Page 1

Addendum I to the District Curriculum Guide:

Differentiating Instruction in a Mixed-Ability Classroom Addendum to the Curriculum Guide


Differentiating Instruction in a Mixed-Ability Classroom

What is Differentiated Instruction? Differentiated instruction means giving students multiple options for taking in information (Carol Tomlinson, 1999). Multiple options such as: using different texts, different languages, different resources, and different tasks. The ultimate goal is for each student to understand what is being taught.

Why Should We Use Differentiated Instruction? Differentiated instruction is a response to the growing needs of diverse classrooms. Today’s teachers have heterogeneous learning environments that include students with different reading abilities, English language learners; students with different backgrounds, interests, and learning styles.

How does Differentiated Instruction work? First and foremost, differentiated instruction is built on knowing each student – what their academic abilities are, as well as, their personal interests, strengths, weaknesses, and learning styles. Assessments, standardized test scores, interest surveys, and personal profiles are the foundation of differentiated instruction.


Start slowly. Students can be grouped in a multitude of ways: by reading levels, learning styles, and/or interests. Eventually, each component of a lesson plan can be differentiated – the content, the process, and the product. Be respectful. Differentiation is about finding ways for each student to make meaning of the information being taught. As many researchers have said, “One size does not fit all students.” Differentiation is about tailoring lessons to meet the learning needs of students in ways that they can.


Lesson Plan: To Kill a Mockingbird - Scout and Gender: Becoming a Southern Lady Teacher: Antoinette Barriga & Katie Peters Standards: W.9-10.9 & RL.9-10.1 I. Objectives At the end of this class period, the student will be able to:  Discuss expectations females faced in the south in the 1930’s  Identify Scout's changing gender identity using quotes from the novel  Break down and analyze quotes from the novel  Construct a written response on their analysis of quotes from the novel  Work constructively in groups II. Anticipatory Set  What were some expectations women faced in the 1930’s in the south? III. Materials  To Kill a Mockingbird  “Scout and Gender” handouts  Article by Shackelford IV. Procedure  Students will individually write down their response to the anticipatory set, and then the class will discuss as a whole.  Students will be broken up into 3 groups depending on their reading level - the groups will participate in a discussion about Scout's gender identity and respond to quotes from the novel.  Group 1 (struggling readers): The group will review the 3 quotes provided in the worksheet and: discuss how Scout's gender is addressed; identify what part of the novel the quote was taken from; write down the context of each quote; and craft a response analyzing each quote.  Group 2 (average readers): The group will use the novel as a guide to discuss how Scout's gender is addressed and: find 3 quotes from the novel that illustrate Scout's view on femininity and gender expectations, identify what part of the novel the quote was taken from; write down the context of each quote; and craft a response analyzing each quote.  Group 3 (skilled readers): The group will read the article "The Female Voice in To Kill a Mockingbird: Narrative Strategies in Film and Novel" by Dean Shackelford and highlight any key points relevant to Scout's gender identity, use the novel as a guide to: discuss how Scout's gender is addressed; find two quotes from the novel that illustrate Scout's view on femininity and gender expectations; write down the context of each quote; and craft a two paragraph response using quotes from both sources to analyze Scout's changing gender identity.


V. Closure & Extension  Students will write down their response to the following questions: o What did you and your classmates discover about Scout and her views on femininity? What events & characters in the novel impact this? o What do you think is Harper Lee’s beliefs/feelings about expectations placed on females? VI. Assessment & Evaluation  Students will be assessed through their participation in the group work and class discussions, as well as their written responses


Differentiation Addendum  

For LTED 667 project

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you