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AGRINEWS February 2014 page 01_Layout 1 14-01-31 2:22 PM Page 1

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Requisite owl snapshot

• Feed • Crop Centre • Grain Merchandising • Hardware

Eastern Ontario residents are spotting lots of snowy owls this season, as seen here atop a pole just outside Chesterville. The southerly influx of large numbers of the arctic bird of prey — known as an ‘irruption’ — has coincided with a cold winter punctuated by periods of bitter “polar vortex� weather affecting large areas of the North American continent.

St-Isidore Tel.: 613-524-2828 St-Albert Tel.: 613-987-2152

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 02_Layout 1 14-01-30 2:53 PM Page 1

Page 2 The AgriNews February, 2014

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Soy seed sales both RR and IP trend upward in 2014 Catherine Thompson AgriNews Contributor ASTERN ONTARIO - FROm

E

ThE bEgINNINg OF

SEEd SAlES ThIS pAST FAll TO ThE ENd, AREA SAlES REpRESENTATIvES hAvE NOTIcEd AN INcREASE IN dEmANd FOR SOy cOmpAREd TO cORN.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big desire to go to soybeans and to IP (Identity Preserved) soybeans. The future market prices of corn or corn acres are not favourable to growers,â&#x20AC;? says Richard Lavigne with Summit Seeds in Oxford Station. Lavigne says the corn crop in Eastern Ontario was better than anticipated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a fairly decent crop based on what the Americans and we have in the system. The weather was favourable and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of grains in the system.â&#x20AC;? He says the price of corn tumbled from $240 per tonne to $160 to $180 for next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s harvest. Besides an abundant corn harvest and lower price, other factors in higher soy sales are yield losses and a reversal to strict corn/soy rotation. Increase in Ip beans â&#x20AC;&#x153;They want to go from Round Up technology on corn to conventional or IP soy to alternate their chemical usage. A lot of varieties are sold out,â&#x20AC;? he says. Lavigne explains there is a fear of weed resistance if Round Up is overused and conventional beans require different herbicides. So far, he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen resistance to the second group because of the infrequency (of use). â&#x20AC;&#x153;The world demand is strong for conventional beans. Ontario is in an excellent position to fill the overseas market. Not all acres will go to IP, but this year we have seen great interest,â&#x20AC;? he says. Lavigne adds projected input costs play a part in the decision making, as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cheaper to grow soy than corn, with its high demand for nitrogen. He says the majority of seed is purchased in Nov. to Dec. but some acres are not committed and growers may require additional seed in the spring. What they decide depends on market signals going into planting time. premium an incentive The premium for IP soy over and above the price for crushed soy is another

incentive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year, $500 per tonne was achievable and this year, prices will probably be between $430 and $450. Premiums paid were from $105 to $300 depending on the variety. While itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible to predict what the price will be until the fall, the projection is there will be a lot of soy in North America. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an option for more income,â&#x20AC;?

he says. Area account manager for Dekalb Seeds, Jason MacCuaig, agrees there is an increase. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For some there is a definite shift that way, moreso in the fringe areas like Renfrew and Pontiac County. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more pronounced that way. The percentage of shift in SD&G is not as sharp, but in Eastern Ontario as a whole, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in

the neighbourhood of 10 to 15 per cent.â&#x20AC;? He adds the fringe areas had a couple of tougher growing seasons and with the economics of growing 120 bushels per acre compared to SD&G, the yields werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there to make it worthwhile. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As you go west and south to Hastings, you see a sharper decrease in corn, too, for similar reasons -

the yields arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as high. The commodity prices are low and the production costs are high.â&#x20AC;? MacCuaig says thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still money in corn, but growers have to be sharper in marketing and be sure their production practices are up to par. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commodity prices â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the case,â&#x20AC;? answers Scott Fife, sales representative for Dupont

Pioneer Seeds in Finch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From late Nov. to early Dec. it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as much as 25 or 50 per cent, but more like 15 per cent. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commodity prices. Beans are more attractive than corn. People are responding to the market.â&#x20AC;? Fife expects the new crop of beans will be in the $450 range and $170 to $175 for corn. continued on page 6

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 03_Layout 1 14-01-30 2:55 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 3


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 04_Layout 1 14-01-31 3:07 PM Page 1

The Editorial Page

Page 4 The AgriNews February, 2014

Editorial PED pushback

On-farm vigilance remains the best defense against the porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) virus that has ravaged hog operations in the United States and made a limited appearance in Canada. As most members of the farming community know by now, after circulating in Europe and Asia, the virus was first recognized in the U.S. last April and has now been identified in more than 20 states. Canada’s first case appeared in Middlesex County; two more soon followed in Chatham-Kent. Highly contagious, PED is usually fatal for piglets while older pigs can recover. For the record, PED isn’t considered to be a risk to human health or food safety. According to the experts, Ontario pork remains safe to eat. Even Ontario Premier/Agriculture Minister Kathleen Wynn said as much. She added the province is working with the federal level to take “coordinated, comprehensive action” against PED in support of “this proud Ontario industry”. Putting our money where her mouth is in a limited way, Wynne announced her government would kick in $2-million to improve biosecurity measures at critical points across the province such as assembly yards and truck washing stations: “Biosecurity remains the best tool to protect swine herds.” Toronto and Ottawa have also created a special PED biosecurity program under their joint initiative, Growing Forward 2. It’s to help producers, abattoirs, truckers, and rendering services invest in additional measures to help limit spread of the virus. Ontario will administer the fund and accept applications until March 13. Amy Cronin, chair of Ontario Pork, seems satisfied with the government response to date. The $2-million and creation of a dedicated biosecurity stream will help the sector, Cronin stated. But vigilance begins at home, say two of Eastern Ontario’s leading pork producers as they stand guard against the killer condition and help try to mitigate the effects of negative publicity on the industry. Already devotees of biosecurity, Geri Kamenz of Ventnor and Bruce Hudson of Kinburn have circled the wagons in the face of this latest threat. They’re concerned because contamination can be tracked in by the trucks and boots of drivers delivering pigs across the province, other parts of Canada and into the U.S. Kamenz ships about 1,000 animals a month for processing in Quebec. He says if he can no longer guarantee his customers that his stock is healthy, his sales will dry up overnight. Extra vigilance cleaning and disinfecting trailers from the U.S. is vital, Kamenz insists. Meanwhile, Hudson is keeping trucks out of his barnyard and transporting loads of outbound pigs to them. Time will tell if they, the Ontario industry, are fighting a losing battle.

Breakfast of champions

Unusual in how it came to be, a cheque for $6,315 was presented to Food for All Food Bank during a morning gathering in Prescott recently. The money came from the Grenville Federation of Agriculture and county 4-H and was handed to food bank executive director Bonnie Pidgeon Gommert by federation president Adrian Wynands. It was a substantial amount. It’s not every day that a food bank anywhere receives that kind of cash. But what was truly unusual was how it was raised. And it might just be the beginning! Taking a page from the Canadian Foodgrains Bank manual, last summer local federation members and friends volunteered land, manpower, machinery and services to plant, harvest and market 112 tonnes of soybeans, directing the proceeds into the food bank donation. Whereas the Foodgrains Bank helps the hungry in Africa – a very worthy cause – this project was about supporting the needy closer to home… in fact, right at home. It’s something that farmer Wynands had been contemplating for some time. It began to germinate in a discussion he had over breakfast in a restaurant with Gommert who was then working as a waitress. He even signed on Augusta Township Reeve Mel Campbell for nine acres of municipal land used to grow the beans. Campbell called the project a team effort and is proud that Wynands is talking about expanding it next season to more local sites. He’s also planning to challenge other federation chapters to embark on similar efforts with proceeds going to their respective regional food banks. Not only did Food for All gain, Gommert suggested the agricultural community benefited as well by learning what the food bank does in the community and how important it is to keep the shelves well stocked. It looks like Gommert and Wynands have a lot to discuss. They’ll have to meet for breakfast again real soon.

AgriGab Port of...you know “Port of Presc…. I mean, Port of Johnstown.” That was port manager Robert Dalley answering his phone the other day, proving that the name change now in effect at the St. Lawrence Seaway landmark is taking some getting used to, even for staff. So you can imagine the rampant customer confusion. Dalley agrees there’ll be an adjustment period. Still, he says, the political decision to match the name of the port to its physical location only makes sense. After awhile, it may even become an asset. More important than the name change is how the Edwardsburgh/Cardinal Township property is doing business wise. The answer is fine thank you, with future opportunities looking promising. Dalley said about $6.4-million in gross sales were registered in 2013 representing a slight increase. Some 1.1 million combined tonnes of cargo handled at the facility was 10 per cent higher than in 2012. A $36-million overhaul launched about three years ago is more than half completed, with additional storage capacity installed and the main wharf and retaining wall rebuilt. About $15-million of the money provided by three levels of government remains to be spent on additional reconstruction, new fencing, lighting and advanced security measures. At the moment, though, the priority is replacing lost fish habitat, a sure sign of today’s environmental times. Under a Fish Habitat Compensation Plan developed between the former Port of Prescott, South Nation Conservation and the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne, port management has agreed to excavate and plant four acres of new wetland to replace similar habitat filled in during construction. The arrangement is to satisfy Canada Fisheries Act requirements concerning lost wetland compensation. Because four acres doesn’t cover the total wetland acreage removed, the port will pay for an additional six acres of riverside enhancement called an “embayment” - down the St. Lawrence near Morrisburg, a site owned by the St. Lawrence Parks Commission. Total cost of the two wetland projects is $942,000 and is included in the port upgrade funding. Already underway, wetland construction at Johnstown Bay is expected to be completed this summer, while the Morrisburg project will come later. Longer term plans at Johnstown call for creation of a pedestrian walkway wending its way through the wetland from the wharf to the parking lot of the Bridgeview Restaurant that sits on land which, like the port, is owned by township and overseen by a management committee.

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by Tom VanDusen It took some time to hammer out the deal but Dalley and the committee see wetland compensation as a fair approach to replacing habitat and to clearing the way for the final overhaul. Dalley believes the four-acre aquatic installation to the east of the docks, berths and grain elevator will serve as a community gathering place. As yet, no thought has been given to naming it. He points out that fishermen and women have congregated in the area for generations and the wetland work is partly to encourage various species to remain in the bay to continue the tradition. Access to the wharf itself will soon be restricted by the fencing and gating to be erected according to stricter federal security requirements at shipping locations. After the basic ground work is completed, this spring South Nation staff will create a buffer of trees, shrubs and wildflowers around the new wetland to improve water quality while reducing erosion and surface runoff. Adding aquatic plants such as water lilies, pickerel weed and wild rice will oxygenate the water and improve habitat. Installation of root wads – upturned stumps – and log clusters will provide additional cover and spawning areas while preventing vegetation from clogging the wetland. Although the work is intended mainly to attract fish, a side benefit will be its appeal to other creatures such as waterfowl and turtles. “Ducks eat wild rice and turtles can bask on the root wads,” observes Michelle Cavanagh, SNC fish and wildlife resource technician. “The port is drawing on our expertise from similar fish habitat projects to ensure this project is successful and cost effective,” Cavanagh adds. SNC has authority for clean water protection, flood and erosion control, fish and wildlife habitat enhancement across 4,200 square kms of Eastern Ontario from Prescott north to part of Ottawa, and east to Hawkesbury. “After months of planning, we’re excited to begin construction,” the technician says. SNC will monitor the new wetland while work is underway and will assess it every spring and fall for the next three years to determine which fish species are attracted. Like I said… it’s a sign of the times, port developers and conservationists working hand-in-hand to make a site attractive, fish and critter friendly, and commercially viable all at the same time. Who would have thunk it only a few short years ago!

The AgriNews is Published by Etcetera Publications (Chesterville) Inc. on the first Monday of each month.

Editor & Publisher: Robin R. Morris Staff Writers: Tom VanDusen, Nelson Zandbergen, Pamela Pearson, Jeff Moore Advertising Manager: Julie Lascelle, agrinewsads@gmail.com Advertising Representatives: Norma Smith (613) 213-4006; agrinews.norma@gmail.com, Muriel Carruthers, Christine Lascelle P.O. Box 368, Chesterville, Ont. K0C 1H0 Telephone: 613-448-2321 Fax: 613-448-3260 www.agrinews.ca e-mail: rm@agrinews.ca Annual Subscription $36.75 (HST Included) within Canada All advertisements appearing in The AgriNews are protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without the express written permission of the publisher.


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 05_Layout 1 14-01-30 2:58 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 5

Stormont Agricultural Society

The Stormont Agricultural Society held its annual general meeting Jan. 18 at St. Luke’s Presbyterian Church in Finch. In front is Secretary-Treasurer Barbara-Ann Glaude with (back, from left) 1st Vice Richard Neville, President Michel Glaude and 2nd Vice David Zummach. Absent: Past President Larry Barkley. Zandbergen photo

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 06_Layout 1 14-01-30 3:06 PM Page 1

Page 6 The AgriNews February, 2014

Soy seed sales trend up Continued from Page 2 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more corn per acre than beans. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ratio between the two that counts, but the price has been dropping for a while through the growing season. From the harvest in 2012, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dropped about $100 a tonne,â&#x20AC;? he says. With most of his soybean sales complete before Christmas, Fife doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect this will change before planting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no guarantee prices wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be different come harvest time,â&#x20AC;? he adds. Shifts are minor For OMAFRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crop specialist Gilles Quesnel, the shifts â&#x20AC;&#x153;are minor compared to other parts of the province.â&#x20AC;? Of the two soybean sectors, the crushed soybeans go to soybean meal and oil and IP for the export edible market in Japan, China and Europe. Although a large part of the soybean crop is crushed soy from GMO or Round Up Ready, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;significant acreage is contracted for IP soy. On the other side of the equation, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fairly large livestock sector in Eastern Ontario. A number of cash croppers are also dairy farmers and use part of the corn crop for grain corn or sileage. So the balance swings from corn to soy or soy to corn.â&#x20AC;? Although there are some swings in acreage, Quesnel believes the percentage is less than 10 per cent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a moving target. Farmers keep their eye on the prices of next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crop for soy and corn. If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a 15 per cent

increase, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean a 15 per cent decrease for corn. The cereal crop acreage is going down too,â&#x20AC;? he adds. He explains fusarium on wheat was severe three years ago but 2012 was a dry year and the wheat was very good. But fusarium was high again in June 2013. With the fluctuating wheat grades came a shift from cereal acreage. Also, as livestock herds were sold, some acreage went from forage or hay to soy. Not a zero sum game â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever the increase in soybean sales does not mean the same reduction in corn,â&#x20AC;? he explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the livestock base, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re anchored. A percentage of corn is needed no matter what. Some soybean increase comes at the expense of forage, cereals and new land going into production.â&#x20AC;? With good corn weather over the past five years and improved genetics, the corn yield in Eastern Ontario has been far greater than soybeans, he adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twenty years ago, 150 bushels per acre for corn was good. Now, farmers want 200 bushels. You can get 1.5 tonnes of soy per acre compared to 4 tonnes or more for corn. But the prices for soy are three times higher.â&#x20AC;? Since growing corn can use 120 to 150 lb. of nitrogen per acre, at an estimated $.60 a lb., the fertilizer costs add up. But as a legume, soy fixes nitrogen from the air. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because of the livestock and IP base, a

certain amount of acreage does not shift. It shifts because of the price. A lot of acres went to corn and now the difference in price gives farmers the opportunity to rebalance the crop,â&#x20AC;? Quesnel adds. Benefits of rotation But farmers â&#x20AC;&#x153;canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily decide to grow what pays the most.â&#x20AC;? Corn root worm can become a problem if producers grow corn year after year in the same field. Likewise if a farmer grows soy on the same ground for several years, pests can affect the yield. Quesnel says they have to consider the benefits of rotation, the demands of livestock and the influences of commodity prices. Farmers must also decide whether to go

www.agrinews.ca to IP soy because of higher premiums or with GMO soy. The problem is that some IP varieties yield as well and some less and the farmer has to weigh the premium versus less yield. He adds they also have to choose between Round Up Ready soy that is glyphosate tolerant or IP soy, which is treated with other herbicides. But some weeds have developed resistance to this second group of herbicides. And while some IP producers also grow crushed soy, they have to be careful not to contaminate the IP product. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Eastern Ontario thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a diversified market for conventional and crushed soy. Both markets are great and the same with corn,â&#x20AC;? Quesnel concludes.

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7 OF MANY FORD 7000 80 hp cab 2wd ........................................SOLD CIH 886 90 hp cab 2wd ...................... $12,900 $7,900 JD 2350 55 hp loader 2wd .................. $10,500 $7,500 A/C 5040 40 hp ...................................... $4,900 $3,400 JD 1640 2wd loader .............................$11,900 $9,400 White 2-105 with cab ............................ $9,800 $7,950 Deutz DX120 4wd cab ......................... $12,500 $10,500

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EXCAVATORS 1 OF 3 70581 T KUBOTA KX41 3900 lb mini ................$11,500

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SKID STEERS 1 OF 9 70185 W Case 1835C Diesel ................................ $9,800

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SPREADERS 3 OF 8 69695 B NH 520 sng axle .........................................................SOLD 71075 W IDEAL slurry side disch........................ $5,900 $3,900  : 1+WDJDWHĂ RWWLUHV ....................... $8,550 $5,400

COMPACT TRACTOR 1 OF 8 67351 B MF 1010 Dsl 2wd gear ......................... $3,800

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PACKERS 1 OF 8 70535 W BLANK 13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; truck tire packer ................ $1,200

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 07_Layout 1 14-01-30 3:08 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 7

Building a culture of farm safety Organic growers: Mark OUR Readers WRITE Feb. 22 on your calendar

Annual Eco Farm Day in Cornwall Catherine Thompson AgriNews Contributor ORNWALL - IF yOu’RE AN ORgAN-

C

IC FARmER IN

EAsTERN ONTARIO, mARK sAT., FEB. 22, ECO FARm DAy As A musT DO EvENT ON yOuR CALENDAR. Organized by the Canadian Organic Growers (Ottawa-St. LawrenceOutaouais Chapter), the annual event provides informative sessions, panels and workshops to farmers and those interested in organic agriculture. “The goal is to have programs full of information and interactive sessions,” says Simon Neufeld, new conference chair. “This will give an opportunity to both experienced farmers and beginners to share ideas and questions.” Neufeld moved here from Manitoba where he worked as an agronomist for a large potato farm. He is now an agronomist with Tom Manley’s Homestead Organics. Last year, Neufeld took over the reins of EFD committee from Manley, who was honoured by COG with the 2013 Outstanding Volunteer Award for 14 years of service. Neufeld says the committee is working together with organizations that are sponsoring parts of the program. Organic Meadows is sponsoring forage specialist Guy Forand’s talk on incorporating profitable forages to field crop rotation and Dr. Susan Beal, on the topic of organic herd health management. Also, the University of Guelph, Alfred Campus is sponsoring presentations by Dr. Renee Bergeron and Dr. Elsa Vasseur on animal welfare issues in organic production A market gardening panel sponsored by the Eco Farmers of Ontario features Matt Holmes, with the COG Trade Association. Holmes is to respond to recent news reports about pesticide residues in organic produce. Other speakers include

Ian Stutt, Patchwork Gardens, from the Kingston area, and Jean Martin Fortier, who will address high intensity small-scale market gardening. Ken Taylor, who spoke at last year’s event, will discuss perennial genetics for organic production. Others include: Peter Kevan on pollinators in organic production, Jodi Koberinsky on the successful promotion of organics for health. There will be a presentation on the Bauta seed initiative on Canadian seed security and heritage grain production. “We’re very excited about the people who come. They have a lot of practical experience. Our goal with the programs is to put something together that will give something practical to farmers that will help take the industry forward. The demand has increased to $3-billion in organic sales in 2012. We want to help the industry meet that demand coupled with the ongoing demand for food that is healthy and safe,” says Neufeld. He adds the session is to help farmers achieve success, not only in organic agricultural production, but also on the dollars and cents side of their operations. “It has to work for them at all levels for the longterm health of the organic agricultural industry.” Set at the Ramada Inn, this is a one-day event that opens at 8 a.m. with registration and trade show setup. The programs start at 9 a.m. and run to 5 p.m. Highlight of the day is the organic lunch from noon to 1:30 p.m. and there are a couple of intervals to visit the trade show. Interested participants can register on-line at ecofarmday.ca or mail a form from the website and postmarked by Feb. 10, with a cheque or money order. Cost is $56.50 for adults, or $67.80 at the door, $45.10 for COG/Organic Meadow member or $56.50 at the door, $28.25 for student,

and $33.90 for senior. No charge for a child 12 and under. Cheques should be made out to COG-OSO chapter and mailed to Gary Weinhold, 1895 St. Felix Rd, Bourget ON, KOA 1EO.

The Editor: Thank you for your ongoing coverage of farm injuries and deaths.  I agree that it is important to publicize these unfortunate events as they will provide other producers an opportunity to see just how easily an accident can happen and that ultimately it CAN happen.  My husband and I farm in nearby Durham Region where we have recently also lost a very young,

 

innovative and vibrant producer to a farming-related accident and saw two others badly injured in a separate farming accident only a few weeks prior.  It is my hope that by publicizing these unfortunate situations, all producers will take a moment to consider how they go about their next ‘task’ with theirs

and other’s safety in mind.  As producers, there is so much to be learned from each other as we start to build a ‘culture of safety’ in primary agriculture. Sincere regards,

Karen Barkey  On Farm Coordinator Durham Farm and Rural Family Resources

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www.ottawafarmshow.com


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 08_Layout 1 14-01-30 3:13 PM Page 1

Page 8 The AgriNews February, 2014

From bees to drones, Crop Conference has something for everyone Catherine Thompson AgriNews Contributor EMPTVILLE EVEry yEar, ThE EasTErn OnTarIO CrOP COnfErEnCE OffErs

K

a hOsT Of TOPICs TO hELP PrOduCErs PLan ThE nExT grOwIng sEasOn.

Scheduled Feb. 20 at the W.B. George Centre, Kemptville Campus, University of Guelph, the conference will address 27 subjects in all, including some new and some old favourites. New this year is Bee Aware led by Tracey Baute, an entomologist with OMAF and the Ministry of Rural Affairs, who works with the University of Guelph conducting tests on lubricants for insecticides to reduce dust during planting. “This is about the concerns over declining bee populations from the growers’ standpoint. There are a lot of views on what’s impacting bees, from a virus to insecticides. A lot is known on toxicity, but unfortunately there’s not as much data from the production side. Certain vacuum planters release more dust than others,” says OMAF crop specialist Gilles Quesnel, who is organizing the event with Scott Banks. Odette Menard with the Quebec Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food will discuss Invaluable Earthworm Building Organic Matter and Nutrient Recycling. “Earthworms remove residue from the soil surface and help build soil structure and drainage. She will discuss how they are affected by tillage and give ideas to growers how to promote a better environment and the importance of keeping soils healthy and the role earthworms play,” Quesnel says. A new topic is Unmanned Air Vehicles What can UAV’s do for Crop Production? with Trevor Crowe, Crowe Productions, explaining a potential new service for farmers. “It’s about little planes taking aerial photographs and the role this can play in crop production, the cost and options. He’ll talk about how to hire a drone, what is needed to fly it, the type of picture it takes and what to do with it. It will

give a perspective to growers, depending on the type of farm and the service,” Quesnel explains. “This is exploratory. I don’t expect a lot of farmers will turn around and hire one. It’s about what we’ll see in the next few years and is it something of value?” he adds. Other topics of interest are Human Resources on the Farm and Ask the HR expert! led by Peter Sykanda, OFA and Gary Mawhiney, HR consultant. “Last year we weren’t sure how much interest we’d have, but there was a lot more than we thought, because more farmers have employees. The presenters did a good job,” Quesnel says. The first session deals with costs associated with non-compliance, employee departure, retraining and safety risk. The second is an in-depth look at the human resources on the farm. Also on the agenda is Growing Forward 11, which Quesnel describes as “a great program for your farm.” Anne Marie Diotte, of OMAF and MRA, will explain this federally funded program that is administered by the Ontario Soil and Crop Association, with support from OMAF. There are three sections, with one on physical structure, environmental improvements and better efficiency. Farmers apply for each project, which is assessed on its own merit. Returning every year is the ever popular Market Outlook by Victor A. Aideyan with HISGRAIN Commodities Inc. This is a grains and oil seeds outlook with marketing strategies for 2014. “It will be less positive than in the past. It’s hard to predict, but we don’t expect the same frenzy for corn and soy. Corn prices in 2013 dropped quicker than soy, but soy dropped some too,” says Quesnel. “Of course, he’ll refer to the new corn and soy prices.” If finances are a priority, Crop Budgeting with John Molenhuis, OMAF and MRA will work through production estimates and compare different scenarios to come to profitable decisions. This is a hands on

www.agrinews.ca workshop at a computer that you sign up for at preregistration. Producers can update themselves on subjects like Weed Management in Field Crops with Peter Sikkema, University of Guelph and Soybean Strategies - Do’s and Don’ts of High Yields by Horst Bohner with OMAF, MRA and Dave Hooker, University of

Guelph, Ridgetown. Scott Banks and Ron Lackey, both with OMAF, MRA will talk about Corn Silage Fungicides and Mycotoxins and Jack Kyle, also with OMAF and MRA, will present a session on Rotational Grazing - How to Get More from your Land, not just More Land. The conference opens with registration at 8:30

a.m. and closes at 4:50 p.m. A box lunch is included with pre-registration before Feb. 7 and allows you to attend sessions through the noon hour. The fee also includes refreshments and conference proceedings. You can pre-register on line at the Eastern Ontario Crop Conference website www.ontariosoilcrop.org/do cs/brochure_20feb or by

WESTEEL WIDE-CORR Make it your choice

calling for more information at 613-258-8295. If you register before Feb. 7, the adult fee is $55, $50 for OSCIA members, and $25 for students. Registration after Feb. 7 is $65 per person and walk-in is $70. Mail the form and cheque payable to Eastern Ontario Crop Advisory Committee, c/o OMAF, Box 2004, Kemptville ON, K0G 1J0.

Call the agri-products dealer near you! CRYSLER

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SEELEY’S BAY

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 09_Layout 1 14-01-31 10:38 AM Page 1

www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 9

2013 Ontario Hybrid Corn Field Trials

T

OnTariO COrn COmmiTTee is made up Of reprehe

senTaTives Of

Heat Units Available for Corn Production in Ontario Notes: Corn Heat Unit ratings for all areas of the province are based on the average heat unit accumulation for the period from May 1 to the date in the fall when the long-term average daily temperature falls below 12C or an occurrence of -2C, whichever comes first.

agriCulTure and agri fOOd Canada, The OnTariO minisTry Of agriCulTure and fOOd, The universiTy Of guelph, The OnTariO sOil and CrOp imprOvemenT assOCiaTiOn, The grain farmers Of OnTariO, The seed COrn grOwers Of OnTariO and The Canadian seed Trade assOCiaTiOn. Tests are conducted each year by the following cooperating agencies: Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph, Ridgetown; Plant Agriculture Department, Continued on page 11

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 10_Layout 1 14-01-31 11:30 AM Page 1

Page 10 The AgriNews February, 2014

www.agrinews.ca

Interpretation of results index The index in the tables indicates a percent of the average of all hybrids included in the trial(s). Index figures above 100 reflect the percentage by which a hybrid is above the average, whereas index figures below 100 show the percent below average. Small differences in index (i.e. less than the LSD shown at the bottom of the table) are not significant. When a hybrid consistently has a higher index over two years, this difference is probably real and should be considered when choosing a hybrid. Hybrid selection should be based on the most data available. Greater emphasis should be put on averages from several locations and years because these provide a more accurate prediction of future performance than do single location results. The average yield for each table is given in bushels per acre. You can calculate the actual yield for a hybrid by multiplying the average yield times its yield index and dividing by 100. The average test weight is given in kg/hl (kilograms per hectoliter). You can calculate the actual test weight

of a hybrid by multiplying the average test weight times its test weight index and dividing by 100. Within each table, hybrids are identified by brand and/or hybrid number or name. Hybrids are listed in approximate order of maturity based on heat unit ratings provided by the companies. Corn Heat Units Ratings for all areas of the province are based on the average heat unit accumulation for the period from May 1 to the date in the fall when the long-term average daily temperature falls below 12C or an occurrence of -2C, whichever comes first. Hybrid heat unit ratings have been assigned by the sponsoring company. % Lodging - â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lodged Plantsâ&#x20AC;? includes plants with stalks that are broken below the ear and plants leaning such that the ear is in the adjacent row or otherwise unharvestable. Because all hybrids in a trial are harvested on the same date, the early hybrids within each table tend to show a greater amount of stalk breakage than do later hybrids. Stalk strength should be compared only with hybrids of the

same maturity. % Moisture - The accuracy of moisture measurement decreases as moisture content increases. Results for hybrids with very high moisture contents should be interpreted with caution. LSD (0.10) - The LSD is a measure of variability within the trial. There is a ninety percent probability that yield indices that differ by an amount greater than the LSD are different. Yield indices that differ by an amount less than or equal to the LSD should be considered to be equal. Managing Bt Corn When using Bt corn, it is imperative that a refuge area of non-Bt corn be planted near the Bt corn to reduce the risk of developing insect resistance to Bt. A list of potential refuge hybrids and information related to the practices that must be followed to comply with current regulations can be obtained from the Canadian Corn Refuge Hybrid Selector at www.refugeselector.ca Hybrids identified with an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oâ&#x20AC;? in the Notes column are available with a refuge hybrid included.

Explanation of codes for special genetic traits Code

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Resistant to Corn Rootworm

D

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R W

Resistant to Western Bean Cutworm

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nOvember 28, 2013.

must be delivered to a marAlthough the Ontario ket that will not ship the Corn Committee believes grain or its processed prodthe information contained in this report to be accurate, ucts to Europe. For more information, contact your growers are strongly urged seed supplier. Information to consult dealers of the regarding the genetic traits respective hybrids and carried by all commercially products, before making available hybrids and their purchasing or management acceptability for export can decisions. All hybrids included in this report have also be obtained from the Canadian Seed Trade been fully approved for Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; List of Corn food and feed use in Canada and the United N0J 1E0 Hybrids Commercially 1-519-842-5538 Available in Canada â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at States. However, a number have not been approvedN0P for 2L0 http://cdnseed.org/list-of1-877-682-1720 corn-hybrids/ use in the European Union. Corn harvested from these K9V 4S3 1-800-661-GROW non-EU approved hybrids

Seed Corn Dealers Brand or Identification

Country Farm DEKALB Elite Horizon Hyland Maizex Mycogen Seeds NK Brand PICKSEED Pioneer PRIDE Seeds

Company

Country Farm Seeds Ltd. Monsanto Canada Inc. La Coop federee Horizon Seeds Canada Inc. Hyland Seeds Maizex Seeds Inc. Dow AgroSciences Canada Inc. Syngenta Seeds Inc. PICKSEED Pioneer Hi-Bred Limited AgReliant Genetics Inc.

Address of Canadian Sponsor

Box 790, Blenheim, ON N0P 1A0 120 Research Lane, Suite 101, Guelph, ON N1G 0B4 9001, Blvd. de L'Acadie, Montreal, QC H4N 3H7 531 Bostwick Rd., Courtland, ON N0J 1E0 P.O. Box 1090, 5 Hyland Dr., Blenheim, ON N0P 1A0 4488 Mint Line, R.R.#2, Tilbury, ON N0P 2L0 397 rue Claude, Ile Bizard, QC H9C 2S7 15910 Medway Rd., R.R.#1, Arva, ON N0M 1C0 1 Greenfield Road, Lindsay, ON K9V 4S3 Box 730, 7398 Queens Line, Chatham, ON N7M 5L1 P. O. Box 1088, 6836 Pain Court Line, Chatham, ON N7M 5L6

Telephone

1-800-449-3990 1-800-667-4944 1-514-384-6450 1-519-842-5538 1-800-265-7403 1-877-682-1720 514-823-9611 1-800-756-SEED 1-800-661-GROW 1-800-265-9435 1-519-354-3210

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 11_Layout 1 14-01-31 10:42 AM Page 1

www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 11

2013 Trial Locations and General Information - Ontario Hybrid Corn Performance Trials 5 Year Heat See Table Heat Unit Unit Average š Number Rating

Location

Alma Orangeville Elora Lindsay Winchester T2 Wingham Lancaster Ottawa Winchester Blyth Dublin Waterloo Exeter Ilderton Thorndale Woodstock Belmont Kerwood West Lorne Ridgetown Tilbury Dresden

1 1 2 2 2 2 3E 3E 3E 3W 3W 3W 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6

2700 2700 2800 2800 3000 2800 3000 3000 3000 3000 3000 2900 3050 3100 3150 3150 3250 3200 3335 3450 3650 3500

2013 CHU Total ²

2793 2733 2831

ECB Rating Âł Soil Type

2737 2714 2751 N/A 2878 2802 2952 2962 2878 2931 2991 2970 3037 2978 3044 3007 3141 3151 3287 3442 3464 3367

2946 2841 2916 3100 2946 2924 2943 2913 2957 3090 3017 3059 2991 3041 3051 3449 3473

L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L

Final plants per Date acre 4 planted 5

Co-operator

Listowel Loam Sandy Loam Silt Loam Clay Loam Clay Loam Harriston Loam Silt Loam Granby Sandy Loam Clay Loam Clay Loam Silt Loam Sandy Loam Clay Loam Silt Loam Silt Loam Loam Loam Clay Loam Clay Loam Sandy Loam Clay Loam

Eastep Farms Ltd Woodrill Farms Ltd. University of Guelph Ed Bagshaw Univ of Guelph - Kemptville Campus Rob Warwick Peter Van Sleeuwen Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Univ of Guelph - Kemptville Campus Heinrich Farms Al Murray Rosendale Farms Ltd. Cliff Hicks John Walls Pat Elliot University of Guelph Peter Gredig Dave Bolton Sanden Acres Ltd. U. of G. - Ridgetown Dan Sullivan Brent McFadden

Date Harvested

32000 May 09 Oct 30 32000 May 04 Nov 19 32000 May 08 Oct 28 32150 May 08 Nov 05 32000 May 10 Nov 08 32000 May 08 Nov 07 32000 May 08 Nov 05 discarded due to variability discarded due to flooding 32000 May 07 Nov 05 32000 May 08 Nov 05 32000 May 06 Oct 15 32000 May 06 Nov 09 discarded due to erosion 32000 May 06 Nov 16 32000 May 14 Nov 04 32000 May 15 Nov 16 32000 May 08 Nov 14 32000 May 13 Nov 20 32000 May 06 Nov 08 32000 May 09 Nov 15 32000 May 07 Nov 14

Notes: 1 Average total heat unit accumulation 2008 - 2012, inclusive. 2 Total heat unit accumulation at location from day of planting to either occurrence of killing frost ( -2 C) or 30-year average end-of-season date. 3 European Corn Borer rating: N = None L =Low M = Moderate H = High. 4 These populations may not be suitable for your farm. 5 All trials planted in 30 inch row widths.

2013 Ontario Hybrid Corn Performance Trial Management Information Location Alma

Previous Table Crop 1 Barley

Tillage Fall Soil Saver

Spring Cultivator

P LR

Soil Test Ratings K pH MR 7.4

Fertilizer Applications N P2O5 K2O 123 45 22

Orangeville

1

Potatoes

Cultivator

MR

MR

6.9

132

45

22

Elora

2

Wheat

Disc Ripper

Cultivator

RR

RR

7.5

158

45

22

Lindsay

2

Soybeans

RTS

RTS, Cultivator

LR

MR

7.7

160

65

82

Winchester T2

2

Soybeans

Plow

Cultivator x2

180

38

15

170

48

24

Wingham

2

Soybeans

None

Cultivate

Lancaster

3E

Soybeans

Deep Tillage

Cultivator x2

LR

MR

7.6

Blyth

3W

Soybeans

Disk

Cultivate

MR

LR

7.6

170

48

24

Dublin

3W

Soybeans

None

Cultivate

LR

MR

7.5

170

48

24

Waterloo

240

3W

Wheat

Chisel

Cultivator

RR

LR

7.6

179

123

103

Exeter

4

Winter Wheat

Plow

Cultivate

LR

MR

6.4

170

48

24

Thorndale

4

Plow

Cultivate

RR

RR

6.8

175

48

24

Woodstock

4

Winter Wheat Wheat

Soil Saver

Cultivator

LR

MR

7.2

171

85

62

Belmont

5

Soybeans

N/A

Cultivated

HR

MR

6.5

175

52

30

Kerwood

5

Soybeans

n/a

Cultivate

RR

LR

7.6

175

52

30

West Lorne

5

Soybeans

Chisel Plow

Cultivate

MR

RR

6.9

175

52

30

Ridgetown

6

Soybeans

Chisel Plow

Cultivate

MR

MR

6

175

52

30

Tilbury

6

Soybeans

Verticle Till

Cultivate

MR

RR

7.3

175

52

30

Dresden

6

Soybeans

n/a

Cultivate

MR

RR

6.1

175

52

30

Table 2: Elora, Lindsay, Winchester, Wingham

CHU 2400 2450 2475 2500 2525 2550 2550 2550 2550 2575 2575 2600 2600 2625 2625 2650 2650 2650 2650 2650 2650 2650 2675 2675 2675 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2725 2750 2750 2750 2750 2750 2750 2750 2775 2775 2775 2775 2775 2800 2800 2800

Brand and/or Hybrid Pioneer P8193AM DEKALB DKC32-92RIB Pioneer P8210HR DEKALB DKC33-78RIB Maizex MZ 2333DBR Maizex MZ 211X Pioneer P8651HR Pioneer P8673HR Pioneer P8673XR DEKALB DKC34-47RIB DEKALB DKC35-54RIB Hyland, Mycogen 8180RA Pioneer P8622AM DEKALB DKC36-30RIB Hyland 8201RA Hyland, Mycogen 8202RA Maizex MZ 266X Maizex MZ 2988DBR NK Brand N20Y-3000GT Pioneer P8906AM Pioneer P8906XR PRIDE Seeds A5433G3 RIB DEKALB DKC38-03RIB NK Brand N21J-3000GT PICKSEED PS 2750RR Country Farm CF310 Country Farm CF327 DEKALB DKC39-97RIB Hyland, Mycogen 8295RA NK Brand N23K-3000GT NK Brand N23M-3110 PICKSEED PS 2751GSX RIB PICKSEED PS 2792VT2P RIB Pioneer P9329AM PRIDE Seeds A5909G2 RIB Horizon HZ 850GT DEKALB DKC42-42RIB Horizon HZ 878 Maizex MZ 3066DBR NK Brand N27B-3111 PICKSEED PS 2711VT2P Pioneer 38N94AM PRIDE Seeds A6011RR Country Farm CF370R Hyland HL CVR48 Maizex MZ 3202SMX PICKSEED PS 2759 Pioneer P9526AM Country Farm CF409 DEKALB DKC43-10RIB Elite E64H22 R

Notes WBRLO BRO WBRL BRO BRO WBRL WBRL WBDRL BRO BRO WBDRLO WBRLO BRO WBDRLO WBDRLO BRO WBDRO WBRLO WBDRL BDRO BRO WBDRO R WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO BDRL WBDRO WBDRLO BRO WBRLO BRO R WBDRLO WBDRO BRO WBDRL BR WBRLO R R BDR WBDRLO WBRLO WBDRLO BRO BRO

Herbicide Applications Product Rate Date Primextra 3.5l/ha May 27 Callisto 0.3l/ha May 27 Primextra II MAC 4.0l/ha May 03 Callisto 0.3l/ha May 27 Primextra 4.0l/ha May 16 Callisto 0.3l/ha May 16 Callisto 122 ml/ac Primextra 1.0 L/ac Primextra II Magnum 4 L/ha May 28 Callisto .3 L/ha May 28 Converge 480 Converge Flexx Ultim Callisto Aatrex NIS Primextra Callisto Converge 480 Converge Flexx Accent Primextra Callisto Converge 480 Converge Flexx Distinct Primextra Callisto Primextra Callisto Option Callisto Aatrex 28% Option Calisto Aatrex 28% Option Calisto Aatrex 28% Option Calisto Aatrex 28% Option Calisto Aatrex 28% Option Calisto Aatrex 28%

May 17 May 17 Jun 04 Jun 04 Jun 04 Jun 04 May 04 Jun 04 May 16 May 16 Jun 26 May 06 May 21 May 17 May 17 Jun 08 May 03 Jun 05 May 15 May 15 Jun 01 Jun 01 Jun 01 Jun 01 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16 May 17 May 17 May 17 May 17 May 17 May 17 May 17 May 17

pre pre post post pre pre post post post post ppi post pre pre post pre post pre pre post ppi post pre pre post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post post

Jun 128

Rainfall (mm) Jul Aug 116 43

Sep 97

Total 491

167

85

148

113

105

618

106

126

161

101

201

May 107

695 N/A

61

165

104

58

178

566

94

71

116

71

203

119

69

91

441

94

206

693

25

115

75

20

120

75

143

89

447

130

170

515

72

138

110

68

63

115

65

97

482

48

116

81

85

410

80

81

94

104

421

110

77

60

147

498

73

122

114

78

123

510

58

65

100

44

122

389

96

101

53

102

104

456

64

102

79

53

90

388

60

65

88

25

83

321

75

105

46

23

98

347

2013 averages²

average of 6 trials

average of 4 trials

Moist %

Ldg %

Test Wt Index

89

23.0

6

103

97 101 84

24.2 24.6 24.3

2 9 12

102 98 106

91

25.3

2

97

95 99 98 98 95 96

28.0 25.0 25.0 22.8 25.5 25.1

3 4 4 7 5 5

97 101 99 103 101 103

103 93 101

25.8 24.3 25.5

5 7 3

101 102 100

95

26.2

7

98

104

27.1

2

99

101 100

25.7 27.3

2 9

103 101

101

26.0

8

101

100 100

26.7 25.8

9 8

102 101

96 105 107

27.1 27.4 28.0

5 4 7

103 100 95

104 109

28.3 27.0

3 2

100 99

Yield Index 81 91 89 94 96 102 82 98 93 95 95 90 97 98 95 96 98 96 99 96 96 103 100 95 100 94 97 102 95 99 96 105 105 102 100 101 108 106 100 102 99 100 99 93 97 103 110 104 102 108 103

Continued from page 9 University of Guelph; Kemptville Campus, University of Guelph, Kemptville; and Agriculture and AgriFood Canada at Ottawa. TESTING METHODS Hybrids entered in the Hybrid Corn Performance Trials are selected by the seed companies. A testing fee is charged per hybrid per replication. A hybrid must be entered in all trials within a table. In each trial, hybrids are replicated in a suitable experimental design. Trials are machine planted with an excess of seed

Moist % 22.2 23.2 22.6 23.1 24.0 24.4 23.9 23.0 23.0 24.7 24.7 24.7 24.9 24.8 25.2 27.7 24.4 24.5 22.6 24.9 25.0 25.4 25.4 24.3 25.0 24.0 24.6 25.4 26.4 25.1 25.8 26.8 26.3 26.6 24.8 27.2 28.2 24.2 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.7 25.0 23.8 26.6 27.7 27.5 27.3 28.8 27.0 27.8

Ldg % 16 6 9 3 3 13 18 7 6 1 3 3 8 4 4 4 5 6 10 7 7 2 7 11 4 9 6 4 11 18 10 3 2 8 2 13 1 10 11 12 8 13 12 7 7 6 10 19 4 3 1

Results of 2013 Performance Trials ELORA Test Wt Index 105 102 103 105 102 97 106 100 101 102 103 97 101 100 101 97 101 98 102 101 103 102 101 102 99 98 104 101 98 100 98 99 101 102 104 101 99 98 101 96 101 102 102 101 103 101 95 100 100 99 98

Yield Index 80 98 90 91 97 100 91 101 93 97 95 88 96 93 95 97 99 99 95 102 98 106 101 95 98 92 98 106 97 94 97 102 105 101 102 104 104 99 102 103 102 101 100 89 93 104 103 104 105 114 103

Moist % 25.7 27.0 26.4 26.5 28.8 26.1 28.5 26.9 26.8 27.7 29.0 29.5 28.4 28.6 27.7 32.3 28.2 28.0 24.1 28.5 28.4 29.5 29.5 27.5 28.1 28.3 30.0 29.6 31.9 28.2 30.0 30.3 31.1 31.6 28.6 31.6 32.8 28.4 31.5 31.0 31.6 31.6 29.6 26.3 31.0 32.9 31.6 31.5 32.8 30.9 33.0

LINDSAY Ldg % 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0

Yield Moist Index % 80 21.0 86 23.0 83 20.9 98 22.5 97 22.5 112 22.7 89 21.3 104 21.8 100 21.7 93 24.6 93 24.5 92 23.8 97 26.4 110 24.8 95 26.0 91 27.6 92 24.6 90 25.9 109 23.5 96 25.4 96 25.0 97 25.9 96 24.8 95 25.6 105 26.0 99 23.1 94 23.9 102 25.5 96 24.8 111 25.9 103 25.6 96 27.1 97 25.5 96 25.2 93 24.0 97 26.8 110 28.4 118 23.1 96 25.5 111 23.2 104 26.7 103 25.7 98 24.2 104 24.7 106 25.9 99 26.1 109 28.1 108 27.2 92 28.5 106 26.2 100 27.6

WINCHESTER T2 Ldg % 4 5 8 4 3 16 6 8 5 1 6 0 8 3 3 4 4 6 9 1 6 3 7 2 3 6 5 4 3 10 7 0 3 10 5 4 1 7 22 9 13 7 7 6 1 4 7 19 6 0 1

Yield Moist Index % 87 19.4 92 19.1 92 20.7 94 20.0 94 20.5 98 22.7 83 21.6 101 20.7 92 20.4 94 22.2 90 21.2 94 21.8 97 20.1 99 21.2 102 23.3 97 24.6 98 21.0 96 20.8 91 21.3 96 21.8 95 22.1 102 21.5 101 21.8 92 21.1 100 21.1 90 21.1 100 20.9 106 22.0 93 24.2 94 22.2 90 23.8 107 23.4 104 22.1 103 23.9 101 21.6 96 24.6 113 24.1 102 21.9 99 21.7 98 26.1 94 22.5 99 23.8 95 21.1 87 20.9 95 22.6 101 24.6 104 25.4 104 24.2 109 25.4 105 24.5 105 23.7

Ldg % 36 4 3 0 4 17 40 6 6 0 0 1 14 0 5 1 7 7 13 10 1 2 3 32 1 6 4 4 24 21 4 4 1 14 1 10 2 10 11 19 3 20 12 12 14 7 13 20 1 1 1

75$&7256)25/($6( $OO1HZ+ROODQG

2013 Ontario Hybrid Corn Performance Trials - Conducted by the Ontario Corn Committee

2012-2013 averagesš

Yield Index

1.67L/ha 330ml/ha 33 g/ha .21 L/ha .58 L/ha 2L/1000L 3L/ha .21L/ha 1.67L/ha 330ml/ha 33.4g/ha 3.5l/ha 0.3l/ha 1.67L/ha 330ml/ha 285g/ha 4L/ha .21L/ha 3.5l/ha 0.3l/ha 0.63 L/ac 0.085 L/ac 0.235 L/ac 1L/ac 0.63L/ac 0.085L/ac 0.235L/ac 1L/ac 0.63L/ac 0.085L/ac 0.235L/ac 1L/ac 0.63L/ac 0.085L/ac 0.235L/ac 1L/ac 0.63L/ac 0.085L/ac 0.235L/ac 1L/ac 0.63L/ac 0.085L/ac 0.235L/ac 1L/ac

Method post post pre post

WINGHAM Yield Moist Index % 76 22.7 87 23.7 89 22.5 96 23.2 99 24.1 102 25.9 65 24.3 88 22.7 88 23.2 97 24.3 102 24.0 84 23.5 100 24.8 91 24.6 87 23.8 98 26.2 100 23.8 97 23.4 103 21.7 89 23.9 95 24.5 105 24.7 103 25.6 99 23.0 100 24.9 97 23.5 93 23.7 95 24.6 94 24.6 100 24.1 94 23.6 114 26.5 112 26.4 108 25.9 102 25.1 107 26.0 107 27.5 108 23.6 101 25.3 99 24.7 97 25.5 96 25.8 103 25.0 95 23.3 95 27.0 109 27.1 125 24.8 100 26.4 101 28.3 108 26.5 103 26.9

Ldg % 23 15 23 9 5 15 27 15 15 4 6 11 12 13 9 10 10 10 20 18 21 3 17 9 12 23 16 8 16 41 31 9 4 8 3 37 2 24 13 20 17 27 27 9 12 13 19 33 8 12 4

and thinned at an early growth stage to obtain a uniform population. A row width of 30 inches is used in all trials. Plots consist of four rows of which the middle two rows are harvested for yield. Fertilizer rates may be higher than those recommended by OMAFRA to compensate for any variability in soil nutrient supply. Most of the hybrids entered in the trials were treated with a seed treatment to control soil insects. Hybrids that were not treated with are not identified in the report. Continued on page 13

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 12_Layout 1 14-01-31 10:43 AM Page 1

Page 12 The AgriNews February, 2014 Table 2: Elora, Lindsay, Winchester, Wingham

CHU 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2875 2875 2875 2900 2900 2900 2925 2950 3000

Brand and/or Hybrid Elite E65D10 LR Maizex MZ 3124BR Maizex MZ 3227EZR Mycogen Seeds 2J337 NK Brand N29T-3111 PICKSEED PS 2843RR Pioneer P9411HR PRIDE Seeds A6015 DEKALB DKC43-47RIB Hyland 8315RA Hyland, Mycogen 8300RA Maizex MZ 3490SMX PICKSEED PS 2844VT2P RIB Pioneer P9526YXR PRIDE Seeds A6228G2 RIB PRIDE Seeds A6419G2 RIB DEKALB DKC44-13RIB Elite E65F12 R Hyland 4402 Hyland, Mycogen 8377RA Maizex MZ 3344R Maizex MZ 3484SMX Mycogen Seeds 8380 Pioneer P9623AM Pioneer P9675AMXT Pioneer P9754AM PRIDE Seeds A6030G8 RIB DEKALB DKC45-51RIB DEKALB DKC46-07RIB Elite E67H22 R Elite E67D10 LR Maizex MZ 3515DBR Pioneer P9855HR PRIDE Seeds A6757G8 RIB Pioneer P9917XR Pioneer P0094AM LSD (0.10) for Yield Index Points* Average all hybrids ** European Corn Borer Pressure

Notes WBDRLO BRL WBDO BDR WBDRO R WBRL WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO BRO WBDRL BRO BRO WBDRLO BRO BDR WBDRLO R BDR WBDRL WBRLO WBDRLO WBRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO BRO WBDRLO BRO WBRL WBDRLO WBDRL WBRLO

www.agrinews.ca

2013 Ontario Hybrid Corn Performance Trials - Conducted by the Ontario Corn Committee

2012-2013 averagesš

2013 averages²

average of 6 trials

average of 4 trials

Yield Index 95 106

Test Wt Index 99 97

Moist % 28.9 25.9

Ldg % 8 9

102

27.0

6

101

105 105

28.6 27.1

3 4

98 100

102

29.0

2

98

94 97 104

27.3 27.6 27.3

4 2 7

97 102 98

103 98 99

28.5 28.6 27.7

3 6 9

99 97 97

102

28.6

11

101

102 101 105 101

29.3 30.4 28.8 28.3

2 3 1 4

100 99 103 101

108

29.0

5

98

109

29.4

9

99

3 202

26.9

5

65

Yield Index 91 108 105 100 105 107 107 100 104 94 95 105 106 102 102 102 102 96 101 105 105 97 104 109 97 102 103 104 101 108 103 108 107 108 108 4 202

Results of 2013 Performance Trials ELORA

Moist % 28.8 25.6 26.6 26.4 25.1 27.4 27.7 28.0 28.7

Ldg % 11 13 19 9 12 5 6 8 3

Test Wt Index 98 97 98 102 98 99 100 97 98

27.0 27.3 26.7 28.5 27.0 26.6 28.7 27.8 28.3 27.7 29.3 27.0 27.9 28.1 27.7 28.9 29.4 29.8 29.3 27.9 31.5 28.7 29.1 32.5 29.5 30.6

5 3 11 23 1 7 11 4 9 13 4 1 6 16 10 9 2 4 2 5 2 1 7 7 14 10

97 103 99 101 99 100 99 99 97 98 98 102 98 101 101 99 100 99 103 100 99 100 99 98 99 101

26.5

8

64

Yield Index 94 104 101 104 96 102 110 105 103 105 94 100 101 99 106 106 103 100 96 103 110 106 91 101 105 91 104 102 101 101 109 103 106 105 106 106 7 217

LINDSAY

Moist % 32.4 29.0 30.5 32.1 28.9 32.8 31.9 32.1 33.3 33.1 30.1 31.1 32.9 32.3 33.0 30.6 33.9 30.7 34.1 32.9 33.1 32.0 33.0 30.8 32.0 33.0 33.4 35.0 34.0 33.5 35.0 33.9 33.1 37.9 32.9 34.7

Ldg % 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

30.7 Low

0

Yield Moist Index % 93 29.6 113 25.0 116 26.2 105 24.3 111 24.0 105 25.6 98 26.9 102 27.2 103 27.6 98 29.1 93 28.4 83 27.9 112 24.5 108 27.3 95 26.1 97 26.2 94 27.5 106 29.6 99 26.8 101 26.6 107 28.8 101 25.7 102 27.5 103 28.1 103 26.2 97 28.4 95 28.1 96 28.8 98 27.8 97 26.9 106 30.6 97 29.2 107 28.0 106 30.3 107 28.5 110 29.3 9 173 26.0 Low

WINCHESTER T2 Ldg % 4 9 0 4 6 3 5 0 0 3 7 0 4 10 0 3 1 4 3 4 1 0 3 11 4 6 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 3 8 4

Yield Moist Index % 102 25.8 102 23.3 97 24.6 99 22.7 102 23.6 108 23.5 108 25.8 111 24.7 107 25.3 24.5 24.0 23.7 26.0 23.0 23.9 26.2 24.5 25.5 24.7 26.5 24.5 25.2 26.6 25.3 26.5 26.4 26.4 26.9 24.0 28.6 25.3 27.0 29.7 28.1 29.7

0 1 2 32 0 15 0 1 4 21 1 1 7 7 13 15 0 4 0 10 0 0 14 0 20 15

5

23.6 Low

9

95 96 106 103 107 106 108 99 101 103 102 104 102 105 105 99 106 111 108 105 107 102 103 112 107 105 6 224

Ldg % 1 22 46 11 18 1 8 1 1

WINGHAM Yield Moist Index % 72 27.4 114 25.1 107 25.2 91 26.3 112 23.8 113 27.6 111 26.4 82 28.0 100 28.8 86 29.0 95 25.0 100 26.3 100 25.7 116 28.3 100 26.0 99 25.5 103 27.2 105 26.2 90 26.7 98 26.4 102 28.8 110 25.7 93 25.9 105 27.0 121 27.2 103 27.6 103 29.6 101 28.9 106 28.4 98 27.2 112 31.7 109 26.2 116 28.3 106 32.2 113 28.6 110 28.8 10 194 25.8 Low

Ldg % 41 20 29 22 25 15 10 29 10 28 14 11 38 50 4 9 41 12 30 27 13 2 13 46 21 13 9 11 8 9 8 6 11 24 28 21

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17

š Elora 2012-2013, Lindsay 2013, Wingham 2012-2013, Winchester T2 2013 ² Elora, Lindsay, Wingham, Winchester T2 * The LSD is a measure of variability within the trial. Yield indices that differ by an amount less than or equal to the LSD should be considered to be equal. ** Average Yields are shown in bushels per acre. Average Test Weights are shown in kg/hl. Hybrid selection should be based on the most data available. Emphasis should be put on averages from several locations and years because these provide a more accurate prediction of future performance than do single location results. Note: The accuracy of moisture measurement decreases as moisture content increases. Results for hybrids with very high moisture contents should be interpreted with caution.

Table 3 East: Lancaster, Ottawa, Winchester

CHU 2550 2550 2550 2600 2625 2650 2650 2650 2650 2675 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2725 2750 2750 2750 2750 2750 2775 2775 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825

Brand and/or Hybrid Pioneer Pioneer Pioneer Pioneer Hyland Hyland, Mycogen Maizex Pioneer Pioneer DEKALB DEKALB Elite Elite Hyland, Mycogen Pioneer Horizon DEKALB Horizon Maizex Pioneer PRIDE Seeds Maizex Pioneer Country Farm DEKALB Elite Elite Maizex Maizex Mycogen Seeds NK Brand PICKSEED Pioneer DEKALB Horizon Hyland Hyland, Mycogen Maizex

P8651HR P8673HR P8673XR P8622AM 8201RA 8202RA MZ 2988DBR P8906AM P8906XR DKC38-03RIB DKC39-97RIB E59L19 R E61P12 R 8295RA P9329AM HZ 850GT DKC42-42RIB HZ 872 MZ 3066DBR 38N94AM A6010G2 RIB MZ 3202SMX P9526AM CF409 DKC43-10RIB E64H22 R E65D10 LR MZ 312X MZ 3227EZR 2J337 N29T-3111 PS 2843RR P9411HR DKC43-47RIB HZ 950 8315RA 8300RA MZ 3490SMX

2013 Ontario Hybrid Corn Performance Trials - Conducted by the Ontario Corn Committee

Notes WBRL WBRL WBDRL WBRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO BRO WBRLO WBDRL BRO WBDRLO BDR BRO WBDRLO WBRLO R WBDRLO BRL BRO WBRLO BRO WBDRLO WBRLO WBDRLO BRO BRO WBDRLO WBDO BDR WBDRO R WBRL WBDRLO R WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO

2012-2013 averagesš

2013 averages²

Results of 2013

average of 3 trials

average of 1 trials

LANCASTER

Yield Index

Moist %

Ldg %

Test Wt Index

99 95 91 95 101

21.9 20.1 20.6 20.9 20.4

1 3 1 1 2

99 100 103 105 102

98

21.1

1

99

89

22.8

11

102

93 96 97

20.2 20.4 21.4

7 4 3

100 101 102

101

22.3

3

101

103 106

22.6 22.2

6 1

100 99

98

21.7

18

98

101 96 100 99 103

21.4 20.9 22.0 22.6 22.6

4 6 3 3 1

102 98 97 101 100

87 94

22.4 22.6

3 2

97 103

Yield Index 90 102 86 95 91 92 102 93 99 98 100 99 108 103 96 91 105 93 88 103 88 104 106 105 100 104 100 105 100 102 90 97 106 106 107 99 82 84

Moist % 22.9 20.2 21.1 21.7 22.9 25.8 21.8 22.4 23.2 22.5 22.9 24.6 25.5 23.9 25.4 26.1 26.8 22.7 22.8 23.3 23.8 27.9 27.4 27.9 26.3 24.1 27.1 24.6 25.0 25.2 23.6 24.2 27.4 27.5 27.9 26.2 26.4 25.4

Ldg % 0 6 6 1 3 2 4 3 3 4 1 2 0 1 1 23 0 8 8 3 9 4 15 0 0 2 3 13 10 9 4 4 8 1 11 0 3 5

Test Wt Index 107 105 103 105 103 97 102 104 105 102 102 99 102 98 102 101 99 100 102 103 98 101 99 101 98 98 97 98 97 100 97 97 100 99 101 97 96 100

Yield Index 90 102 86 95 91 92 102 93 99 98 100 99 108 103 96 91 105 93 88 103 88 104 106 105 100 104 100 105 100 102 90 97 106 106 107 99 82 84

Moist % 22.9 20.2 21.1 21.7 22.9 25.8 21.8 22.4 23.2 22.5 22.9 24.6 25.5 23.9 25.4 26.1 26.8 22.7 22.8 23.3 23.8 27.9 27.4 27.9 26.3 24.1 27.1 24.6 25.0 25.2 23.6 24.2 27.4 27.5 27.9 26.2 26.4 25.4

Ldg % 0 6 6 1 3 2 4 3 3 4 1 2 0 1 1 23 0 8 8 3 9 4 15 0 0 2 3 13 10 9 4 4 8 1 11 0 3 5

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Table 3 East: Lancaster, Ottawa, Winchester

CHU 2825 2825 2825 2825 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2875 2875 2875 2875 2875 2875 2875 2875 2875 2900 2900 2900 2900 2900 2900 2900 2900 2900 2900 2925 2950

Brand and/or Hybrid PICKSEED PICKSEED Pioneer PRIDE Seeds DEKALB Elite Hyland Hyland, Mycogen Hyland, Mycogen Maizex Maizex Mycogen Seeds Pioneer Pioneer Pioneer PRIDE Seeds PRIDE Seeds Country Farm Country Farm Country Farm Country Farm DEKALB DEKALB Elite Hyland PICKSEED DEKALB DEKALB Elite Maizex Maizex NK Brand PICKSEED PICKSEED Pioneer PRIDE Seeds PRIDE Seeds DEKALB

PS 2818GSX PS 2844VT2P RIB P9526YXR A6419G2 RIB DKC44-13RIB E65F12 R 4402 8377RA 8395RA MZ 3344R MZ 3484SMX 8380 P9623AM P9675AMXT P9754AM A6030G8 RIB A6509G2 RIB CF440 CF441 CF455GSX CF466 DKC45-51RIB DKC46-07RIB E67H22 R 4398 PS 2860VT3P RIB DKC46-17RIB DKC46-82RIB E67D10 LR MZ 3515DBR MZ 3550SMX N34N-3111 PS 2902VT2P RIB PS 2996GSX P9855HR A6535G8 RIB A6757G8 RIB DKC48-12RIB

2013 Ontario Hybrid Corn Performance Trials - Conducted by the Ontario Corn Committee

Notes WBDRL BRO WBDRL BRO WBDRLO BRO BDR WBDRLO WBDRLO R BDR WBDRL WBRLO WBDRLO WBRLO WBDRLO BRO R WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO BRO WBDRL BDRO BRO WBDRLO WBDRLO BRO WBDRLO WBDRL BRO WBDRL WBRL WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRLO

2012-2013 averagesš

2013 averages²

average of 3 trials

average of 1 trials Test Wt Index

Yield Index

Moist %

Ldg %

102

21.5

1

97

103

22.6

2

101

105 91 100 102

24.0 22.4 25.0 23.5

0 2 1 3

99 97 100 98

101

23.6

1

103

102 104 94

24.1 22.4 24.3

2 2 17

100 100 98

95 99 98 103

24.1 22.9 25.1 24.0

0 1 6 1

101 102 99 102

104

25.4

1

99

108 102

24.5 23.8

1 2

100 101

103

22.5

2

101

107 98

25.7 25.2

1 2

99 100

104

24.1

1

97

Yield Index 94 109 98 97 94 96 114 88 110 107 101 98 108 99 94 106 96 99 105 86 100 102 100 107 90 100 107 106 116 108 102 95 101 104 111 92 101 110

Moist % 25.9 23.9 28.0 25.6 26.6 24.4 30.1 24.8 31.7 28.4 26.7 28.1 27.9 28.5 29.6 30.7 25.3 30.6 25.9 27.9 28.3 31.8 29.4 26.7 25.7 31.7 30.0 26.8 30.7 29.1 32.9 36.0 24.2 27.8 32.0 29.6 34.4 29.0

Ldg % 3 2 16 4 0 4 0 1 1 2 3 2 0 17 6 2 2 11 2 0 3 1 2 0 5 1 1 0 0 1 3 12 3 3 2 3 0 0

Results of 2013 LANCASTER Test Wt Index 97 98 102 100 97 99 97 96 101 99 101 97 103 100 100 100 99 98 100 99 100 101 101 100 96 100 100 98 100 101 101 100 100 101 100 99 100 96

Yield Index 94 109 98 97 94 96 114 88 110 107 101 98 108 99 94 106 96 99 105 86 100 102 100 107 90 100 107 106 116 108 102 95 101 104 111 92 101 110

Moist % 25.9 23.9 28.0 25.6 26.6 24.4 30.1 24.8 31.7 28.4 26.7 28.1 27.9 28.5 29.6 30.7 25.3 30.6 25.9 27.9 28.3 31.8 29.4 26.7 25.7 31.7 30.0 26.8 30.7 29.1 32.9 36.0 24.2 27.8 32.0 29.6 34.4 29.0

Ldg % 3 2 16 4 0 4 0 1 1 2 3 2 0 17 6 2 2 11 2 0 3 1 2 0 5 1 1 0 0 1 3 12 3 3 2 3 0 0

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 13_Layout 1 14-01-31 11:16 AM Page 1

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Field Trials Continued from page 11 There was no significant damage from soil insects at any of the locations. To determine the percentage of lodged plant, a count is made, immediately before harvest, of all plants broken below the ear and all plants which are leaning such that the ear is in the adjacent row or is otherwise unharvestable. The moisture percentage of the grain is measured at harvest time. The weight of

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 13

grain harvested from each plot is determined and the yield of shelled corn is calculated at 15% moisture. Test weights are recorded either during harvest, using combine- mounted monitoring equipment, or in the laboratory, using procedures recommended by the Canada Grain Commission. For further information, contact The Secretary, Ontario Corn Committee, 109 Maple Ridge Road, R. R. # 2, Owen Sound, Ontario N4K 5N4.

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 14_Layout 1 14-01-31 9:11 AM Page 1

Page 14 The AgriNews February, 2014

Techincal Updates

On to a Good Start: Colostrum Management Mario S. Mongeon Livestock Specialist, OMAF and MRA

C

alving is a stressful period for the cow as well as the newborn calf. A difficult calving can result in lost production, infection and poor fertility on the part of the dam. The newborn calf may be weak and suffer from bovine respiratory disease or diarrhea as a result of its experience and may even not survive. Mortalities in the first 3 weeks of life have been attributed to Failure of Passive Transfer (FPT) of immunity from the dam to the newborn calf. The only way a calf receives immunity after birth is through colostrum. Antibodies, also called immunoglobulins or Ig, are present in the colostrum from the mother and passed on to the calf. For a short period of time after birth, those immunoglobulins will be absorbed intact through the small intestine membrane into the blood stream. These immunoglobulins will help the calf fight against disease during the first few weeks of life. This is why it is so important to have excellent colostrum management. Colustrum is secreted by the cow right before and shortly after calving. True colostrum comes only from the first milking as later milkings are less concentrated in nutrients and immunoglubulins. Leakage from the udder prior to calving will reduce the concentration of Ig in the dam's colostrum once the calf is born. The three "Q's" to achieving successful passive transfer of immunity through immunoglobulins are: Quality, Quantity and Quickness. Feeding quality colostrum in the right quantity quickly after birth will greatly improve the chances of calf survival, good health and future performance.

Quality Colostrum contains more energy and protein than milk. The amount of immunoglobulins per millilitre of colostrum as well as its cleanliness will determine its quality. In order to minimise the contamination of colostrum, the udder needs to be properly cleaned. Milking, storage and feeding equipment should also be sanitized. The colostrum fed to the newborn calf should contain at least 50 mg/ml of IgG and ideally, no more than 100,000 colony forming units/ml (an estimate of bacteria number) It is possible to use a Brix refractometer to measure the immunoglobulin concentration in colostrum. The Brix refractometer is designed to measure the amount of sucrose (table sugar) in a solution, such as maple syrup. It is possible to relate the Brix values to IgG in colostrum. A Brix value of 22 % corresponds to 50 mg of IgG per ml. A Refractometer is easy to use, reliable and reasonably priced ($175.00 - $350.00) and can be purchase online. The optical model is cheaper that the digital one but can be trickier to read. Look for a refractometer with a Brix scale ranging more or less from 0 to 30 %. Colostrum quality decreases quickly after calving so collection should occur within the first few hours. Colostrum from Johne's positive cows should not be used. Suspicious looking, visibly mastitic, discolored, bloody or watery colostrum should be discarded as well. Freshly harvested colostrum should be fed right away or refrigerated or frozen within one hour to prevent bacterial growth. Refrigerated colostrum should be stored for no more than 48 hours. Surplus colostrum can be frozen and used when the colostrum quality from the dam is questionable. Since the Ig concentration tends to increase with lactation numbers, freezing colostrum from older cows make sense. Frozen

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colostrum can be kept for up to one year. Thawing technique is critical. Avoid exposing colostrum to temperatures exceeding 40? C. Once thawed, colostrum should be fed right away as bacterial growth will resume.

Quantity Feed colostrum as soon as possible after birth at a rate of 12% to 15% of the calf's body weight which represents at least 3 to 4 litres depending on breeds. Large breeds such as Holsteins should get at least 4 litres of excellent quality colostrum shortly after birth and 2 more litres within 12 hours of birth. A large volume of colostrum cannot overcome low antibody (IG) concentration. This is why testing for quality is so critical. According to research, the best way to make sure calves get the colostrum they needs, on time, is to milk the cow and feed a known quantity of colostrum to the newborn calf.

Quickness A newborn calf should receive colostrum as soon as possible after birth. The ability of the calf to absorb immunoglobulins through the gut wall decreases rapidly from 0 to 6 hours after birth. As a matter of fact, the calf is only able to absorb IG intact for the first 30 hours of life (Table 1). Once this critical period is over, IG will be digested as any other protein in the calf's digestive system. Difficult calving and allowing the calf to suckle on its own are conditions that have been shown to contribute to Failure of Passive Transfer. Calves that were born unassisted but allowed to suckle on their own do not fare as well as they probably do not receive first colostrum in a timely manner. Research indicates that 25% of calves left alone DO NOT nurse within 8 hours of birth.

Table 1: Immunoglobulin absorption by the calf over time.

The next level of herbicide resistance - cross resistance

lowing traits: • The same herbicide was used year after year. • One weed, which normally should be controlled, is not controlled although other weeds are controlled. • A patch of an uncontrolled weed is spreading. • Healthy weeds are mixed with controlled weeds (of the same species). Even if a control failure exhibits these traits, it is not an absolute diagnosis of herbicide resistance. Get your weeds tested for resistance to confirm. As we get familiar with herbicide resistant weeds we are finding that many species are developing cross resistance to herbicides. Cross resistance is defined as the ability of a weed population to be resistant to more than one herbicide. This may arise without the weed population ever being exposed to one of the herbicides. Why does this happen? Today, there are more than 100 different herbicides on the market, but many of these work in exactly the same way or, in other words, have the same mode of action. Fewer than 20 plant-growth mechanisms are affected by current herbicides. If a field is infested with herbicide-cross-resistant weeds, the grower may lose yield because a competitive weed isn't controlled. Growers also may have higher costs if they lose the use of several economical herbicides. If you suspect a resistance problem: • Use herbicides with a different mechanism of action to control the escaped weed. • Do not let weeds go to seed. • Use cultural practices such as cultivation. • Contact OMAF, your dealer and your sales representative. • Get your weeds tested for resistance (contact: kristen.obeid@ontario.ca). Herbicide resistance is a complicated subject. Many weed scientists warn of hidden dangers in rotating modern herbicides. Because so many modern herbicides have the same mode of action, a grower could rotate crops and herbicides but still wind up with a resistance problem. The mode of action may not change even when crops and chemicals are rotated. Look for the mode of action (also known as the Herbicide Group Number) on the top right corner of your herbicide label. OMAF Publication 75: Guide to Weed Control also lists all the herbicide group numbers in Table 4-1. Reference: http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G4907

Kristen Obeid Weed Management Program Lead - Horticulture/ OMAF and MRA

H

erbicide resistant weed populations are now found throughout Ontario. The number of resistant species and areas affected by resistance continues to increase. Herbicides are the most heavily relied upon weed control method for many growers because they are both cost effective and simple, which has resulted in high selection pressure for herbicide resistance in populations of weed species. It is often thought that weeds change or mutate to become resistant. However, weed scientists, believe that weeds do not change at all. Instead, populations change. The resistant weeds have always been present in low populations. When a particular herbicide is used, it controls the normal-susceptible types. This makes room for the population of the resistant weeds to increase. Consequently, when growers say that their "weeds have become resistant," they really mean that the population of their resistant weeds has increased greatly and the population of their susceptible weeds has decreased. As we learn about herbicide resistance, an unfortunate side effect is that some herbicide failures from bad weather, weeds that are too large or improper applications are considered herbicide-resistance problems. Do not suspect herbicide resistance unless a herbicide failure fits the fol-

Programs and Services

Step Up Mentorship Program

S

tep Up Mentorship Program is an on-farm learning placement. This program matches those who are considering a farming career with an experienced farm manager. This is a chance to learn farm business management skills in a hands-on setting. Anyone who is an experienced farm manager interested in taking the time to pass on the best of his or her farm business management knowledge can be a mentor. Mentors received a $2,000 honorarium for participating. Anyone who is interested in agriculture and is at least 18 years old can be a mentee. This is a national program so you can choose a placement close to home or in another province. The deadline to • Continued on page 16


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 15_Layout 1 14-01-31 11:46 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 15

Dairy Design seminar, March 4-5 in Kemptville K empTville — This yeAr’s AnnuAl dAiry design

seminArs Are bringing

The FArm TO The ClAssrOOm insTeAd OF The OTher WAy ArOund.

Rather than featured excursions out to recently upgraded dairy operations, organizer Harold House says a farm owner — Roy Hofhuis — will instead present to course attendees at the Kemptville Legion. The course runs March 4-5. “Normally we go out and have a farm visit, but often that can only be attended by a few of the people on the course,” explains Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food dairy and beef housing engineer. “And our experience the last couple of years is that it’s been so cold, it’s been difficult to stand around and talk much in the barn, and so we end

up trying not to see as much as we can.” Organizers concluded it would be productive to have an operator who recently built a new barn “to come and talk about and just have an opportunity for discussion and questions.” He adds, “It isn’t so much about what they built as much as the process: How did they go about collecting their information and getting a contractor and a design, and what advice can they give to people in a similar situation who are considering building in the next couple of years?” The Hofhuis family of Osgoode built a new robotic dairy barn in 2012, which features a couple of different innovations. “It is robotic milking, a six-row design with perimeter feeding,” reports House, adding the featured operation

includes a new type of automated scraper — tube scrapers — that collect the manure into a slit running the length of the floor. The result is cleaner floors and fewer hoof problems, he says. The Hofhuises also installed a new type of neck rail designed with the help of Dr. Neil Anderson, he says. “And they’re also using a deep-bedded stall with a mixture of straw and powdered limestone,” he adds, saying the combination

offers interesting alternative to sand in particular. The first day starts with farmstead planning, followed by an Anderson presentation related to cow comfort, barn planning, and building, environment, and ventilation. In keeping with the trend of more and more automation, Robotic feed delivery systems will be touched on as well — even if that technology is not as common as robotic milkers yet. Hofhuis presents on the second day. Cost for the two-day event is $214.70 (includes 13% HST). For more information and to register, call the Agricultural Information Contact Centre 1-877-424-1300 or 519826-4047.

Calling Kemptville College Alumni O

TTAWA – KempTville COllege Alumni KempTville grAds TO meeT On Wed., mArCh 12, during The OTTAWA vAlley FArm shOW AT The ernsT & yOung CenTre, 4899 uplAnds drive, OTTAWA. The alumni reunion at the Show runs 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in Office #3, located directly opposite Meeting Room D. For more information contact Isabel Kinnear at 613673-5900. OrgAnizers WOuld liKe

Canada-Ontario Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) Start the business planning process by attending this FREE two-day interactive workshop. You will: • Assess business management practices • Determine priorities and key goals • Develop realistic action plans • Learn about cost-share funding opportunities

Producers are invited to attend free EFP (Fourth Edition) Workshops to learn more about: • Best management practices • Develop an action plan for their farm • Learn about cost-share funding opportunities

GYFP Workshop Schedule EFP Workshop Schedule

All workshops 10am - 3 pm Navan

Day 1 - Feb. 4

Day 2 - Feb. 11

Leeds(Elgin)

Day 1 - Feb. 6

Day 2 - Feb. 13

Markham

Day 1 - Feb. 13 Day 2 - Feb. 20

Chesterville

Day 1 - Feb. 14 Day 2 - Feb. 21

Renfrew

Day 1 - Feb. 19 Day 2 - Feb. 26

Bethany

Day 1 - Mar. 14 Day 2 - Mar. 21

Alfred (FRENCH)

All workshops 10am - 3 pm Spencerville

Day 1 - Feb. 5

Day 2 - Feb. 12

Tweed

Day 1 - Feb. 5

Day 2 - Feb. 12

Alexandria

Day 1 - Feb. 18 Day 2 - Feb. 25

Campbellville

Day 1 - Feb. 18 Day 2 - Feb. 25

Day 1 - Mar. 15 Day 2 - Mar. 22

Elginburg

Day 1 - Feb. 24 Day 2 - Mar. 3

Embrun (FRENCH)

Day 1 - Mar. 17 Day 2 - Mar. 24

Sunderland

Day 1 - Feb. 24 Day 2 - Mar. 3

Maizex is recruiting motivated individuals to promote and market seed products in your area. Increase yields and ROI for your customers with the broadest offering of traits, hybrids, and soybean varieties. Reap the rewards year-round with the best in agronomic expertise and business support.

Whitby

Day 1 - Mar. 17 Day 2 - Mar. 24

Metcalfe

Day 1 - Feb. 27 Day 2 - Mar. 6

Brighton

Day 1 - Feb. 27 Day 2 - Mar. 6

Durham

Day 1 - Mar. 6

The successful candidate will have the following qualifications:

BECOME A MAIZEX DEALER Grow into a career with the largest Canadian-owned hybrid corn company. Join MAIZEX SEEDS and provide the best in local expertise and global technology.

• A sound understanding of agriculture and a desire to learn • A passion to succeed • A commitment to serve the needs of customers

Call 1-877-682-1720 or apply online : maizex.com/become-a-dealer

St Eugene (FRENCH) Day 1 - Mar. 18 Day 2 - Mar. 25 Avonmore

Day 1 - Mar. 18 Day 2 - Mar. 25

Napanee

Day 1 - Mar. 18 Day 2 - Mar. 25

North Gower

Day 1 - Mar. 20 Day 2 - Mar. 27

Almonte

Day 1 - Mar. 19 Day 2 - Mar. 26

Bloomfield

Day 1 - Apr. 3

Kemptville

Day 1 - Mar. 24 Day 2 - Mar. 31

Day 2 - Apr. 10

Workshops Now Available Register Online at www.ontariosoilcrop.org

Day 2 - Mar. 13


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 16_Layout 1 14-01-31 12:16 PM Page 1

Page 16 The AgriNews February, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ Continued from page 14 submit your application is Friday February 14, 2014. For more information, go to:www.fmc-gac.com/step-up or contact: Jennifer Hardy-Parr, by phone at: 1-888-232-3262, or by email: stepup@fmc-gac.com

www.agrinews.ca website at: www.serviceontario.ca/publications or call 1800-668-9938 â&#x20AC;˘ Visit the OMAF and MRA website at: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/products/index.html or contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre by calling: 1-877-424-1300

Resources

Follow Us on Twitter Species at Risk Farm Incentive Program

T

he Species at Risk Farm Incentive Program (SARFIP) offers substantial cost-share funding towards the establishment of selected Best Management Practices (BMP). The range of possible activities applies to croplands, grasslands, riparian areas, wetlands, or even woodlands. SARFIP for 2013-2014 introduces a new cost-share design to focus efforts on activities that directly support wildlife species at risk (SAR) that are known to reside on farm properties. SARFIP is available to farm businesses across the province, and is linked to the Canada-Ontario Environmental Farm Plan (EFP). To be eligible for SARFIP, a farm business must satisfy all of these criteria: 1. Have selected a BMP from the SARFIP eligible list that related directly to an action identified in the farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s EFP Action Plan that has been verified to be complete, and effectively moves a â&#x20AC;&#x153;1â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;2â&#x20AC;? rating to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;3â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;4â&#x20AC;? (best) rating. 2. Have a completed Program Enrollment form filed with Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA). 3. Have a Premises Identification Number for the farm property where the proposed project applies. 4. Have a valid Farm Business Registration Number or equivalent. Project proposal application forms for SARFIP may be obtained from the OSCIA website www.ontariosoilcrop.org, or from OSCIA Regional Program Leads. Questions can be directed to programreview@ontariosoilcrop.org or 519-826-4214.

OMAF and MRA, Agriculture, Food, Rural Affairs @atOMAFRA Foodland Ontario, Local Food @FoodlandOnt OMAF Field Crops, Crops @onfieldcrops OMAF Hort Update, Horticulture @onhortcrops OMAF Swine Team, Swine @ONswineinfo Joel Bagg, Forage @JoelBagg Tracey Baute, Entomology @TraceyBaute Christine Brown, Nutrient Management @manuregirl Mike Cowbrough, Weeds @Cowbrough Brian Hall, Edible Beans @Brian_Hall_Ont Peter Johnson, Cereals @WheatPete < Jack Kyle, Pasture @JackKyle5 Gilles Quesnel, Pest Management @GillesQuesnel Ian McDonald, Applied Research @ian_d_mcdonald Barry Potter, Beef, Dairy, Sheep @LivestockPotter Christoph Wand, Beef and Sheep Nutritionist @CtophWand Tom Wright, Dairy Cattle Nutritionist @feedlandontario

Electronic Bulletins and Newsletters Ag Business Update http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/busdev/news/inde x.html

Virtual Beef http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/beef/new s.html

Pork News and Views Newsletter http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/swine/ne ws.html

CropPest Ontario http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/field/news/n ews_croppest.html

CEPTOR - Animal Health News http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/ceptor/ne ws.html

ONVegetables (Vegetable Viewpoint)

Fact Sheets and Publications

To order OMAF and MRA publications and factsheets: â&#x20AC;˘ Visit any OMAF and MRA Resource Centre / Northern Ontario Regional Office or Service Ontario location http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/ english/offices/rural_ ont_ad.htm â&#x20AC;˘ Visit the Service Ontario

http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/hort/news/ne ws_vegview.html

Ontario Berry Grower http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/hort/news/ne ws_berrygrower.html

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A WEALTH OF SUMMER EXPERIENCE?

MacEwen Agricentre has become the foremost feed, and crop input supplier in Eastern Ontario by staying one step ahead of the competition with competitive pricing, outstanding customer service, state-of-the-art equipment, and superior industry knowledge. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the people who work for MacEwen who make the difference. :H DUH ORRNLQJ WR ÂżOO WKH IROORZLQJ SRVLWLRQV LQ 0D[YLOOH DQG 9DUV IRU WKH Summer 2014 season. Delivery Persons This is a hands-on, physical role delivering products to customer sites and from suppliers. A valid driversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; license is required, and the ability to move and handle loads. Knowledge of the area is an advantage. Yard Persons Assisting customers with the loading and unloading of products, maintaining the delivery area and yard. This is a physically demanding role that will require the ability to work inside and out in all weather conditions and willingness and ability to work at heights. AZ Drivers This role requires the successful candidate to loading and deliver products and to ensure safe and timely deliveries to customers and from suppliers. An AZ license is required, as is a safe driving record. This is a physical job and will require the successful candidate to be able to move and handle loads and must be able to climb in and out of trucks. 2IÂżFH$GPLQLVWUDWRU 9DUV

7KLVUROHZRXOGUHTXLUHVRPHRQHZLWKH[SHULHQFHKDQGOLQJFXVWRPHURUGHUV FRRUGLQDWLQJ GHOLYHULHV ZRUNLQJ ZLWK FRPSXWHUV DQG ÂżOLQJ 7KH VXFFHVVIXO candidate must also be willing to help with deliveries when the need arises. )OXHQF\LQERWKRIÂżFLDOODQJXDJHVLVUHTXLUHG&DQGLGDWHVPXVWEHDYDLODEOH from April to end of August. Each of the above positions requires candidates who are available from April to September, 2014. Bilingual (English/French) is highly desirable. More details are available at www.macewenag.com. Applications in the form of a resume and cover letter may be submitted to careers@macewenag.com before April 1, 2014. Please indicate which position you are applying for and your availability.

:HORRNIRUZDUGWRZRUNLQJZLWK\RX


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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 17

Propane shortage sparks concern Cochim pipeline reversal to further restrict Ontario supply in June by Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer aSTERN oNTaRIo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; THE REgIoNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SHoRTagE of PRoPaNE IS So REal, ComPETINg SuPPlIERS HavE bEEN REluCTaNT To add NEW CuSTomERS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; EvEN THoSE aNxIouS To SWITCH bRaNdS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ouT of CoN-

E

CERN THEIR oWN RETaIl fuEl SToCkS mIgHT RuN Too loW To SERvICE ExISTINg ClIENTS.

Coinciding with a bitterly cold winter, the issue finally sparked the interest of senior politicians last month, with Federal Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver ordering a National Energy Board and Competition Board review of the situation. Ontario Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli has also called for action. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some companies are not able to take on new customers,â&#x20AC;? conceded MacEwen Petroleum President Allan MacEwen early in January. Asked if his firm was in the same boat, he replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ask me that tomorrow.â&#x20AC;? The â&#x20AC;&#x153;severe shortageâ&#x20AC;? affecting all of Eastern North America began in mid-December but does â&#x20AC;&#x153;seem to be improving,â&#x20AC;? he also said. Jim MacEwen, president of MacEwen Agricentre, also confirmed last month that his operationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drying operation relied on propane from Levac. He commended the other company for meeting its obligations to the Agricentre and for working round the clock amid media reports of a shortage. Another area propane vendor, who spoke on condition of anonymity last month, acknowledged not being able to take on additional customers at the moment. He explained that vendors have been limited by the refineries in the amount they may currently buy above what they previous-

ly contracted for the season. The cap has been set at 10 per cent of the amount contracted. Meanwhile, there have been reports of consumers receiving half loads or delayed fillups. In Chesterville, cash cropper Marty Derks told The AgriNews the pipes froze at his house after his propane ran out. He managed to get a fillup a few days later, at a whopping $1.25 per litre. His farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corn-drying operation, however, avoided the propane pinch because the operation is within reach of natural gas, he said. Rural Eastern Ontario has seen a significant shift by homeowners away from heating oil and into propane. According to an industry source, insurers have been driv-

ing consumers out of oil. One operator with both oil and propane customers estimated that 40 per cent of oil users on his routes had converted to propane in recent years. Marty Derks said he was one of those, switching to propane last year at the insistence of his insurance company, even though his oil furnace was only six years old. And the Ontario propane supply situation could be crimped further this spring with the impending reversal of Kinder Morganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cochin Pipeline, which sends western Canadian propane to Windsor over U.S. territory. But that pipeline has received American approval to send light oil from Illinois westward for use in refining Alberta bitumen, effectively closing the spigot on that Ontario propane supply this spring. A company official confirmed that shipments of propane on that pipeline would cease this June.

Parmalat churning Winchester expansion By Jeff Moore AgriNews Staff Writer INCHESTERâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; PaRmalaTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WINCHESTER

W

PlaNT IS uNdERgoINg a 5,000-SquaRE-fooT ExPaNSIoN IN THE buTTER dEPaRTmENT, doublINg THEIR PRoduCTIoN. dIRECToR of oPERaTIoNS STEPHEN WIlSoN aNNouNCEd THE dEvEloPmENT laST fall, aNd CoNSTRuCTIoN bEgaN IN EaRly dECEmbER.

Concrete for the foundation has been poured and preparations are underway for steel work in early March. According to

Wilson, the new building should be completed in late May, to allow the company to bring in the machinery required for the butter production line. A staple item at the Winchester plant for many years, Parmalat will ramp up butter output gradually as the new addition comes on-line. The company intends to be in full production by the fall of this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is about opportunity for the future, and expanded [producer] flexibility,â&#x20AC;? Wilson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The butter business is quite variable, and we need

to be more flexible to meet increased demand,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to be able to manage changes that occur in any condition, this (addition) will help us achieve this.â&#x20AC;? With relatively few competitors in the region, such as Kraft, Saputo Foods, and St. Albert Cheese among others, he observed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This solidifies our role as a cheese producer in the region, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good thing,â&#x20AC;? He also alluded to benefits for the economy of the Township of North Dundas, Winchesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local municipality.

Parmalat is one of the largest employers in the township and a huge player worldwide. Their parent company is Lactalis, with its headquarters in France. According to Wilson, however, â&#x20AC;&#x153;there will be minimal new jobs created by this project, but it will be able to secure the employees it now has.â&#x20AC;? Parmalat is mostly known for its cheese production, under the brand names Black Diamond and Balderson. The brand name for their butter product is Lactancia.

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 18_Layout 1 14-01-31 1:51 PM Page 1

Page 18 The AgriNews February, 2014

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Gov’ts announce swine virus help CaNada aNd ONTaRiO have aNNOuNCed help fOR The pORk iNdusTRy TO sTep up measuRes TO CONTaiN The spRead Of The pORCiNe epidemiC

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After circulating widely in Europe and Asia, the virus was first seen in the United States last April and is now known to be in more than 20 states. Canada’s first case was identified in Middlesex County on Jan. 23. A second case of PED has been confirmed, with a third under investigation. Both are in the Chatham-Kent region.  The province will be allocating $2-million to help the Ontario Pork (OP) support industry-wide investments to improve biosecurity measures at critical points across the province, such as assembly yards and truck washing stations. Biosecurity remains the best tool to protect swine herds. In the Jan. 28 press release announcing the new program, OP Chair Amy Cronin remarks, “This investment speaks to the provincial government’s ongoing commitment to our industry. These funds and the creation of a dedicated biosecurity stream under Growing Forward 2 will most certainly help our sector with some of the initiatives we’ve already started to help manage this disease.” Both governments have also created a special PED biosecurity program under Growing Forward 2 (GF2) to help producers, abattoirs, truckers, assembly facilities, and rendering service providers in the pork industry invest in additional biosecurity measures to limit the spread of PED. “Our Government recognizes the importance of the Canadian hog industry in creating jobs and economic growth. This investment allows Ontario to utilize the flexibility of GF2 to support producers and the industry in improving biosecurity,” said Minister

of Agriculture Gerry Ritz. This initiative is in addition to the existing GF2 funding assistance program, to be administered by the province, and applications will be accepted until March 13. "Investing in enhanced biosecurity measures is part of the federal and provincial governments’ actions to foster a strong agricultural sector," Ritz noted. Kathleen Wynne, Premier and Minister of Agriculture and Food stated that Ontario pork is safe to eat and a vital part of the agriculture sector. "That’s why we’re taking coordinated, comprehensive action against this virus. We’re here to help this proud Ontario industry — especially those already affected by PED.”

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 19_Layout 1 14-01-31 12:13 PM Page 1



www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 19

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Lone opponent in farm community speaks against proposed terminal by Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer ORRISBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A RetIRed

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MORRISBURG. Former beef producer and retired Agriculture Canada public servant Ron Wilson opposes the planned Ontario Grain Terminals (OGT) project on Lakeshore Drive, located a few kilometres from his retirement home on Coyle Drive in South Dundas Township. He was the lone voice of opposition to identical resolutions endorsing the project that otherwise easily garnered crowd support at back-to-back meetings of the Dundas Soil & Crop Improvement Association (DSCIA) and the Dundas Federation of Agriculture (DFA) in December. But he insists his personal proximity to the proposed site does not drive his point of view, saying the project wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be visible from his house anyway. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not particularly concerned about location,â&#x20AC;? says Wilson, who explains his stand is solely based on respect for the law. More specifi-

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cally, he insists the project does not comply with the townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current zoning bylaw because â&#x20AC;&#x153;elevatorâ&#x20AC;? is not, according to Wilson, among the prescribed developments permitted at the site, though the bylaw would allow a â&#x20AC;&#x153;warehouseâ&#x20AC;? of up to 15 metres in height. The OGT elevator proposal calls for an initial pair of storage bins nearly 30 metres

high, raising the ire of petitioning residents of Lakeshore Drive led by Chris Rowntree. But had the bylaw included the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;elevator,â&#x20AC;? Wilson would have advised the Rowntree complainers â&#x20AC;&#x153;too bad, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approved, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the bylaw.â&#x20AC;? That not being the case, he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we as agriculture want one there, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I support something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s illegal.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; We say,

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like what the bylaw says, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s try to change the bylaw, and then if somebody wants to build an elevator, let them go ahead with the project â&#x20AC;&#x201D; any more than we recommend that trucks loaded with grain or salt should drive at 115 km/h down the highway. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m saying we shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t being doing this other thing here â&#x20AC;Ś If we vote in favour of it, it means we know weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re supporting something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not permitted by the bylaw.â&#x20AC;? However, he says that local farmers seem uninterested in learning about the legal constraints of the site. He also expresses skepticism at the developerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assurances that a dryer wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be part of the development and suggests itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inevitable such equipment would be installed after the bins go up, perhaps after a year or two. It otherwise makes no sense to expect corn producers to deliver their crops for drying at places like Johnston, only to load it back up and bring it to Morrisburg, he argues. Wilson briefly voiced his concerns at the Dec. 4 DSCIA meeting in Chesterville, prior to passage of the resolution expressing support for more grain storage capacity in Dundas County â&#x20AC;&#x153;such as the Morrisburg project.â&#x20AC;? cointinued on page 21


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 20_Layout 1 14-01-31 10:54 AM Page 1

Page 20 The AgriNews February, 2014

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‘By the bucket’ production earns producer innovation award By Pamela J. Pearson AgriNews Staff Writer ETCALFE — GEorGE WriGhT And KiM MACMuLLin hAvE

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GEhL oATs, dEvELopEd dr. vErn burroWs AT ThE ExpEriMEnTAL FArM in oTTAWA. For years, Wright sowed wheat and soybeans conventionally, but when the local grain elevator stopped buying wheat he needed to diversify.  The farm tried to do business with the Port of Prescott, but when they aligned themselves with ethanol production, he was forced to switch his crops altogether. “Without being at the mercy of the elevators, it does give a person the option to grow what they want” said Wright, “but it also by

offered up the opportunity to experiment with other grains such as hard red spring wheat, and buckwheat.”  With more consumers going gluten free, these products now account for half of Castor River’s sales.  Hull-less oats, barley, spelt and rye are also sown. Wright says that his initial plan was to mill into flour himself, but after some discussions with a mentor farmer, he decided to try his hand at ‘grain rolling’. Everything is a trade off, and Wright noted the Gehl oats, which hull cleanly, do not have a high yield.  “But with the ‘middle man’ cut out,” Wright said “my sales at farmers markets get full retail value.”  The preprocessing removal of the hull is a major savings afforded by the use of the Gehl variety. Switching to rolling oats has also helped Castor River Farms in the current gluten free trend among customers.  Wright says that it is hard to keep

the oats completely gluten free as they can be crosscontaminated when processed in large retail batches.  His process by comparison is “by the bucket”, and tested weekly with a product called EZ Gluten Free.  It will detect a presence above 10ppm, and Wright says that “it is easy to keep a bucket clean”, so he has stayed gluten free for over four years. That attention to detail paid off in October 2013, when Castor River Farms was recognized by the province with the Premier’s Award for AgriFood Innovation Excellence stating, “Owners George Wright and Kim MacMullin have pioneered organic protocols for growing gluten free grains, relying on carefully planned crop rotations and rigorous cleaning of machinery to keep their buckwheat and oats completely uncontaminated. Continued on page 21

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George Wright, owner of Castor River Farms in Metcalfe, is seen here at his farm-gate store where he sells his rolled and steel-cut oats, a variety of heritage grains, such as spelt, rye, and buckwheat. Eggs, a variety of pork products, and a new line of prepackaged pancake and cookie mixes are also available. The store is open on Sundays from noon until 3 p.m. PJ Pearson Photo

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 21_Layout 1 14-01-31 10:55 AM Page 1

www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 21

Lone terminal opponent Continued from page 19 Later that evening, Wilson says, the chair cut

him off as he spoke on the same motion at the DFA meeting in the same vil-

Innovation award Continued from page 20 The press release continued, “With more and more consumers going gluten free, these products now account for half of Castor River’s sales.” Wright has been a vendor at the Ottawa Farmers Market for five years, and is the Christmas and Indoor Committee Chair currently searching for a venue to house a winter market.  He mills flour on site to the requests of his customers.  Between there and their gate shop, the farm sells eggs, a variety of pork products, the heritage grains, and has recently introduced a new line of prepackaged pancake and cookie mixes. The farm is a returning vendor, and educator, at the annual Living Locally Fair held in Russell.  Wright is a firm believer in free information sharing: “In order to grow and save heritage breeds and grains, we must talk and sell directly to the people.”  To this end he travels to conferences and makes presentations about the lessons he has learned along the way.  One observation was that a farm operating on solar and wind power is feasible, until you bring on the big equipment.  A generator supplements his power needs then, but time for maintenance of that equipment is something that one needs to factor into the operations of the farm.  Parts and availability are always a challenge, but they are also a part of the family’s commitment to their lifestyle. Wright will be presenting at the ECO Farm Day 2014 on Feb. 22 in Cornwall. Further information can be found at www.castorriverfarm.ca

lage. His proposed amendment, excising the reference to the Morrisburg project, was also defeated at the DFA, he says. The contention has pitted Wilson against an upand-coming younger generation of aggressive agricultural leaders typified by Marty Derks, vice-president of the DFA, and fellow director Warren Schneckenburger, who also serves as new president of the DSCIA. Derks dismisses Wilson’s stance because of his address. “He’s biased,” says Derks, also noting that Wilson “no longer earns an income from farming” and is an associate member of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture. Supporting the Morrisburg site only makes sense, argues Derks. “It’s on the main drag, it’s the centre of the heart of farming, right? So why not have it at the centre of the heart of farming?” he says. Pointing to the site’s previous history as a port for shipments of salt and bulk oil, he observes, “It’s

always been a terminal. So what’s changed other than the fact it’s going to be used finally?” In light of the expected $20,000 in annual property taxes to be paid by the new facility, the 20-something cash cropper describes the OGT proposal as “win-win for everyone.” He also posits that neighbouring houses near the terminal were initially cheap to buy “because there was always a terminal there, there was always a port there. “What’s the big deal?” He asserts that farmers in the region require more avenues to bring their crops to market, comparing it to added seats on a bus. “The more boats that leave the area, the better the price gets,” says Derks. “If we can fill four more boats a year, that’s great. Or we’ll be topping them up here.” “It’s better than boats coming in from Ohio and dropping off corn here,” he adds, alleging the influx of American corn brought in by Casco would tie up storage capacity at harvest time and “suppress the price. That’s what used to happen. And then they

would buy our corn cheap in January and February.” He further alleges, “Greenfield has kind of gotten on board with the Casco theory, so we need someone else who’s going to shake it up, right? Because we do have some of the worst bases prices in North America, in Eastern Ontario.” Meanwhile, Wilson contends that he’s not entirely without expertise on the matter : In the late 1970s and early 1980s, in his capacity with Ag Canada, he helped write federal legislation for what was called the inland elevator program, “to help build elevators in the grain deficit areas of the country, to serve as infrastructure which would help improve marketing opportunities.” He’s offended, he says, that no one among local organizations is willing to entertain “an open and fair discussion, not even a halfhour discussion on a major policy item to say that we support that Morrisburg facility.” He’s equally chagrined at being denied the opportunity to speak to his local township council as a delegation.

He says the township has inappropriately lumped him in with the Rowntree camp, which already addressed council last summer, so won’t hear his presentation. Instead, he’s taken to writing letters to the editor of local newspapers, essentially making public missives that he’s already written to the township. That correspondence, he explains, was going to be released anyway to another party making a freedom of information request to South Dundas on the OGT matter. He says he supports the idea of increased grainprocessing capacity generally — just not this one because of his legal concerns. He points out, however, that a recent review of Dundas County agriculture by Carleton University identified no such demand. Conducted by the geography department, the resulting report “made no mention of a shortage of grainmarketing facilities, or any need for an additional elevator somewhere to help with exporting, nothing,” says Wilson.

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 22_Layout 1 14-01-31 2:37 PM Page 1

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General Contractor – Projects Manager

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A hose port opens through the outside wall near the bulk tank outlet, for the convenience of the bulk milk trucker. Some trucks also require an outdoor 220-volt inside switch. Check hose port and electrical requirements with your trucker. In case the bulk tank may be installed or changed after construction, the plan shows a removable window combined with an insulated panel below. Secure the window and panel with screws or bolts instead of nailing, for easier removal and replacement. milk room size The milk room should be sized to accommodate necessary equipment and provide adequate working space. The following table gives recommended milk room dimensions in relation to herd size: wall and roof Construction

Waste heat from the milk cooler together with some supplementary electric heat can easily maintain milk room temperature in cold weather, provided that the building is fully insulated. A wood frame makes fully insulated construction easier since it utilizes economical 4-inch and 6-inch batt insulation as used in modern houses. The conventional stud wall construction used here includes an insulated concrete perimeter foundation extending below frost and a sill of pressure-treated wood at the base of the wall studs. Rigid polystyrene foam board at grade insulates the outside perimeter of the concrete foundation, and a layer of cement-asbestos board protects the insulation from damage and rodents. The gable roof is framed with wood trusses to support the insulated ceiling and the roofing, and a modified truss extends out over the entrance pavement. Interior wall and ceiling surfaces should be secured with dip-galvanized nails. Caulk all interior joints with a top-quality flexible caulking (or sealing tape) and finish inside with a smooth waterproof coating such as polyurethane or epoxy enamel. Concrete floors The milk room floor must be easy to keep clean, but not polished so smooth that it becomes slippery when wet. The floor supports the loaded bulk milk

tank, so it should be laid on well-compacted granular fill and steel-reinforced to prevent unsanitary cracks. Concrete should be top quality (4000 psi min.), and be finished to a smooth non-skid surface such as a ‘wood float’ finish. milk room drainage The entire floor should slope to an oversized floor drain complete with a slotted cover, sediment bucket and gas trap. Locate the floor drain adjacent to the outlet end of the bulk milk tank and at least two feet from the outlet valve. Milk room wastes including floor washings and sink drainage may be drained to a sedimentation tank thence to a tile disposal bed, if the sub-soil is coarse and well-drained. This sediment tank must be pumped out regularly to dispose of solids, otherwise the tile will plug. With a liquid manure system, a better way to dispose of milk room drainage is to pipe the waste to the liquid manure storage tank. This provides the necessary dilution for easier pumping of the manure. ventilation and heating This plan shows a separate cooling compressor suspended in one corner of the milk room; summer ventilation for this unit is through a pair of louvered and screened openings complete with insulated sliding panels to be closed in winter. For winter, the plan Continued on page 27

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 23_Layout 1 14-01-30 3:28 PM Page 1

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Russell mayor new head of E.O. Wardensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Caucus

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USSELL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JEan PaUL St. PiERRE, WaRdEn of thE UnitEd CoUntiES of PRESCott and RUSSELL, and MayoR of RUSSELL toWnShiP, WaS ELECtEd on Jan. 17 aS ChaiR of thE EaStERn ontaRio WaRdEnS' CaUCUS (EoWC) foR 2014. At the annual meeting of the EOWC, held in Kingston, St. Pierre â&#x20AC;&#x201D; elected last month to a one-year term as UPCR warden â&#x20AC;&#x201D; assumed the chairmanship previously occupied by County of Hastings Warden Rick Phillips. Northumberland County Warden Linda Thompson was elected as St. Pierre's Vice-Chair. Thompson is the Mayor of the Municipality of Port Hope. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am truly thrilled to have been elected to the Chairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position,â&#x20AC;? declared St. Pierre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Eastern

Ontario Wardensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Caucus is working very hard to support all property taxpayers in the 103 member municipalities across the EOWC region and I look forward to lending my help to such efforts. The EOWC takes pride in doing its homework and coming up with new ideas that contribute to positive change in our municipalities.â&#x20AC;? The EOWC is a group of eleven Eastern Ontario counties and two single-tier municipalities, who work in conjunction with the provincial and federal governments in promoting our region and focusing on this year's EOWC priorities. In 2013, those priorities include economic development and financial sustainability, including the Eastern Ontario Rural Network's  $170-million project to supply modern high-speed internet service internet access to thousand

of rural homes and business. Among St. Pierreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s priorities for the region this year is the completion of a new economic development strategy for Eastern Ontario as well as working with partners, including the Eastern Ontario Mayorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Committee, to finalize a plan for its implementation. Thompson remarked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The economic development of our region has been recognized as a priority, and

for that reason I welcome the release and implementation of the forthcoming regional economic strategy for Eastern Ontario. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m eager to see the results of this year-long collaboration, whose distribution next month will represent a significant step forward for the EOWC and its many partners.â&#x20AC;? A second priority is to continue research and advocacy work on matters related to the financial sustain-

ability of municipal government in Eastern Ontario, including the writing and publication of three new â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;white papers'; and work towards stopping the spiralling costs of policing that are crippling municipal budgets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of our major concerns is the spiralling cost of policing. The EOWC is lending its support and its voice to the efforts to reduce those costs because they are simply unsustain-

able. Municipalities already have to consider spending reductions on critical infrastructure such as roads and bridges because of escalating police budgets,â&#x20AC;? added St. Pierre. He noted that municipalities across the region continue to face significant financial shortfalls, "One way to curb this tide is to promote economic development and encourage permanent, sustainable funding.â&#x20AC;? The local warden concluded that despite the large amount of work ahead, he intends to remain focused on the identified priorities.

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 25_Layout 1 14-01-31 3:08 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 25

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 26_Layout 1 14-01-31 11:40 AM Page 1

Page 26 The AgriNews February, 2014

www.agrinews.ca

Over 2,000 acres reclaimed by Wanna Make It Farm

W

anna Make It FarM Is a FaMIly busIness located In Moose creek, ontarIo oWned and operated by the leduc FaMIly. Wanna Make It FarM runs a dIversIFIed FarMIng operatIon. operatIng a lIcensed graIn buyIng and dealIng elevator, raIsIng corn, soybeans and Wheat and sellIng Mycogen seed brand products. addItIonally, truckIng servIces, custoM Work and bIo solId applIcatIons are oFFered.

In conjunction to the daily farming operations, Wanna Make It Farm has been bringing abandoned land and woodlots into production primarily for row crops. This is achieved with a team of highly qualified excavator operators who possess a cumulative of over 50 years work experience. Each excavator is equipped with five attachments; a hydraulic thumb, ditching, digging, root rake and skeleton bucket. The skeleton bucket is used primarily for fence removal, tree removal, excessively stony fields and can pick 5 inch stones and up. Also included is a fleet of rock trucks varying from 25T to 35T; these are used for site preparation, demolition, fence removal and during land clearing. Upon completion of land clearing, GPS land levelling can be requested to prepare the soil

bed. This practice is relied upon in farming practices ensuring sufficient surface drainage. Finally trucking services comprising of hauling grain, aggregates, wood chips, manure, compost, and floating heavy equipment are offered. Each acre of land cleared requires significant amounts of work to bring it into production. Adequate drainage, soil additives, and levelling will greatly assist in maximizing returns on investment. With our knowledge and experience in this area finding the right solution for your ever changing farm needs is possible. Over 2,000 acres of new land have successfully been brought back into production with the qualified and skilled team at Wanna Make It Farm. For more information on our services or how we can assist you and your farm feel free to contact us at 613 538 2547 or visit our website at www.wannamakeitfarm.com. Fact: From 2006 to 2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2,033,920 acres of prime farm land have been removed from agriculture due to urban expansions such as; shopping centres, developments, highways and people concern themselves with farmers improving and clearing a fraction of these acres! CANADA NEEDS FARMERS!

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 27_Layout 1 14-01-31 3:14 PM Page 1

www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 27

Faces of Farming calendar entrants sought by Feb. 7 ontArio fArmer or fArm fAmily

hAve you ever looked At the fACes of fArming CAlendAr And piCtured yourself on one of the pAges? if so, the AnnuAl fACes of fArming CAlendAr Contest might be whAt you’re looking for. The third annual contest is now underway – with a deadline to enter of Fri., Feb. 7. The winning family, pairing or individual will participate in a spring photo shoot, will receive complimentary copies of the calendar and two tickets and accommodation for the 2014 Ontario Harvest Gala and calendar launch later this fall. They will also be featured on a page in the 2015 Faces of Farming calendar – the tenth edition of the project which is annually produced by Farm & Food Care Ontario. Last year, the Heeman family of London submitted the winning entry which was chosen by a panel of urban judges from 25 great entries submitted by farm families across Ontario. Since it was first published in 2005, the project has featured the faces and stories of 120 Ontario farmers and farm families. Each year, the calendar is distributed to thousands of Ontario media, grocery retail outlets and politicians and is sold through the Farm & Food Care office. The goal of the project is to break down stereotypes of who Ontario’s farmers are and what they look Continued on page 29

shows a small intake fan to maintain ventilation with a slight positive pressure; this helps keep out barn odours. Run the fan after washing operations to dry out the room. A 4 to 5-kW electric heater with thermostat usually provides enough heat in winter to supplement waste heat from the cooling compressor. location This plan meets the requirements for most authorities having control of farm milk handling. However, you should obtain approval for your plans from proper local authorities before construction is started.

YOUR LOCAL DEALERS:

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Smooth riding even in rough y The left and right country. sides of the P ARALLEL-LINK PARALLEL-LINK suspension move completely independently independently..

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FARM SEGUIN DAIR DAIRYY FARM St. Eugene 613-674-2177

MOORE 5 COUNTR COUNTRYY DAIRYY SERVICES DAIR Napanee 613-354-5516

Alexandria 613-525-3691

AV AIL ABL E



Martintown 613-528-4205

FARM & DAIR R.B. FARM DAIRYY EQPTT. LLTD. TD. EQPT.

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The Canada Plan Service prepares detailed plans showing how to construct modern farm buildings, livestock housing systems, storages and equipment for Canadian Agriculture. This leaflet gives management information and describes one of these detailed plans. To obtain a copy of the Canada Plan Service detailed plan, contact your focal provincial agricultural engineer or extension advisor.

Loaded with features for professional users:

• High Output impeller with 6” or 8” discharge • Automatic Industrial brakes • High-speed steering /IL lLLEDÏHUBS • / IL lLLEDÏHUBS

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Continued from page 22

OUTPERFORMS, OUTMANEUVERS AND OUTSPREADS THE COMPETITION BY A MILE.

ENTT. REMI BERCIER INC. ENT.

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R o x b o r o u g h Agricultural Society director Glen Canham (left) congratulates this year’s Ontario Agricultural Service Diploma recipient, Brent MacIntyre, at the Society’s Jan. 25 annual general meeting. Volunteering with the Society and the Avonmore Fair since 2004, MacIntyre wasn’t deterred by the regular chore of helping to erect the Fair’s original tent. “Some people never return, but this year’s recipient decided to stay with us and as a result had a dream” — of never having to put up that tent again, reported Canham. MacIntyre, who served as president during the fair’s 150th anniversary, was credited for “leading the charge” that led to the installation of the fairgrounds’ central fabric-covered structure. “Thanks to him and his family behind him, we have beautifully manicured grounds and from time to time we get to enjoy his mom’s cooking. Zandbergen photo

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with A story thAt’s wAiting to be told?

MacIntyre receives Ontario Agricultural Service Diploma

JameswayFarmEq.com info@JameswayFarmEq.com Tel : 819-845-7824

Vankleek Hill Vankleek 613-677-0649


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 28_Layout 1 14-01-31 3:51 PM Page 1

Page 28 The AgriNews February, 2014

www.agrinews.ca

Key woodlot speaker on health benefits of forests K “ Catherine Thompson AgriNews Contributor EMPTVILLE — ThE MEdIcaL bEnEfITs of forEsTs

wILL hIghLIghT ThE

KEynoTE sPEEch aT ThE

wInTEr woodLoT confErEncE, fEb. 19, aT ThE w.b. gEorgE cEnTrE, KEMPTVILLE caMPus. Trees Ontario CEO Robert Keen will give a presentation on a published report called "A Healthy Dose of Green" that shows "how trees benefit human health, not just offset greenhouse gases and provide habitat for wildlife creatures," says Melanie Williams, spokesperson for the Eastern Ontario Model Forest. Next is Dr. Richard Wilson, forest pathologist for the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, who will advise woodlot owners on invasive species and pests and what to do about them. They include thousand cankers disease on black walnut, beech bark disease and hemlock wooly adelgid, a small aphid like insect that threatens the health of hemlock trees. He will also touch on a new product to treat root rot disease in red pine, a tree of commercial value that has a long history in Eastern Ontario. A prescriptive video for the EOMF will show woodlot owners what to do in the face of emerald ash borer, currently in the Ottawa area and advancing in Eastern Ontario. The video is in two sections, one for municipal

Vernal ponds are more than just a breeding ground for mosquitoes. They have a role in the ecosystem.”

officials and urban residents and one for woodlot owners with large stands of ash. Growing culinary mushrooms is Bruno Pretto and Paula Vopni's subject. The two, who are with Mycosource Inc. will describe and demonstrate the log cultivation of mushrooms, expecially shitake, for the gourmet market. "They will speak on the ecological and medical role of mushrooms. Every year, we talk about non-timber products of the forest. We present options to give greater income from the woodlot, if owners choose," Williams says. She adds a presentation by Brian Lawrence, Workplace Safety North, will deal with "very real hazards" in the bush and how to protect oneself, by observing chainsaw safety and other measures. Janine McLeod will explain how vernal ponds “are more than just a breeding ground for mosquitoes. They have a role in the ecosystem,” Williams says. A half hour morning coffee break will allow

attendees to network and visit exhibits by sponsoring organizations like the EOMF, businesses and the Ferguson Forest Centre. Williams says "these are a big part of the conference. People arrive early and mill around before it starts. We have 14 sponsors we're indebted to and also have funding support from the Grenville Community Futures Corporation." There is also a 1.5 hour lunch break to let people view displays. A cafeteria ticket comes with the registration fee of $30. Just the proceedings without lunch costs $20. In the afternoon, Thomas Logan, executive chair of Protocol Biomass Corporation will give an update on a new pellet mill for Prescott and how woodlot owners might market their chips or logs. Tom Richardson with Heideman Forest Services will outline opportunities for red pine pre-commercial and commercial harvesting. Since it's not economically feasible for individual small woodlot owners, selective harvesting may be arranged if a group is formed. Finally, a wildlife feature and speaker is to be announced. Registration, coffee and exhibit viewing is from 8 9 a.m., when the proceedings start. The conference winds up at 3:30 p.m. You can also register by calling 613-258-8241 or online at eomf.on.ca/winter-woodlot-conference or e-mail modelforest@eomf.on.ca

Barn and House Wall Repairs

Cooking up support for the 2015 IPM

John Roosendaal (left) Ottawa Valley Seed Growers Association President, Diana Legault, Cookbook Committee Chair, and Tom Van Dusen, OVSGA General Manager, show off the SD&G 2015 International Plowing Match and Rural Expo Cookbook. The cookbook, which features 900 recipes, was officially launched Nov. 30 at the South Nation Conservation office in Finch. The books are available for $12 each as an IPM fundraiser. The OVSGA contributed $10,000 to help offset printing costs. Matte photo

Sand & Gravel, Stone, Washed Aggregates, Road Building, Commercial Asphalt Paving, Truck/Equipment Rentals (w/operator) One load or 100, you call we haul. Serving Beautiful Eastern Ontario Since 1957.

Sweet’s Sand & Gravel 3299 County Road 32 Seeley’s Bay 613-387-3838 Kemptville Division 4054 County Road 43 Kemptville 613-258-3612

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Wilson Quarry 1590 County Road 43 Between Smiths Falls & Merrickville 613-269-4004 (May-November) Tackaberry Sand & Stone Ltd. 16129 Highway 7 east of Perth 613-267-1280


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 29_Layout 1 14-01-31 3:35 PM Page 1

www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 29

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Russell Ag Society elects executive

The 2014 Russell Agricultural Society Executive members, elected at the RAS Annual General Meeting on Jan. 24. From left: Ina Henry (Homecraft), Henry Staal (1st Vice-President), Gord Sheldrick (Past-President), Barbara Cook (Treasurer) and Debra McMahon (Secretary). Missing is President John Hickling, who was also President in 1996-97.

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Bob Mark New Holland takes on Hyundai Construction

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2 yard to 6 yard capacities.   (followed By tHe HyuNdai Material). Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas, Inc. has been in the United States for over 20 years and is a part of the Construction Equipment Division of Hyundai Heavy Industries, a global leader in froM

Calendar continued from page 27 like. It also helps to introduce consumers to the farmers who work 365 days each year to provide quality, local Ontario products. Farmers or farm families are encouraged to enter the contest by submitting both a family photo and short essay (400 words or less) describing their family. Candidates must make their primary income from agriculture. Their essays must include the following to be considered: â&#x20AC;˘Names and ages of all

Shipbuilding, Offshore Drilling & Engineering, Industrial Plant Development & Engineering, Engine & Machinery Manufacturing, Electro Electric Systems Manufacturing and Construction Equipment. Hyundai offers quality earthmoving and materialhandling equipment, including hydraulic excavators, wheel loaders, skid steer loaders and electric and diesel forklifts. They also manufacture internal combustion cushion and internal combustion pneumatic forklifts. With Hyundaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North American headquarters and parts depot in Norcross, GA, both dealers and customers consistently receive quick fulfillment on all orders. Hyundaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to family members â&#x20AC;˘Address including county or region of residency â&#x20AC;˘ A description of the farming operation including types of crops grown and/or livestock raised â&#x20AC;˘History of the farm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; number of generations farming, etc. â&#x20AC;˘Any other details that make their story unique including community involvement, environmental initiatives, unusual hobbies, etc. â&#x20AC;˘Why theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to appear in the Faces of Farming calendar.

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innovation is unparalleled in the industry and they continue to push the envelope when it comes to construction equipment capabilities.  If you want a more extensive history, please see our about us page on our website: http://www.hceamericas.com/hyundai-construction-equipment

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It pays to manage depth with Precision Proper planting depth leads to even emergence and maximum yield. Start with 20/20 SeedSenseÂŽ with FieldViewâ&#x201E;˘ so you can watch and react to everything thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening in real time. Add AirForceÂŽ to make sure your planter stays at the depth you set. Then press seeds into the bottom of the trench with KeetonÂŽ Seed Firmers for optimum seed-to-soil contact. That way, every seed gets the proper moisture. They all come up together. You get a consistent stand in which every plant adds to your yield. Come in and secure your Precision depth management tools today for a maximum yield this fall. Ask about managing germination and spacing, too.

Vernon Valley Farms Ltd. Greg Millard, Winchester, ON 613-774-6400 Eric Levac St. Bernardin, ON 613-524-5292

Andreas Baumann Delta, ON 613-928-2614

Gary Parks %ORRPÂżHOG21 613-399-2307


Open House

AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 30_Layout 1 14-01-31 1:10 PM Page 1

Page 30 The AgriNews February, 2014

www.agrinews.ca

FOR JOHN DROOGH AND FAMILY AT SHADY LANE FARMS IN NORTH GOWER (6526 4TH LINE RD.)

FEBRUARY 27TH, 2014 FROM 10 A.M. - 3 P.M.

Full Line Of Seed & Feed


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 31_Layout 1 14-01-31 1:12 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 31

BUILDING FEATURES:

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GUY LAMBERT Sales Manager Gérant des ventes

116 Willowlea Road - Unit 1 Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0

2265 Highway 31 Winchester, Ontario K0A 2K0 2I¿FH )D[ (PDLOVSHQFHUW#UHLVHTXLSPHQWFD www.reisequipment.ca

Collins Barrow WCM LLP 52 LANSDOWNE AVENUE CARLETON PLACE, ONTARIO K7C 2T8 T.: (613) 253-0014 F.: (613) 253-0129 DIRECT LINE: (613) 253-0014 EXT. 221 DIRECT EMAIL: jfoster@collinsbarrow.com

an independent member of

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 32_Layout 1 14-01-31 2:23 PM Page 1

Page 32 The AgriNews February, 2014

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Ontario AAS Service Diploma recipients â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stormont

Volunteers of over 20 years with the Stormont County Fair, Gloria and Albert Milley were recognized Jan. 18 for their work with the annual event in Newington. At the Stormont County Agricultural Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual general meeting, the couple received the Ontario Association of Agricultural Societies Agricultural Service Diploma. Usually haunting the flower area during the late-summer fair, the Milleys were also commended for many hours spent in the hospitality tent conversing with visitors and handing out chocolate milk and curds. The fair also serves as a family get-together for the Milleys.

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 33_Layout 1 14-01-31 3:25 PM Page 1

www.agrinews.ca

Dispelling myths around organics T Simon Neufeld Special to The AgriNews he CBC reporTed reCenTly on The

Canadian Food inspeCTion agenCyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TesTs For pesTiCide residues on

organiC and ConvenTional produCe in Canadian groCery sTores. The ConCern aBouT pesTiCide residues is real: we should Be wary oF exposing ourselves To ChroniC low doses oF Complex and unTesTed ChemiCal mixTures. people are righT To Choose organiC produCe as a way To reduCe exposure To These unknown risks.

According to the report, CFIA testing between 2011 and 2013 found pesticide residues in both conventional and organic produce. Almost half   the organic produce tested    positive for at least trace amounts of pesticide. Based   on this fact, the story   implied that organics









were practising â&#x20AC;&#x153;false advertisingâ&#x20AC;?: people pay a premium for organic produce, but there are still pesticides in the food. This kind of story is perennial. The challenge for those of us in the organic industry is to respond to these reports by reminding the public about the good reasons to choose organic instead of conventional, while dispelling some of the misunderstandings about what organic food is. There are a few common misunderstandings about organic food that come to mind: 1. Organic food is certified to be free of pesticides. In fact, organic certification addresses the process by  was pro  which the food duced. It  does not certify  the finished product. The   Canadian Organic Standard   



states that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Organic practices and this standard cannot assure that organic products are entirely free of residues of substances prohibited by this standard... since exposure to such compounds from the atmosphere, soil, ground water and other sources may be beyond the control of the operator.â&#x20AC;? It goes on to state that the objective for organics is â&#x20AC;&#x153;to assure the least possible residues at the lowest possible levels.â&#x20AC;? 2. Organic agriculture is simply farming without pesticides. Organic standards encompass much more than just a ban on synthetic pesticides. Organi c farmers must use longer crop rotations that promote  biodiversity, they must protect the soil from and erosion, degradation,  sterilization, and they must   manage their  

livestock using higher welfare standards than conventional farmers. Organic farmers are allowed to use a select range of natural pesticides that are derived with minimal processing from minerals or plants. For example, insecticidal soap is an effective tool used for insect control by organic market gardeners. The list of permitted substances for organic agriculture is surprisingly detailed. It is published by the Canadian gov-

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 33 ernment, and is enforced by of soil fertility can cost third-party certifiers that more than conventional audit every certified organic seed and fertilizer, and farm in Canada organic farmers must pay every year. Organic farmers the annual cost of certificathat do not follow the rules tion itself. The premium face penalties or the loss of paid for organic food comtheir certification. pensates organic farmers 3. Organics are not for these economic disadworth the extra money vantages. The fact that because we cannot trust the some dishonest conventionlabelling. Organic crop al farmers and food procesyields are for the most part sors have taken advantage lower than their convenof the organic premium to tional counterparts. In addi- squeeze some extra profit tion, inputs like seed and  Continued on page 34 organic-compliant sources

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 34_Layout 1 14-01-31 3:27 PM Page 1

Page 34 The AgriNews February, 2014

Organics Continued from page 33 (like a bakery in B.C. selling conventional bread as organic) is not a strike against organic farmers. It is merely further evidence that the CFIA must adequately enforce the Canadian Organic Standard. There remain many solid reasons to choose organic instead of conventional produce. One reason was contained in the pesticide residue story itself: organic produce contains drastically lower amounts of pesticide than conventional pro-

duce. In the CFIA testing, while about half the organics tested positive, conventional produce tested positive almost 80% of the time. In addition, when pesticides were found on organic produce, the levels were lower on average than those on conventional produce. For example, average levels of thiabendazol (a fungicide) were 15 times higher on conventional apples compared to organic. Thus, eating an organic diet will reduce your exposure to agricultural chemicals. But there are other reasons to choose organic: the “carbon footprint” of organic farming is significantly

www.agrinews.ca lower than conventional, mostly due to the vast quantity of natural gas used in the production of nitrogen fertilizer for conventional farms. The diversified crop rotations used by organic farmers promote greater biodiversity of wildlife, birds, and beneficial insects. The fact that organic farms are not using synthetic pesticides means that organic farm labourers around the world are not being sprayed by pesticides directly. The improved richness of soil in organic agriculture means less erosion, better natural fertility, and a general improvement

in the soil’s ability to recover from environmental stresses like dry or wet years. Organic agriculture is not only doing its part to slow climate change, but is also the form of agriculture best suited to adapt to climate change as it progresses. Clearly the demand for safe, nutritious food will continue to grow in coming years, and it is important for organic farmers to meet the challenge this demand pres-

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include Matt Holmes of the Canadian Organic Trade Association on market outlooks and his response to the recent pesticide residue media coverage, Jodi Koberinski of the Organic Council of Ontario on the real health benefits of organic food, and JeanMartin Fortier on bio-intensive organic gardening. For more information about this year’s conference, visit the Eco Farm Day website at www.ecofarmday.ca.

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 35_Layout 1 14-01-31 4:53 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 35

Can humans, coyotes co-exist? by Carolyn Thompson Goddard AgriNews Contributor he CoyoTe, or Canis laTrans, is a member of The dog family whiCh has spread from wesTern Canada To almosT every provinCe of Canada sinCe The near exTinCTion of The grey wolf. This wild animal has a greaT CapaCiTy To adapT To urban as well as rural living wiTh a well- developed abiliTy To find food in eiTher seTTing. wiTh

T

The ever inCreasing inTrusion of human habiTaTion inTo The rural seTTing, The inCidenCe of human-CoyoTe inTeraCTions appear To be on The inCrease.

Kim Beach of the Kemptville District office of MNR, reports that the “number of coyotes seen by hunters in Wildlife Management Unit (WMU) 65, which includes SD&G, has been increasing since 2010.” In fact a few years ago in Osgoode Township which borders North Dundas, there were numerous accounts of coyotes attacking and killing household pets such as small dogs or cats and reports of aggressive actions by these animals towards humans. Approximately two years ago there were reports of similar activity in a northern section of the City of Cornwall which prompted this municipality to hold a coyote information evening at Viscount Alexander Public School in Cornwall on Thursday January 23. Representatives from Coyote Watch Canada as well as the Association for the Protection of Fur Bearing Animals spoke to a group of approximately fifty persons from both Cornwall and outlying areas about the need to have a peaceful co-existence with all wild life include the coyote. Lesley Sampson, co-founder and director of Coyote Watch Canada was the main speaker at the evening. Her organization seeks to “work with farmers moving away from lethal – it doesn’t work.” In fact, she had spent the afternoon with a farmer near Martintown assisting him in putting together a non-lethal coyote plan for his farm. Some of the ways in which to “Farm in Harmony” with the coyote are to ensure that animals are in at night, remove dead stock, invest in guard dogs and educate humans. Sampson describes the coyote as a “keystone species” as they help to keep the ecosystem in balance and healthy. The virtual eradication of the wolf has led to man being their main predator and it is open season, 365 days a year on the coyote. These omnivorous animals have a variety of food choices including small rodents, insects, carrion, deer, fruits, vegetables and domestic animals. Coyotes are intelligent and adaptive animals and are often attracted to areas as a result of people providing this wild animal easy access to food. The slogan “I was fed … now I’m dead” was touted as a dramatic illustration of this phrase. A member of the audience from South Stormont related how during a coyote hunt in the recent past, none of these animals were killed, but a large number of feral dogs were shot. He also suggested that there should be some consequences for people who feed the coyotes either inadvertently by leaving dog food outside or on purpose in order to get a good photo of this striking animal. Later a farmer from Quebec produced enlargements of graphic photographs showing sheep that had allegedly been mauled by coyotes, a situation that had been occurring for years and resulted in thousands of dollars’ worth of livestock being lost. In Ontario there is the Ontario Wildlife Damage Compensation Program, administered by the Ministry of Agriculture and Food which can provide compensation for livestock. According to the MNR spokesperson Kim Beach, the farmer is required to notify the municipality within 48 hours of discovering livestock or poultry which may have been damaged or killed by a wild animal, such as coyote. The coyote is a firmly established part of our ecosystem in Eastern Ontario. We know they are here because we can hear them and see them. Hunters report their existence, rural or city dwellers will often see them and many have heard the unforgettable howling of a coyotes in the night. How we look upon these dog-like wild creatures is dependent upon our frame of reference and according to Sampson it is better to determine how to live with the coyotes instead of killing or relocating them.

Elaine Kennedy of Cornwall looks on as Lesley Sampson, co-founder of Coyote Watch Canada and Elwood Quinn, Quebec farmer discuss the photo of a sheep he alleges was mauled by coyotes on his Quebec farm. Goddard photo

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 36_Layout 1 14-01-31 11:17 AM Page 1

Page 36 The AgriNews February, 2014

www.agrinews.ca

DateLine East Region Feruary 11 Northumberland Federation of Agriculture, Centreton Community Centre 7:30pm - 9:30pm For information, call Eileen Argyris, Secretary Northumberland Federation of Agriculture at 905-8851456 or email: argyris@sympatico.ca February 13 Quinte Farm Trade Show Where: Knights of Columbus Hall, 57 Stella Crescent, Trenton, ON 9am - 4pm Speakers include: Victor Aideyan, HISGRAIN Commodities; Paul Cuddy, Superior Propane; Eric Lawlor, Growing Forward II Program; Dairy Speaker to be confirmed. Admission is free. 45 local exhibitors. Hot lunch available for $12. For more information contact Jeff Finlay jeff.finlay@fcc-fac.ca February 13 Eastern Ontario Dairy Days - Kemptville, W B George Centre, Kemptville Campus, University of Guelph, Kemptville, ON 9:30am - 3:30pm This event provides an opportunity for area dairy producers to meet and be educated on the latest technology, discuss pertinent marketing issues and interact and exchange ideas with other dairy professionals. Registration is $25.00, payable at the door and includes lunch. For more information visit our new

website www.eontdairydays.com February 13 Alice the Moose in the Land Between: The Biodiversity Project, Township of Thurlow Community Centre, 516 Harmony Road, north of Belleville, ON 7pm - 9:30pm The public is invited to a fascinating talk on the biodiversity of where we live â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so unique it has its own name â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Land Between. Emily Conger tells the story of Alice the Moose. Free of charge. Donations accepted at the door. Information: 613-391-9034 or email: info@hastingsstewardship.ca February 13 Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture Monthly Director Meeting, OPP Office Boardroom, County Rd. 1, (Schoharie Road), Picton, ON 7:30pm - 10pm All Welcome! Contact Patti Stacey at 613-476-3842 or email princeedwardfarmers@gmail.com February 14 Eastern Ontario Dairy Days, Maxville District Sports Complex, 23 Fair Street, Maxville, ON 9:30am - 3:30pm This event provides an opportunity for area dairy producers to meet and be educated on the latest technology, discuss pertinent marketing issues and interact and exchange ideas with other dairy professionals. Registration is $25.00,

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payable at the door and includes lunch. For more information visit our new website www.eontdairydays.com February 22 & 23 Farms at Work â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Seed Saving 101 (tentatively) For more informationcontact Jay Adam â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Program Coordinator 705-743-7671 February 22 Eco-Farm Day 2014 Ottawa-St. Lawrence Outaouais Chapter COG The Ramada Inn, 805 Brookdale Ave, Cornwall, ON 8am - 5:30pm This year's theme for Eastern Ontario's premier organic farming conference is "Getting to the Roots". Program includes guest speakers, panel discussions and an extensive trade show for organic, transitional and conventional farmers. Visit www.ecofarmday.ca for more information and registration. Contact: Simon Neufeld at 613-244-4000 ext. 4 or by email at ecofarmday@cog.ca. February 25 Food Charter Action Planning Day, 600 William Street, Large Board Room Cobourg, ON 10am - 4pm We need your ideas for initiatives across the food system that support local food, healthy food access, economic development and environmental sustainability. Register Contact Kimberly Leadbeater (613) 475-0933 x 4235; klead-

beater@hkpr.on.ca. February 27 Hastings Federation of Agriculture Meeting, Thurlow Community Centre, Corbyville, ON, 7pm - 10pm Start at 7pm with guest speaker Don McCabe, followed by regular board meeting at 8:30pm. Contact Judy Hagerman, SecretaryTreasurer, email jlhagerman@sympatico.ca. March 1 Farms at Work â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kawartha Farm Stewardship Workshop For more information contact Jay Adam â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Program Coordinator 705743-7671 March 4 - 6 All day Free Stall Dairy Housing Design Seminars Kemptville, Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 212, 100 Reuben Crescent, Kemptville, ON This seminar is specifically intended for producers with plans to build or renovate their free stall in the next few years. The focus is on fundamentals of design. It will also provide practical information needed to build an economical, labour efficient facility that is comfortable for cattle. Cost for 2 day course is $214.70 (includes 13% HST). For more information and to register, call the Agricultural Information Contact Centre 1-877-4241300 or 519-826-4047. March 11 Northumberland Federation of Agriculture, Centreton â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 38

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 38_Layout 1 14-01-31 9:30 AM Page 1

Page 38 The AgriNews February, 2014

DateLine Community Centre 7:30pm - 9:30pm For information, call Eileen Argyris, Secretary Northumberland Federation of Agriculture at 905-8851456 or email: argyris@sympatico.ca March 13 Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture Monthly Director Meeting, OPP Office Boardroom, County Rd. 1, (Schoharie Road), Picton, ON

www.agrinews.ca

â&#x20AC;˘ Continued from Page 36

7:30pm - 10pm All Welcome! Contact Patti Stacey at 613-476-3842 or email princeedwardfarmers@gmail.com March 27 Hastings Federation of Agriculture Meeting, Heather Lang, 979 Wyman Road, Shannonville, ON 7:30pm - 10:30pm Contact Judy Hagerman, Secretary-Treasurer, email jlhagerman@sympatico.ca. April 8

Northumberland Federation of Agriculture, Centreton Community Centre 7:30pm - 9:30pm For information, call Eileen Argyris, Secretary Northumberland Federation of Agriculture at 905-8851456 or email: argyris@sympatico.ca April 10 Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture Monthly Director Meeting, OPP Office Boardroom, County

Rd. 1, (Schoharie Road), Picton, ON 7:30pm - 10pm All Welcome! Contact Patti Stacey at 613-476-3842 or email princeedwardfarmers@gmail.com May 8 Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture Monthly Director Meeting, OPP Office Boardroom, County Rd. 1, (Schoharie Road), Picton, ON 7:30pm - 10pm

All Welcome! Contact Patti Stacey at 613-476-3842 or email princeedwardfarmers@gmail.com May 13 Northumberland Federation of Agriculture, Centreton Community Centre 7:30pm - 9:30pm For information, call Eileen Argyris, Secretary Northumberland Federation of Agriculture at 905-8851456 or email: argyris@sympatico.ca

June 10 Northumberland Federation of Agriculture, Centreton Community Centre 7:30pm - 9:30pm For information, call Eileen Argyris, Secretary Northumberland Federation of Agriculture at 905-8851456 or email: argyris@sympatico.ca June 12 Prince Edward Federation â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 39

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INNOVATION FRI., FEBRUARY 28, 2014 PLAQUES: BEST INDOOR OF THE YEAR 10 A.M.5 P.M. & OUTDOOR AWARD

DOOR PRIZES Come see the latest in Farm Machinery, Equipment, with many Exhibits and Displays of seeds and more!

Come visit with your neighbours!

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ECO Farm Day

.HPSWYLOOH'DLU\'D\ PRESENTED BY:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Getting to the Roots: Successful Organic Farmingâ&#x20AC;? Saturday, February 22, 2014 LTTi')+564#6+10#0&4#&'*192'0 MTT61HTTi10('4'0%'241)4#/ KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Matt Holmes Guy Forand Canadian Organic Trade of TRIOLACT Forage Solutions Association Dr. RenĂŠe Berseron and Jean-Martin Fortier Dr. Elsa Vasseur author of The Market of Alfred College Gardener George Wright Jodi Koberinski Castor River Farm Organic Council of Ontario and others! Â&#x2DC; +'.&4125Â&#x2DC;+8'561%-Â&#x2DC;#4-'6 #4&'0+0) Location: The Ramada Inn, 805 Brookdale Ave., Cornwall, ON 1 hour from Ottawa, 1.5 hours from Montreal, 2 hours from Kingston

Register on-line at www.ecofarmday.ca

DISPLAY

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 39_Layout 1 14-01-31 9:35 AM Page 1

www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 39

DateLine

CLASSIFIEDS

â&#x20AC;˘ Continued from Page 38

of Agriculture Monthly Director Meeting, OPP Office Boardroom, County Rd. 1, (Schoharie Road), Picton, ON 7:30pm - 10pm All Welcome! Contact Patti Stacey at 613-476-3842 or email princeedwardfarmers@gmail.com July 8 Northumberland Federation of Agriculture, Centreton Community Centre 7:30pm - 9:30pm For information, call Eileen Argyris, Secretary -



Northumberland Federation of Agriculture at 905-8851456 or email: argyris@sympatico.ca July 10 Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture Monthly Director Meeting, OPP Office Boardroom, County Rd. 1, (Schoharie Road), Picton, ON 7:30pm - 10pm All Welcome! Contact Patti Stacey at 613-476-3842 or email princeedwardfarmers@gmail.com

FOR SALE

SERVICES

FOR SALE 2012 Demco 850 Sprayer, 65â&#x20AC;&#x2122; boom with 2x5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; extensions. Tee-Jet 3 way nozzles at 20â&#x20AC;? spacing, 5 section, 17 gal inductor, 100 gal rinse tank, 13.6-38 tires, hydraulically driven pump, Raven 450 rate controller, Cruiser II guidance system. For more info contact 613-347-2933. 01 FOR SALE Tajfun RCa 400 firewood processor. Buhler 1070 grain auger with swing away. 613-853-5027. 01

LEWIS CONSTRUCTION 613-340-9035 613-652-6299 Renovations/Additions Decks Roofing Siding, Soffit and Fascia Garages Blown in Insulation tfc

WANTED Does anyone offer a horse drawn Hearse Service in Eastern Ontario? Please call Jeff Mason 613-478-3314. 01

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 41

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 42_Layout 1 14-01-31 9:56 AM Page 1

Page 42 The AgriNews February, 2014

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 43_Layout 1 14-01-31 5:46 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 43

A winter fair to remember in Russell

R

USSELL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; RESidEntS of RUSSELL and thE

SURRoUnding aREa had thE good foRtUnE to

6th annUaL RUSSELL hoRticULtURaL SociEtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Living LocaLLy faiR on Sat., Jan. 18.  it waS a Show-

viSit thE

caSE foR pRodUcERS and

EaStERn ontaRio. A feast for the senses, the rooms and hallways of St. Thomas Aquinas CHS were filled with meats, grains, baking, crafts, wool, clothing, handmade wooden products, herbs, cheese, and lots of other eye catching or delectable items.   Local farms present included Dunveganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hawk Hill Farm, Smiths Fallsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Milkhouse Farm and Dairy, Dunbrae Farm in Almonte, Excalibur Farm in Embrun, and Metcalfeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Castor River Farm.  These farms sustain Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rare breeds and heirloom crops and market their products directly to their consumers.  Meadow aRtiStS fRom

   







 

Greens Nursery near Marionville was also on hand reminding us that spring is around the corner.



 

Artisan Claude Bouchard, owner of Les Seaux GADI Buckets of ClarenceRockland, displayed his excellent woodworking skills at Russell Living Locally Fair on Jan. 18. Bouchard creates a variety of heritage style buckets, created with over 25 wood species.

 

   

   

 

  

Education was as important as merchandising for the farms present, as inventory and samples moved

 

 

 

 

 

    

briskly.  All the farm vendors reported incredible interest in their products, including full order sheets

for the non-commercially raised meat products.  Grass fed beef, poultry and lamb products are sold out well in advance by word of mouth and return sales.  Selling directly is the only reason they are able to survive raising heirloom crops and heritage breeds, the products from which do not work well within standard commercial distribution, but remain important to crop and species diversity. Excalibur farms raises Scottish Highland beef organically and highlighted their educational display with a fast food hamburger, many years old, that was desiccated and shrivelled, but not rotten and decayed.   Dunveganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hawk Hill Farm advertised their flock and herds which include Partridge Chantecler chickens, North Country Cheviot and Tunis Sheep, and the Canadian horse breed.  Dunbrae Farms in Almonte, featuring grass fed heritage Red Poll cattle and Tamworth pigs was represented by Bruce and Janet Duncan also representing their chapter of

Rare Breeds Canada. Organizer Lindley McPhail heard mostly good comments from vendors and attendees alike. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overall the event was smooth as silk, with only parking being an issue that we hope to rectify for next year.â&#x20AC;?  And with a record 2,300 coming through the doors that is to be expected.  The attendance certainly helped the linked charity drive for a local food bank, augmented by the draw from the Capital City Garrison and the Rebel Legion.  The proximity to Ottawa generated the tag line that the fair had galactic visitors from far, far, away. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Events like these do not just happen.â&#x20AC;? McPhail  said, noting noting that the STA students and staff were very knowledgeable about what needed to be done, and were a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;great helpâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in getting the fair set up the previous night.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have done it without them,â&#x20AC;? she stated.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a very successful year, and the Society looks forward to next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event.â&#x20AC;?

  



8IFOJUDPNFTUPNPWJOHNBUFSJBM OPUIJOHHFUTUIFKPCEPOFMJLFB)ZVOEBJ8IFFM-PBEFS:PVNJHIUOFFEUPMPBEBUSVDLPSIBVMHSBWFM NPWF                            MVNCFSPSEFCSJT/PNBUUFSXIBUZPVSQSPKFDU UIFTFSVHHFE IJHIQFSGPSNBODFNBDIJOFTBSFUIFGBTU FGĂĽDJFOUXBZUPHFUNPSFXPSLEPOF                       8JUIUIF4FSJFT8IFFM-PBEFST ZPVCFOFĂĽUGSPNIJHIRVBMJUZ)ZVOEBJDPOTUSVDUJPONBUDIFEXJUIPVS)JNBUFSFNPUFNBOBHFNFOUUFDIOPMP                  HZ FBTZNBJOUFOBODFGFBUVSFTUIBUSFEVDFNBDIJOFEPXOUJNFBOETFSWJDFDPTUT FYUFOEFEMJGFDPNQPOFOUTUIBUDBOHPBTNVDIBT IPVST                       CFUXFFODIBOHFT5IFZBSFUSVMZIBSEXPSLJOH CVEHFUGSJFOEMZNBDIJOFT     

494 Main Street, Hwy. 3 Courtland 519-688-0909 EISZDVO!CMVFXFTUDBtXXXCMVFXFTUDB

Sunderland: 705-357-3121 Lindsay: 705-324-2221 Campbellford: 705-653-3700 ECVUUBS!CPCNBSLDBtXXXCPCNBSLDB


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 44_Layout 1 14-01-31 10:02 AM Page 1

Page 44 The AgriNews February, 2014

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Preservation, innovation StonCorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s watchwords S tonCor

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InG InnovatIve SolutIonS to proteCt and enhanCe our CuStoMerSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Infra-

StruCture by CoMbInInG the produCtS and reSourCeS of four world leadInG CorroSIon Control CoMpanIeS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Stonhard, CarbolIne, fIberGrate and StonCor ConStruCtIon produCtS Group (CpG). Over 90 years of field experience has solidified StonCorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to cutting-edge technology and uncompromising quality. StonCor Group understands the challenges and opportunities facing corrosion protection and provides a single source for all coatings, linings, flooring, precision grouts, waterproofing, fireproofing, FRP (fiberglass reinforced plastic), grating and structural system needs. Our products are engineered to provide longterm, cost-effective systems that provide corrosion and abrasion resistant solutions while offering aesthetic appeal and design flexibility. Stonhard has set the standard for installing high performance polymer floor, wall and lining systems. Stonhardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seamless, long-wearing and easy to clean flooring systems are engineered to perform in both industrial and commercial flooring environments without sacrificing design

and innovative vision. Carboline Company is dedicated to supplying high performance coatings, linings and fireproofing products around the world through continuous technological improvements and first class service. Carboline products and services are designed to satisfy our customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs by protecting assets from the effects of corrosion, erosion, abrasion, physical abuse, weather, fire, etc. Fibergrate Composite Structures Inc. is a global manufacturer of fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) products for industrial and recreational applications. Fibergrate manufactures a wide range of FRP products â&#x20AC;&#x201C; grating, floor plates structural shapes, stair treads and covers, handrails and ladders. Fibergrate composite products are proven to make a significant contribution to safety, corrosion resistance, durability, and maintenance-free operation. StonCor Construction Products Group combines world leading product ranges to provide a comprehensive and integrated solutions portfolio for repair, restoration, waterproofing, grouting, corrosion protection and upgrading of residential, commercial and industrial buildings, parking decks and structures. StonCorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diverse portfolio of construction product solutions include Five Star, Vandex, Deckshield, StonFlow, Joint Stabilizer, StonWalk, CarboComp and Leak Inject.

  

 

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AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 45_Layout 1 14-01-31 4:50 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews February, 2014 Page 45

All-Ontario Jerseys announced

J

ersey

OntariO

annOunced the winners Of the

2013 all OntariO cOmpetitiOn last mOnth. Receiving All Ontario Heifer was Sleegerholm Reagan Ikea, exhibited by Mike Sleegers and Ari Ekstein and the All Ontario Cow was Arethusa On Time Vogue-Et, exhibited by Pleasant Nook Jerseys and Whiskey River. Payneside Farms Inc. (Finch)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Payneside Mac N Cheese (4-H Calf Reseve, Senior Calf Honourable Mention); Better Than Cheddar, Cassidy Smith (4-H Reserve Yearling, Summer Yearling All Ontario) Hollylane Jerseys & Ed Mcmorrow (Corbyville) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hollylane Jacknife Zulu

(Junior Calf All Ontario) Michael and Monique Bols (Russell) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Drentex Reward Silk (Summer Yearling Reseve); Drentex Reward Brava (Milking Yearling) Avonlea Genetics, Inc. (Brighton) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Avonlea BC Kept Secret (Summer Yearling Honourable Mention); Avonlea Kookie Dough ET, (Junior 3-yearold Honourable Mention,) Junior herd All Ontario (Unanimous) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Charlyn Jerseys; Reserve â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Avonlea Genetics Inc; Honorable Mention â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tim Hunt Breeders herd All Ontario (Unanimous) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pleasant Nook Jerseys; Reserve (Unanimous) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Avonlea Genetics Inc; Honorable Mention â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bridon Farms Inc.

Tel: 613-932-4413 Fax: 613-932-4467

1440 Tenth Street East, Cornwall, Ontario Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25, Cornwall Ontario, K6H 5R9

Bobby Robinson of Payneside Jerseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Finch) is seen here showing one of their cows at the St. Lawrence Parish Jersey Show last Sept. at the Russell Fair. Payneside's Better than Cheddar and Mac N Cheese both received awards in Jersey Canada's All Canadian Competition and Jersey Ontario 2013 All Ontario Competition.

Quota debate at Dairy Days

St. Lawrence Valley Jersey Club Supports CHEO

From left: Kevin Elshof, president of the St. Lawrence Valley Jersey Club, presents Kevin Keohane, CEO, CHEO Foundation, with a cheque of $1,214 on behalf of the members. Each year, at the annual meeting of the Club, members hold an auction with proceeds donated to a worthwhile cause â&#x20AC;&#x201D; CHEOâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;being the choice this year.

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EASTERN ONTARIO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; An expected highlight of this monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Dairy Days conferences in Kemptville (Feb. 13) and Maxville (Feb. 14) are planned debates between a supporter and a detractor of the present dairy quota exchange system. Chris Buchner of Elmwold Farms and Dave Loewith of Summitholm Holsteins will square off. See the new Dairy Days website at www.eontdairydays.com

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Email: robsangers@me.com www.sangersilo.com


AGRINEWS February 2014 Page 46_Layout 1 14-01-31 11:42 AM Page 1

Page 46 The AgriNews February, 2014

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DeLaval robots do the job at Shady Lane Farms By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer ORTH GOWER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A dOublE-8

N

HERRiNGbONE pAR-

lOuR pAssEd iNTO HisTORy AT

sHAdy lANE FARms

lAsT summER.

Since last July, a pair of DeLaval VMS robots have been milking the herd of just over 100 registered Holsteins at the operation run by second-generation dairy farmers John and Dianne Droogh. The machinesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shiny stainless steel arms work ceaselessly in practically the same spot where the basic, raised parlour once stood at the front end of the main barn, an 84-by-160foot structure with automated turkey curtains and alley scrapers thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just over a decade old now.

The front entrance and adjoining milkhouse area of the barn were redone and reconfigured as part of the latest upgrade. Today, the front door opens onto a bright and wide lobby-like area bounded by the robotic stalls, sitting end to end, beyond which the cattle mill about in their four-row, free-stall environment. After the gleaming VMS units, the eye is immediately drawn to the terrazzolike floor underfoot, a glossy concrete finished with a pleasing, epoxy plastic system sprinkled right into the surface. Esthetics aside, the improvements were undertaken as a matter of lifestyle and progress. At about 27 kg daily per animal milk output has stayed about the same as it

was when they had the parlour, says John, who explains that boosting production wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t what the switch to robots was all about. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was about, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to milk cows anymore, and finding hired labour was hard.â&#x20AC;? The eldest of the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five sons, 24-year-old Jacob, possessing degrees in animal science and agribusiness, is returning to the farm after a two-year stint as an accounts manager with TD Bank. Their other sons range in age from 14 to 22 years of age, with three of the boys still living at home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is easier to ask the boys to go into the barn now,â&#x20AC;? says Dianne, candidly acknowledging the hightech approach is of greater interest to the younger gen-

eration of Drooghs than was the old unmetered milking parlour. Their 18year-old son, she adds, is a creator of web-browser plug-ins, who has taken a particular interest in the smart-phone app that remotely monitors both robotic milkers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The boys were getting to that age where we had to do something,â&#x20AC;? John agrees. They had talked about making the switch to robots for a long time, he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and I guess we finally felt comfortable enough with the technology to do it.â&#x20AC;? They chose to stick with DeLaval and their local dealer Norwell Dairy Systems, â&#x20AC;&#x153;very happyâ&#x20AC;? with Continued on page 47

The very arm-like appendage on the DeLaval VMS concludes with a very robot-like pincer on the busines end of the unit, which gingerly places milkers on cowsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; teats. Both units are visible in this photo.

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Shady Lane Continued from page 46 the service offered by the firm. The installation of the robots last summer involved keeping one half of the parlour operational while the new machines were put in place on what was the other half of the parlour footprint. John says the robots initially offered feed alone for only one day prior to switching all milking over to the VMS units. “The transition for us was good.” The strategy also involved drying off a higher than usual number of animals before the switch, effectively dropping the production herd down to 80 for a time, he says. As numbers gradually returned to normal, it meant an influx of animals at the beginning of their lactation, when they were easier to train. He says his day in the barn typically begins between 6 and 7 a.m. He begins by manually fetching a handful of animals that show up on the computer as having gone too long between milkings. Then he moves on to feeding, calving and other

chores. A tow-behind TMR unit dispenses feed within the main barn and the attached circa-1998 heiferand-dry-cow barn that forms a ‘T’ at the end of the building. In a bit of a departure, the feed alley doesn’t extend all the way through, so the TMR is backed in and driven out. The layout also necessitated hydraulic alley scrapers, as opposed to the cable-drawn type that are perhaps a little more commonly seen these days. “The routine has changed, but I’m in the barn probably more,” John says of his workload. “It’s a different routine,” adds Dianne. Begun last March, they say the “capital intensive” project took a little longer to reach total completion by being a renovation rather than a new build. Some of the finishing touches didn’t occur until Christmas. “It’s harder to get contractors who will do renovations,” he observes. The forward-looking operation also continues to signal its optimism for the future by buying the small amounts of quota available on the market these days. Shady Lane Farms opens

its doors to let folks see the upgrades on Feb. 27, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. They’re among 30 farms with DeLaval robots hosting open barn events in Canada that week. On a related note, Norwell Dairy Systems is holding a free VMS information session at Purvis Hall, on the Kemptville Campus, Feb. 11. That free event also runs 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

The milkhouse utility room includes vacuum pumps and other actuation equipment used by the robots.























“... results ... convenience ... asset for quality.” 





— The Ramsey family Three gen. EX-94 from Paradise-R Bell Sears: Paradise-R Hi Metro Serenity with dam Paradise-R Drew Stacey and daughter Paradise-R Lewis Stacy, fresh 100 days in her fifth lactation and one of over 100 Paradise-R cows with over 200,000 lbs. lifetime. She was 2012 reserve champion of the Ohio show. Bill Ramsey (center) with son Brian (right) and son-in-law Nevin (left).

PARADISE VALLEY FARMS, LOUISVILLE, OHIO RAMSEY FAMILY 4 Generations: Paul & Catherine, Bill & Debbie, Brian & Liz, Mike & Shelley, Brenda & Nevin, Jill & Corey, and 13 grandchildren. 410 Holsteins. SCC 200,000 Production: 28,853 m 3.7 f 3.1 p (3x) 2010 National Dairy Shrine Distinguished Breeder

At Paradise Valley Farms, Louisville, Ohio, Udder Comfort™ is the first line of defense and the product of choice to ensure quality udders develop quickly in fresh cows. Home to 900 reg. Holsteins, the farm is run by Bill and Debbie Ramsey, their sons, daughters, son-in-law, and Bill’s parents. Quality is the passion driving decades of progress in breeding productive, long-lived cows. Recent sire proofs put Paradise-R Sebathia-ET as #3 bull of the breed for type. All told, Paradise Valley has had 100 cows top 200,000 lifetime. The 410-cow milking herd now has 9 over 200,000, 7 over 300,000, and 1 over 400,000.

John and Dianne Droogh pose inside their renovated dairy barn at Shady Lane Farms. One of two new DeLaval VMS milker robots is in the background.

Quality also led Paradise Valley to Udder Comfort. After trying another, “we did not see the difference we see with Udder Comfort. We like the results and convenience,” says Bill’s son-in-law Nevin L’Amoreaux, who cares for the milk herd; his wife Brenda is herd vet.

“This is a definite asset for quality. We spray quarters 3x/day for 1 to 2 days to soften and soothe, and more often than not, they improve. “Udder Comfort is the go-to trigger next to the towels in the parlor. We buy the spray by the gallon and keep it accessible.”

Quality Udders Make Quality Milk

Keep the milk in the system 1.888.773.7153 1.613.652.9086 uddercomfort.com

Available at Select Sires, Norwell Dairy Systems, participating Co-ops, Country Depot, Purina, Shurgain, Dundas Agri Systems, Ritchies Feed and Seed, and Lawrence’s Dairy Supply. For external application to the udder only, after milking, as an essential component of udder management. Always wash and dry teats thoroughly before milking.


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