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Whitehill Bordon Eco-town Economic Development and Employment Strategy

1 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

Final Draft 20th June 2011 Available at www.whitehillbordon.com


Index Introduction Overview Whitehill Bordon Vision Delivery Action

4 6 9 12 18 23

Cover photo: Credit Off Grid Living

2 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Appendices A B C D E F G H I J

Funding Data Previous studies Consultation Monitoring Draft policies Local Economic Partnership Glossary Bibliography Integrated impact assessment Footnotes

33 34 47 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72

Whitehill Bordon Eco-town Location Map

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Introduction Eco-town status gives Whitehill Bordon a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The exceptional quality of the environment, the location in the South of England only 75km from London and the quantity of land that is expected to become available, gives the local economy excellent potential. This strategy focuses on the opportunities that are available in five key economic sectors: • Green technologies like energy systems • Tourism • Education, innovation and training • Sustainable construction • Micro-businesses including working from home All these business sectors are expected to grow throughout the next 25 years. They have the prospect of providing a higher quality and quantity of jobs and to remain buoyant regardless of the overall economic situation. They are all rapidly expanding sectors. In the past Whitehill Bordon has relied on one major employer, the Ministry of Defence (MoD). The MoD has been a well respected and constant presence within the town for more than a hundred years. But in the future any town that relies on one major employer in vulnerable. This report advises that the new economy is based on a much wider range of jobs and businesses. A first draft of this report was issued for consultation in January 2011 and detailed responses have been received from some members of the public and a range of stakeholders. The report has been modified to take on board many of the comments

4 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

and suggestions that have been made. In addition the report has been updated to take account of new initiatives and opportunities that have come forward in the last few months. (For example the potential to become an enterprise zone.) This strategy offers a timetable for action. It sets out the issues the town faces, it shows how the town’s economy could be developed and shows how jobs can be secured to deliver ambitious employment targets. These targets have been set to ensure that local people, whose jobs will be vulnerable as the MoD start to vacate the site, can be redeployed and that housing growth matches employment growth in the new developments. Our economy will continue to grow. In particular new technologies are transforming the way we do business and transforming the sorts of business that we do. This report sets a framework so that existing members of the community and new residents can have access to opportunities in their home town to realise their individual potentials, to enjoy a secure and prosperous career, and to live the Green Town Vision that was the trigger for the Eco-town initiative.

John Walker Interim Chairman Delivery Board

Daphne Gardner Project Director


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Overview

1.1 . 1.2

1.3

1.4

This report proposes a framework for the town’s future economic growth and provides the basis on which . decisions and policies should be based.

1.5

It is expected that there will be around £1.5billion invested in the town by 2036.1 This investment will come principally from the private sector, a large part of which will be investment in construction and infrastructure. This strategy seeks to ensure that the community and the local economy will get maximum benefit from the investment.

• •

The need is to create a sustainable economy for the whole community - while respecting and protecting its superb natural environment. It is generally accepted today that a low carbon economy is a sustainable economy. This report shows how that ambition for the town can: • • • •

Increase the skills of the local workforce and provide a wider range of good local jobs. Promote the Eco-town as an exemplar lowcarbon economy. Develop the town as a place where residents can enjoy an exceptional quality of life. Identify new sectors for economic growth which will replace the jobs that will be lost when the MoD leaves.

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Additionally the strategy:

1.6

Supports the Eco-town objectives to achieve carbon neutrality, increase biodiversity, improve transportation options and reduce water usage by 2036. Establishes targets and selects indicators to monitor the effectiveness of economic development activities. Contributes to and provides further evidence to support the emerging Framework Masterplan2 and the East Hampshire Core Strategy – Local Development Framework .3 Encourages development of appropriate commercial land and an inspiring range of affordable, resource-efficient commercial premises.

The Strategy will be regularly reviewed throughout the development process which is expected to continue to 2036. Its focus is on the Whitehill Bordon Eco-town but also considers the wider economic context especially the rural hinterland of villages like Headley and Kingsley, the impact of nearby economic areas like the Blackwater Valley and the urban centres of south Hampshire.


1.7

The overriding numerical target for jobs is one new job per new home. But in addition there is also a need to redress the imbalance of employment caused by the withdrawal of the MoD. The employment predictions of the masterplan model are as follows:

Timescale

Total New Jobs (estimated)

Draft Framework Masterplan Phase

Total New Housing (estimated)

Post MoD relocation

Loss of around 1500 3200

n/a

No change

20122019 2028 2036 1.8

5500 6800

Phase 1 Phase and 3 Phase 4

1.9

Delivering replacement employment to compensate for the withdrawal of the MoD will be a huge challenge, so the responsibility to implement this strategy cannot rest with any single organisation. The creation of a robust, sustainable economy will only be met through the committed and sustained engagement of numerous key players, particularly the businesses and the workforce, supported by the public sector and business support organisations. The action lists below identify the action, the timescales and the owners of the various activities.

1.10

Working in partnership we have a real opportunity to show the true value of Whitehill Bordon as a pioneer in sustainable living that will become an exemplar of national significance.

1.11

The Whitehill Bordon Delivery Board, a partnership of public sector organisations is the ultimate owner of the strategy and will be responsible for ensuring its overview, direction and delivery.

1700 2

4000 5300

During the development of the strategy we have considered: • The main economic drivers, including education, skills and workforce development The availability and affordability of commercial land and property • Infrastructure provision, particularly ICT, transportation and access to housing. Analysis was drawn from recent data sources to assess the town’s current economic performance and skills base.

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1.12

Implementing the strategy is critically dependant upon the endorsement and active support of key delivery partners. Many of these have been involved in the generation of this report and continue to support the project through their activities, advice and encouragement. The principal external organisations are outlined below: Alton College Local primary Schools Business East Hampshire Business Link Communities and Local Government Community First Connexions Department for Business Innovation and Skills Development Agency (SEEDA) East Hampshire 14 -19 Consortium Enterprise First Enterprise M3 LEP Farnborough College of Technology Federation of Small Business Hampshire Chamber of Commerce Jobcentre Plus Local Children’s Partnership Local Enterprise partnerships (M3 and Solent) Mill Chase Community Technology College National Apprenticeship Service Local Housing Associations Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers South Downs National Park Authority

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University of Portsmouth Whitehill & Bordon Business Breakthrough Group Internal to the Delivery Board: Hampshire County Council East Hampshire District Council Whitehill Bordon Town Partnership Whitehill Town Council Homes and Communities Agency MoD Defence Infrastructure Organisation In addition there are a number of surrounding parishes who will wish to play their part.


Whitehill Bordon 2.1

Whitehill Bordon and Lindford are all within the Ecotown policy zone – shown on the diagram opposite. Together this cluster of settlements becomes the largest town in East Hampshire with a population just over 16,0004. But with expansion, the town will become by far the largest community within the district, being surpassed in population only by more distant towns and cities like Basingstoke, Winchester, Guildford and Chichester. Currently the town is very different to the traditional market towns in the surrounding locality such as Alton and Petersfield, which are historic market towns. By comparison the villages of Whitehill and Bordon grew up around an Army camp on an important former toll road. The camp first became a centre of military importance in 1863 when the War Office purchased 1,600 acres of training land here. The town grew up to service the needs of the military bases. With the intended withdrawal of all garrison activities over the next few years, the town urgently needs to find a new rationale and source of wealth creation.

2.2

Other specific employment activities which take place around the town include forestry, agriculture and some tourism. There is also a specialist insurance broker employing about 100 staff, and a pharmacological company specialising in cancer medication.

2.3

Whitehill Bordon is surrounded by wildlife-rich areas of heathland and forest. The north-south road, the A325,

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district with 1.7% of the 7,900 economically active residents claiming job seekers allowance compared to 1.4 % in the entire district and 3.5% for the whole of Great Britain. (Appendix B)

bisects the town. Additionally the main London to Portsmouth A3 trunk road passes nearby. The ÂŁ370m Hindhead Tunnel will be completed in July 2011. This will further improve road access to London and beyond. 2.4

The nearest railway stations are at Liphook to the south and Alton to the north, both providing access to London Waterloo. A recent rail study has established the business case for further investigation of a new rail link which would connect a new station in the centre of the Eco-town directly to Waterloo.5

2.5

This strategy defines Whitehill Bordon as the five Whitehill wards plus Lindford ward as shown on the adjacent map, together with the circle of land defined as the Eco-town boundary.

2.6

Adjacent to this area lie the wards of Selborne, Binsted and Bentley, Headley, Bramshott and Liphook and The Hangers and Forest, which together contain a further population of 20,0006. As Whitehill Bordon Eco-town grows it is likely that this population will begin to look more often towards the town for jobs and services.

2.7

In addition the strategic location of the town places around 2.7 million people living within a one hour journey time. See P3.

2.8

In December 2010 the labour market profile of the town was similar to the surrounding East Hampshire

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2.9

Around 40 per cent of working residents travel out of town to work in larger centres, including Guildford, Portsmouth and London. In addition to supplying employment opportunities these locations also provide (and capture the benefits from) a range of shopping and leisure activities.

2.10

More detailed socio-economic information on the town is provided within Appendix B.


Chalet Hill shops

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VISION 3.1

3.2

3.3

In the context of a challenging UK economy at the moment, the Eco-town vision provides Whitehill Bordon with a strategy to build a stronger local economy as the national economy picks-up. The town offers a unique set of features which can be used to distinguish and market the opportunities. The overarching ambitions should be to: • Achieve a balanced mix of business and jobs • Improve education, training and learning to create a skills base capable of supporting a robust economy • Develop available employment land to provide high quality and efficient business space • Develop new sectors and encourage targeted inward investment • Encourage business start-ups, entrepreneurship and support innovation • Improve accessibility and transport links locally and regionally The Eco-town programme will bring about some key changes that will contribute to the delivery of these ambitions: • Increase in population to around 25,000 people7 • Redeployment of SEME staff • Increased demand for sustainable construction, low-carbon energy and environmental business

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• • •

Availability of major employment sites and buildings Improvements to local biodiversity and landscape including development of the South Downs National Park Improvements in transport and access, including a new rail link and the opening of the Hindhead Tunnel Improvements in ICT infrastructure

KEY PRIORITIES 3.3 In order to achieve the objectives and take full advantage of the changes that the Eco-town will bring this report focuses on a number of key areas. The priorities, arranged in order of their importance to the delivery timetable, are as follows. 1 TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE MILITARY LEGACY

3.4

The first priority is to take advantage of what we already have in the town, and what skills we may be about to lose. Bordon Garrison is home to the School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering (SEME), the training academy for the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME). SEME is the UK’s largest electro-mechanical engineering teaching establishment and has built a considerable reputation as the national centre for expert military training, particularly in trade skills for electrical and mechanical engineering as well as welding, transportation repair and driver training. Typically


modest scale and with the right strategic investment by public and private partners, possibly including DECC, MoD, Skills Funding Agency, Babcock and a Local Authority, there would be a unique opportunity to safeguard and retain some of the elements of the existing Bordon skills training assets, both physical and intellectual, to ensure that they are captured for long-term civilian benefit.

there are approximately 1500 soldiers at SEME undertaking career and equipment courses and gaining transferable qualifications ranging from NVQ level 2 to HND. 3.5

3.6

3.7

This is an important first step. The departure of the Garrison will provide a unique opportunity for some of this knowledgebase to be retained and adapted to civilian needs. Assets include a significant number of skilled civilian trainers as well as a series of buildings, laboratories and workshops. Staff are currently under contract to Babcock. Many live nearby and most are unlikely to relocate with the departure of the garrison. There is a considerable and growing need in the UK for increasing the provision of training for skilled trade workers, in particular the energy sector. This sector is being targeted by government as it requires vast re-investment, from the rebuilding of the national grid, to the construction of new low-carbon power generating stations in order to meet the national 34% carbon reduction obligation by 2020 as committed by the 2008 Climate Change Act. There are already some important internationally significant firms in the locality, not least the GE Energy Services, turbine factory at Alton. Whilst locally there are currently some excellent civilian engineering training facilities at both Alton and Farnborough Colleges, these are of a relatively

3.8

3.9

3.10

Ensuring that this valuable electrical and mechanical engineering legacy is capitalised on is important if the links to advanced manufacturing and aerospace sectors within the Blackwater Valley towns are to be realised. 2 LEARNING AND INNOVATION CAMPUS A Learning and Innovation Campus has been proposed by the East Hampshire Skills Study. The need to increase educational attainment is pressing. This is linked to the dearth of post 16 education within the town at the moment. This proposal could become the focus of a multi-institutional facility serving not only Whitehill Bordon but the rest of East Hampshire as well. Such a campus would not be intended to directly compete with or replace any existing provision but to complement them. The whole of East Hampshire would reap significant rewards from the creation of such a facility in terms of increased economic benefits and an elevated profile. It will be important that the students should

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businesses who would choose Whitehill Bordon as a location for three principal reasons: • Being at the heart of one of the largest construction projects in the South East region. • Being in a very attractive area. • Having a 360 degree catchment to over 2.7m people living within a one hour journey time.

be coached in entrepreneurial skills and the One Planet Living philosophy to ensure that after graduating they would fully contribute to the sustainable economic development of the town. 3.11

3.12

3.14

Initial discussions have been held regarding the location of a specialist sustainable construction college within the town. 3 SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION The construction envisaged, which is expected to start some time after 2016, provides another imminent opportunity. The level of construction, estimated to be in the region of £1.5billion, and to extend beyond 2026 will generate wealth and jobs for the town. It will comprise a wider range of activities than construction of homes and businesses. For example there will be new infrastructure required such as renewable energy, water, waste, environmental technologies and tourism. The sector is significant at the regional level and the town has a number of unique competitive advantages on which to take a lead. During 2010 the Eco-town project received expressions of interest from businesses supplying the construction industry with high efficiency materials, who were interested in how they might become involved in the building of the new town. The concept of “the town that built itself” in the draft Framework Masterplan has real potential to attract

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3.15

The recent Energy Bill published in December 2010 announced the “Green Deal” programme to encourage retrofit of energy-saving measures for both businesses and householders. This should provide a significant boost to the sector.

3.16

Business networks including Business East Hampshire and the Sustainable Business Partnership are well placed to assist in marketing the town to potential new employers and investors through an active campaign of local sustainable business conferences and seminars with themes including; energy efficiency, packaging minimisation/recycling, resource efficiency, etc.

3.17

Whitehill Bordon could also host a major sustainable construction fair, which if successful could be developed into an annual event, possibly housed in one of the larger surplus MoD buildings. This would be focused on the local community, but should also attract visitors, trade and families from a wide area who want to see at first hand new innovations in


environmentally friendly materials, construction methods and products. 3.18

3.19

3.20

To build this sector it will be critical to ensure that the Eco-business parks proposed in the draft Framework Masterplan will provide a suitable range of sites and premises. For example, production and storage of construction materials require large areas of land. Suitable planning policies would also need to be considered to ensure that the sector could grow relatively unhindered. 4 NEW BUSINESS SECTOR INCUBATOR One of the key success criteria in developing new employment sectors, is the early establishment of a nucleus, typically comprising a physical building with associated networked support. Such a combination demonstrates commitment and can act as a focus for cluster marketing. The conversion of the Old Fire Station into the new Eco Station is an important first step. But as the town moves forward it will be critical that at least one of the Eco-business parks becomes home to a world-class flagship building. Such a facility could bring together companies, suppliers, research academics, service providers and private investors, to stimulate business activity, projects, contracts and generate employment. This project can commence as soon as land and major investment becomes available.

3.21

5 ENCOURAGING MICRO-BUSINESS The strategy envisages that housing developments will be designed to encourage working from home. The target is that 25% of new houses will have resident workers. This implies that all new houses in the town will be designed to support home working. From about 2018, when the first new neighbourhood centres are constructed, microbusiness start-ups from home will be one of the most cost effective way of encouraging new business sectors within the town. This model of working has the added advantage of providing flexibility for carers, parents and part-time working as well as considerable lifestyle benefits. However there are drawbacks to working from home in a normal suburban location. These can include: • Isolation • Lack of high quality broadband • Poor business facilities • Lower business kudos • Lack of high quality business support The intention is to ensure that new and existing residential neighbourhoods within the town are provided with low cost neighbourhood business hubs which can provide business support, a meeting point, as well as business services. These could work alongside local primary schools or neighbourhood shops. A good local example which has been very successful is the Kingsley

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Centre in Kingsley, which integrates meeting space, business facilities and a post office. 3.22

3.23

3.23

3.24

3.25

There is already a high proportion of small businesses within the town and the district. The rollout of high speed Infinity Broadband to Whitehill Bordon is due to commence this year and be completed by 2012.

National Park and the East Hampshire Food Fayre will strengthen this initiative. 3.26

Unfortunately these new fibre-optics will not extend to the hinterland of villages. To redress that balance Hampshire County Council is currently applying for funding to fill in the gaps. 6 VALUE ADDED FOOD AND DRINK The agricultural hinterland that surrounds Whitehill Bordon is already home to a number of growing quality food and drink businesses including the Blackmoor Estate Farm and the Priors Dean Vineyard. Whitehill Bordon can capitalise on the increasing demand for local food. The rich agricultural hinterland and the range of interesting locally produced products gives the town an excellent ready-made local distinctiveness. This is also a practical way of ensuring that local businesses in the satellite villages can benefit from the Eco-town. Collaboration with the South Downs

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7 VISITORS AND TOURISM East Hampshire is a splendid place for visitors with beautiful countryside, the national park, attractive market towns and villages and a number of visitor attractions generating a turnover estimated to be £150 million a year. Whitehill Bordon currently has neither the image nor facilities to significantly benefit from this spend. However there are already many visitors and students visiting the town, predominantly through the military training function. Over time development of the Eco-town should provide significant opportunities for the promotion of both business, eco-tourism and activities relating to the surrounding natural environment.

3.27

The East Hampshire Tourism and Marketing Partnership has identified a district shortage of visitor accommodation and also raised the issue of quality of visitor accommodation and there are already some limits on visitor capacity.

3.28

To improve its visitor and tourism sector Whitehill Bordon should seek to: • Improve the provision of tourist and visitor information • Provide a better range of visitor accommodation • Make the local environment more attractive and accessible


• • • •

Improve visitor facilities and attractions Encourage B&B and local catering start-ups Use the Eco-town itself as a visitor draw Provide suitable accommodation for business uses and business visitors.

3.29

There is considerable scope within appropriate forestry areas to develop a location for a major forest holiday destination, as successfully undertaken in similar locations using the Center Parcs model. Such developments require very careful planning and controls in order to safeguard the natural environment, ecology and habitats, but they do produce significant (in excess of 1000 jobs) quality all-season employment. Provision of such a facility preferably within a 10km radius of Whitehill Bordon could provide a very substantive employment boost as well as providing new conference and leisure facilities.

3.30

The masterplan recommends that some of the MoD buildings could be converted into a new hotel or conference centre. The Officers’ Mess is one good example. Such business-related accommodation might also be available for leisure use at the weekends.

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DELIVERY 4.00

4.01

4.02

The increase in the town’s population over the next 25 years will promote Whitehill Bordon to become the largest town in East Hampshire. Add a totally new eco-friendly 21st century town centre, an innovative education and training campus, and low carbon transportation links and the ingredients are assembled to transform the town into an important location for business. Such a community will be far more self-sufficient in leisure, culture and entertainment venues, with an inspiring retailing heart. There is an immediate need in the short term to provide more comparison goods shops (selling clothes, electrical goods etc). Attracting new retailers will transform the shopping experience for the local community and will increase the prospect, particularly in the latter stages of the new town’s development, to attract specialist retailers. This could include specialist products, such as ultra-low carbon vehicles and low-energy heating/lighting products that would be available in wider and better ranges. The expanding community will also require growth of a professional service sector to serve the new businesses as well as provide higher paid jobs, including banking, financial services, insurance brokers, estate agencies, solicitors and accountants. In addition there are currently very few places where executives might wish to settle and a re-balancing of the housing provision to include new executive

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homes, one-off eco-homes and off-grid will be provided. 4.03

Both the day and night-time economies will need to expand to meet the needs of existing and new residents, students, businesses and visitors. So provision will be required for additional pubs, restaurants, entertainment venues, a cinema, and further leisure centres. The town should also seek to make provision for large scale leisure activities such as indoor ski centres.

4.04

TRANSPORT There is a target to reduce car trips within the town to 25%. This presents both a major challenge and a significant business and employment opportunity in order to deliver the compelling range of alternative transport modes that will be needed to fulfil that ambition.

4.05

A rail feasibility study has already established that there is a business case for a direct rail link between the town and Waterloo (via Bentley). Further work is required, but there is no doubt of the business advantage this would provide the town.

4.06

The town is an ideal location to encourage a bus/coach company to provide an operational centre. Employment directly from the provision of a regular town bus shuttle service, possibly running for around 18 hours per day as well as the public


transport links to other communities could contribute in excess of 50 jobs for drivers, office and maintenance workers. 4.07

The town will benefit from one of the most modern networks of cycle routes and so will generate demand for cycle hire, sales and servicing, both for traditional cycles and also electric assisted models.

4.08

Although we hope that car ownership will be vastly reduced, a new breed of hybrid and electric vehicles are being developed to meet the new target of 95g/km CO2 emissions by 2020. These ultra low carbon vehicles (ULCVs), including fleets of allelectric and eventually fuel cell technology vehicles, will all require specialist maintenance. The town could position itself as a major centre for the distribution and servicing of these ULCVs by building up associated charging points and service centres.

4.09

PUBLIC SERVICES As the town grows to become the largest in the district there will naturally develop a growing need for improved access to public services. Despite the current public sector austerity and the possibility that future local authority structures and boundaries may change, there will be a growing case for providing better local access to these services. This includes policing, healthcare, social support, and public administration.

4.10

Currently there are three local authorities with responsibility for the town, Hampshire County Council, Whitehill Town Council and East Hampshire District Council. The latter presently occupies old and inefficient buildings in Petersfield, where there will be continued pressures to achieve significant savings. There is a Customer Access Strategy8 being developed and the outcome of this work will be important for the project. The focus may well be on access points for the local community. Such investment would be an important catalyst. If the public sector were to invest it would also demonstrate further commitment.

4.11

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT Whitehill Bordon suffers from a lack of entrepreneurial intensity and needs to vigorously encourage more entrepreneurial prowess. For example the recent national ‘Make Your Mark’ campaign proved very powerful, especially at a local level to create an enterprise culture among young people in the UK. Whitehill Bordon in partnership with the 14-19 Consortium Partnership and the Local Children’s Partnership should take a subregional lead in developing a local young entrepreneurship foundation, similar to the Enterprise UK initiative.

4.12

This would be complemented by the government’s commitment to increase the number of apprenticeships in the UK. It is vital that Whitehill

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This must be augmented by better access and a wider range of workforce. Proximity to airports at Southampton, Farnborough, Gatwick and Heathrow and to the seaports at Portsmouth and Southampton will also be a benefit.

Bordon businesses seize this opportunity to work with the National Apprenticeships Service. 4.13

INWARD INVESTMENT The definition of inward investment for economic development has historically been limited to foreign direct investment (FDI) from overseas businesses who wanted to establish a UK presence, whether in manufacturing, research or sales. However since the rapid globalisation of economies and expansion of the EU that concept has been significantly broadened and in recent years acquisitions and mergers of existing UK businesses by foreign or venture capital have been included in some statistics.

4.14

For many communities, including Whitehill Bordon, care has to be taken if a growth strategy is overreliant on inward investment by new businesses, as without personal or historic connections to a community, this kind of inward investment has too often been found to be transitory.

4.15

However, inward investment remains an important source of job creation and investment. There continues to be interest in the UK from abroad, including the USA and fast expanding Asian markets like India and China. Whitehill Bordon’s attraction will include the supply of land and or buildings. In the shorter term the availability of economic exmilitary buildings should not be underestimated.

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4.16

Historically Hampshire has not been as successful as it’s neighbours in attracting investment. This function is likely to be an important role for the new Local Enterprise Partnerships (also see Appendix F). Realistically, the new Eco-town is unlikely to have sufficient budget or expertise to be able to independently promote its own strengths overseas and therefore it will require to work with and support the LEPs in their inward investment strategies.

4.17

THIRD SECTOR The Eco-town could catalyse the growth of a more active social economy across the local community, voluntary and social enterprise sectors. Such economic activity, such as local trading schemes, credit unions and co-operative trading ventures could offer Whitehill Bordon better routes to meet the needs of the new community than have been previously provided by the private sector and to assist in filling the emerging gaps in the existing community service provision due to the current public sector financial austerity measures.


4.18

SOCIAL ENTERPRISES This need to encourage a greater growth in social enterprises and promote a community based approach to employment creation involving the voluntary and community sector in service delivery is being recognised by the new government through the Big Society concept. It will be important that any of the Cabinet Office incentives such as the Big Society Bank and eligibility for the new Community Fund are fully pursued.

4.19

SOCIAL INCLUSION

Eco-housing in Ammersfoort Netherlands

The projects which come out of this strategy must each consider their inclusive nature. As well as ensuring that schemes do not discriminate against protected groups like the disabled, women, ethnic minorities we will also need to ensure that existing residents and those living in the villages are not unfairly disadvantaged as well.

21 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


4.20

PROGRAMME

4.21 MARKETING STRATEGY

There is a natural progression of the economic development work because it is so closely linked to the programme of development. Each priority sector naturally relates to a different phase of development. The first phase is of great importance because of the fragility of the economy during the transition period, while the MoD is withdrawing.

.

Starting NOW 1 Taking advantage of the military legacy PREPARING FOR MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS Now - 2016 2 Learning and innovation campus 3 Sustainable construction 4 New business incubators ONCE MAJOR DEVELOPMENT STARTS 2016 – onwards 5 Encouraging micro-businesses 6 Value added food and drink 7 Visitors and tourism

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In the next section we identify a series of activities that must occur to allow these target sectors to flourish. In particular the marketing campaign will need to commence as soon as we have an MoD announcement.


Action 5.00

The next stage of works will establish programmes covering a series of activities. These are:

Marketing and investment

Low carbon-innovation and technology

Business performance and competitiveness

Employment land and commercial property

Education, skills and training

Environment and infrastructure

5.01

The tables on successive pages shows the relationship between the priorities and the activities, indicating where particular priorities will require the primary support of a certain mix of activities.

5.02

At a meeting of the Whitehill Bordon Standing Conference it was agreed that marketing and investment strategies would be urgently required once the MoD had made their announcement.

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Right: Table relating the prioritised growth sectors with key activities. The stars indicate the primary relationship between activities and priorities. Each action is outlined in more detail in a separate table on the next few pages.

ACTIVITIES

Low carbon

Business competitiveness

Land and property

Education and training

Environment and infrastructure

Marketing and investment

NOW 1 Taking advantage of the military legacy

‘

‘

‘

‘

PRE – DEVELOPMENTS Now - 2016 2 Learning and innovation campus 3 Sustainable construction

‘ ‘

‘ ‘

4 New business incubators

‘ ‘

‘

‘

‘

DEVELOPMENT PHASE 2016 – onwards 5 Encouraging micro-businesses 6 Value added food and drink 7 Visitors and tourism

‘ ‘

‘ ‘ ‘

24 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

‘

‘ ‘ ‘

‘

‘ ‘ ‘


Action

Key objectives

A. Low-carbon innovation and technology

Support local low-carbon innovation in science, technology and research for application within new sustainable business sector economy Attract and secure new investment in the key low-carbon growth sectors and maximise new market opportunities

Action

Potential delivery partners

Timescale

Priority

A1 Capitalise on the opening of the Eco-Station to ensure the development of a rolling programme of relevant seminars, events and conferences.

EHDC, Alton College, UoP, SBP, Low carbon product suppliers, EcDvSG, EHB, BL

Medium term

High

A2 Finalise Eco-grant scheme – possibly develop as a competition

EcDvSG, EHB, BL, UoP, tEC, WHBT

Short term

Medium/High

A3 Work with HEIs and partners to bring investment in innovation and business focused research

UoP, Technology Strategy Board

Medium/long term

Medium

A4 Promote innovation events, local sustainable business conferences and lowcarbon programmes

EHDC, HCC, tEC, Ent M3 LEP, Alton College, UoP

Medium/long term

Medium

A5 Develop an Eco-town branch of the Sustainable Business Network

SBN, EHB, WHBT

Medium term

Medium

A6 Build on R&D, University and Enterprise links – encourage Knowledge Transfer Networks to support and encourage local high growth businesses

UoP , Technology Strategy Board, Ent M3 LEP, venture capital funders

Medium term

Medium

A7 Encourage local SME take-up of the new “Green Deal” incentives for energy efficiency

BL, EHB, SBN, Ent First

Short term

High

A8 Evaluate the feasibility of staging a major sustainable construction fair

BL, EHB, SBN, Ent M3 LEP

Short/Medium term

Medium

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Action

Key objectives

B. Business performance and competitiveness

Develop a more diverse, competitive and resource efficient local economy . Support the development and growth of microbusinesses and small and medium sized businesses Increase quality and availability of jobs and resultant wage levels

Action

Potential delivery partners

Timescale

Priority

BL, Ent First, EHB, EHDC, SBP, Radian, WTP

Whole of plan

Medium

B2 Support local manufacturing, including strengthening local supply chains into: ICT, advanced manufacturing, energy & aerospace sectors.

BL, EHB, WHBT, Ent M3 LEP, HCoC, FSB, Farnborough Aerospace Consortium, BIS

Whole of plan

High

B3 Encourage and support further development of local industries, including: pharma and the value added food and drink sectors

Existing local businesses EHDC, HCC, WTP, Ent M3 LEP, UoP and other universities,

Whole of plan

High

B4 Encourage new investment in the retail sector. Explore the potential for attracting specialist businesses as an “Anchor Store� for example ultra low carbon vehicles

EHB, EHDC, WHBT, WTP, FSB

Medium/long term

Medium

B5 Evaluate the potential to establish a Business Improvement District (BID) or equivalent

EHDC, WTC, WTP, EHB, FSB

Medium term

Medium

B6 Develop and stimulate the growth of a visitor economy and Eco-tourism. Includes promoting the area to operators and investors, including hotels and quality leisure attractions.

EHTMP, EHDC, EHB, WTP, SDNP

Medium/long term

Medium

B7 Support the development of forestry diversification and further development of the value added wood and forestry products.

EHDC, HCC, Forestry Commission, forestry businesses , Alice Holt Research Centre

Medium term

Medium

B8 Evaluate options with partners to stimulate a creative industries cluster

EHDC, HCC, EHB, Phoenix Theatre

Medium term

Low/Medium

B9 Investigate options to stimulate the third sector and the social economy and maximise access to employment

CF, Voluntary and community support organisations EHDC, WHBT, Cabinet Office, CLG,

Short/Medium term

Medium

B1 Stimulate emerging industries, particularly: sustainable environmental industries, and low-carbon energy sector.

construction,

26 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Action

Key objectives

C. Employment Land and Commercial Property

Fully meet all the expected, and where possible unexpected demands, for employment land. Provision of a range of commercial property options for both new investments and indigenous business growth to provide suitable ladders of accommodation

Action

Potential delivery partners

Timescale

Priority

C1 Maximise the use of the Eco-station as the initial focal point for demonstrating low-carbon technologies and providing relevant seminars and information C2 Commission feasibility study for the development of a sub-regional hub for public service provision including policing, healthcare, social support and public administration. C3 Work with partners to explore options to deliver more managed workspaces suitable for SME and micro-businesses.

WHBT, SBP, HCC,

Medium term

High

EHDC, HCC, WTC

Medium term

Medium

Ent First, HEP, HCC, Ent M3 LEP, EHDC, MoD DE

Medium term

High

C4 Develop mechanisms to ensure the reuse of suitable former MoD buildings. Consider introducing cellular office uses within converted Edwardian villas and barracks. Evaluate MoD buildings appropriate for B1, B2 and B8 planning class uses.

MoD DE, Highways

HCC

Short/Medium term

Medium/High

C5 Provision of suitable premises to support appropriate social support infrastructure including the retention and expansion of the Chase Community Hospital, community centres, and schools.

EHDC, LCP, Development partners, HCC, NHS, WTC, Chase Community Hospital, MCCTC

Medium/Long term

High

C6 Quantify requirements and optimum locations for business support, including small business incubators / enterprise centres that may have important dual role to support and provide services to the expected large number of home-working employees. Including world class flagship buildings.

EHDC, EHB, Ent First, BL, HCC, HEP, HCoC

Short/Medium term

High

C7 Ensure the development of the four proposed Eco-business Parks is fulfilled to provide an affordable range of sites and premises capable to meet the requirements of new business growth sectors.9

EHDC, MoD DE, HCC, Development partners

Medium/Long term

High

C8 Evaluate reuse of the Officers’ Mess for Hotel refurbishment/development. Alternatively consider other hotel options including business budget class

EHDC, MoD DE, Development partners, Hotel operators

Short/Medium term

High

C9 Investigate and promote “Big Box” leisure options, including multiplex cinema, bowling and indoor leisure sports eg Snow Dome

EHDC, MoD DE, WTP, Development partners, Major Leisure operators

Medium/Long term

High

WHBT,

EHDC

Planning,

27 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Action

Key objectives

D. Education, Skills and Training

Ensure that all within Whitehill Bordon have affordable access to learning and training Enhance the skills offer to improve the employability of the local workforce to compete for higher value jobs. Improve educational achievement, attainment and aspirations, including the development of entrepreneurial attitudes Ease the transition between education and work, especially for the NEET group

Action

Potential delivery partners

Timescale

Priority

D1 Investigate feasibility of retaining key elements of the SEME facilities and/or trainers and adapting to civilian needs of UK industry.

Babcock, HCC, Hampshire Military Economic Partnership, MoD DE, Ent M3 LEP, 14-19 consortium, DECC, SFA

Short term

High

D2 Undertake full feasibility study into the East Hampshire Learning and Innovation Campus proposal, including linked learning centre for adults and identification of funding models

Alton College, UoP, CF, MCCTC, 14-19 consortium, LCP, SFA, HCC, EHDC, WTC

Short term

High

D3 Stimulate uptake of post 16 education and training

14-19 consortium, EHDC, Ent First, HCC. JC+

Short/Medium term

High

D4 Engage with key academic and training providers to identify practical mechanisms to improve the skills and education levels to meet local business needs.

14-19 consortium, EHDC, EHB, FSB, Business Link, Ent First, NAS

Short/Medium term

High

D5 Investigate establishing a Young Entrepreneurship Foundation to reinvigorate the next generation and create opportunities to launch new enterprises or to contribute innovative ideas. D6 Contribute to initiatives focused on intermediate labour market with focus on young people and disadvantaged groups, especially NEETs

MCCTC, Enterprise UK, Ent M3 LEP, Ent First, LCP, CF, HCC, 14-19 consortium

Medium term

Medium

Alton College, Connexions, Job Centre Plus, CF, MCCTC, 14-19 consortium , EHDC, Enterprise UK, All Age Careers Service

Short/Medium term

High

D7 Initiate business training through a revitalised Business Breakthrough Group.

Ent M3 LEP, Alton College

Short term

High

28 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Action

Key objectives

E. Environment and infrastructure

That all development proposals safeguard and enhance the built, new and natural environment, and implement sustainable construction methods to achieve optimum low-carbon living Improve physical and digital accessibility and transport links within the region, between the Eco-town and surrounding communities Make the new town centre a sustainable location and ensure it acts as the focus for investment and environmental enhancement

Action

Potential delivery partners

Timescale

Priority

E1 Investigate employment opportunities emerging from low-carbon travel and transport planning, eg bus company relocations, cycle hire, low-carbon vehicles sales and servicing

HCC, EHDC, bus companies

Medium term

Medium

E2 Maximise employment opportunities from provision of low-carbon infrastructure, eg ICT

HCC, EHDC, private construction industry

Whole of plan

Medium

E3 Work with East Hampshire Tourism and Marketing Partnership to encourage improvement in the quality and quantity of visitor attractions E4 Lobby for private investment in next generation ICT

EHTMP, EHB, HCC, WHBT

Whole of plan

Medium

EHDC, HEC, FSB, EHB, Private sector partner (e.g. BT or VirginMedia)

Whole of plan

High

E5 Analysis of market requirements

Local business groups, wider business sector. Association of Small Businesses. CBI

Short term

High

E6 Revitalise Business Breakthrough Group (See also D7)

Business Specialist Group, partnership

Short term

High

developers

and

Whitehill Town

29 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Action

Key objectives

F. Marketing and Investment

Promote a compelling and distinctive image for Whitehill Bordon that appeals to investors and creates a sense of identity Secure new inward investment from the rest of the UK and overseas Enhance strategic linkages with the Blackwater valley towns and urban South Hampshire

Action

Potential delivery partners

Timescale

Priority

F1 Ensure that investment opportunities, including the Ecobusiness parks are effectively promoted. Engage with suitable inward investment networks. F2 Develop external business promotion of the Eco- town, possibly including the creation of a “Choose Whitehill Bordon” website. Encourage joint sub-regional promotions

Ent M3 LEP, UKTI, HCC, HEP, EHDC, DE, Commercial property agents

Medium term

Medium

WHBT, HCC, EHB, HEP, Ent M3 LEP

Short/Medium term

Medium

F3 Develop sources of external funding to support the delivery of the actions and encourage public – private partnership investment arrangements

EHDC, HCC, GO-SE, Ent M3 LEP, EHB

Whole of plan

High

F4 Work with the other Eco-towns and Eco-cities to develop joint initiatives for promotion and co-branding

Other Eco-towns & elsewhere in Europe

Short/Medium term

Medium

F5 Enhance and develop statistical knowledge and economic performance data relevant to the town.

EHDC, HCC, HEP

Whole of plan

Medium

30 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Eco-town warriors from Bordon Junior School

31 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Appendices A B C D E F G H I J

Funding Data Previous studies Consultation Monitoring Policies Local Economic Partnership Glossary Bibliography Integrated impact assessment Footnotes

32 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


A Funding 1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

Core funding for the initial Eco-town stages is being provided principally by government grants. But future economic growth in Whitehill Bordon will be secured because of the long-term private sector investment associated with development of the town. The capital value of the development is estimated to be in the region of ÂŁ1.5 billion. An Eco-town Funding Strategy was adopted by the Delivery Board in December 2010, the principles of which will be used to guide efforts to secure the required external funding for the delivery of the objectives of this strategy.

Regional Growth Fund Community Infrastructure Levy Section 106 contributions Future replacement scheme for Local Authority Business Growth Initiative New Homes Bonus Possible Supplementary Business Rate Possible Business Improvement District Public Private Partnerships

Public sector funds from all sources are being massively reduced. The Whitehill Bordon Eco-town team will ensure that a high priority is given to continuing to access funding from all sources.

Business Angels

The current EU funding programmes are more limited than previous EU programmes so we will need to look for new opportunities and consider whether the project may be applicable to new initiatives, for example from the European Investment Bank (EIB).

Research Councils and Technology Strategy Board

Options for sources of future financing for economic development of the Eco-town may include:

Prudential Borrowing (Local Government option)

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) Other EU programmes

R&D relief on corporation tax Carbon Trust Grants Big Society Bank

33 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


B Data

1.1

There are limitations to much of the statistical data readily available for a locality such as Whitehill Bordon. Data is typically derived from the rather old 2001 census or from surveys and forecasts that tend to be based on sub-regions or whole local authority areas. National Statistics data for trends and comparison purposes also tends to be limited to a district wide basis.

1.2

Nonetheless where available and relevant, data at ward and Lower level Super Output area (LSOA) basis, such as job seeker records provide specific detail about the town.

1.3

Some of the baseline and forecasting studies that were developed for the original Green Town Vision and the subsequent bid for Eco-town status remain of relevance to this strategy. These include the GVA Grimley Revised Baseline Report, the SQW Economic Potentials Report and the AECOM draft Framework Masterplan (June 2010). Key findings of these studies and reports are summarised in Appendix C.

1.4

Key findings from both the East Hampshire Skills Audit and the Hampshire Local Economic Assessment are also summarised in Appendix C. Data and analysis of the forthcoming 2011 census will provide valuable additional information as it becomes available during 2013.

1.5

The recent comprehensive East Hampshire Skills Audit is of particular relevance in identifying district wide skills and training issues and provides a focus

34 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

on Whitehill Bordon. Upper tier local authorities had a duty to provide an analysis of their area’s economic performance and the Hampshire Local Economic Assessment does provide considerable analysis and information for the whole of Hampshire, but the potential of the Whitehill Bordon Eco-town was not identified in the document. 1.6

This strategy proposes that more relevant town specific data should be collected and compiled in order to provide a robust baseline of the town’s current economic performance and such data will require regular updates in order to monitor the progress and outcome of the proposed actions.


England Whitehill East South Hampshire and Bordon Hampshire East Wales Managers and Senior Officials Associate Professional and Technical Occupations Administrative and Secretarial Occupations Skilled Trades Occupations Personal Service Occupations Sales and Customer Service Occupations Process, Plant and Machine Operatives Elementary Occupations

10.5

15.0

13.1

13.2

11.3

18.4

14.9

15.0

14.6

13.8

11.6

12.7

14.1

13.8

13.3

18.3

12.5

11.6

11.0

11.6

8.2

7.5

6.6

6.9

6.9

6.2

5.9

7.0

7.3

7.7

6.9

5.2

6.5

6.3

8.5

10.9

9.1

10.4

10.5

11.9

Employment by main occupation groups (percent) 2001

35 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


to form a c Population Ward

Persons

Lindford

2244

Whitehill Chase

2388

Whitehill Deadwater

2776

Lindford

31

2.0%

Whitehill Hogmoor Whitehill Pinewood

2886 3370

Whitehill Chase

26

1.6%

Whitehill Deadwater 47

2.5%

Whitehill Walldown

2421

Total 16085 Source ONS 2009 Ward Population Estimates for England and Wales

Unemployment Job Seekers Allowance Dec 2010

Claimants %

Whitehill Hogmoor 19

0.9%

Whitehill Pinewood 38

1.7%

Whitehill Walldown 20

1.3%

East Hampshire Rate %

1.4%

GB Rate % 3.5% Source: DWP Claimant Count, ONS Jan 2011ombined indicator for education, skills and

36 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Economic Activity Rates Ward/Region

% Employed *

% Unemployed

% Retired

Whitehill Chase

79

1.8

7.9

Whitehill Hogmoor

78

1.4

7.6

Whitehill Pinewood

77

2.4

2.7

Whitehill Deadwater

72

2.6

7.1

Whitehill Walldown

76

1.4

8.2

Whitehill/Bordon

76

1.9

6.8

East District

68

1.8

13

Hampshire County

68

1.9

14

England and Wales

61

3.4

14

Hampshire

*Full time, Part time and self-employed Source: Office for National Statistics, 2001 Census

37 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Earnings In 2010, East Hampshire had significantly the lowest average gross weekly pay for jobs with an average of just £335, this compares with a figure of £528 for Rushmoor. Source ONS

Weekly pay - Gross (£) - For all employee jobs: United Kingdom, 2010 Local Authority Area Number of jobs Median weekly pay £’s East Hampshire 34000 335.2 Gosport 20000 342.1 New Forest 61000 345.0 Havant 39000 357.1 Fareham 43000 377.3 Test Valley 46000 377.7 Eastleigh 61000 401.7 Winchester 66000 423.4 Basingstoke and Deane 75000 483.2 Hart 39000 513.9 Rushmoor 42000 528.9

38 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Employment by Sector

11.5

16.8

15.4

13.0

17

7.5

8.3

5.7

Education

6.3

8.5

7.3

7.8

0

Health and Social Work

8.9

9.5

9.3

10.9

0.1

0.3

Other

5.1

5.3

4.8

5.2

13.4

13.9

15.0

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.7

7.2

7.0

7.2

6.8

17.3

15.5

16.0

16.8

3

3.4

4.0

4.8

5.8

6.0

6.9

7.0

3.3

4.0

4.6

4.7

% Hampshir e County

% England and Wales

2.7

1.6

1.5

0

0

0

0.1

0.2

12.3

% Whitehil l/ Bordon

% East Hampshir e

Agriculture, Hunting and Forestry

1.6

Fishing Mining and quarrying

Industrial Sector

Manufacturing Electricity, gas and water supply Construction Wholesale and retail, repair of motor vehicles Hotels and catering Transport, storage and communicatio ns Financial intermediation

Real estate, renting and business services Public administration , and defence

Total Number 23,627,75 7,897 55,117 625,860 Employed 4 Source: Hantsweb 2003 from Office of National Statistics, 2001 Census

39 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Travel to Work As shown in the SQW potentials study the 2001 census reported around 7900 working residents in Whitehill of which less than 50% of the towns workforce found employment close to home, with around 4000 workers needing to out commute for employment SQW also concluded that in ball-park figures, that there were around 2,000 workers working in military and defence-related jobs in Whitehill Bordon in 2001. Of these, over 1,300 (i.e. nearly 70%) lived locally. So if garrisonrelated employment (whether military or civilian) is excluded, the town’s level of “underlying� self-containment is much reduced.

.

40 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Source: SQW from Office for National Statistics, 2001 Census

Commuting flows between the main settlements in East Hampshire – All occupational groups, 2001 Place of employment – i.e. where people work Total Area Whitehill Alton Horndean Petersfield Elsewhere Elsewhere in East in England and Wales Hants Whitehill 3,453 361 6 122 1,055 2,905 7,902 Place of residence - i.e. where people live

Alton

145

3,667

9

45

912

2,729

7,507

Horndean

42

31

1,557

327

241

4,273

6,491

Petersfield

141

117

40

2,815

669

2,522

6,304

Elsewhere in East Hants

789

1,461

189

1,063

10,658

12,785

26,945

Elsewhere in England & Wales

1,516

2,173

1,651

2,982

4,934

23,559,456

23,572,712

41 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Deprivation

LSOA

WARD CODE

WARD NAME

LA CODE

LA NAME

IMD SCORE

ENGLAND RANKING (1 = MOST DEPRIVED)

E01022634

24UCHU

Whitehill Chase

24UC

East Hampshire

10.76

22851

292

36

E01022633

24UCHU

Whitehill Chase

24UC

East Hampshire

6.67

28035

474

58

E01022635

24UCHW

Whitehill Deadwater

24UC

East Hampshire

20.80

13275

91

11

E01022636

24UCHW

Whitehill Deadwater

24UC

East Hampshire

8.45

25817

379

46

E01022637

24UCHX

Whitehill Hogmoor

24UC

East Hampshire

11.60

21834

260

32

E01022638

24UCHX

Whitehill Hogmoor

24UC

East Hampshire

10.87

22703

285

35

E01022640

24UCHY

Whitehill Pinewood

24UC

East Hampshire

16.51

16783

155

19

E01022639

24UCHY

Whitehill Pinewood

24UC

East Hampshire

6.51

28241

485

59

E01022641

24UCHZ

Whitehill Walldown

24UC

East Hampshire

10.22

23539

311

38

E01022642

24UCHZ

Whitehill Walldown

24UC

East Hampshire

6.89

27772

458

56

Source: Department for Communities and Local Government

42 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL AREA RANKING

% Out of 822

worst 20% in Hampshire

Y

Y


The National Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) considers indicators for areas such as education, health, crime and employment and it combines all these indicators giving a rank of relative deprivation for each local authority in England. The table to the left compares the data for local super output areas (LSOAs) of key indicators in 2007, whilst the map on page 44provides a graphic representation for the whole of Hampshire. From a national perspective, East Hampshire and Whitehill Bordon are not significantly deprived, however it is important to note that individual and relative poverty still have major consequences for the families involved. In addition the situation as the MoD vacates its land and lays off staff is expected to get worse before it gets better. The task is to ensure that the population of Whitehill Bordon will have the same prospects as other parts of the district and county. For example two of the LSOAs in Whitehill Bordon are within the worst 20% of all 822 LSOAs in Hampshire.

43 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Index of Multiple Deprivation Source: Department for Communities and Local Government 2007 English Index of Multiple Deprivation - Environment Department, Hampshire County Council

44 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Ward boundary map – Whitehill Bordon Š Crown copyright. All rights reserved. HCC 100019180 2006

45 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


training in East Hampshire. It includes: • the a

46 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


C Previous studies 1.1

1.2

Five recent studies and reports that provide relevant analysis and recommendations were considered in detail during the development of this Strategy. Extracts of the key findings for each study is included at Appendix B. The bibliography at Appendix G provides details on where full copies of the reports may be found. In the section below there is an assessment of the relevance of each study to this Strategy.

Hampshire Economic Assessment 1.3 Although not sufficiently detailed to provide specific consideration of Whitehill Bordon, the assessment provides a wealth of data and analysis on the whole Hampshire economic area and that of the central Hampshire / New Forest sub-area within which Whitehill Bordon and much of East Hampshire is categorised. The assessment shows that whilst Hampshire as a whole is performing broadly in line with the national economy, its economic growth and wealth generation is dominated by the north and the south parts of the county, with the central, more rural areas significantly underperforming economically, and with poorer future prospects. 1.4

As a consequence of high levels of ‘out-commuting’, in part due to the lack of suitable employment, the area has a higher than typical carbon footprint. The

implications for Whitehill Bordon is that it will need to significantly out-perform the rest of its sub-county area both in future economic and employment growth and in reducing carbon emissions if it is to meet its high level objectives. 1.5

Although Whitehill Bordon was not specifically recognised within the assessment, the growth of the Eco-town could be a major part of the solution in addressing Hampshire’s need for new economic growth and in vastly improving the environmental performance of the central Hampshire sub area.

GVA Grimley Revised Baseline Report 1.6 Whilst it is more than two years since the revised baseline studies were concluded, there has been only limited change within the town, in part due to the continued uncertainty of the timing of the MoD withdrawal and the need to develop the Masterplan process but also because commercial and housing development nationally has stalled due to macroeconomic factors including political change, the banking crisis and a resultant lack of confidence in investment. For example, the limited take-up of the commercial and leisure land at Viking Park. It is considered this baseline study continues to provide a reasonably valid analysis of the town’s current performance.

47 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


SQW Economic Potentials Report 1.7 The Economic Potentials Study provided an analysis and forecast model for the town. The report’s author, SQW proposed three scenarios for the future development of the Eco-town, of which Scenario 2: “The development of the Eco-town proceeds with heavily constrained public sector investment, and the Garrison closes in the middle part of the next decade…” currently appears to be the most likely to be realised. 1.8

At the heart of the SQW report is a recommendation of four core options for the town’s future economic development. Considering each in turn; •

Blackwater Valley Linkage Employment in the Blackwater Valley towns is likely to remain under considerable pressure due to the public and defence sector spending cuts, compounded by the global competition for manufacturing, including the ICT and aerospace sectors. Increasing the alignment of Whitehill Bordon with the Blackwater Valley towns will hold future risk as their own economies are unlikely to be as robust as in the past few decades. Growing levels of vacant commercial buildings within the Blackwater Valley underline the weaknesses of adopting a strategy that attempts to win or to closely align with businesses from those towns.

48 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

Examplar in Sustainable Development Undoubtedly this remains a highly relevant and achievable goal, despite the recognition that low-carbon living has to be mainstreamed into all future development strategies for all communities and therefore Whitehill Bordon will be in competition with many other growing towns who also wish to demonstrate their own low-carbon capabilities.

Whitehill Bordon as a tourism hub Whilst an attractive idea, the reality is that the South Downs National Park will have several “northern gateways” across Surrey and Sussex that are already prepared and have an existing tourism and visitor profile. Whitehill Bordon may have a better medium and long-term potential for eco-tourism as the demonstration projects and retrofit housing programmes become more established. There is also scope, at the right scale, for managed visitor facilities in the town’s forest hinterland that should be progressed.

A hub for post-16 education and training Whilst the SQW proposal gives recognition to the current and growing skills deficit, their proposal lacks ambition and scale for a


town that will become the largest in the district and with the potential to act as a regional and possibly national focal point for low-carbon and sustainable growth. The East Hampshire Skills Audit carried out subsequently provides a more visionary approach. The East Hampshire Employment and Skills Audit and Action Plan 1.9 This report completed in June 2010 highlights the major education and skills deficit that the town already suffers from, a situation that, without a fundamental shift will exacerbate with the closure of the Garrison. The action plan provides an ambitious “Big Idea” for transformation with the creation of a lifetime Learning and Innovation Campus to meet the needs of the expanded town, and also to act as a sub-regional centre that could transform the skills and training base for the whole of East Hampshire. The report correctly recognises that meeting the capital requirements of such a project will be challenging, however an incremental approach using a network of existing facilities, aligned to the rate of the growth of the town is both plausible and a fundamental requirement in order to meet the future needs for education and training provision in the enlarged community.

1.10

Their recommended Action Plan (Annex 5 of that report) provides a compelling framework for future concerted action and the establishment of a Learning and Innovation Campus is therefore included in Section 6 as one of the proposed strategic elements of this Strategy.

AECOM draft Whitehill Bordon Framework Masterplan June 2010 1.11 The draft Framework Masterplan provides an analysis of how and where the large employment growth could occur. It identifies four principal employment locations: • Re-use of former MoD Buildings • Establishing eco-business parks • Town centre employment, including public sector services • Home working 1.12

The draft Framework Masterplan identifies that 5500 jobs would require the creation/allocation of a total of around 113,000 sq m of floorspace within the new town centre and the eco-business parks. Additionally the report highlights the requirements to consider the wider economic infrastructure including transport and communication connectivity and to promote Whitehill Bordon more broadly as an investment location with likely interventions that would include: business start-up and growth

49 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


support, training programmes and targeted inward investment. 1.13

AECOM concludes that next steps should include:• Establish a skills centre • Establish business support networks • Prepare and implement an inward investment strategy • Step-up the level of marketing and promotion

50 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


51 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


Upper tier local authorities were given a duty to produce an annual assessment of their economy. For the whole of Hampshire (including Portsmouth and Southampton) this was first undertaken in 2010. The following are extracts and summaries based on the document prepared by Hampshire County Council in collaboration with SQW Consulting. The assessment considers that there are three distinct economic geographies within the Hampshire Economic Area (HEA): • Northern Hampshire, from Basingstoke across to the Blackwater Valley Towns, • Urban South Hampshire, • Central Hampshire including the New Forest.

• • • • • •

The reports findings are typically restricted to these three broad economic geographies, so whilst specific data and assessment of Whitehill Bordon is not made, nonetheless there is considerable value in understanding the economic context in which the town is located. The following is a selective and summarised list of the key points within the draft assessment, with a particular focus on central Hampshire:• Economic output of the whole of the Hampshire economic area has a steady performance

52 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

• • • •

Gross value added (GVA) per capita for Hampshire is below those for the South East region and England and well below those for buoyant neighbouring economies (e.g. Berkshire and Surrey) Central Hampshire/New Forest is the weakest economy within Hampshire Central Hampshire/New Forest has the strongest skills base, but weakest GVA - in part due to the impact of commuting patterns Unemployment for the HEA is about 2.9%, similar to the regional average Central Hampshire/New Forest has the lowest unemployment levels but with some local unemployment hotspots Central Hampshire/New Forest is the worst performing in terms of carbon emissions Highly qualified residents of Central Hampshire/New Forest often commute out of the area generating high carbon emissions. A sectoral structure which is indistinctive (other than being dominated by the public sector) Economic growth of Central Hampshire/New Forest has been only 1.6% per annum since 2000, below both regional and national averages A polarised economy with big and growing contrasts between those who work locally and those who commute outside the area to work Employment sectors of Central Hampshire/New Forest distinctively different from any other parts of the HEA


• •

Employment within public administration, defence and health and social work in Central Hampshire/New Forest is double the regional average Unemployment across the HEA rose from 1.3% in March 2008 to 2.9% in March 2010 in line with the South East Total population forecast to increase by 10.2% across the HEP over 20 years. The rate of growth forecast for the Central Hampshire/New Forest subarea being the lowest at 7.2% (Proposed growth of the Eco-town not apparently included) Employment projections as “best guess” with regard to employment growth over the period 2006-2026 is an increment of about 87,000 jobs in the whole HEP, of which around 18,000 may be within the Central Hampshire/New Forest sub area (Proposed growth of the Eco-town not apparently included) A deficit in the projected growth of the economically active population in Central Hampshire/New Forest with the scale of the shortfall apparently larger than any likely increase in activity rates It would require a fundamental change in the sectoral/occupational composition of employment, if the current levels of out-commuters from Central Hampshire/New Forest could be encouraged to take local jobs Likely that bank commercial lending over the next period will be more restrictive than in the last decade and, to the extent that growth is financed

• •

through credit, inevitable consequences in terms of GVA growth The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) in June 2010 significantly scaled back national forecasts for GVA growth reflecting the composite impact of fewer migrants and an ageing society resulting in reduced growth of potential labour supply Support for local entrepreneurship including, potentially, access to capital and the provision of shared workspace in rural communities The market towns of the HEA have a crucially important role that should be recognised and supported as the basis for a sustainable economic future

53 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


The Table below highlights the relative poor business start up rate within central Hampshire/New Forest area Patterns of business start-up across Hampshire Economic Area and in its sub-areas and comparator areas

England South East Hampshire Economic Area • North Hampshire • Districts in Central Hampshire/New Forest • Districts in South Hampshire Berkshire Surrey County West Sussex County

Business births as a % of enterprises, 2008

Business births per 1,000 population, 2008

11.8 10.9

4.64 4.87

10.7 11.6 9.5 11.3

4.28 5.03 4.80 3.68

12.0 11.4 9.7

5.62 6.15 4.23

Source: Office for National Statistics from IDBR (Inter-Departmental Business Register)

54 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Revised Baseline Report : GVA Grimley Appraisal

- Socio-Economic

Summary of Baseline Findings and Key Issues September 2008 • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

Very young population structure High proportion of lone parents The young population structure is likely to be maintained if the military relocates Need to continue to provide education and community facilities Very low proportion of elderly people Hinterland is attractive retirement location with higher proportion of elderly Fairly static population between 2001 and 2008, forecast to slightly decrease between 2008 and 2013 Car ownership levels are high as reflected in the travel to work patterns Levels of public transport use are low Poor public transport provision within the area and high out-commuter rates of resident employees Unusually high proportion of residents walk to their workplace. (In part attributed to military personnel movements between service families accommodation and the Garrison) School leavers and adult residents are less qualified than their counterparts within the district Low educational attainment is perceived as a potentially significant deterrent to new businesses or residents moving to the area

• • • • • • • • • •

Unemployment is low in comparison to the district and national level but with a higher proportion of young unemployed people than the national or district averages High rate of economic activity but this is counteracted by high levels of resident workers commuting out of Whitehill Bordon to find suitable work Many of the employed workers in Whitehill Bordon commute in from other locations The major employment sectors are manufacturing, wholesale, retail and repair, finance and business services and public administration The employee jobs available within the town are within distribution, catering and retail, public administration and manufacturing The lack of employment opportunities within the area is a weakness of the local economy There is also a lack of diversity with regard to employment opportunities A number of local businesses do not employ local people Complex commuting patterns exist for the resident and employed workforce within the town The town is a net exporter of labour with high levels of out commuting by resident employees The town has a healthy industrial sector but suffers from a shortage of high quality office and industrial premises, which prevents new and existing businesses from developing and limits employment opportunities

55 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


• •

• • • •

Low proportion of the population employed in professional and managerial positions particularly when compared to the East Hampshire average The garrison has a positive impact upon the local economy and is a major contributor in terms of local employment (2,452 direct, indirect and induced jobs) and expenditure (estimated total induced economic impact at £28.6m) The potential closure of the Bordon Garrison would have a negative effect on the local economy The impact of the potential closure of the Garrison on the local economy would be likely to occur over a relatively short period of time when it relocates Major redevelopment will take place over the longer term, taking time to replace the level of current activity in the economy Careful programming and the phasing of the release of land will be necessary to mitigate impacts on the economy and local population

56 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Whitehill Bordon Economic Potentials Study : SQW July 2009 (finalised November 2009)

57 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


SQW outlined three likely development scenarios that could emerge over the next decade:“Reflecting both dimensions of uncertainty, three scenarios in relation to the medium term development process in Whitehill Bordon. All three are extreme, but they are important in framing and testing the economic strategy: to be of value, it needs to carry conviction in the context of all three possible scenarios.” The 3 scenarios being: • Scenario 1: The development of the Eco-town is substantively and sustainably resourced by the public sector over the medium term, and the Garrison closes in the middle part of the next decade… • Scenario 2: The development of the Eco-town proceeds with heavily constrained public sector investment, and the Garrison closes in the middle part of the next decade… • Scenario 3: Whitehill Bordon Eco-town retains a strong military presence over the next decade… Defining Roles SQW identified four potential future roles to effect exogenous economic growth:1. Linking Whitehill Bordon into the aerospace/high value engineering cluster within the Blackwater Valley Potentially, the relocation of Bordon Garrison could provide the scope to respond to many of the constraints

58 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

to growth identified with regard to the Blackwater Valley clusters. …..the creative re-use of the garrison site could result in: • affordable, managed office space for start-up and newly formed Blackwater Valley enterprises, possibly in the form of an enterprise centre • small workshop units for Blackwater Valley enterprises, • larger premises for light industrial activity, • technical training facilities 2. Exemplar for sustainable development …….suitable sites would need to accommodate low-carbon manufacturing businesses such that they might: • play a role in retrofitting the existing housing stock • contribute to the development of the new homes specified for the Eco-town, as well as the sustainable energy, sustainable urban drainage and green transport infrastructure….. 3. Whitehill Bordon as a tourism hub In April 2011 the South Downs National Park was formally formed. Situated on the edge of the northern ridge of the National Park, Whitehill Bordon will be in close proximity to both of the National Park’s Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, East Hampshire and the South Downs. This presents an opportunity for the town to define a role as a ‘northern gateway’ to the National


Park. This role could involve a National Park visitor centre…. EAST HAMPSHIRE EMPLOYMENT AND SKILLS AUDIT AND ACTION PLAN : Kingshurst Consulting June 2010 Selective key statistics • In Whitehill Bordon the workforce is skewed to lower skill levels and jobs, with a relatively high proportion of youth unemployment and low participation in post 16 learning and Higher Education. •

Although the proportion of the population with no or low skills is relatively low overall for the District, this masks significant variation between some areas, for example Whitehill Bordon, where three in ten of the workforce have no qualifications (Census, 2001, ONS).

There are some areas of the district where the proportion of young people not staying on in education approaches 50%. This includes parts of Alton, Whitehill Bordon/Headley, and Petersfield.

Our work brings together a number of data sources to form a combined indicator for education, skills and training in East Hampshire. It includes:

• • • • •

the average points score for children at Key Stages 2, 3 and 4 young people not in education post 16 the proportion not entering HE secondary school absence working adults with no or low qualifications

Based on these measures, a significant concentration occurs in and around Whitehill Bordon and Headley, further reinforcing the level of need in the area. Recommendations We (Kingshurst Consulting) firmly believe that the opportunities represented by the Eco-town, allied to the development of the new National Park, require a bold and ambitious response as demonstrated by our central recommendation for a new Learning and Innovation Campus at Whitehill Bordon serving the wider District. We believe that such a response does justice to the scale of ambition involved with the overall vision for the Eco-town. A number of important developments are planned to come together to realise the ambition of this ‘Big Idea’. They include the potential redevelopment of Mill Chase Community Technology College and the interest of the East Hampshire Consortium of 14-19 learning providers to use Whitehill Bordon as a base for future courses. The Learning and Innovation Campus could include a distributed network of provision with a central hub within the Eco-town and

59 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


perhaps other aspects of the campus in other parts of Whitehill Bordon. It (The Learning and Innovation Campus) is recommended as the centrepiece of the overall action plan and the ‘Big Idea’ which places learning at the heart of the Eco-town and will enable people and businesses from across the district to share in the jobs and prosperity which are planned.

60 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


Draft WHITEHILL BORDON AECOM June 2010

FRAMEWORK MASTERPLAN :

Chapter 9 A New Economic Role Masterplan employment space provision The draft framework masterplan proposes the following employment sites and initiatives:Reuse of MoD buildings • • •

Introducing cellular office uses within converted Edwardian villas and barracks. Buildings appropriate for industrial uses. These range from building H-043 (24,400 sq m) to former stable blocks (360 sq m). Other buildings appropriate for light industrial uses.

Eco-business Parks Around 2480 jobs would be provided through the development of new eco-business parks and office accommodation totalling approximately 70,250 sq m of floorspace. Around 18.4 hectares of land is allocated in the draft Framework Masterplan for these employment uses in four main locations dispersed around the town. The following locations benefit from good access via public transport and road networks and short walking and cycling distances from existing and future residential communities: • •

Eastern part of Louisburg Barracks, At Viking Park and wrapping around Woolmer Trading Estate,

West of the town centre core,

Quebec Barracks employment uses will be developed as a mixed use scheme alongside • Residential. In addition, the draft Framework Masterplan proposes to retain the Woolmer and Bordon Trading Estates. Town Centre Employment The development of a new town centre offers considerable employment potential. It is estimated that around 2070 jobs could be provided as a result of the following town centre uses:• Retail • Restaurants, food, takeaways, pubs • Financial / professional services • Office (incorporating managed business space) - a range of flexible office space will be provided within and close to the town centre. Office space must meet the needs of start-up and small growing businesses and adequate grow on space should be phased appropriately to support the growth of local businesses. • Within the town centre office space may be provided above retail units or within retained former MoD buildings. • There is also the potential for council services to be accommodated in office space within the town centre.

61 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


• •

Hotel / tourism. To support the development of the tourism sector within the town. Commercial leisure. Big box leisure such as cinema, or bowling alley could be developed at the edge of the town and within Viking Park.

Home-working Based on current levels of home working within East Hampshire it is estimated that around 1 in 10 new homes could contain a home-worker. Creating a setting for business The proposals for employment space should not be considered in isolation. Creating a location for robust and competitive businesses requires consideration of all forms of economic infrastructure including transport and communication connectivity. In addition to the physical elements of economic infrastructure, a range of softer interventions should be delivered that support the growth of the existing business base and promote Whitehill Bordon more broadly as an investment location. While these fall outside of the remit of the draft Framework Masterplan they are likely to include: business start-up and growth support, training programmes, and targeted inward investment support. In many cases these softer interventions may be situated within the premises proposed here, including business support services

62 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

located within incubator space and training initiatives in the new secondary school. Key next steps to take forward the economic strategy include:• Establish a skills centre • Establish business support networks • Prepare and implement an inward investment strategy • Step-up the level of marketing and promotion to the key sectors identified above


Draft Framework Masterplan - Projected Commercial Land & Premises requirements table: TOWN CENTRE JOBS Town Centre 2,068 Jobs % 38% Total Floorspace 40,972

BUSINESS PARK JOBS Eco-Business Parks 2,482 Jobs % 45% Total Floorspace 72,248 Land-take outside town centre (ha) Gross area (133%) ha

OTHER JOBS Other Jobs

950

% Total Floorspace

17% Nil

Total jobs Total Floorspace

5,500 113,200

14 18.43

TOTALS

Summary of employment proposals for providing around 5500 new jobs Assumptions: % Whitehill Bordon employment in Police, Fire, GPs, Dentists, Education, Social Work = 9% (Annual Business Enquiry) Assumed % of employment housed in social infrastructure / public sector employment = 10% Net Retail Employment Density = 20 (EP Guide to Employment Densities) Gross to Net Assumptions = 20% (Employment Densities: A Simple Guide, English Partnerships)

63 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


Source: AECOM June 2010 Framework Masterplan

Planned for within town centre core. Offices above retail. Retail A3/A5 A2 Financial/ Town Hotel Restaurants, Professional Centre Food, Services Offices Takeaway, Pubs

Edge of Centre/ Viking Park Commercial Leisure

Eco-Business Parks Light Small Industrial Business Units

High Tech

Office

640

Other HomeWorking (relating to 10% of 4000 new homes) 400

Total Employment % of total employment (exc public sector & live/work) Employment Density (jobs per sq m) Gross internal land requirement (sq m)

1,002

308

140

506

50

62

853

589

400

550

18%

6%

3%

9%

1%

1%

16%

11%

7%

12%

7%

10%

24

13

20

20

n/a

n/a

34

32

29

20

n/a

n/a

24,046

4,008

2,805

10,113

n/a

n/a

29,000

18,848

11,600

n/a

n/a

Number of stories External Land Coverage Total Employment Footprint / Land Coverage

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

1

2

2

3

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

30%

50%

40%

50%

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

96,668

18,848

14,500

8,533

n/a

n/a

64 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

Public sector employment (10% of total employment mix)


D Consultation 1.1

1.1

1.2

1.3

Consultation on the draft of the Economic Development and Employment Strategy was undertaken during February and March 2011. Feedback included a dedicated workshop, meetings with local authorities and survey questionnaire which asked the public, community representatives, businesses, voluntary sector and development partners to consider the proposals. All responses and findings have been considered prior to finalising the strategy. Issues raised and our response to them is outlined below. There were a series of observations regarding detail, figures and interpretation. This report has been updated to respond to comments. In particular more references have been included. Some respondents felt that the Economic Development and Employment Strategy was too aspirational, however others felt that it was not ambitious enough. In redrafting we have tried to distinguish more clearly between those aspects of the plan which are ambitious and those which are less so. There was a lot of support for the priorities, themes and actions, however some people found the way in which these were laid out was confusing. In addition some respondents felt that the priorities were not adequately identified. We have reset these chapters to

prioritise seven rather than 12 items and now publish a set of actions which relates to the general themes of the strategy. 1.4

Some people were concerned that this study assumes that the Eco-town will be developed and all the improvements will not be made. It is important to note that this report sits alongside the AECOM masterplan and the further work that has been done during 2011. If the masterplan or studies highlight further challenges or opportunities, or if other aspects of the proposals change then this strategy will in turn change.

1.5

The next step will be for the Economic Development Theme Lead, within the Eco-town team to establish a programme of work to commence the delivery of priority projects. An important part of that next phase of work will be to set up a monitoring regime. This regime will test the assumptions of the masterplan and the strategy with the reality of roll-out.

1.6

We shall continue to consult the community and work with partners and stakeholders.

65 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


E Monitoring 1.1

The monitoring of this project throughout the delivery period, 2011-2036 is of paramount importance. The use of robust performance data will be invaluable to ensure that the initiatives are effective. It will also be important to ensure that consistent monitoring can show a history of achievement, in addition there are national indicators by which we can measure the relative success of the project against other comparator towns.

• • • • • •

1.2

. 1.3

Although a decade apart the census planned for 2011, 2021 and 2031 would provide an important baseline. There is discussion that the 2011 census will be the last conducted in this way. It may be that more accurate up-to-date information will be available to policy makers in the near future. In addition indicators such as the Indices of Multiple Deprivation(IMD) and key district wide indicators of economic activity and prosperity will be evaluated. Because of the scale of the town it is likely that some additional data collection will be required to obtain local data for Whitehill Bordon. Possible economic performance indicators may include: • Percentage of economically active people in employment in Whitehill Bordon • Number of Job Seekers Allowance claimants as a percentage of the resident working age population

66 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

• • • •

1.4

Percentage of Job Seekers Allowance claimants who have been out of work for more than a year Total number of VAT registered businesses in the town at the end of the year Percentage of 15 year olds achieving 5 or more GCSEs at grade A*-C or equivalent Gross weekly pay for full time employees Total number of inward investment enquiries per annum Leverage of external funding as a direct result of partner intervention Area of MoD land made available for reuse in hectares Occupancy rate of industrial and commercial units Annual failure rates of new businesses in the area Number of business support enquiries for advice and information received per annum

The strategy will be annually reviewed to ensure that it remains responsive to emerging opportunities.


F Draft Policies

1.1

1.2

The planned withdrawal of the Bordon Garrison exposes the town to the severe risk of negative economic and social consequences. Equally the closure brings a real prospect of introducing a new purpose and transforming Whitehill Bordon into an examplar Eco-town. This strategy proposes seven primary sectors and projects which together will achieve a mixed and sustainable economy as identified within Section 5: •

Taking advantage of the military legacy

Learning and innovation campus

Taking advantage of the eco-construction boom

New business sector incubator

Encouraging micro-business

Value added food and drink

Establish visitor and eco-tourism activity

Target small and micro business development

The action plan shows how these can be achieved by concentrating on a number of activities. • Low carbon innovation and technology • Business performance and competitiveness • Commercial land and business property • Education skills and training • Environment and infrastructure • Marketing and Investment

1.3

This can only be achieved by partnership working. An important part of the partnership control will be via economic development policies within the East Hampshire District Council Core Strategy Whitehill Bordon Chapters.

1.4

Policies should be established that: • Encourage home working in residential properties • Link the construction of houses to jobs • Encourage business support hubs within neighbourhood centres, (as well as within the town centre) • Support improved access and public transport • Encourage tourism and visitor facilities • Look at ways that local food can be marketed, processed and sold locally.

1.5

As well as ensuring that schemes do not discriminate against protected groups like the disabled, women, ethnic minorities policies will also need to ensure that existing towns people and those residing in the villages are not unfairly disadvantaged by developments. In particular ease of access to facilities will be an important consideration.

1.6

Policies must safeguard the Eco-business parks land, ensuring that there is e range of sites and premises, including land for production/storage of construction materials which are relatively land hungry.

67 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


G Local Economic Partnership 1.1 Local Economic Partnerships (LEPs) were introduced in 2010 following the government’s drive for a business led, rather than public sector driven, approach to economic development. The government is determined that the LEPs will be business focused successors of the Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) which are being abolished from March 2012. Some of the functions of the previous RDAs such as investment funding are likely to pass to the new LEPs. For example, the new Regional Growth Fund is likely to be principally allocated via the LEPs. 1.2 Whitehill Bordon was not included in the geography of the Solent LEP bid, which is now approved. This area covers the south Hampshire sub-region and the Isle of Wight. 1.3 Whitehill Bordon is now included within the Enterprise M3 LEP. This bid was focussed on Basingstoke and covered the north Hampshire sub-region as well as parts of West Surrey. It is closely associated with the remise of various MoD establishments in the area. 1.5 The government is committed to ensuring widespread business support for the new LEPs. 1.6 It will be vital that the town continues to engage with businesses and their intermediaries from a much wider geographical area. No town’s economy exists in isolation to those towns around it.

68 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

1.7 Initial indications are that the new M3 LEP is fulfilling its function well. Whitehill Bordon has been included in the first bid for Enterprise Zone status. Our ambitions for job creation will support the LEP in achieving its own targets.


H Glossary 14-19 consortium

East Hampshire Partnership

AC

HCC

Hampshire County Council

PGS

Planning Gain Supplement

Alton College

HCoC

Hampshire Chamber of Commerce

PPPs

Public Private Partnerships

AECOM

AECOM Consultants

HEA

Hampshire Economic Area

REME

Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

Babcock

Babcock Training

HEIs

Higher Education Institutions

SEME

School of Engineering

BID

Business Improvement District

IMD

Indices of Multiple Deprivation

SBP

Sustainable Business Partnership

BL

Business Link

JC+

Job Centre plus

SDNP

South Downs National Park Authority

CLG

Communities and Local Government

LCP

Local Children’s Partnership

SEEDA

South East of England Development Agency

EHB

East Hampshire Business

LDF

Local Development Framework

SMEs

Small and Medium Sized Enterprises

EHDC

East Hampshire District Council

LEA

Local Education Authority

SOA

Super Output Areas

Ent First

Enterprise First

LEP

Local Enterprise Partnership

Solent LEP

Solent Local Enterprise Partnership

Enterprise M3

Enterprise Partnership

LPIs

Local Performance Indicators

SQW

SQW Consultants Limited

ERDF

European Regional Development Fund

LSOA

Lower Layer Super Output Area Statistics definition for small areas)

UKTI

UK Trade and Investment

FSB

Federation of Small Business

MCCTC

Mill Chase Community Technology College

UoP

University of Portsmouth

M3

14-19

Local

Consortium

Enterprise

(National

10

Electrical

and

FCT

Farnborough College of Technology

MoD DE/DIO

Ministry of Defence, Defence Estates Now termed Defence Infrastructure Organisation

WTP

Whitehill Bordon Town Partnership

GO-SE

Government Office for the South East

NIs

National Indicators

WTC

Whitehill Town Council

69 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy

Mechanical


I Bibliography Whitehill Bordon Economic Potentials Study SQW Consultants

www.whitehillbordon.com/files/whitehill-bordon-economic-potentials-study.pdf

July 2009 (finalised November 2009)

Hampshire Economic Assessment

www3.hants.gov.uk/local_economic_assessment_for_hamsphire_-_draft_14__final___hf000001011332_5.pdf

June 2010

Green Town Vision

www.whitehillbordon.com/whitehill_bordon_opportun/files/green_town_vision_01.pdf

2008

Eco-town Revised Bid

http://whitehillbordon.typepad.com/whitehill_bordon_opportun/files/whitehill_bordon_opportunity_ecotown _bid.pdf

August 2008

Informing our Future Hampshire Economic Partnership Core Strategy East Hampshire District Council East Hants Tourism Action Plan East Hampshire District Council The Whitehill/Bordon Opportunity Revised Baseline Report, GVA,

www.hep.uk.com/informing.php

2010

www.easthants.gov.uk/ehdc/planningpolicy.nsf/webpages/Core+Strategy

2010 2010

Office for National Statistics & NOMIS Whitehill Bordon and Whitehill (ward) Whitehill Bordon Draft Framework Masterplan AECOM

www.easthants.gov.uk/ehdc/formsfordownload.nsf/0/AFF39CD9F9199D968025771400491C54/$File/Tou rism+Action+Plan+201011.pdf Available on request from Whitehill Bordon Eco-town team whitehillbordon@easthants.gov.uk http://tinyurl.com/69vesvp http://tinyurl.com/6gogth4 www.whitehillbordon.com/whitehill_bordon_opportun/masterplan.html

June 2010

East Hampshire Employment and Skills Audit and Action Plan Kingshurst Consulting Whitehill Bordon Eco-town Funding Strategy

www.easthants.gov.uk/ehdc/formsfordownload.nsf/0/95AA4C1CBE01E8CD8025775E00391CE8/$File/An nexes+to+Skills+Audit+2010.pdf Available on reuest from Whitehill Bordon Eco-town team whitehillbordon@easthants.gov.uk

June 2010

Enterprise M3 LEP submission (Revised)

www.basingstoke.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/254BE885-3D93-4029-A6F9B7324482E519/0/EnterpriseM3proposal.pdf www.solentlep.org.uk/Solent_LEP_final.pdf

Dec 2010 Sept 2010

Big Society

www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/big-society

Dec 2010

Forestry in England - DEFRA

ww2.defra.gov.uk/news/2010/10/29/forestry/

October 2010

One Planet Living Bioregional and WWF

www.oneplanetvision.org

2010

Solent LEP submission

70 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

2008 2001 - 2010

2010


J Integrated Impact Assessment 1.1 An integrated impact assessment was carried out in May 2011 to test this strategy against social, economic and environmental impacts. The basis for this is East Hampshire District Council’s standard procedures. 1.2 The strategy will, by its very nature, provide support for local employment opportunities to the Third Sector and will help to create improvements in education, training and work experience opportunities. 1.3 The strategy can also contribute towards positive improvements under the following headings. 1.4 CUSTOMER, COMMUNITY & EQUALITY Employment is very closely linked to health and wellbeing. The assessment identifies a number of areas where the strategy can support other initiatives in particular: • Health and wellbeing • Crime and anti-social behaviour • Equalities and inclusively It is important in future projects initiated as a result of this strategy that consideration is given to these issues. Similarly projects and initiatives could positively contribute to more equality of access to local shops, services, facilities and leisure/recreation facilities.

20,000 population living in surrounding smaller villages. This is discussed in more detail in section three. 1.6 SUSTAINABILITY The very nature of the Eco-town means that sustainability issues are paramount. In particular protection and enhancement of the local environment is seen as an important selling point to encourage new investments. In addition concentration on the green economy and tourism, among others, will naturally support sustainability targets. 1.7 No negative impacts can be identified in relation to health and safety issues or the safeguarding of children and vulnerable adults.

1.5 RURAL COMMUNITIES This report discusses the potential of strategies to positively impact on employment opportunities for the approximately

71 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


FOOTNOTES

1

CLG Viability Analysis of Eco-towns PWC 2009 The most up-to date iteration of the masterplan at the time of writing is the draft Framework Masterplan Whitehill Bordon AECOM June 2010 3 For an up to date version of the Core Strategy refer to www.easthants.gov.uk/planning/policy 4 Hampshire County Council population figures 2001 Lindford and Whitehill parishes – 16,218. Hinterland including the wards of, Selborne(2,214), Headley (5,459), Binsted and Bentley (2,654), Bramshott and Liphook (7,904) and The Hangers and Forest, (2,439) which constitutes over 20,000 further population. 5 HCC Rail Study June 2011 6 For population figures see appendix B 7 For population figures see appendix B 8 See EHDC www.easthants.gov.uk 9 The eco-business parks should provide a minimum of 70,000 . sq m accommodation situated within a 18.4 ha land . allocation: • Louisburg Barracks.(Eastern part) • Viking Park and extension of Woolmer Trading Estate • West of new town centre Quebec Barracks. 10 MoD Defence Estates was renamed Defence Infrastructure Organisation after this report went to press. 2

72 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy


73 Whitehill Bordon Economic development & Employment Strategy


www.whitehillbordon.com Produced by Whitehill Bordon Eco-town Team East Hampshire District Council Penns Place Petersfield Hampshire GU31 4EX 01730 234 329

74 Whitehill Bordon Economic Development & Employment Strategy

Draft Economic Development and Employment Strategy  

For Whitehill Bordon Eco-town

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