include: Detailed delivery timetable Core services delivery plan, including public transport, health and social care Community development and third sector support Resources to encourage environmentally responsible behaviour Annual metrics to monitor, support and evaluate progress in low carbon living Details of how carbon emissions from construction will be limited.

Community and governance

Long term governance structures are necessary to ensure a new town retains its integrity as an Eco-town, and is able to manage change in a planned way.

Implementation and Delivery An initial phasing plan has been developed relating to the departure of the MoD from 2014 onwards. Core services will be delivered in line with housing growth.

Development of a town where individuals are important and development is designed with people and nature in mind.

Implementation and Delivery • A form of Development Trust SPV is proposed to deliver the Eco-town retaining public sector control. • It is recommended that community engagement continues to build on the momentum developed through the masterplan engagement process.

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Appendix A : Housing quality standards

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Appendix A :Housing Quality Standards

Lifetime Homes

Code for Sustainable Homes

The concept of Lifetime Homes84 has been developed to encourage more thoughtful housing design which The masterplan supports the following quality standards allows for flexibility and adaptability over time as for housing: individual circumstances change allowing people to remain independent in their own home. The Eco-town PPS requires that all new homes should conform with Building for Life the 16 Lifetime Homes design criteria which cover Building For Life82 an initiative led by CABE and the space and wheelchair access considerations and Home Builders Federation promotes 20 criteria for potential for properties to accommodate adaptations functional, attractive and sustainable homes and such as hand rails and chair lifts. neighbourhoods covering the themes of : • Environment and community • Character • Streets, parking and pedestrianisation • Design and construction Detailed proposals for residential schemes within the Eco-town should be assessed against these criteria at the planning application stage. The Eco-town PPS requires new housing to meet Building for Life Silver Standards (achieving a score of 14-15 out of 20 against the criteria). Our recommendation would be for Whitehill Bordon to go beyond that and assume a target of meeting the Building for Life Gold Standard (16+ out of 20) to emphasise the importance of achieving the highest quality of design.

• Energy and CO2 Emissions • Pollution • Water • Heath and Wellbeing • Materials

Space Standards The Eco-town PPS requires that new homes should be built to minimum internal floor area space standards as set out by the Homes and Communities Agency Quality Standards84 as follows: 1 bedroom/2 person homes

51 sqm

2 bedroom/ 3 person homes

66 sqm

2 bedroom/ 4 person homes 77 sqm 3 bedroom / 5 person homes 93 sqm 4 bedoom/ 6 person homes

The Code85 produced by Communities and Local Government measures the sustainability of a home against nine design categories, rating the ‘whole home’ as a complete package. The design categories are:

106sqm

• Management • Surface Water Run-off • Ecology • Waste Homes are assessed against both mandatory standards and tradable credits to determine their code level. The Eco-towns PPS requires that all homes achieve a minimum of code level 4, while the Green Town Vision increases that target to code level 6 or ‘zero carbon’. At present it may not be practicable or viable to insist on code level 6, however the target will continue to be pursued as technologies improve and costs are reduced in the run up to the major phases of development post 2014

For further information visit www.buildingforlife.org For further information visit www.lifetimehomes.org.uk 84 English Partnerships (now Homes and Communities Agency) Quality Standards, November 2007 85 The Code for Sustainable Homes: Setting the standard in sustainability in new homes, Communities and Local Government, February 2008 82 83

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Appendix B: Population projections methodology

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Appendix B: Population Projections Methodology

out below.

The population projections underpinning the social infrastructure assessment (SIF) for Whitehill Bordon

Projected Population Change among the Existing Population

are based on: • Projected population change among the existing population • New population growth associated with the new dwellings

The approach to identifying each of these is set

In order to assess the social infrastructure requirements of housing growth within Whitehill Bordon it is necessary to predict how the existing population base is likely to change over time. Using the 2001 Census, the population of Whitehill Bordon86 was identified as 13,953 and using this population base, Hampshire County Council have projected that, in the absence of any housing growth the population of Whitehill Bordon would decline to 12,630. For the purposes of this study, and in the absence of further information, it has been assumed that the population decline occurs uniformly over the build out period. Table B1 presents the projected total population by each masterplan build-out phase.

Table B1

Existing Population Projected 86

Whitehill Bordon Population Projections (Existing Population Base Only) 2001

2006

2011

2015

2020

2024

2028

2031

13,953

13,688

13,424

13,212

12,948

12,736

12,524

12,365

Defined as the following wards; Whitehill Chase, Whitehill Deadwater, Whitehill Hogmoor, Whitehill Pinewood, and Whitehill Walldown

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Population Growth Associated with the New Dwellings In addition to the population change projected for Whitehill Bordon’s existing population, it is also necessary to consider the characteristics of the households that will live in the new dwellings. This is possible by applying average household characteristics (such as average household size and average child yield) to the total number of dwellings to be brought forward within each phase. The 2001 Census was used to identify the average household size of households that moved into or within East Hampshire in the previous twelve months. These are set out in table B2 and were applied to the housing trajectories set out in Chapter 12 to project the likely population associated with the housing set out within the masterplan. Using these assumptions it is possible to project the total population that is associated with the new dwellings. These figures are provided in table B3. By 2028, the 4,000 new homes would be expected to house a total of 9,413 residents. The maximum growth scenario (assuming 5,300 new homes by 2031) would be expected to house a total of 12,475 new homes.

Total Population Change By combining the change among the existing population with the number of people expected to be resident in the new homes, it is possible to project the total population change within Whitehill Bordon. While this is an estimate based on the assumptions set out above, it provides a reasonable overview of the potential population change within the town. (Table B4). Overall the total population of Whitehill-Bordon in 2028, assuming 4,000 new dwellings, would be almost 22,000. This would represent growth of 8,250 since 2006. Under the higher growth scenario with 5,300 new units, the total population of Whitehill Bordon would rise to 24,800.


DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN

Total Population Associated with New Dwellings 2011

2015

2020

2024

2028

2031

Total Dwellings (Cumulative)

0

325

1,726

3,094

4,000

5,300

Population Associated with New Dwellings

0

846

3,850

7,215

9,413

12,475

Table B3

Average Household Size, by Size and Tenure Mix

Private Market and Intermediate Housing

Socially Rented Housing

Flat - 1 bed

1.3

1.23

Flat - 2 bed

1.63

1.98

Flat - 3 bed

2.07

2.43

Flat - 4 bed

2.47

3

House - 1 Bed

1.59

1.37

Table B2

House - 2 Bed

1.87

2.23

House - 3 Bed

2.4

3.3

House - 4 Bed +

2.83

3.84

Source: Census 2001

Source: AECOM 2009

Total Population Change (Existing Population and New Dwellings)

4,000 Units

5,300 Units

2006

2011

2015

2020

2024

2028

2031

Total Dwellings

0

0

325

1,726

3,094

4,000

5,300

Total Population

13,688

13,424

14,058

16,798

19,951

21,937

24,840

Table B4

Source: AECOM 2009

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Appendix C: Hampshire County County Demographics

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Age profile

Demographic facts and figures for Bordon/Whitehill wards

Dependency Ratios

80-84

Females Males

70-74

Whitehill / Bordon 51.1 14.6 36.4 40.2

Total Dependency Ratio Old Age Dependency Ratio Child Dependency Ratio Ageing Index

60-64

East Hants 63.6 30.2 33.4 90.5

HCC 63.6 30.7 32.9 93.2

Dependency ratios show the number of children and/or retired people per 100 people of working age.

50-54

Total Population East Hampshire and Hampshire have larger dependant populations than Whitehill / Bordon. Whitehill / Bordon has fewer retired people than children. Both East Hampshire and Hampshire have more retired people than children.

40-44 30-34

13%

20-24

Total Dwellings

10-14 0-4 7

87%

Whitehill / Bordon

12% 5

3 1 2 4 Percentage of the Population

6

Bordon/Whitehill wards has a young age structure with the majority of their population in the working age groups and a large military population

The rest of East Hampshire

88%

Age groups In 2001 the population of Bordon/Whitehill wards is estimated to be 13,900

60.0

Over 12.5% of East Hampshire's population live in Bordon/ Whitehill and 1.1% of the County's population

50.0

East Hants 2.1

HCC 3.4

Population by Broad Age Groups

% Children % Working Age % Retired

Whitehill / Bordon 24.1 66.2 9.7

East Hants 20.4 61.1 18.5

Percentage

Population Density Whitehill / Bordon Population density 6.9 (number of people per hectare)

Whitehill / Bordon HCC

30.0

Source and Notes

20.0

All figures are derived from the 2001 Census The Whitehill/Bordon area is made up on 5 wards - Whitehill Hogmoor, Whitehill Chase, Whitehill Deadwater, Whitehill Pinewood and Whitehill Walldown

10.0 HCC 20.1 61.1 18.7

Bordon/Whitehill wards has a higher percentage of children compared with East Hampshire and Hampshire

The rest of East Hampshire

In 2001 there were estimated to be 5,500 dwellings in Bordon/Whitehill wards Almost 12% of East Hampshire's dwellings are found in Bordon/Whitehill wards and 1% of the County's

East Hants

40.0

Whitehill / Bordon

0.0 0-4

5-15

16-44

45-64

65-84

85+

74% of Whitehill / Bordon's population area aged 0-44 years while 58% of East Hampshire and Hampshire County Council's populations are in this broad age group.

The Total Dependency Ratio is the number of children and retired people to every 100 people of working age. The Child Ratio is the number of children per 100 people of working age. The Old Age Ratio is the number retired people per 100 of working age The Ageing Index is the number of retired people to every 100 children

Published by Spatial Stratgey and Research, April 2009

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Appendix D: EHDC Statement regarding HRA

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Appendix D: EHDC Statement in relation to the Appropriate Assessment for the Whitehill Bordon, November 2009 EHDC have provided the following statement in relation to the Appropriate Assessment for Whitehill Bordon: ‘The HRA of the Whitehill Bordon Draft Masterplan is the responsibility of the ‘Competent Authority’, East Hampshire District Council (EHDC). As an HRA requires ecological expertise to assess the implications for sites’ ecological integrity, the Council commissioned UE Associates to carry out an Appropriate Assessment for the Draft Masterplan accompanied by a Visitors’ Survey. Close working with Natural England has helped to agree this process. Taking due regard of the HRA, we have been able to identify, analyse and quantify potential adverse effects on the European sites in and around Whitehill Bordon for development of up to 5,500 new homes and associated infrastructure. East Hampshire District Council, as the competent authority, considers that the AA currently shows that it is possible through avoidance and mitigation measures to overcome all adverse effects on the European sites, with the exception of those relating to air pollution at this stage. The AA recommends a variety of avoidance measures to be built into the Whitehill Bordon draft Masterplan to help remove all identified effects. Where there is a risk of residual effects occurring, despite avoidance techniques, further mitigation measures are proposed to ensure the effects are removed completely.

As a result of the assessment it is considered that the negative disturbance effects of the draft Masterplan in relation to the conservation objectives of the European sites are effectively removed, and do not require further assessment in combination with effects of other plans and projects, provided the avoidance and mitigation measures are adopted and implemented successfully. However, the air pollution effects of the draft Masterplan cannot yet be resolved. A further iteration of the appropriate assessment will be required once the results of the transport modelling become available; this is currently scheduled for spring 2010. An in combination assessment may still be required. Currently avoidance and mitigation measures are suggested and these will be further developed once this information is available for assessment. A crucial part of the Whitehill Bordon avoidance and mitigation measures is the delivery of Suitable Accessible Natural Greenspace (SANGs). East Hampshire District Council is fully committed to their delivery. Based on the studies it has carried out to date, EHDC is confident that there is a clear and significant potential for the development of SANGS to substantially improve both the carrying capacity and accessibility of the land allocated for this use. Future work on the Masterplan and its implementation strategy will set out detailed terms of reference for the quality, design and long term management of SANGS and to secure arrangements for funding and ownership.’

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• Transport Strategy, Alan Baxter Associates,2010 • Viability appraisal, GVA Grimley, 2010 - confidential • Gardiner And Theobald, cost consultants - incomplete • Energy, Water, Waste and Climate change adaptation strategies , AECOM, 2010 - incomplete

• The South East Plan - Regional Spatial Strategy for the South East, Government Office for the South East, May 2009 • East Hampshire Local Plan, Second Review, East Hampshire District Council, March 2006 • East Hampshire Core Strategy Preferred Policies Document, East Hampshire District Council, November 2009

• Building Bulletin 98, Briefing Framework for Secondary School Projects Revision of BB82: Area Guidelines for Schools (Secondary section), DFES, 2004 • Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study, East Hampshire District Council, 2008 • Get walking plan, Ramblers Association, 2009

• 2001 Census, Office for National Statistics

• Active Design, Promoting opportunities for sport and physical activity through good design, Sport England (date unknown)

• Whitehill Bordon Economic Potentials Study, SQW Consulting, 2009

• Forecasts by Hampshire County Council demographers, 2009

• South East Green Infrastructure Framework, GOSE, 2009

• Whitehill Bordon Baseline Report, GVA Grimley 2008

• East Hampshire District Landscape Character Assessment, Land Use Consultants, July 2006

• The essential role of green infrastructure: eco-towns green infrastructure worksheet and Biodiversity positive: Eco-towns biodiversity worksheet, both TCPA, 2009

• Consultation summary and event reports, Kevin Murray Associates, 2010

• Outline water cycle study, Halcrow Group, 2009 • Appropriate Assessment for the Draft Masterplan, UE Associates, 2009 • Visitors Survey, UE Associates, 2009 • Modelling of carbon and ecological footprint reductions in East Hampshire, Bioregional 2009 • Town centres, retail and leisure study, Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners Ltd, 2007 • Whitehill Bordon Baseline Report, GVA Grimley 2008

• www.woolmerforest.org.uk

• 080613 FINAL Household Mix - tailored to predicted needs, EHDC draft document, 2008 • Central Hampshire and New Forest Housing Market Assessment, DTZ, Nov 2007 • B&W hsg needs, EHDC Housing, August 2009 • Developing energy efficient and zero carbon strategies for Eco-towns - ecotowns energy worksheet (Initial draft by AECOM, published by TCPA, 2009) • Securing the future - delivering UK sustainable development strategy, Defra, March 2005

• A space for nature, Natural England (former English Nature), 1996 • Eco-towns sustainability appraisal and habitats regulations assessment of the draft planning policy statement:Ecotowns addendum, Scott Wilson for CLG, July 2009 • BNXS41: Dynamic demand control of domestic appliances, DEFRA Market Transformation Programme, January 2008 • Sustainable Community Infrastructure, UKGBC and Zero Carbon Hub, February 2010 • Project Discovery: Energy Market Scenarios, Ofgem, October 2009

• Planning Policy Statement: Eco-towns - A supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1 (Communities, Local Government, 2009)

• The Living Planet Report, WWF, 2008

• A green community vision – Whitehill Bordon EcoTown, Whitehill Bordon Opportunity Group, August 2008 update

• Modelling of carbon and ecological footprint reductions in East Hampshire, Bioregional 2009

• Eco-town Revised Bid, Whitehill-Bordon Opportunity Ecotown, East Hampshire District Council, September 2008

• Living Planet Report, WWF, ZSL, Global Footprint Network, 2008.

• www.lifetimehomes.org.uk

• The Climate Change Act, 2008

• Foresight – Land Use Futures. Discussion Paper: A Perspective on Sustainable Land Use, Professor Tim O’Riordan, University of East Anglia

• English Partnerships (now Homes and Communities Agency) Quality Standards, November 2007

• PPS3: Housing, CLG, 2006; • PPG17: Planning for Open space, Sport and Recreation, CLG, 2002; • Planning Policy Statement 9: Biodiversity and Geological Conservation, CLG, 2005.

• Climate Change Act, 2008

• Creating Low Carbon Homes for People in Eco-towns: Ecotowns Housing Worksheet Advice to Promoters and Planners, November 2009, Town and Country Planning Association • Redevelopment of High Street & Chalet Hill Area Whitehill/ Bordon – Comprehensive Development Study, Atisreal, November 2006

• http://www.defra.gov.uk/sustainable/government/progress/ regional/factsheets.htm • www.buildingforlife.org

• The Code for Sustainable Homes: Setting the standard in sustainability in new homes, Communities and Local Government, February 2008 • What makes an Eco-town, CABE and Bioregional, 2009

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DRAFT FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN REPORT

PRODUCED FOR EAST HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL

Masterplan. June 2010  

The latest version of Whitehill Bordon’s evolving masterplan

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