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Published by: Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortes A.C.

Tianguis Comes to Los Barriles By Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr.

uickly becoming one of the most compelling weekend attractions in Los Barriles, the new tianguis (open-air market) is off to a big start. Held at the new Parque Laguna (Laguna Park) in the heart of Los Barriles, the market offers a great selection of locally grown farm fresh produce, handmade crafts, art, jewelry, clothing and traditional dancing. The idea of a community market had been tossed around for a while by the organizers, as farmers markets have popped up everywhere. They felt there was a need in Los Barriles. The town hall meeting on January 27 with the Mayor Ramiro Hirales, led to a formal agreement and full support from the Mayor to use the new park as the venue for the market. The mayor hopes that vendors from throughout La Paz county will participate. The main goal of the bi-weekly Los Barriles Community Market is to provide a meeting place for both the foreign and the Mexican communities to enjoy food, shop, sell arts and crafts and enjoy performances. It also provides an opportunity for l o c a l school students to raise money for projects such as dancer’s shoes, for example. Local first graders sold burritos to raise money to build storage boxes in their classrooms. Twenty vendors participated in the first market on February 18: many sold out in an hour. Twenty five vendors came to the second week on March 3 with similar results. The market draws visitors from the East Cape region as word has spread. The organizers estimate that over three hundred people walk through the gates on Market Saturday. The first dancers were from the local primary school and the second week showcased a group from Misión Cultural, a government sponsored program that goes to various www.eastcapearts.com

Issue No. 58

April/May 2012

Free/Gratis

towns and teaches art, sewing, woodworking and dancing. The dancers all came from San Bartolo. The market will grow to be sure. The Mexican and foreign community are encouraged to come, shop, sell, eat and get to know each other. There will be a blend of food, produce, arts and crafts and entertainment that can offer an opportunity for local folks to gather together and celebrate our community. The organizers hope for it to start in November next year and run u n t i l April. F o r m o r e informat i o n about the L o s Barriles Community Market or if you are interested in selling food, produce, arts, crafts or providing entertainment please email dude_mom@hotmail.com or dklinnet@hotmail.com.

The Tianguis Tradition The open-air market has a long tradition in Mexican culture. The Aztecs called it tianquiztli, Nahuatl for the “marketplace.” Modern Mexicans refer to it as the tianguis, mercado sobre ruedas (market on wheels). The original Aztec markets, like the markets of Tlatelolco and Teotihuacan, were famous in pre-Columbian times for their size and variety of produce, but they were stationary bazaars, confined always within the same site. Mesoamerican markets were based on the trading of items, with certain very valuable items such as cacao beans serving as currency. Since that time, the traveling tianguis has evolved with its own unique culture to keep the marketplace conveniently close to the inhabitants of Mexico's large cities, and smaller towns, where due to the low demand of goods, stationary businesses are not economically feasible. The real charm of the typical Mexican tianguis is in the sheer variety of products and people all gathered together in one place. The new Los Barriles open-air market may just be the new gathering place on Saturdays.

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East Capers Editorial

The Decline of the San Bartolo Arroyo rt comes in many forms and often nature provides the most pleasing varieties. If you travel up the San Bartolo arroyo you will see the patterns in the limestone after many years of erosion. The occasional cow may give you a strange look while it munches on whatever it can find. I recently drove up the arroyo and was saddened by what I found. Yard waste, construction debris and household garbage are strewn along the south wall of the arroyo for several miles. When I visited the area last, there were a couple of piles of yard waste but nothing like I saw this time. Bubble wrap, plastic, wine bottles, concrete block, cans and just about everything else lay along the trail. It is hard for me to understand why someone would dump their trash in the arroyo when, as far as I know, the El Coro dump will take anything. One does not need to live here very long to realize that when we get some significant rain, all of that trash will be in the ocean. I can only conclude that there are two reasons why someone would do this. The first is laziness. The dump is a little further to drive then the arroyo. The second reason: they just don’t care. If this is the reason, it is very disturbing! If we are going to continue to enjoy this wonderful area and all its unspoiled charms, we need to try to fix this. If you are doing this, stop spoiling the arroyo for the rest of us! Ask your gardener where he is dumping your yard waste. Ask the construction workers were they are dumping the debris from you project. You might be surprised. Tell them that it not acceptable to use any arroyo as a dump. When a question came up at the meeting with the new mayor in January, Mayor Ramiro Hirales told the group to report anyone seen dumping trash to the police and they will be fined. If you see someone dumping, give the license number to the police. Pretending the problem does not exist or not wanting to say anything negative about Los Barriles is disingenuous. Let’s not put our head in the sand! Letters to the editor are welcome. mail@wzaponline.com

Anonymous submissions are not accepted.

Check out the color version of East Capers at www.eastcapearts. com

In This Issue The Mexican Will Spanish First Aid Words News From La Ribera Chicken (Pollo) Cuts Mexico's Current Sales Tax Rate Mexican Inflation & GDP A Few Good Cops Car Talk in LA Legal Terms: Bank Trust The Sea of Cortez Aquarium Advertiser’s Map The Earth Under Our Feet The Great Japanese Conspiracy in the Sea of Cortez Kava: Who Knew? Community Services Directory Aztec Eagles The East Cape Music Scene Crock Pot Chicken Tostadas Masks for the Mardi Gras Parade Saturday Art Classes at La Concha Mexico Pushes for Mariachi Preservation Mexican Minimum Daily Wage Medical Tips 19th Annual Art Festival Legal Terms: Notario Publico Advertiser's Directory

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East Capers is published bi-monthly by the Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C., Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico Managing Editor: Walter S Zapotoczny Jr - mail@wzaponline com * Copy Editor: Pako Ford * Circulation Manager: Brian Cummings * Community Representative: Jim Stangarone * Foreign Correspondent: JoAnn Hyslop * Advertising & Graphics: Russ Hyslop Printed by Imprenta Ciudad Los Niños, La Paz, BCS, Mexico

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The Mexican Will By Gisela Talamantes Saenz,

uring March and September, the Notaries Public College of the State of Baja California Sur will reduce their fees up to 50% for granting Wills, also some notary public offices will extend their working hours to the public in order to facilitate the granting of Wills during these months. WHAT IS A MEXICAN WILL?

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Public must be very careful if the testator is a foreigner with no proficiency in the Spanish language, in this case the testator must be assisted by an interpreter or an official translator that will also sign the Will together with the testator before the notary public. Without following the formalities outlined by the Mexican Civil Code the Will is subject to be challenged in Court and nullified by parties holding an interest.

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The Mexican Will Is a legal act where an individual leaves written instructions for his/her assets, property, rights and obligations after death, appointing heirs, executors, tutors, and beneficiaries. In Mexico THE WILL is revocable meaning that at any moment the individual may grant a new Will automatically cancelling the previous Mexican Will granted. It is personal, meaning that it cannot be granted by a legal representative, through a power of attorney, a family member or a friend. Since foreigners may own real estate property in Mexico, through the Mexican Fideicomiso or Mexican Corporation, it is important to highlight that if a foreigner holds Mexican shares/stocks to grant a Mexican Will may save his/her heirs from having to initiate an Intestate proceeding before the Mexican Family Court or to Homologate a foreign Will in order for the court to appoint the new beneficiary of shares or stocks within the Mexican Corporation, both of these proceedings are expensive and cumbersome. Let’s remember that the Mexican Fideicomiso includes a substitute beneficiary clause, therefore your beneficiary rights and of your heirs are protected. With the figure of the Mexican Corporation there is no substitute beneficiary clause, therefore the Mexican Will is the best legal tool to appoint beneficiaries of your shares or stocks and protect the real estate property acquired through Mexican Corporations. Also, very important, per Mexican law The Mexican Will follows strict formalities, therefore, the Notary www.eastcapearts.com

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Spanish First Aid Words

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Accident / Accidente Allergy / Alergia Ambulance / Ambulancia Antibiotics / Antibióticos Appointment / Cita Arm / Brazo Asthma / Asma Back / Espalda Backache / Dolor de espalda Bite / Mordedura Bleeding / Sangrado Blister / Ampolla Blood / Sangre Blood pressure / Presión sanguínea Blood test / Análisis de sangre Bone / Hueso Bruise / Moretón Burn / Quemadura Chest / Pecho Cold - Flu / Resfriado Constipation / Estreñimiento Contagious / Contagioso Cough / Tos Cut / Cortada Danger / Peligro Diarrhea / Diarrea Dizziness / Mareo Doctor / Doctor

Ear / Oído Ear ache / Dolor de oído Earthquake / Temblor Eye / Ojo Face / Cara Faint / Desmayo Fall / Caída Fever / Fiebre Finger / Dedo Fire / Fuego Foot / Pie Hand / Mano Head / Cabeza Headache / Dolor de cabeza Heart / Corazón Help / Ayuda Hospital / Hospital Hurt / Herido Ill - Sick / Enfermo Indigestion / Indigestión Infection / Infección Injection / Inyección Itch / Comezón Knee / Rodilla Leg / Pierna Liver / Higado Lung / Pulmón Medicine / Medicina

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Mouth / Boca Muscle / Músculo Neck / Cuello Nose / Nariz Pain / Dolor Pain killer / Analgésico Pill / Píldora Pregnancy / Embarazo Rash / Salpullido Sea sickness / Mareo Shiver / Escalofrío Shock / Susto Skin / Piel Sting / Picadura Stomach / Estómago Stomach ache / Dolor de estómago Sun stroke / Insolación Swollen / Hinchado Throat / Garganta Tooth ache / Dolor de muela Tooth / Diente Tranquilizer / Tranquilizante Treatment / Tratamiento Urgent / Urgente Vomit / Vomitar Wound - Injury / Herida

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News from La Ribera By Lynda Wise

Valentine’s Day Dinner/Dance

ith the coming of the winter winds and the lack of decent fishing days, folks in La Ribera decided it was time for a fiesta and chose to celebrate with a Valentine’s Day fiesta. In past years, La Ribera hosted a Valentine’s Day Dinner/Dance that was open to all. Since we had not had a Valentine’s celebration in two years, up steps the Gringo community to take on the job of hosting the Valentine’s Dinner/Dance this year. This was the first event in La Ribera where the local Mexican and Gringo communities cooperated to put on a fiesta. With a combined effort and a lot of volunteer workers, a fantastic dinner and dance was held at the old Concha site on Friday evening, February 10, 2012. At least 300 people attended the event. Employees of the Delegación de La Ribera headed by Delegado Guillermo Sandez, made the Concha ready. It had not been used for a long time, but was made ready in record time. Proceeds from the event, which amounted in excess of $2,000.00 American dollars, are being used to erect play structures in our children’s park, and to provide bench seating for seniors in the park. If you were unable to attend or didn’t know about it, you missed a terrific night of fun, food & fabulous dancing. Cliff Pulfer was appointed Chairman of the fiesta, and with his guidance and forceful delegation of authority, com-

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mittees were appointed, and the fiesta preparations were quickly put together. In a few short weeks, with a lot of dedicated hours by volunteers from the whole community, everyone was ready for this night of fun. Committee chairs were as follows: Treasurer - Ace Bryant, Food - Sue Howery and Dale Rousselle, Decorations - Kim Mc Christian & the ladies from the DIF, Tickets - Terrie Moffatt and Russ Fritz, Beverages - Bob Choquette and John Byatt. Bob Moran provided his DJ services throughout the pre-dinner & dinner festivities. Sangre Nueva of La Ribera provided live music. Charlie’s Chocolates provided chocolate covered strawberries. Chuck at Lighthouse Pizzeria provided pizza. The Delegación provided security. Special thanks go to the committees and volunteers for tackling this affair, especially since most had no prior working knowledge of just how this would get done. However, there are a lot of tenacious folks in La Ribera, and with everyone dedicated to putting on a great show, La Ribera did indeed have a successful fiesta. The menu included pulled beef sandwiches, beans, pasta salad, carrot salad & desserts, with pizza for the children. Many donations were provided by individuals & Cabo Riviera and ranged from $200 pesos to $100 American dollars. With many thanks to a lot of individuals who helped to put this party on and to those who used their own resources to make sure this night would be a success, we can only say, “MUCHAS GRACIAS” from all of us in La Ribera. Bob continued on page 29

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Chicken (Pollo) Cuts English

Spanish

hen

gallena

cock

gallo

fryer

pollo de leche

wings

alas

giblets

menudencias

gizzards

mollejas

thigh/drumstick

muslo

breast

pechuga

leg

pierna

heart

coraz贸n

neck

cuello

wing

ala

whole chicken

pollo entero

liver

h铆gado

feet

patas

tail

cola

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From: www.theboatgalley.com

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A Few Good Cops By Pablo Ponce

he Baja I have known and loved all my life has been in the spotlight these past few years and I’m not talking about the fishing. It seems that a few bad apples in the bunch are ruining Baja’s reputation. Having traveled Highway 1 dozens of times and seeing firsthand what corruption really does go on, I’d like to offer a story that might help take the edge off some of the recent bad press. A few years ago my buddy and I decided to take a road trip to a remote fishing spot a little ways off Baja’s Highway 1. We loaded up the truck with pretty much everything but the kitchen sink, and after a little hesitation, we took off for the border. We both knew it was a bad idea to be driving in Baja at night but we just couldn’t wait until daylight to head out. It must have been right around sunset the next evening when it started raining, which added to the fun of driving Highway 1 at night, but what could we do besides press on to our predetermined camp site for the night. This camp just happened to be a few miles outside of a small town so we loaded up on tacos at a roadside stand and at 11pm we continued south. We didn’t get very far when we blew a tire so we pulled off the road and parked in the mud. It was not exactly the safest place for us to be at that hour but we had to change the tire before we could continue on. Upon inspection we

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realized we now had a bigger problem than we thought. With such a huge load of stuff packed in the back of the truck, our rear bumper was practically dragging on the ground so our little bottle jack wouldn’t even come close to fitting underneath the truck. As we tried to come up with a plan as to how to get out of this predicament without all of our stuff getting soaked, a police car pull up behind us. The officers stepped out of their patrol car and asked us what the problem was. We informed them of our dilemma and asked if they knew of a repair shop that was open. The look they gave us told us there would be no repair shop open at that particular time. One of the cops told us to go sit in our truck and as we do, all of a sudden the rear of the truck started to rise. We looked back and the cops were lifting the rear end of the vehicle with a bumper jack they just happened to have in their car. They helped us remove the spare underneath the truck, helped with the lug nuts, lowered the vehicle, then told us the next time we come to Baja, trash the bottle jack and buy a bumper jack. As they headed back to their car I pulled out a twenty and offered it to them. They declined my offer and told us to have a good night. Mind you, they were now both wet and muddy so I stopped them and once again offered them the twenty saying I’d love to buy them a couple beers once they were off work. After some hesitance continued on page 16

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UNIQUE BEAUTIFUL LIVABLE DESIGNS. Same people. Same quality. Different name. Through VOS en Construction, we have been designing and building fine custom homes in the East Cape since 1991. The workmanship produced by VOS has been exemplary of integrity, artistry and top quality in its field. Most of all, every home designed and built has always been unique, beautiful and livable. Unique Beautiful Livable Designs will continue the integrity, artistry and top quality same, same, different name. What is happening with VOS en Construction? The VOS name is retiring. In the construction industry, restructuring a company is a natural part of its process and evolution. Our goal is not only to survive, but thrive. It is time to update our list of services and our name; offering Unique Beautiful Livable Designs for custom homes, remodels, additions and interiors; processing of all legal requirements pertaining to building permits and manifests. If you are working on home improvement yourself and simply need some professional input, our consulting service can be of great help. It is amazing how many ideas we can brainstorm in one hour. Most importantly, we will continue to offer a full professional service, supervising all aspects during the construction of your home, providing weekly reports on its progress, resulting in a worry free building experience for the homeowner and a guaranteed top quality end product. For those of you who are not familiar with us: Javier Cota is a civil engineer and experienced builder, born right here in Buena Vista; Tehroma Lask is an architect, with vast experience in project management, interior design and a strong background in art, born in Oregon, migrated to Baja 21 years ago. Our experience in the construction industry equals 27 years for Javier and 18 years for Tehroma. We have worked together designing, engineering and building custom homes under the name VOS en Construction for 16 years. We will continue with the same work ethic under our new name: UNIQUE BEAUTIFUL LIVABLE DESIGNS. If you have any questions or are interested in obtaining a testimonial regarding what it might be like to work with us, please feel free to contact us. We would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank our clients, who over the years have also become our friends. We believe that every home tells a story – a story about the wonderful people who live in these homes. Each home is unique, beautiful and livable because of you. Thank you for asking us to tell your story. We consider it an honor and privilege.

Javier Cota and Tehroma Lask javiercota@prodigy.net.mx romalask@prodigy.net.mx

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Car Talk in LA By Escarabajo Amarillo

ola amigos. My owner (JoAnn Hyslop) has been reporting on the LA scene in her little column, A Foreign Correspondent in LA. This is all well and good. However, since her interests are a little different than mine, I decided that it’s my turn to tell you about the LA adventure from my perspective. For starters, how do you think I felt when she drove me from the border all the way up Highway 5. I was LOADED with clothes, books and other items that she thought she needed to have in her new home, living with her family. Did she think of ME, an ancient ’73 Super Beetle with thousands of miles on the engine as she floored it heading north? Did she care that I was surrounded by much younger, more powerful cars and giant double tows? Did it bother her that I didn’t have insurance coverage and that I was sporting a Mexican license plate? Of course not! She’s lucky that I didn’t pop a rod and stall out in the middle of the freeway. Anyway, we’re both here safe and sound. I’m now licensed in California, covered with insurance, and have Max, the best VW mechanic in LA. Things are a little different up here to say the least! Although I’m street legal to park in front of the house, there are special regulations I have to live by. On Thursdays I have to be parked on the left side of the street and on Fridays on the right side so the street cleaner can clean the gutters. This happens EARLY in the morning so if my owner forgets or over-sleeps, she has to fork out $61.00 US. So far it’s only happened once. But then she’s a very quick learner when it comes to dinero! How about the important issue of deciding how to get from point A to point B? What if she wants to go to Pasadena or Bakersfield to see the rest of her family? OK, there ARE massive freeway

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systems up here that will take you wherever you want to go. In the beginning we tried a couple of them only to discover that, due to my advanced age and lack of energy, I basically created an impediment on the system. Besides, they scared the *#% out of me! But, now that my owner has discovered the Metro Bus System, (which will take her anywhere for 25 cents a ride because of HER advanced age), I can stay home snoozing safely in my appointed parking spot while she’s gone. When we go shopping, pick up grandsons from school or hit the cinemas we cruise along surface streets. This is when I really have some fun. Lots of drivers give me the “thumbs up.” Others smile and wave. But then there’s some that apparently think they’re making a point by tail-gating me at 50 mph in the 25 mph zone. The snotty new Toyota Prius driven by some decked out longhaired female is the worst. My owner just keeps cool and stays in her lane, mindful of the speed limit. When the light turns green she takes off in first gear and laughs as they try to keep up. Sometimes when we’re at a stop light, another driver will ask, “What year…or how many miles on the engine?” Occasionally I get…”I had one just like it in blue ” spoken with heartfelt nostalgia Then there’s the “Se Vende?” questions. They always come from hombres, never from mujeres. One time when I was waiting in a parking lot a man walked up to the parking attendant and asked him if he knew who my owner was. He wanted to buy me! Another time, we were headed out of a parking lot and stopped at the kiosk to pay when the two parking attendants asked if I was for sale. In Baja when my owner stopped for gas at a PEMEX station, she was asked if I was for sale. I know I’m very cute but come on….could it be that they’re just exercising their machismo? What do you think?

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A Few Good Cops Continued from page 12 they did take the money but only after I persisted. Now don’t get me wrong, I have had my fair share of run-ins with the law on both sides of the border. I won’t try to convince you that it is not safer in the U.S. or wherever you happen to be from. I just thought I’d relate a story that you might otherwise never hear or read about. So, for the record, not all cops are bad cops, it’s just that the bad cops seem to make it in the news a lot more often. That’s my story.

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Legal Terms: Bank Trust. This is probably the most improperly used term and is pervasive within the on line real estate sites. This expression is often used to describe the document that one can or must obtain to acquire a personal Right over a real estate property in the restricted zones in the territory of Mexico. The use of this word is wrong because a trust in the common law system is not a contract and in the Mexican law system the word trust cannot be found. First of all, the only legal and safe system for a foreigner to acquire the right to use a real estate property is per the Ley de Inversiones Extrajeras (Foreign investment law) in Mexico. The proper expression is Contrato De Fideicomiso Translativo De Dominio (Contract of Trust Translative Domain). The proper term is FTD Contract.

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The Sea of Cortez Aquarium: Snippets from the Sea By Theresa Comber

Mass Migration of Moby Dicks - November, 2008

e left in the early morning light with the sunshine of a fisherman’s hope pouring out of our veins as Too Awesome’s twin screw 370-Cummins were pouring on the power. Giddy with the beautiful day and calm seas, we were heading for a long run offshore – 35 miles east and a bit south with expectations we’d find big tuna before the fall season closed. We plied the waters and kept up our game faces and good cheer, with tuna nowhere near. LOOK! In the distance there’s a splash, maybe a spout! Who cares? Haul in the lures and head there fast! Pulling ever closer, we could see it was a spout, not a splash, and our tuna hopes dimmed. Until….until we saw buses. Buses as far as the eye could see, parked all catawampus and idling gently in the deepest part of our blue sea. What the hell and holy ballena we thought and could not believe our eyes. We consulted our Marine Mammal Field Guide to confirm the ‘Sperm Whale’ species of these crazy cetaceans - it was like nothing we’d seen before, not even Captain Congo who’d been on the water for 30 years. This was no ordinary fleet of whale buses, these were Moby Dick buses! The huge, square headed whales were lolly gagging around, some rafted up head to tail in long lines, with babies gently swaying nearby, bottlenose dolphin swimming

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and jumping in their midst. The scene was calm, serene, like kindergarten children resting on their mats at naptime. Hey, you on board, wake up, start counting! As Too Awesome went to an idle we all started counting. Sixty? No there’s 70, no 80, even more, 88 was our best count. This was a unique mass migration of sperm whales, females and their offspring, which must have made a left into the Sea of Cortez chasing prey while heading south toward their equatorial winter feeding and birthing grounds. That summer had seen a particularly abundant Humboldt squid population and our fishing season had benefited greatly as pelagic game fish eat it like bait made into candy. It also happens to be Sperm Whale’s favorite. Unlike baleen Grays and Humpbacks, Sperm whales are the largest living toothed animal and voracious meat eaters, able to dive more than 6000 feet chasing their deep water prey and can consume 3% of their body weight each day. Their dives can last up to an hour and they even show signs of squid sucker marks on their skin. In fact, much of what we know about deep water squid has been extracted from the bellies of sperm whales. Sperm whales have the largest brain of any living creature, can live more than 70 years and thrive in a stable social environment with female whales caring for their offspring and allowing them to suckle for more than ten years. Their giant block head and jaw encompasses more than a third of their body and their undersea clicking sound that emits from it is the loudest noise made by any continued on page 34

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The Earth Under Our Feet: Part 2 By Russ Hyslop

s I mentioned in Part 1, the earth is actually moving under our feet. The name for this fascinating process is plate tectonics. Before we get into the realm of plate tectonics, let us look at the historical record that guided the processes now accepted by modern geology (the study of earth and how it works). The earliest records of theories of geology came from ancient Greece during the 4th century B.C. They came from the observations of Aristotle who made critical notes of the slow rate of geologic change, which humans cannot observe during their lifetime. From Aristotle to the present day, individuals and later research teams contributed to our understanding of the earth and how it works. During the Middle Ages early Muslim geologist AbdulRahman al Biruni (973-1048), when writing on the geology of India, hypothesized that the subcontinent had been under the sea, arose and attached itself to the continent of Asia. A Chinese naturalist named Shen Kuo (1031-1095), formulated a theory of geomorphology, the scientific study of landforms and the processes that shape them. Among the many observations he made was the discovery of ocean fossils in mountains hundreds of miles from the Pacific Ocean.

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“church” at the time had the earth’s age at about 6,000 years old. Hutton stated that by studying the layering of strata one could deduce how old a formation might be. He deduced that the layering he observed had taken millions of years. Following on the heels of Hutton was William Smith (1769-1839), the so-called father of English geology. He used fossils to identify sedimentary rock layers and produced the first geologic image of England and Wales (1815). American geologist Harry Hammond Hess (1906-1969) contributed a great deal to our understanding of plate tectonics. As a young student at Princeton, he joined the Navy Reserve and on December 8, 1941, reported for active duty aboard a Navy transport ship that traversed the Pacific Ocean many times during WWII. While aboard the USS Cape Johnson, as its commander, he was able to study the ocean floor with the ships Sonar. It was with these observations that Hess deduced that the basalt floor was young, thin and moving away from the mid ocean rift zones towards the continents. It was being subducted back to the inner molten core were it will return eventually to the rifts to make a new ocean floor. What a system, huh? Tune-in to the next issue of East Capers for more on how the various forces below our feet have developed the Baja Peninsula! Resources: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Markes E. Johnson, Discovering the Geology of Baja California Jack Williams, The Magnificent Peninsula

His findings told us that the land does in fact move. Another early naturalist was James Hutton (1726-1797). A Scotsman, trained as a medical doctor, he was fascinated with geology and made out to establish what the real age of the earth was. It should be noted that the teachings of the

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NOTE: I learned only recently that in the Pacific Northwest, where I am from, there have been a number of such “dockings” by south pacific islands and subcontinents. These parcels would include the Seven Devils complex in Eastern Oregon and Washington. The Okanagan micro-continent “docked” about 100 million years ago and was followed by the North Cascades subcontinent a short time later. I was astounded to learn of these events much after my formal education years had concluded.

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The Great Japanese Conspiracy in the Sea of Cortez From: http://www.perlas.com.mx/blog/ n the late 1930’s most Mexican people were not really thinking of the future “space race” or about “little green men” and had little interest in such conspiracy theories. But, this does not mean that our fishermen lacked from imagination or ideas. They actually began to wonder what some boats with “rising sun” flags and men from a different language and race were doing inside their Gulf . These men seemed quite suspicious: they anchored here and dropped little devices into the water, retrieved them and then moved to another spot and repeated the process and yet, they never seemed to fish anything! Also, instead of the friendly exchange of products (cigars, gas, bait, etc.) that they seemed to enjoy with other fishermen –regardless of nationality- these guys were overly serious and would not trade a thing. They must be up to some mischief indeed! Back in 1939, many Mexican fishermen still remembered the importance of their pearl fisheries and considered the local pearl oysters as a useful food & shell resource that might reward them with a very valuable gem, if they were truly lucky. Some people heard that the Japanese had b gun producing cultured pearls and seemed to be unparalleled in their ability to produce them. Still, many believed that cultured pearls were no match for the “real thing” (the natural pearl) and that Mexico would once again become a major league player in the world’s pearl markets. So, add ingredient #1 (the presence of Japanese in the Gulf) and ingredient #2 (the return of the Mexican Pearl) and you basically have created a plot - a Japanese conspiracy to poison the Sea of Cortez and destroy any possible rival for the Japanese cultured pearl. The Japanese vessels were dropping poison into the pearl beds to kill their opponent before it had a chance to get back on its feet. And you wouldn’t believe how many people heard of this plot, and how many talk about it as a certifiable truth - people from Guaymas, from La Paz, from Hermosillo, from Mexico City, everyone! Is there any truth in this plot? Could the Japanese have really killed off the pearl beds? The Facts and the Myths It is a fact that many Japanese vessels with Japanese men were in the Sea of Cortez in the late 1930’s and they were definitively up to something, but it is highly unlikely they were sent on a mission to kill pearl oysters. Why? Because with the technology available in those days it is www.eastcapearts.com

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very unlikely they could have possessed a toxin or poison made specially to kill pearl oysters. Any other poison would have killed other creatures as well. Dying clams, snails and maybe even fish would have been noticed by fishermen. Even today, there are no toxins that will only kill pearl oysters. So, what were the Japanese doing here if not killing oysters? Well, check your timeline and you will notice that the Pacific War officially began in December 1941 when Japan went into war with the United States of America, Mexico’s northern neighbor. So, could it be possible that the Japanese were taking depth measurements of areas in the Sea of Cortez? Could they possibly have been planning a future attack into U.S. soil from Mexico in order to avoid the heavily defended California coast? It does sound possibility and while no information is available, it certainly has the makings of another conspiracy theory. Editor’s Note: Just after the attack on Pearl Harbor, a force of seven Japanese submarines patrolled the United States. On February 23, 1942, a Japanese submarine fired on an oil production facility in north west of Santa Barbara and then headed south towards Los Angeles. This incident was later called the Ellwood Shelling.

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Legal Terms: Notario Publico. The proper English translation for this association of words is Contract Lawyer. Notario Publico should not be confused with the English-language term, Notary Public. A Notary Public is NOT the equal of the Notario Publico in Mexico. The Notario Publico in Mexico is a person who became a lawyer after many years studying law in a university then worked for a Notario Publico for a certain period as an assistant, passed exams and then was given a position as a public officer called Notario Publico. 25


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Kava: Who Knew? By Pako Ford

ight here in our East Cape tropical thorn forest grows another botanical wonder – Kava, Piper Methysticum, the Polynesian wonder drug. The roots of the plant are used to produce a drink with sedative and anesthetic properties. Kava is consumed throughout the Pacific Ocean cultures of Polynesia. The Kava ceremony, followed by food, precedes any meeting where important decisions are made. Kava is sedating and is primarily consumed to relax without disrupting mental clarity. Its active ingredients are kavalactones. Effects of kavalactones include mild sedation, numbing of the gums and mouth and vivid dreams. Kava has been reported to improve cognitive performance and promote a cheerful mood. Here in Mexico, it is called Rama Santa (holy branch) and is an important part of the Curanderas (traditional folk healer or shaman) medicine bag. The leaves and stems are used for therapeutic reasons. The author has grown Kava here in Los Barriles. The plant grows to 12 feet, or more, and resembles bamboo, with nodes every 6 to 12 inches. The leaves are large (to 10 inches), heart shaped and have a delightful spicy scent.

Community Services Medical Clinic 624-141-0797

Green Angels 078

Dental Clinic 624-141-0375

Emergency 066

Canadian Consulate 624-142-4333

Los Barriles Police 624-141-0525 Veterinarian 044-624-145-2982

US Consulate 624-143-3566

Buena Vista Fire/Police 624-141-0316

British Consulate 624-173-9500, ext. 220 Buena Vista Ambulance 624-191-1221

Local Non-Profit Organizations Amigos de los Animales Animals info@amigosdeanimales.org

Baja Shakespeare, A.C. Theater tyfield1@hotmail.com

Animal Lovers of Mexico, A.C. (ALMA) Animals http://almacares.com/

East Cape Guild, A.C. Scholarships bjborg@earthlink.com

East Cape Health Center, A.C. Medical & Dental Care www.eastcapemedical.com

Patronado Cabo Este, A.C. Turtle Protection pepemurietta@hotmail.com

Rotary International, A.C. Community Service www.losbarrilesrotaryclub.org

UVERDE, A.C. Environment lacasadevos@prodigy.net.mx

AsociaciĂłn de Artes del Mar de Cortez Arts www.eastcapearts.com

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The Aztec Eagles By Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr.

ery few people would include Mexico in the list of U.S. World War II Allies. Sadly, Mexico's aid to the United States and the Allies has been largely ignored by historians and is mostly absent from American history books. When the Mexican aviators had the opportunity to show their courage in battle, they did so with valor. The 31 pilots of Mexican Expeditionary Force 201st Fighter Squadron flew missions supporting ground troops in the Philippines and long-range sorties over Formosa. Allied theater commander General Douglas MacArthur commended the pilots and 150 support personnel. Squadron 201 earned combat awards from the Philippine, American and Mexican governments. After the war, the pilots of Squadron 201 were welcomed home as heroes. Sending men to fight with the United States was an unpopular move among many Mexican politicians and citizens in the early 1940s. The memory of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe, that ceded 500,000 square miles of Mexican territory to the U.S., was still fresh in many minds. As the world moved toward war again in the late 1930's, Mexico reluctantly turned to the United States for help. President Roosevelt had been a constant friend to Mexico. Once elected to a second term, he used both the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation and military intelligence to help the Mexican Army in their fight against pro-revolution rebels. The climate for U.S. business was improving and eventually Mexican raw materials fueled 40% of the U.S. World War II industries. The Mexican government wanted to do everything possible to insure that Mexico did not become a battleground if Germany or Japan invaded the continent. They secretly permitted agents of the U.S. to enter the country to train Mexican counterintelligence forces. Attacks on Mexican ships by German submarine began to increase and the U.S., England and France began a massive propaganda campaign against the Axis powers. These factors began to turn the tide of public opinion in Mexico. A blunder by Germany provided the momentum to swing public opinion in favor of fighting with the Allies. A German U-boat torpedoed the Mexican oil tanker SS Potrero del Llano, on May 14, 1942, killing 13 of the 35 crewmembers. Germany answered a protest filed by the Mexican government with the sinking of a second oil tanker, the SS Faja de Oro, killing 10 of the 37 crewmembers. Mexico declared war on Germany, Japan and Italy on May 22, 1942 when Germany refused to compensate Mexico for the losses. Leaders of the Mexican military began to clamor for Mexico to enter the war. www.eastcapearts.com

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After meeting with Franklin D. Roosevelt at Monterrey on April 20, 1943, President Camacho decided that Mexico should fight together with the Allies. Camacho, who was a former army general, also knew the army was unprepared but believed that an Air Force unit could be made ready with help from the U.S. The Fuerza AĂŠrea Mexicana (Mexican Air Force) in the 1930s was a small, under-funded part of the army. Its missions were mostly mapmaking, reconnaissance, air support and airmail. The Fuerza AĂŠrea Mexicana had tactically organized units but no modern pursuit planes. Since Mexico had no indigenous aircraft industry, the United States would have to provide the planes capable of stopping an offshore attack by the Axis. As citizens rallied around the war effort, Mexico began to receive shipments of U.S. aircraft, including Navy SBD Dauntless dive-bombers, B-25 Mitchell Bombers and Consolidated PBY Catalina flying boats. Sending troops overseas however, ran against Mexican tradition, politics and the more pressing priority of coastal defense. The government began to activate additional Mexican units for service. Coastal patrol and tanker escort missions were increased. Major Luis Noriega Medrano was flying a routine patrol on July 5, 1942, when he spotted a German submarine. Medrano bombed and damSquadron 201 Emblem aged the German U-boat in the Gulf of Mexico. The war was getting closer to home and President Camacho had to rally support for direct involvement. In order to help sell the idea of fighting abroad to the public, Camacho directed the Air Force to stage an air show. More than 100,000 spectators watched on March 5, 1944 as North American AT-6 Texans and Douglas A-24B dive-bombers attacked targets with live ordinance near Mexico City. The show was a spectacular success. Soon after, Presid e n t Camacho declared that M e x i c o should fight alongside of the Allies and that the Mexican Air P-47D Thunderbolt F o r c e would represent the nation in the conflict. Three hundred men enlisted from all parts of Mexico joined. They soon boarded a train to San Antonio, Texas and training at Randolph Army Air Base. After being separated by specialty, ground personnel traveled to different bases for additional instruction. The pilots continued on page 33

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East of the Sun and West of the Moon: The East Cape Music Scene By Randy Leach

he music scene seems to have really picked up since the Christmas break. Otra Vez continues to lead the way in Los Barriles with a continuous commitment to musical events. Mark Walters and Randy Leach, Los Viejos, Chevy the International, and others have had good success at Otra Vez. And of course, the Wednesday open mike nights at the Roadrunner still continue to be extremely popular. But the highlight of the season was the Rocking Blues Extravaganza, a tour of Canadian and American musicians as well as local bands too. The Rocking Blues Extravaganza performed in San Lucas at the Giggling Marlin, Los Barriles at Las Palmas, San Jose at Don Sanchez and Deckman’s, and several other venues as diverse as Las Ventanas. Headlining were Robbie Laws, a very acclaimed guitar player from Portland, Oregon and Tim Williams, another very accomplished guitar player from Calgary, Alberta. The Dream Band consisted of several musicians from Calgary, Alberta and included Greg Haugesag from San Jose on flugelhorn. Opening at the Giggling Marlin and Don Sanchez was Cambio de Corazon, a very accomplished Latin Jazz/Salsa band. Local favorite Skeleton Key opened at the Las Palmas event in Los Barriles. Blues Explosion from La Paz opened the show in Las Ventanas. Credit must go to promoter Hubert Miller, as he was relentless in making sure every detail was covered. I expect to see Hubert reappear for another exciting series next season as well. It is very exciting to see so much local talent surface as it seems to do on a consistent basis in this southern Baja that we all love so much. And to see interaction between Mexican, Argentinean, Brazilian, Canadian, and American artists is a pleasant sight as well. The East Cape Music Festival for November 2012 is in the planning stages. It will be a very exciting lineup, I can

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assure you, although it is too early to announce. Tentatively the plan is to build a lineup around Latin traditional, Latin jazz and salsa with a sprinkling of rock and roll and reggae to top it off. There will be more details coming in the next few months as the festival moves from the planning stages to a more defined lineup and a venue is selected. Rest assured that it will be as popular an event as it has in the past. That is about is for now, but please don’t forget to get out and support your local musicians. It would be a sad world without live music!!!!

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Crock Pot Chicken Tostadas kinless, boneless chicken breasts or thighs are cooked in the crock pot with salsa, then shredded and spooned on top of tortillas along with cheese, lettuce and sour cream.

Ingredients: 2½ pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts or thighs 2 cups salsa 1 teaspoon granulated garlic 10 - 8" tortillas (flour or whole wheat) 1 cup sour cream 1 cup grated cheddar cheese 2½ cups shredded (spring mix) lettuce ¼-½ cup taco sauce or additional salsa 2 tablespoon lime juice ¼-½ teaspoon chili powder Directions: Place chicken, salsa and garlic in a crock pot. Stir; cook on low for 8-10 hours or on high for 4-5 hours. Remove cooked chicken from crock pot and shred with 2 forks. Return meat to the crock pot, stirring back into the salsa mixture, and then continue to cook until heated through or ready to serve. To serve, place a tortilla on a plate and spread with 1 tablespoon of the sour cream. Using a slotted spoon to drain liquid, place 1/3 cup of chicken on top, sprinkle with cheese and lettuce, drizzle with taco sauce and lime juice, then top with a dollop of sour cream and a light sprinkle of chili powder.

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News From La Ribera Continued from page 6

Choquette is heading up the committee t o repair and assemble the playground equipment. The nuts and bolts are purchased and the volunteers are lining up to get the project started. Amigos de Animales Rummage Sale

The Amigos de Animales of La Ribera held its annual Rummage/Bake Sale on Saturday, February 25, 2012, at the home of Bob and Ruth Moran. There were many great re-sale items donated this year, which created many happy buyers. If you didn’t get a chance to come to La Ribera this year, you missed some wonderful baked goodies, such as pies, cakes, cookies, cinnamon rolls, breads, cupcakes, and much more. There were many happy customers with either bags full of merchandise, and/or bags full of goodies. The proceeds of this year’s sale came to well over $23,000 pesos. This will help us to continue our spay and neuter programs, and to offer more individual animal care. A big thanks went to all who donated the great items & baked goods. We will be having a table at the Festival de Artes where we will be selling baked goods. We will have the same delicious items there that we did at the rummage sale. The next fund-raising event will be the annual Amigos Fundraising Dinner and raffle to be held at La Trinidad Restaurant in La Ribera on Wednesday, April 11, 2012, at 6:00 PM. Please plan on attending. All proceeds will go to benefit the work of Amigos de Animales.

Serve immediately!

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Masks for the Mardi Gras Parade By La Concha Kids

Los Barriles Rotary Club’s annual Mardi Gras parade on February 18 was another successful event. The sidewalks were jammed as bystanders watched the many decorated floats, quads and dancers go by. Among the parade participants were local kids with specially decorated masks that were decorated that morning. T h e Rotary Club donated the masks to the As oc iac ió n de Artes La Concha Kids Program and volunteers from the community helped the kids decorate them. One Saturday a month, from October through June, volunteers from the Asociación de Artes teach over forty kids how to make jewelry, greeting cards, Christmas ornaments and various other crafts. The objective is to teach them art and craft-making techniques that they may not have the opportunity to learn at school or at home. If you have a skill or talent that you would like to share with the children or have some extra art or crafting supplies you can spare, send an email to Kathy Obenshain or Carol Dixon at eastcapearts@gmail.com.

April/May

the other child. These classes would not be such a success without our volunteers. Come and check out our next class beginning at 11:30 a.m. on April 28 at La Concha in Los Barriles. We will be teaching the kids how to make shell mirrors.

Saturday Art Classes at La Concha By Kathy Obenshain he class we had on Saturday, March 17, was the biggest and best yet. We had 48 kids attending a painting and drawing class with Xochitl. They drew pictures with pencils and even had a model to work with them they painted a portrait of the child sitting across from them after mixing the paint colors to match the skin tone of

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April/May

Mexico Pushes for Mariachi Preservation Source: Al Jazeera

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) officials

will meet in Paris soon to decide whether Mariachi music should be inscribed on its list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding. The Mexican government issued the request for Mariachi's recognition amid growing concern that the traditional and native Mexican songs are at risk of being forgotten.

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Mexican Minimum Daily Wage he official daily minimum wage in Mexico for 2012 rose by 4.2 percent. The minimum salary in Geographical Area A (the states of: Baja California, Baja California Sur, Mexico City; some municipalities of the states of: Mexico, Sonora, Tamaulipas Veracruz and Chihuahua) is $62.33 pesos per day. Reference: Report on Living Costs in Mexico 2nd Edition, 2012, Mexperience.com

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Medical Tips: Facts About PSA

Testing For Prostate Cancer By Doctor Sergio Rendón

very Saturday at the Amerimed Clinic in los Barriles, we have our lab-testing day. We have a visiting chemist and lab engineer who collects the blood samples of the patients that require some type of lab test. Among these tests, one is very popular and has high demand: Prostatic Specific Antigen or PSA in male patients. Their physician requests some, while friends or relatives suggest the test for others. Do you know or understand what this test can do for you or what is it for? How can it help you to prevent a prostate disease? Last year, a panel of European scientists published an article in the Nature magazine. They claimed that after 10 years of research with thousands of male patients, PSA testing, could no longer be reliable for screening for prostate cancer by itself. There were terminal prostate cancer patients with very little elevation of PSA. On the other hand, other patients with elevated PSA were without presence of tumoral activity or evidence of cancerogenous cells from tissue biopsy. Prostate cancer is the second most lethal and frequent cancer among males in the USA. PSA is a protein made by the prostate. It is elevated by both benign prostate hyperplasia (BHP) and prostate cancer. New uses for PSA show up all the time. It can be split into free and bound forms, which tell us different things about the likelihood of BPH and cancer within the prostate. There is PSA velocity (how fast it changes over time) and PSA density (the weight of a man’s prostate). In men without prostate disease, average PSA levels remain around 1ng/ml (nanograms per milliliter). For those who develop prostate enlargement, PSA levels start out around 1ng/ml, but can increase to around 3ng/ml over the next two decades. For men who develop prostate cancer, the rise in PSA is much faster, compared to men without it. The rate of rise in PSA could distinguish men with and without prostate cancer.

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PSA velocity describes the rate of rise in PSA and suggests that among men with PSA levels between 4ng/ml and 10ng/ml, and a PSA velocity greater than 0.75 ng/ml per year, could predict the presence of prostate cancer. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) now recommends the use of PSA velocity as one indicator of prostate cancer risk in men with low PSA. PSA velocity above 0.35ng/ml per year could help identify men who might otherwise be overlooked, based on a PSA level alone. Therefore, missing a curable prostate cancer would be unlikely if men with a PSA below 2ng/ml were to undergo testing every other year. How often you should have the test done and what is the range of age when it is significant and what you should do if it shows dramatic elevation. Johns Hopkins specialists at the urology department have set the guidelines for standardizing a protocol to use the relevance of PSA testing. Screening strategies for preventing prostate cancer death should be started at age 40; again, at age 45 then every other year beginning at age 50. This can reduce prostate cancer deaths and needs fewer resources to diagnose a prostate cancer. For men in their forties with a PSA level above 0.6ng/ml and for men in their fifties above 0.7ng/ml there is a 3 to 4 times greater risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer over the next two decades than for men with lower PSA levels. Results in Europe are confirming this concept of “targeted screening” rather that “one size fits all” approach.

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Aztec Eagles

Continued from page 27 went to Victoria, Texas, for Curtis P40 Warhawk transition training. The new unit soon began calling themselves “Aztec Eagles.” Pilots and ground personnel reunited in October at Pocatello, Idaho and began training as a unit. At Pocatello, the pilots transitioned to the Republic P-47D Thunderbolt, the largest, heaviest and most expensive fighter aircraft in history powered by a single reciprocating engine. Considered state-of-the-art aircraft, their P-47D Thunderbolts had twin turbochargers that could climb to over 40,000 feet. The aircraft could approach the sound barrier in a dive. On November 27, 1944, the unit transferred to Greenville, Texas, northeast of Dallas, in order to take advantage of better flying weather. As 1944 ended, Mexico prepared for the deployment of Squadron 201 and the Mexican Senate gave the President Camacho authority to send troops abroad. Squadron 201 boarded the liberty ship SS Fair Isle in San Francisco Bay on March 27, 1945, joining 1,500 U.S. soldiers headed for the Philippines. The SS Fair Isle entered Manila Bay with the rest of the convoy on May 1, 1945. After a brief ceremony, the men boarded a train that transported them to their airfield at Porac, near Clark 'Pancho pistols' logo of the 201 Squadron Field, about painted on the wing of a Japanese Zero f o r ty m ile s northwest of Manila. Squadron 201 was assigned to the 58th Group. The 201st formed the fourth squadron of the group, and operated in its own area under Mexican command and administration. Within a short time, the Aztec Eagles began flying missions as a unit. About the same time, the U.S. 25th Infantry Division was meeting fierce resistance from the Japanese in the Marikina watershed east of Manila. Squadron 201’s mission was to support them. Their initial targets were Japanese buildings, military vehicles, artillery and enemy troop concentrations. Four flights of eight pilots each made up the squadron. Missions were short at first. As the Japanese retreated farther and farther back, the missions became longer. Mechanics and armorers would arm and fuel the www.eastcapearts.com

April/May

aircraft in preparation for the next mission as the pilots studied the mission details while relaxing in the afternoon sun. Throughout June 1945, the Japanese Fourteenth Army was holding out in the central highlands. The U.S. Sixth Army troops advanced through rugged mountain passes in pursuit of the enemy. The fighting was a brutal mixture of jungle and mountain warfare. The close air support provided by the 201st was crucial as the U.S. troops pursued the Japanese deeper into the mountains. The Mexican’s missions changed from hitting buildings, military vehicles, artillery and enemy troop concentrations to attacking hardto-see Japanese soldiers and fortifications near friendly troops. The targets in the central highlands were usually covered with jungle and nearly invisible. Enemy targets would be marked with colored smoke or a rocket by a controller or spotter aircraft. The Squadron leader would typically make a pass over the target to confirm. The rest of the Squadron would follow, dropping their 1,000-pound bombs, ripping holes in the jungle canopy. The bombs often threw debris 1,500 into the air with black smoke billowing from the jungle floor below. The pilots would dive into the enemy machine gun and anti-aircraft fire, dropping their ordinance then pulling up so hard they would nearly black out from the G-forces. While close air support was hazardous enough, the U.S. Navy was preparing a riskier assignment. The Aztec Eagles were to fly fighter missions across the South China Sea at the limit of the range of the P-47s. The U.S. Navy required control of the sea-lanes south of the Japanese island of Kyushu, as it prepared for the invasion of Japan. The area was a heavily occupied Japanese strong point and dominated by the island of Formosa (Taiwan). Though the Fifth Air Force bombing campaign had reduced enemy activity, it was still a threat. Straining under a maximum load of bombs and fuel, eight Mexican P47 Thunderbolts took off from Clark Field early on July 6, 1945 barely clearing the runway. Flying in a cramped cockpit over 600 miles in the vast area of the Pacific with only basic instruments was uncomfortable, to say the least. As the Mexicans traveled towards their target, with the blistering tropical sun burning through the cockpit glass, the pilots soon became dehydrated. They were well aware that a small problem could force them to ditch in seas patrolled by the Japanese. The Mexicans encountered no enemy aircraft over Formosa, and the mission concluded successfully. Crew chiefs had to help the pilots from their cockpits. Their legs were numb after wearing their survival gear for over seven hours. The Aztec Eagles returned to Formosa yet again on August 8, 1945, for their last bombing mission. The Mexican Expeditionary Force 201st Fighter Squadron flew its final mission on August 10, as they escorted a convoy of U.S. Navy ships bound for Okinawa. The Japanese had resorted continued on page 35

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April/May

19th Annual Art Festival By Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr. he 19th Annual Festival de Artes was a huge success, drawing hundreds of artists and thousands of visitors to the Palmas de Cortez on April 1. Visitors enjoyed food, music and dancing while they strolled past the artist and vendor booths. Original paintings, custom jewelry and creative handcrafted items were a few of the offerings available. Children’s projects were ongoing throughout the day allowing young minds to create.

The Sea of Cortez Aquarium Continued from page 18 From its humble beginning in 1992, the Festival de Artes, organized by Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez, has grown to be become one of the premiere events in the East Cape. The purpose of the festival is to give local artists an opportunity to show and sell their original work. One of the highlights on the Festival was a special pres-

Back row: Andrea Aguilar, Dale Crawford, Patty Laguna, Jamie Laguna. Front row: Heidi Ford, Amairany Castro

entation of school supplies to Andrea Aguilar Honesto, Director of the Los Barriles Primary School, by Asociación de Artes President Dale Crawford. The Asociación was able to purchase supplies for eighteen local schools with the proceeds from their events last year. For information about how you can donate supplies, contact Art Without Barriers program directors Jamie or Patty Laguna at Cell 624-124-8066. Or, visit the Asociación website at www.eastcapearts.com to learn how to help.

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animal on earth. With males averaging 50’ and weighing 40 tons and females averaging 36’ and 15 tons, except for man and the occasional brave orca, Sperm whales have few predators due in great part to their enormous size, strength and their willingness to aggressively defend themselves. Of course Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick is based on a true story about a sperm whale that attacked the whale ship Essex. Awe struck and impressed with Mother Nature as we’d ever been, our sighting caused a bit of a stir once we shared it back on shore. Scientific whale experts were thrilled and wanted to know more; a few self-appointed Sea of Cortez whale watching experts thought we were high. Thankfully Kim Scholfield & Rick Tyfield had a corroborating story; aboard their boat the previous spring in just about the same deep canyon waters, they too had seen this incredible sight. We knew the Sea of Cortez had indeed served us up another incredible experience that surely would have impressed even Jacques Cousteau. Although we may have been hungry for tuna, we were full with delight over our sperm whales. More incredible information is at www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperm_whale.

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Aztec Eagles

Continued from page 33 to the use of Kamikaze (suicide) attacks and U.S. Navy Intelligence had concerns that Japanese Kamikaze aircraft would attack the convoy. The 201st Squadron supplied air cover for the convoy until relieved by the U.S. Air Force Northrop P-61 Black Widows. The men of the 201st were watching a movie on the night of August 26, when the film stopped. Captain Gaziola announced that he had received a message from headquarters that Japan had surrendered after the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on two Japanese cities. The combat experience for the Aztec Eagles was over. Squadron 201’s 25 aircraft had flown 96 combat missions, 791 sorties, flown 2,842 total hours, dropped 1,457 bombs, and fired 166,922 rounds of .50 cal ammunition. The Squadron flew 53 ground support missions in support of the U.S. 25th Infantry Division and Philippine soldiers. The Squadron lost two pilots in combat action, one missing and four due to accidents. The Aztec Eagles killed over 30,000 Japanese troops and destroyed countless enemy buildings, armor, vehicles, machine gun emplacements, anti-aircraft guns and ammunition. Many of the young aviators and ground support crews who flew and fought with the Allies became successful in academia, business and in aviation. The 201st Squadron’s Republic P-47 Thunderbolts are long gone, but the battle flag the Aztec Eagles carried rests in the National History Museum in Mexico City. Five of those pilots became Fuerza Aérea Mexicana generals. The Aztec Eagles helped the Allies defeat Japan. They helped end the isolationism of Mexico. They paved the way for important agreements between the United States and Mexico. They helped modernize the Mexican Air Force and demonstrated that Mexico could mount a successful expeditionary force. Significant as these achievements are, perhaps the unit's most important legacy is that the Aztec Eagles fought for honor and for Mexico as Allies in WWII, creating national pride throughout their homeland. That pride endures and is evident today as the story of the Aztec Eagles can be heard in towns and villages across the nation. www.eastcapearts.com

April/May

Advertiser’s Directory East Cape Community Fellowship Gisela Talamantes Attorney El Toro y La Luna JA Custom Home Baja Bonita Coldwell Banker Bahia Real Estate East Cape Health Center Baja Properties Unique Beautiful Livable Designs Baja For Sale By Owner Apostolis Restaurant CMC Construction Los Barriles Hotel Wolf Property Management Baja Dream Properties Baja Awesome Sport Fishing Advertisers’ Map East Cape Casas & RV Park Amerimed Hospital Homes and Land of Baja La Casa de VOS Restaurant Piscis East Cape Tackle Café Maria Ruth Rundquist Naty Salon and Spa Dennis Payment Service Baja Foot Reflexology Solutions Clinica de Belleza Oscar the Mechanic All Around Solutions C & G Builders ProTex Plan Health Insurance Smokey’s Grill & Cantina Charlie’s Chocolates Plaza del Pueblo

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Advertising in the East Capers Advertising in the East Capers gets the word out about your business and your ad money supports 18 local schools with art programs and supplies. In addition to space in the printed version, your color ad appears in the online version at no additional cost. You can download an Advertising Kit by visiting our website at www.eastcapearts.com. Follow the East Capers Periodical link and click on “Advertising in the East Capers.”

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East Capers Issue 58 - Apr/May 2012