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Issue No. 59

June/July 2012

Free/Gratis

Cover photo courtesy of Captain Dave from the Southern Cross


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East Capers Editorial

Pay Tribute ars will probably not end during my lifetime or even that of my great grandchildren’s. Wars have been fought in some form or another for thousands of years for hundreds of reasons. I doubt if there has ever been a single year since recorded history began when a war was not being fought in some location about the world. As a writer and historian, I read quite a bit of history. Often I come upon the stories of little known wars now lost to time in faraway places where the reasons for battle were obscure. However, there are an equal number of stories where freedom against oppression was the courageous driving force. In many cases, no alternative existed except to fight. Between the ridiculous and courageous reasons for the wars lie the surviving veterans, the wounded, the dead, and those family members and loved ones left to mourn. A couple of weeks ago the U.S. celebrated Memorial Day. The holiday has gone through many changes since its first creation as Decorations Day after the Civil War. Now it encompasses all military personnel, past and present, rather than only those that died. From the simple act of placing flowers upon a grave to parades in some communities, we honor our armed forces and remember in our own ways. Speaking of those who died in WWII in the Pacific, Admiral Chester Nimitz said, “They fought together as brothers in arms; they died together and now they sleep side by side… To them, we have a solemn obligation — the obligation to ensure that their sacrifice will help make this a better and safer world in which to live.” Wherever you are or whatever country you call home, take a moment to pay tribute to all that have given of themselves from every race, creed and color, so you may now have the freedom to do as you wish. There is no glory in war, only pain and suffering. Even its victory in the end is bittersweet.

Letters to the editor are welcome. mail@wzaponline.com

Anonymous submissions are not accepted.

In This Issue The Future of the Sea of Cortez Medical Tips 8 Summer Exercise Tips Spanish Characters On Your Keyboard The East Cape Music Scene Toast to Summer Baja Fish Tacos Songs of Border Conflict Advertiser’s Map The Earth Under Our Feet: Part 3 Neem II: Who Knew? Agua Malas A Foreign Correspondent in LA Fish and Crustaceans How to Select the Perfect Avocado Advertiser’s Directory

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Check out the full color version of East Capers at www.eastcapearts.com

*** East Capers is published bi-monthly by the Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C., Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico Managing Editor: Walter S Zapotoczny Jr - mail@wzaponline com * Copy Editor: Pako Ford * Circulation Manager: Brian Cummings * Community Representative: Jim Stangarone * Foreign Correspondent: JoAnn Hyslop * Advertising & Graphics: Russ Hyslop Printed by Imprenta Ciudad Los Niños, La Paz, BCS, Mexico

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The Future of the Sea of Cortez By Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr.

he Sea of Cortez is amazing in so many different ways. From the abundance of sea life to the clarity of the waters, our “backyard” is host to amazing fishing, scuba diving, beautiful views, and more. Legendary diver Jacques Cousteau once described the Sea of Cortez as the "world's aquarium" and the "Galapagos of North America." According to marine biologists, for all that remarkable diversity, the Sea of Cortez is a sea in decline. Cousteau might also have called it Mexico’s fish market. Every year the commercial fishing industry takes more than 500,000 tons of seafood from the sea, representing about half of Mexico’s fishing economy. That annual catch counts only the fish brought to market. Estimates of unwanted “bycatch” (fish caught unintentionally) of fish and marine mammals range wildly, from one million tons to three million tons. The destruction began in the 1930s, when the arrival of outboard motors and gill nets transformed fishing in the region. During the past two decades, the Mexican government has created 11 marine protected areas in the Sea of Cortez. The intention was to promote sustainable fishing practices: gill nets and trawling are banned, and a few small areas have been designated as no-take zones, where fishing is completely prohibited, at least in theory. Tim Folger of OneEarth Magazine writes, “In practice the laws are largely ignored.” Shrimp trawlers do the most damage. For every pound of wild shrimp caught, trawlers kill as much as 40 pounds of “bycatch.” Using nets weighted with heavy chains that dig as much as a foot into the sea floor, the trawlers scrape virtually any seabed shallower than 300 feet, dredging the bottom year after year in a maritime version of clearcutting. The wild shrimp fishery in the northern Sea of Cortez has virtually collapsed. In the last several decades, five species of sea turtle have all but disappeared from these waters. Almost without exception, the protected areas in the Sea of Cortez are not rebounding. For the past 14 years, marine biologists have been making careful surveys of crucial habitats here, counting the number of species in selected areas almost yard by yard. The data are grim. Recovery efforts, hamstrung by lack of enforcement, have largely failed. In almost all the Sea of Cortez, even where it is protected, the sizes and numbers of fish today are less than 10 years ago. Fish have completely disappeared from some reefs in the northern part of the sea. The absence of grazing fish may explain why bacteria now cover the reefs, a phenomenon referred to by some researchers as the “rise of the slime. Thousands of illegal vessels are in operation throughout the gulf, and poaching is common. Honest fishermen struggle to make a living. Perhaps the biggest problem confrontwww.eastcapearts.com

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ing the current conservation effort is that the 11 existing protected areas of the Sea of Cortez are too large to patrol with limited resources. The islands and protected areas of the Gulf of California were declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2005. To preserve the ecosystem in this area, the Mexican government has established various projects. A marine observatory bearing the name of Jacques Cousteau was established in La Paz in 2009.1 The aim of the observatory is to become a key element in coastal management in Mexico by monitoring the changes of the local ecosystems with particular attention to climate change impacts. This enables the area to be protected and possibly receive funding for conservation projects. In addition, the Mexican government has been promoting the Sea of Cortez as a tourist attraction and home for various water activities. The most aggressive of these pro-

A Pod of Dolphins Swim Under the Boat

jects is the Escelera Nautica (Nautical Ladder) project.2 It is a massive construction and upgrade package, involving fullservice marinas, many of which will be constructed from scratch. The majority of the focus is on nautical and maritime improvements with the hopes that the resulting boost in tourist-related dollars will trickle down to the other industries and communities. Perhaps the most successful project is the Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park.3 In Cabo Pulmo, there are sharks, manta rays, sea turtles, and other species in numbers not seen anywhere else in the Sea of Cortez. That was not always the case in the 27-square-mile marine protected area. Fearing that their once bountiful fishing grounds were being destroyed by overfishing -- and indeed that any fishing in the area might not be sustainable -- the villagers began petitioning the federal government more than 20 years ago to establish a marine reserve at Cabo Pulmo. The government eventually granted their request in 1995, setting aside 35 percent of the park as a no-take zone, where all fishing is prohibited and banning gill nets, trawling and long lines in continued on page 4

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The Future of the Sea of Cortez Continued from page 3

the remainder of the park. Many in the village thought the no-take zone was too small and decided on their own to enforce a no-take policy throughout the whole park. The villagers now regularly patrol the waters in their pangas to guard against poaching. Overnight, the hundred or so members of a century-old fishing community voluntarily gave up their way of life. The plan was to remake the village into an ecotourism destination. In only 10 years, the increase in biomass has broken all records. The total biomass has increased 460 percent. In terms of top predators, it has increased 1,000 percent in just 10 years. In the past four years, tiger sharks and bull sharks have returned. According to Amanda Maxwell, Director of Latin America projects in National Resource Defense Council’s international program, based in Washington, D.C., “The residents of Cabo Pulmo have demonstrated that tourist development and sustainability are not mutually exclusive; in fact, they can be mutually beneficial.” Commercial fishermen have to make a living just like anyone else. Without alternatives, they have no incentive to change. Perhaps, through better fisheries management, better education, the promotion of ecotourism, and the proactive involvement of the sport fishing industry, the Sea of

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Cortez can continue to be the "world's aquarium" for future generations.

References: 1For

more information about the Center of Scientific Research of the Northwest (CIBNOR) located at Playa Palo de Santa Rita Sur, La Paz go to their website: http://www.cibnor.gob.mx/en/ home. 2 For more information about the Escelera Nautica (Nautical Ladder) Project, visit the project website at http:// www.escaleranautica.com/general2.html. 3 For more information about the Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park visit their website at: http://www.cabopulmopark.com/.

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Medical Tips: The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (Metabolic Syndrome)

By Dr. Enrique Toledo Rodríguez

etabolic syndrome was recognized as Insulin Syndrome over 80 years ago in medical literature, though more than 250 years ago, the Italian doctor Morgagni identified the association between visceral obesity, Arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis and high levels of Uric acid in blood and frequent periods of respiratory obstruction calling this “obstructive respiratory syndrome”. It was renamed "Syndrome X" in the 1980’s. A decade later, it was called Plurimetabólico Syndrome or syndrome of insulin by the characteristics of the same resistance. What is metabolic syndrome? It is a disease consisting of several diseases, which we call silent; Diabetes Mellitus type 2, systemic Arterial hypertension, Dyslipidemia (abnormal amounts of lipids) and Visceral obesity. Why I have taken the liberty of calling it the “Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse,” is because the prevalence of these diseases has been growing along with the population. Besides that, they are diseases that we diagnose when they usually already have a complication. In both Mexico and the United States, obesity is a major public health problem. Millions of dollars will be spent in both countries for control and prevention and to educate the public of this syndrome. How do we diagnose? Very easily, with a review every 6 months of patients with the disease who have pre-existing conditions such as diabetes or hypertension. By checking blood glucose levels, the blood pressure no higher than 130/80 mmHg, HDL cholesterol is less than 35 mg/dl in men and women less than 39 mg/dl, measuring the waist hip index every 6 m o n th s and whichever is lower in women and men to .90 of .85. Then the results are compared to a table as it is diagnosed according to the OMS, EGIR and ATP III. How do we know the rate of hip waist? It is very easy, it means our perimeter of waist (the widest part) and divide between the circumference of the waist (just half of the buttocks) and with that, we have our index. Waist hip index = waist / hips in centimeters. In addition, with this we will have an idea of the type of obesity that we have. The more dangerous as already mentioned in the article by Dr. Sergio www.eastcapearts.com

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Rendon, is the Central obesity. What is micro albuminuria? It is when our kidney starts to leak small amounts of protein, and is diagnosed with a urine test. It can be done with a single sample or a urine collection of 24 hours, without any special preparation. In patients with diabetes or hypertension, it is advisable to do this every 6 months because they are diseases, which can directly affect the kidney. A result of less than 30 micrograms per milligram (mg/mcg) is normal. This means that your kidneys are most likely working well. The normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk with your doctor about the meaning of the specific results of its review. How can metabolic syndrome be prevented? To tell the truth it is very easy to prevent it: 1. Check the index of waist hip, which is taken with a tape measure and if we see that it begins to climb, exercise 1 hr. daily before or after our daily activities is sufficient to control obesity. 2. If already diagnosed with Diabetes, it is necessary to make evidence of insulin resistance or intolerance to carbohydrates. There are tests carried out in the laboratories monitored by a doctor. In addition, patients with obesity are more prone to this condition. We control this by doing a weekly glucose check using a Glucometer or other measuring device. By getting these averages, you may be able to lessen your risk of Diabetes with diet and/or exercise. Or simply go to your doctor and take adequate control of your blood glucose. 3. If you have Arterial Hypertension (high blood pressure), do a weekly check with an in-home measuring device. Consult with your doctor once a month with the results to see if your medication needs to be changed. 4. If you have D yslipidem ia (high cholesterol and/ or hi gh tr i g l y c e r i d e s ), control diet and exercise for one hour a day along with a laboratory test every three months to see if you need medication. Conclusion This syndrome is not mentioned much publicly, because it is very simple to prevent. But once you have it, means the patient is already complicated, either with obecontinued on page 27

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8 Summer Exercise Tips From Accelerate Health.com

ummer has arrived early in Baja Sur, and with it comes more daylight hours to go outside and get in a workout. It is a great time of year for exercising, but warmer days also bring a few dangers if we do not dress or hydrate properly. Here are a few exercise tips to get the most out of your summertime workouts: Stay hydrated. Hydration is important for exercise anytime of the year but more so during the summer months because you sweat more. Failure to properly hydrate can result in heat stroke, heat exhaustion and even death. Replace your electrolytes. Electrolytes are the substances that help conduct electrical signals throughout your body. Depleted electrolytes decreases your body’s performance, and sweating drains your electrolyte level. So, it is important to drink electrolyte-rich liquids while working out in the summer. Gatorade is the most popular drink, but e-caps and salt tablets are popular options, too. Exercise early in the day. During hot summer months, the later you wait to do a workout, the hotter it will be, so workout early in the mornings, before the planet has time to heat up. If your schedule doesn’t allow for early morning exercise, go in the evenings. Just avoid the hottest part of the day (10:00 AM to 3:00 PM). Back down the intensity on really hot days. Excessive heat and humidity can sap your energy, regardless of how well you hydrate. If your energy levels just aren’t there, back off the intensity and duration of your workout, because trying to push through will do more harm than good. Wear light, moisture-wicking clothes. Sweating helps cool your body during hot summertime runs, but if the sweat doesn’t evaporate, no cooling occurs. Light, moisture-wicking materials help draw the sweat off of your skin and cools your body. Wear a hat and/or oil-free sunscreen. Nobody wants to deal with sunburn or skin cancer, and in summertime, there’s more of a risk because people spend more time outside and the sun is more intense. Protect your exposed skin with sunscreen and a hat to help protect your skin from damage. Make sure you wear oil-free sunscreen, because the oil will clog your pores and prevent you from sweating. Workout in the shade. Another way to protect yourself from the sun is to workout on a route or in an area that is well shaded. Shaded routes are also www.eastcapearts.com

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cooler and provide more scenery than the hot sidewalks on a city street. Stretch afterwards. Stretching is important after every workout any time of the year, but since your muscles are more pliable in the summer months, take advantage and increase your flexibility and help stave off injury. A Note About Humidity Heat and humidity are a dangerous combination for people who exercise, especially at lower altitudes. On hot summer days when you are glistening while standing around, the humidity is so high that sweat is not evaporating, so your sweat isn’t cooling you off. Exercising and raising your body temperature only makes it worse. On days like these, the only thing you can do is back off the intensity and dump water over your head to help keep your body cool.

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How To Type Special Spanish Characters On Your PC Keyboard Did you ever wonder how you can type those special accented Spanish characters on your PC computer keyboard, even if you have just a standard U.S. keyboard? It's easy to add them to Word documents or Email by using a few simple keyboard shortcuts: Turn on Num Lock and hold down the ALT key while entering the three digits on the numbers pad using your number keys:

é á í ó ú ñ ¡ ¿ ü

= = = = = = = = =

ALT + 130 ALT + 160 ALT + 161 ALT + 162 ALT + 163 ALT + 164 ALT + 173 ALT + 168 ALT + 129

To get accents on the MAC, hold down the Option key, and while holding it down, type the letter e; then release those keys and type the letter that you want the accent to appear on: é á í ó ú

= Opt + e, then e = Opt + e, then a = Opt + e, then i = Opt + e, then o = Opt + e, then u

For the ñ, hold down the Option key while you type the n; release and type n again. ñ ¡ ¿

= Opt + n, then n = Opt + 1 = Opt + shift +?

To place the diaeresis over the u, hold down the Option key while pressing the u key; release and type u again. ü

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= Opt + u, then u

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East of the Sun and West of the Moon: The East Cape Music Scene By Randy Leach

he music scene seems to have really picked up since the Christmas break. Otra Vez continues to lead the way in Los Barriles with a continuous commitment to musical events. Mark Walters and Randy Leach, Los Viejos, Chevy the International, and others have had good success at Otra Vez. And of course the Wednesday open mike nights at the Roadrunner still continue to be extremely popular. But, the highlight of the season was the Rocking Blues Extravaganza, a tour of Canadian and American musicians as well as local bands too. The Rocking Blues Extravaganza performed in San Lucas at the Giggling Marlin, Los Barriles at Las Palmas, San Jose at Don Sanchez and Deckman’s, and several other venues as diverse as Las Ventanas. Headlining were Robbie Laws, a much acclaimed guitar player from Portland, Oregon and Tim Williams, another very accomplished guitar player from Calgary, Alberta. The Dream Band consisted of several musicians from Calgary, Alberta and included Greg Haugesag from San Jose on flugelhorn. Opening at the Giggling Marlin and Don Sanchez was Cambio de Corazon, a very accomplished Latin Jazz/Salsa band. Local favorite Skeleton Key opened at the Las Palmas event in Los Barriles. Blues Explosion from La Paz opened the show in Las Ventanas. Credit must go to promoter Hubert Miller, as he was relentless in making sure every detail was covered. I expect to see Hubert reappear for another exciting series next season as well. It is very exciting to see so much local talent surface as it seems to do on a consistent basis in this southern Baja that we all love so much. And to see interaction between Mexican, Argentinian, Brazilian, Canadian, and American artists is a pleasant site as well. The East Cape Arts Music Festival for November 17, 2012 is in the planning stages. It will be a very exciting line-

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up I can assure you, although it is too early to announce. Tentatively the plan is to build a lineup around Latin traditional, Latin jazz and salsa with a sprinkling of rock and roll and reggae to top it off. There will be more detail coming in the next few months as the festival moves from the planning stages to a more defined lineup and a venue is selected. Rest assured that it will be a very popular event as it has in the past. That is about is for now, but please don’t forget to get out and support your local musicians. It would be a sad world without live music!!!!

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Toast to Summer By Pablo Ponce With winter gone and summer here The water’s warm and fish are near About sunrise we’ll launch the boat Head down the coast someplace remote Up in the sky a seagull sails And off the bow a pod of whales With mantas jumping dolphins spinning Life is good and we are grinning We’re finally at the fishing spot Check the meter looks real hot Pin on the hook fresh wiggly bait Sit patiently but we can’t wait Soon hear the sound we’ve waited for “HOOK UP!”, then we hook some more The sea’s alive a wave a splash And off the stern see tuna crash It’s so much fun but arms so sore We’ll leave after we catch one more With most released but some on ice Our evening’s shaping up quite nice A fresh fish dinner is our plan Not talking tuna from a can Then off to bed for early rise I’m sure you guessed it’s no surprise Just not at sunrise maybe ten We’ll go out fishing once again

Community Services Medical Clinic 624-141-0797

Green Angels 074

Dental Clinic 624-141-0375

Emergency 066

Los Barriles Police 624-141-0525 Veterinarian 044-624-145-2982

Canadian Consulate 624-142-4333

US Consulate 624-143-3566

British Consulate 624-173-9500, ext. 220

Buena Vista Fire/Police 624-141-0316

Federal Police 088

Buena Vista Ambulance 624-191-1221

Local Non-Profit Organizations Amigos de los Animales Animals info@amigosdeanimales.org

Baja Shakespeare, A.C. Theater tyfield1@hotmail.com

Animal Lovers of Mexico, A.C. (ALMA) Animals http://almacares.com/

East Cape Guild, A.C. Scholarships bjborg@earthlink.com

East Cape Health Center, A.C. Medical & Dental Care www.eastcapemedical.com

Patronado Cabo Este, A.C. Turtle Protection pepemurietta@hotmail.com

Rotary International, A.C. Community Service www.losbarrilesrotaryclub.org

UVERDE, A.C. Environment lacasadevos@prodigy.net.mx

Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez Arts www.eastcapearts.com

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Baja Fish Tacos From The Paupered Chef

his version, collected from a few different recipes, is an emulation of the classic recipe of homemade tortillas, lightly fried tempura-style fish, a dairybased white sauce and fresh, crunchy, gently spicy red cabbage. Real Baja fish tacos are nothing like what you are used to eating when it comes to Mexican food. In fact, true Mexican cuisine might be our biggest missed chance. Satisfied by the (admittedly tasty) Tex-Mex-style with its copious cheese, sour cream, pile-it-on technique, we are missing a world of subtlety shot through with spicy excitement, flavors that emphasize festivity and celebration, not fullness and indulgence--a rich tradition of indigenous techniques influences by European sensibilities, infused with a penchant for bold flavors. There could not be a better example of anti-TexMex than fish tacos. First, because they provide us a reference point: we all know what tacos are. We have a general idea that you take a pile of meat and add fillings. PART I: TORTILLAS Ingredients: ½ cup minus 1 tablespoon lard 3 cups flour 1 tablespoon salt 1¼ cup very warm water Directions: First, you mix the flour and the salt in a mixing bowl, and then add the lard in a big chunk. Working with your

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hands, break the lard up into smaller and smaller chunks, coating each with flour, until they're around the size of, or a bit larger than, rice grains. Add the water in three stages and mix the ingredients into a large ball. Next, roll the whole batter into a long 3-inch-thick cylinder, then cut into pieces. The idea here is to help you divide the dough into 16 equal balls of dough. Once you do that, let them rest for around 15 minutes. Now you are ready to roll out the tortillas. Using a rolling pin or Corona beer bottle (it is the perfect shape, actually, and less unwieldy than a pin), roll the dough with a little flour, turning 90 degrees and repeating until it makes a 6-inch circle. You will have to experiment a bit with the thickness--too thick, it is more like a pita, too thin and it turns into a cracker on the griddle. Once you roll it out, toss it from palm to palm to coax it into a nice round shape. Right before you cook it, stretch it gently here and there to even out the thickness. Heat the griddle to medium -low heat and cook for about a minute until bubbles start to form and it starts to become pliable. PART II: WHITE SAUCE

Ingredients: fresh lime juice ½ cup yogurt ½ cup mayonnaise 1 habanera chili (use a milder one if you wish) ½ teaspoon - crushed oregano ½ teaspoon - ground cumin ½ teaspoon - dried, crushed dill ½ teaspoon - ground cayenne chili ground white pepper to taste continued on page 21

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Songs of Border Conflict

From “Mexican-American Folklore” by John O. West, 1989 long the English-Scottish border for many decades and on many other boundaries, songs of conflict have often given a measure of emotional relief to people. The border between the United States and Mexico is certainly one involving cultural clashes and misunderstandings, and as with the underdog culture in other rivalries, life there has produced an impressive body of songs as a result. When the Texas Revolution ended, Texans insisted on claiming the Rio Grande as their southern boundary; when the conclusion of the Mexican War made that boundary a fact, a vast number of Spanish-speaking people were separated artificially from their kin and their associates – much as the Berlin Wall did in Germany. On the north bank of the river, the Anglo was usually in control, even when he was not in the majority, and this situation continue to some degree even today. Away from urban centers of population, people used to be able to visit one another freely across the border, without encountering official restraints. Of course, that has changed. Not long ago in the Big Bend area of Texas, for example, I was offered a twenty-five cent ride across the Rio Grande in a tiny rowboat called the chalupa. I was assured that everyone crossed that way, without interference. Now, fear of smuggling or illegal entry prohibits crossing in this way and keeps the age-old resentments alive among many MexicanAmericans. Thus, it is understandable if they sing the old songs – as they do – of men and situations not entirely different from their own. It is in this context that the hero songs flourish. Heraclio Bernal, who was a successful gadfly to the regime of Porfirio Díaz during the 1880s, for example, was – and to some degree – still is – the Mexican-Americans’ Beowulf, their Cid, their St. George, and their Robin Hood all in one song. The song in his honor, “Corrido de Feraclio Bernal,” reflects these heroic qualities, even in translation: Town of Sinaloa, State of Michoacán, is where they took out the order to arrest Bernal.

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How handsome was Bernal on his dark horse, in the midst of the Acordada with a nice big cigar. And in Mazatlán they killed by treachery and from behind, because that don Crispín Garciá was good at selling someone out. Oh, you rich of the coast, you will no longer die of fright; now that they have killed Bernal, and you can sleep with ease. Fly, fly little dove, light on that walnut tree; now the roads are empty, now they have killed Bernal.

You can hear this song at: http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=wacBc986kXg.

The Squadron of the North from the Military College went out, To ride through the mountains to arrest Bernal. Heraclio Bernal said that he was a man and didn’t back down, that he, mounted on his horse, gave pardon only to God. Heraclio said at the Pericos Hacienda that he did not rob the poor, only the rich. A family in the mountains found itself in dire need; he gave them seven hundred pesos so that they might alleviate their troubles.

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The Earth Under Our Feet: Part 3 By Russ Hyslop

eologists now agree that the Baja peninsula and the adjacent Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) evolved through three sequential phases from the start of Miocene time, about 24 million years ago, to the present. The first phase lasted until 12 million years ago, when the peninsula was still part of the mainland of Mexico and plate tectonic activity was restricted to the Pacific Coast. That early tectonic activity created the numerous old volcanoes that are still in evidence today in the mid section of the peninsula. The most prominent of these relics is Volcan las Tres Virgenes, which is located north of the highway between San Ignacio and Santa Rosalia. The second phase occurred between 10 million and 3.5 million years ago, when crust stretched widely beneath the western margin of the North American Plate (see Figure 1.)

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Enter the East Pacific Rise, which is a segment of the greater Pacific Plate, and is responsible for subducting the mainland of Western Mexico. It lifted what is now the Baja Peninsula and proceeded to move us northwesterly, opening up the Gulf and creating a new boundary between the North American Plate and the Pacific Plate. The boundary that was established is the S an An dr es Transfer Fault (see Figure 2). And yes, we are moving towards Alaska at a rate of approximately 3 ½ inches per year. Part 4 will look at the mountain ranges of the Peninsula.

Stay tuned! Resources: Markes E. Johnson, Discovering the Geology of Baja California Jack Williams, The Magnificent Peninsula

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Baja Fish Tacos Continued from page 14

Directions: First, mix the first three ingredients, aiming for a slightly runny consistency. Dice the chili and finely as possible and add it along with the remaining ingredients. You are done. PART III: THE FISH Use a light fish like cod, tilapia or parrotfish. Regardless, get it into 1-inch wide strips. Ingredients: 1 cup flour 2 teaspoons salt 1 beer, not dark (the beer from the bottle you used as a rolling pin)

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Make sure it is not on high or it will start to smoke and all chaos will break out. Do test runs with one piece of fish, and when it is ready, the bubbling of the oil will look like this. Turn the fish after about a minute. Look for the color to decide when to remove. Brown is bad; golden is okay. What you are looking for is something a little less than golden. Remove and place on a plate with a paper towel to drain. Cut up red cabbage. Slice as thinly as possible so the strands still stay together. Take your freshly made tortillas, place the freshly fried fish and the cabbage inside and slather it with the sauce. Squeeze some limejuice over it all. It will be messy. It will be spicy. Chances are, you will never have tasted a taco quite like this. Make sure a beer is within arm’s reach and devour until all is gone.

Directions: Combine flour and salt, and then add beer. The consistency should be rather goopy, which was nice since the batter will actually stay on the fish when it is fried.

Get a big pan with a thick lip and put enough oil so it is about an inch thick. Turn the heat up to medium-high.

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Neem II: Who Knew? By Pako Ford

his is the continuation of my article in the February/March issue in of East Capers regarding the Neem Tree (Azadirachta Indica) and it’s many uses. I’ve had several requests for information on how to use Neem. What follows are my personal experiences using Neem leaf, stems and seeds for 17 years. A close friend had been fighting her Candida infection for years to no avail. She tried Neem therapy and was clear of the fungus within 10 days. She used Neem leaf tea, 3 times a day (1/4 tsp. Powder), 12 oz. Hot, but not boiling, water and local honey to taste and used a Neem leaf douche twice daily (1 tsp. Neem powder in 24 oz. of water). Boil for 20 minutes strain and cool before use. She had also suffered with migraine headaches all her life. Neem leaf tea (Neem is a vasodilator) relieved her symptoms at once. Continued use has kept her free of headaches. Problems with hemorrhoids'? 3 or 4 drops of Neem seed oil, applied topically to the affected area, brings relief and healing. As a bug repellent, Neem has no equal and you aren’t spraying yourself with some dreaded chemical. Slow boil 1 tsp. Powered Neem leaf in 32 oz. water for 20 minutes. Cool and strain into a spray bottle. Keep refrigerated. To use in the garden, add 3 or 4 drops of dish detergent. Neem trees are fast -growing, drought resistant and beautiful. They’re available here on the East Cape at any Vivero (Nursery).

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by hand and then powder them in a coffee grinder. Save the stems for use as toothpicks-your teeth will love you and you’ll never have to see the dentist again. Reference: Conrick, John. Neem the Ultimate Herb. Lotus Press, 1996. Editor’s Note: From the very beginning of recorded human history, people have used the mysterious Neem tree. Today, rural Indians call this tree their "village pharmacy" because it is said to "cure" diseases and disorders ranging from bad teeth and bedbugs to ulcers and malaria. The seeds, bark and leaves contain compounds called limonoids with proven antiseptic, antiviral, antipyretic, a n t i inflammatory, anti-ulcer and antifungal uses. Native to the dry forest areas of India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, Neem thrives in the dry areas of the tropics and subtropics.

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To Make Neem Oil Gather seeds, from the ground, in July and August. Wash away the fruit covering the seeds and let them dry in the sun. Grind in coffee grinder—the hulls and seeds will separate. Add the seed “mush” to an equal amount of olive oil. Bring the mixture to a low boil, remove, let cool and bring to a boil again. Remove, let cool, strain and bottle. To Make Neem Leaf Powder Dry the leaves, strip them from the stems, crumble 22

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Beware Of The Beautiful Blue Balloons On The Beach And In The Water Agua Malas or Portuguese Man of War

By Dean D Ettinger, M.D.

(Re-printed From Issue 54) he man of war cannot steer itself. They float at the mercy of wind and waves. Mostly in warm waters and on the East Cape they are no exception. You could touch the float but it is best not to do so just in case the tentacle is sitting on it. The Portuguese man of war (physalia) can be found in any ocean when the water is warm. Most often seen when strong winds blow onshore. These creatures are characterized by their blue, violet or pink balloon-like float which trails clusters of tentacles and polyps. The tenta cles have been m ea su re d as long as 165 ft (50 meters) in length. These house the stinging nematocysts (stinging organ). These sting on contact. This is a response for gathering food to paralyze the food source. It does not distinguish between small fish or large human. Unfortunately it is similar though in one respect to the western diamondback in that the smaller the man of war the greater the toxin is released like the smaller snake does not know how much venom to inject into its pray therefore it empties the venom sacks completely, that is why we see far greater mortality in rattlesnake bites when they are small snakes verses large ones. But I digress.....the man of war sting can cause life threatening reaction if not quickly treated although those are rare. Inappropriate first aid will also make the sting worse so you need to remember a few things for the possibility of a man of war sting. Many properly cared for stings resolve on their own sometimes as quickly as 10-15 minutes. That is why it is so important to take prompt and appropriate action for a sting. First aid for man of war stings: 1. Prevent further stings. Carefully remove the tentacles using a stick or gloves. If you are in the water get out quickly so as to not get other nematocysts on your body. Never rub the tentacles while on your skin. This will stimulate the nematocysts to release more toxins. www.eastcapearts.com

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2. Rinse the area with sea water. Fresh water does not help nor does vinegar as these also may increase the release of toxin all at once which can greatly increase your risk of anaphylaxis. Do not scrub the area or use meat tenderizer, baking soda, urine, or aluminum sulfite. All of these may deactivate the toxin but they also may stimulate the stinging cells to discharge all at once greatly increasing the injury. 3. Ice may be applied to the area to reduce pain and swelling. 4. Pain can be counteracted with topical products containing lidocaine or benzocaine. Some sunburn products have these but our local pharmacies can get and do have limited supplies of lidocaine jelly for topical use. Do not worry they do not outdate really and hopefully you will never need to use them. 5. Benadryl cream may be applied as well also menthol cream (sarna lotion) will help with the pain and discomfort. 6. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience shortness of breath or swelling of lips or tongue, or difficulty maintaining consciousness also seek medical attention if you begin to have muscle spasms. Many times I am asked if taking oral Benadryl will help or using fresh Aloe Vera gel. The antihistamine has been shown to help and if you feel the stinging relieved by the Aloe Vera, by all means try it. It will not hurt you but progressive toxin spread can. Many people relate to me the typical home remedy and trials of everything including human urine and swear they get relief but in reality the symptom will have lasted usually only 10-15 minutes anyway the home remedy may have not been the cure. Tincture-of time works the best. Finally, infection can occur after a sting. Seek medical attention if your areas of the sting become red, discolored, or if you notice enlargement of your lymph glands and red streaking between the stung area and your nodes. It is not uncommon for symptoms of man of war stings to flare up over a 6-8 week period but unless signs of infection are present these symptoms will resolve on their own. We should enjoy the beauty of our cape and our daily lives but be prepared to give yourself or a friend the correct help for the sting of the aqua mala, the beautiful Portuguese man of war.

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A Foreign Correspondent in LA By JoAnn Hyslop

ell, the Oscars are over and life has returned to “normal” in LA. Since movies are a large part of the artistic expression around here, it’s fascinating to watch the industry hand out little gold statues to those actors, directors, song writers, script writers, etc. who have been selected as winners by a “Board of Governors”….i.e. influential “money bags” that the industry couldn’t do without. The show ONLY took 3 hours, but it was exceedingly entertaining. My favorite part happened on the famous “Red Carpet” when Sasha Baron Cohan, dressed in costume for his next role as a despotic dictator poured “ashes” of the deceased North Korean president on a passer-by. A halfhearted struggle with a security official ensued with the result that Cohen spilled the rest of the “ashes” on the guys foot. For those who don’t know who Sasha Baron Cohen is, get on UTube and click on his “AliG” gigs. Totally hysterical! Between trips to Trader Joes, Target, World Market, movies and Ben & Jerrys, I’m enga ged in checking out the art scene in LA. One of the first things I picked up when I arrived up here last May was a brochure for “Pacific Standard Time”… a Getty Museum-inspired program to bring arts institutions across Southern California, from Santa Barbara to San Diego together to participate in a collection of venues showcasing the Arts. My friend Sherri and I decided that we’d check out what was going on closer to home in LA. Our first stop was the Autry National Center where we took in the “Art Along the Hyphen: The MexicanAmerican Generation” exhibit which documented the individual stories of six Los Angeles artists. These artists represent people of Mexican descent born or raised in the United States between the late 1800s and the 1930s. One of the most memorable works was titled, “Braceros”, by Domingo Ulloa, an oil on Masonite painting depicting agricultural workers gathered behind a barbed wire enclosure. Domingo was born in Pomona, California to migrant workers and spent his formative years in Baja California. After he moved to LA he became one of the important local Mexican -American artists who promoted social justice through their artwork. We also have visited LACMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Wilshire Blvd. next to the La

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Brea Tar Pits. Rather than drive we hopped on the Metro bus and rail system….roundtrip cost...$1.50 for seniors! The LA art scene is currently all a-twitter about an upcoming exhibit titled, “Levitated Mass”. (No, it’s not an “upon high” religious service!) The centerpiece, a really, really REALLY big rock, arrived at LACMA early in the morning on March 10. The 340 ton, 21 foot high rock was delivered to LACMA on a 294-foot long, 3 freeway lanes wide specially built steel beam transporter. The rock was removed from a Riverside County quarry in February. It traveled, only at night, to LACMA in downtown LA for 12 days along a 106-mile route of residential streets through 4 counties and 22 cities at a speed of 5 miles per hour. More than 100 utilities were affected by the rock’s passage. Utility crews traveled with the rock to temporarily remove power lines, traffic lights and other obstacles. Once the rock passed on through service was immediately restored. In downtown Long Beach, when transport handlers navigated an underpass with inches to spare, a group of “Rock Fans” cheered wildly and danced to the theme song from “Rocky”. In Ontario, Ramone Vasquez dropped on one knee as the rock passed and said to his girlfriend, “Maybe that rock won’t fit your finger, but this one will”. She said “yes.” The whole project…cost of the rock, its transport and construction of the sculpture site at LACMA totals $10 million. It is being paid for through donations from several local donors. Once the rock is in place it will rest on supports high atop a 456 ft.-long ramp dug in the ground. Visitors are expected to pass UNDERNEATH the rock thus making it appear that the rock levitates above them. When Sherri and I heard about the specifics of this remarkably quirky idea we just looked at each other and said in unison…”I’ll pass on THAT exhibit, thank you very much!!!” LA Times readers are equally skeptical. One expressed her dismay by commenting, “Think how much good $10 million bucks might do if applied to something constructive.” Another stated that the “Levitated Mass” exhibit concerned him, but not just with its tremendous cost. He had recently published a novel called, “Fault Line” ABOUT GUESS WHAT? Need I remind you that we ARE in earthquake country up here!

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The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse Continued from page 5

sity, with micro Albuminuria, mixed Dyslipidemia, or uncontrolled high blood pressure. It is only by following the four steps above, that you can prevent and treat. For more information please consult the following addresses or stop in Amerimed Los Barriles with Dr. Enrique Toledo and with pleasure we will answer all your questions. References: http://www.medscape.com/ http://www.diabetesvoice.com/ Look up: “Metabolic diseases�

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Fish and Crustaceans he general name for a fish in Spanish is una pez, with the plural spelling peces. A fish referred to as food is pescado. Crustaceans are referred to as crustáceos.

English

Spanish

Seafood abalone clam eel squid shrimp scallops crab lobster crayfish mussel oyster octopus

Mariscos abulon almeja anguila calamar camaron concha jaiba langosta langostino mejillon osteon pulpo

Fish anchoves tuna codfish bonito mahi mahi red snapper yellow tail flounder striped mullet grouper bluegill/sunfish pompano snapper white fish snook / sea bass salmon Spanish sardine Spanish mackerel shark trout

Pescado Anchoas atun bacalao bonito dorado huachinango jurel lenguado lisa mero mojarra pampano pargo pescado blanco robalo salmon sardina Españolas sardine sierra Españolas mackerel tiburon/cazon trucha

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How to Select the Perfect Avocado vocados are a nutritious source of vitamins, potassium, sodium and digestible fats. They are a good ingredient for fresh salads or delicious as the base of a fresh guacamole. Choosing the right avocado at the store depends on when you plan to use it. Avocados ripen quickly and do not respond well to refrigeration, so it's best to select the right avocado for your recipe at the store. 1.Determine when you will be using the avocado. An unripe avocado will become freshest in about five days, while a fully ripe avocado should be used the same day it's purchased. 2. Scan avocados by color. For avocados you plan to use in four or five days, gravitate toward green ones. Avocados with slightly more wrinkles and some dark green patches are good for two to three days in the future. A dark, nearly black avocado is likely to be fully ripe. 3. Pick up an avocado of the appropriate color and squeeze it gently in your palm without using your fingertips. If there is some give to the avocado but it doesn't squish too easily, that means it is ripe and ready to eat within one to three days. If it is mostly firm but not hard like a rock, it will be ready in four to five days. A hard avocado should be left at the store.

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Advertiser’s Directory Unique Beautiful Liviable Designs

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El Toro y La Luna C & G Builders

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Solutions Clinica de Belleza Baja Legal Solutions

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Dennis Payment Service Naty Salon & Spa

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Baja Properties

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Smokey's Grill & Cantina Vista del Cortez

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Wolf Property Management Apostolis Restaurant

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Advertiser's Map

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Homes & Land of Baja La Casa de VOS

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Ruth Rundquest Baja For Sale By Owner

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Piscis Restaurant East Cape Casas & RV Resort

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Bahia Real Estate

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Oscar the Mechanic Charlie's Chocolates

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Baja Bonita Coldwell Banker

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JA Custom Home Designer/Builder

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Solstice Solar of Baja Los Barriles Hotel & Storage

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East Cape Tackle CMC Construction

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East Cape Health Center Amerimed Hospitals

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Advertising in the East Capers Advertising in the East Capers gets the word out about your business and your ad money supports 18 local schools with art programs and supplies. In addition to space in the printed version, your color ad appears in the online version at no additional cost. You can download an Advertising Kit by visiting our website at www.eastcapearts.com.

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East Capers Issue 59 Jun/Jul 2012  

East Capers is a community magazine published bi-monthly by the Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C. For more information about the As...

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