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Gregory Frank Harris “Blue Waters, Rio Pecos” oil on panel, 30x30 inches, $5200

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T Barny “Afficere” Italian alabaster, 14x11x12 inches, $19,600

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T Barny “Hadron” Egyptian onyx, 27x21x22 inches, $33,000

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Gregory Frank Harris “Sedona Colors” oil on linen, framed 50x56 inches, $11,500

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Gregory Frank Harris “Poetic Landscape, No. 2” oil on linen, framed 26x28 inches, $4800

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T Barny “Coalescence” Equadorian travertine, 27x16x12 inches, $14,400

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T Barny “Medial” Mexocan fluorite, 15x11x11 inches, $18,800

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Gregory Frank Harris “Spring Patterns, Abiquiu” oil on linen, framed 40x44 inches, $7000

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T Barny “Runic” Bolivian sodalite, 25x24x3 inches, $9600

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Gregory Frank Harris “Cielo Activo” oil on linen, framed 32x40 inches, $6200

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Gregory Frank Harris “Arroyo Seco, Taos” oil on paper board, framed 36x26 inches, $4500

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T Barny “Scire” Korean pyrophyllite, 19x10x6 inches, $9600

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T Barny with “Hadron” Egyptian onyx, 27x21x22 inches, $33,000


Gregory Frank Harris with “Cielo Activo� oil on linen, framed 32x40 inches, $6200


G r FRANK e g o r yHARRIS Frank Harris GREGORY Gregory Frank Harris has painted in a number of styles and genres thus far in his career. He cites influences ranging from seventeenth century Dutch landscape painters to the French Impressionists, to the Fauves and other Postimpressionists, to first and second generation abstract expressionists, to contemporaries Wolf Kahn, Stuart Shils, and Eric Aho. “Many of my most recent paintings, “he observes, “seem to combine 19th century Tonalism with 21st century Abstraction.” The Tonalists’ interest in atmosphere is clearly reflected in Harris’s landscapes. He often seems to reverse our normal perspective, bringing air and sky to the foreground while landscape features recede into the distance behind them. In many of these paintings, the air itself seems to be visible, saturated with color to suggest a saturation with moisture. In mastering various versions of visible atmosphere, he has also mastered their opposite—the crystalline clarity of New Mexico’s air and light. For the past several years, Harris has been exploring the use of the window squeegee as an artist’s tool (a technique he discovered through the German painter Gerhard Richter). To find suitable images,” he says, “I will go directly to nature and paint the scene from life, or use photography, or at times, my imagination. I develop the paintings with several techniques in which I begin an underpainting using large brushes and heavy impasto to render the colors and pictorial design. Then, with different sized squeegees, I go over the wet paint to ‘blur’ the forms, leaving elements of the underpainting to show through.” Where the Tonalists blurred images slightly, perhaps tentatively, Harris blurs them boldly. There is boldness too in the way he allows elements of the “scene from life” to show through—boldness because for much of the past century, the art world thought of abstraction as something opposed to representation. Paintings were either representational or non-representational, figurative or non-figurative. In Harris’s landscapes, abstract and representational elements coexist quite naturally. In fact, they work together beautifully.

Hunter Kirkland Contemporary

200-B Canyon Road

Santa Fe, New Mexico


T BARNY

T Barny T Barny delights in producing a sense of wonder with his sculpture, teasing impossibly graceful figures out of the roughest materials—especially stone, which he selects from quarries around the world. “I have worked in almost every material, form, and scale, “he says, noting that he is always drawn back to stone, “the oldest material of Man, the one that I continue to find the most expressive.”

Among his most striking pieces are his many variations on the möbius strip, the looping curve that twists back upon itself so that its one side is also its other side (a line traced down its length will traverse “both sides” and end up at its starting point). This strange singleness of surface seems to defy logic, which may explain its appeal to artists like M.C. Escher and Jose de Rivera. T Barny’s versions seem almost to defy gravity as well, as sinuous loops reach up and hang suspended in mid-air. T Barny’s other work includes wood carvings, stone wall hangings, primitive stone carvings, and fountain sculptures. He also produces bronze castings in limited editions. Born in San Francisco in 1956, T Barny studied at Stanford and Brown Universities and graduated with a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. He has taught stone carving in California and New Mexico, and has worked as Artist-in-Residence at art centers in New York, Texas Italy and Greece. His work is represented in numerous private and corporate collections. It has been featured in more than 250 solo and group exhibitions in galleries worldwide. He has exhibited in Santa Fe since 1989.

Hunter Kirkland Contemporary  200 Canyon Road  Santa Fe, NM 87501  phone: 505.984.2111 fax: 505.984.8111  hunterkirkland@earthlink.net  www.hunterkirklandcontemporary.com


200 B Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM

505-984-2111

hunterkirkland@earthlink.net

hunterkirklandcontemporary.com

Gregory Frank Harris & T Barny  

An exhibition of new work by stone sculptor T Barny and contemporary landscape painter Gregory Frank Harris.

Gregory Frank Harris & T Barny  

An exhibition of new work by stone sculptor T Barny and contemporary landscape painter Gregory Frank Harris.