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The regeneration magazine for the London borough of Ealing / Issue 8 / Spring 2017

Ealing Rocks

How music has shaped the borough

The Ealing In London Debate

What developers in Ealing see as the major challenges ahead

Why Ealing?

12 Reasons to invest in the capital of west London

Rainer Hersch Interview Ealing’s comedian composer on life in W5


EALING

FINAL PHASE NOW L AUNCHED Creating a new exciting residential, retail and restaurant destination complete with new public square > Crossrail coming 2019, reducing travel times by up to 50% > Less than 300m from Ealing Broadway Underground Station > Night Tube service now available > Highly specified apartments > 24 hour concierge > Residents’ only spa, pool & fitness suite > Residents’ only underground parking*

“50% increase in house prices predicted over the next 5 years within a 750m radius of Ealing Broadway Station.” JLL, 2015

2 & 3 B E D R O O M A PA R T M E N T S F R O M £ 8 8 0 , 0 0 0 † dickens-yard.co.uk 020 8003 6026 Dickens Yard Sales Information Centre, The Old Fire Station, 4 Longfield Avenue, Ealing, London W5 2UQ Open daily 10am-6pm. Thursday until 8pm. Evening appointments available on request. * Available at an additional cost. † Price correct at time of going to press. Computer generated imagery for illustrative purposes only.


WEST LONDON’S NEW VIBRANT VILLAGE Overlooking 90 acres of Country Park and with one kilometre of canal frontage, Southall Waterside is one of the capital’s largest and most important regeneration projects. The first homes to be built at Southall Waterside will be spacious modern apartments with views over a tree-lined central boulevard. Residents will have access to dedicated cycle routes and pathways, which will safely connect them to the urban areas, canal and parkland throughout the development. Southall Waterside is already perfectly placed for all that London has to offer, located in one of West London’s most up and coming commuter belts. The forthcoming Crossrail station will offer new connections to Central London, the City, Heathrow and beyond.

Heathrow 8 mins

Southall

Ealing Broadway 6 mins

Bond St 17 mins

Liverpool St 24 mins

REGISTER YOUR INTEREST

STUDIOS, SUITES, 1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS

southallwaterside.co.uk

Computer Generated Image of Southall Waterside, indicative only. All journey times are sourced from crossrail.co.uk. ©Hunter for Berkeley Homes

Canary Wharf 31 mins


WWW.EALINGINLONDON.COM

EALING 2017 ìì £5 Billion of Investment underway ìì 150,000+ jobs and growing ìì 20,000sqm + new retail and employment work space in the last year ìì 100% of secondary schools rated Outstanding or Good by Ofsted

“Ealing ticks many boxes...with good schools, an established town centre and more open space than any other borough. Crossrail will provide the missing link.” Matthew Gilbert, Savills, Ealing

“One of the things that sets Ealing Council apart is that they speak with one voice... and they really do understand viability.” Jamie Hunter, Hill, Developers

Contact us to find out about the many exciting development sites and opportunities in the borough branded the standout area of west London in the UK’s Property Week magazine or sign up to our newsletter @ www.ealinginlondon.com @Ealinginlondon1

EALING IN LONDON CONTACTS

EalinginLondon

Cllr Julian Bell

LEADER OF EALING COUNCIL BellJ@ealing.gov.uk

Ealing In London

Pat Hayes

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Regeneration & Housing HayesP@ealing.gov.uk

Lucy Taylor

DIRECTOR Regeneration & Planning TaylorL@ealing.gov.uk


Welcome to Ealing in London I first moved to Ealing more than 30 years ago, attracted by its fantastic quality of life and exceptional transport links. What has stayed in my mind throughout is that impression that although you are only ten minutes from Paddington by train, once here it never feels as though you are in London.

contents 07 News 10 Ealing mapped 27 Knocking on Ealing’s door 28 Art Deco delight 30 Ealing In London debate 37 Ealing In London a year in pictures 38 Why Ealing? 45 Ealing rocks 51 Setting out your stall 52 Ealing’s comedic conductor 55 Crossrail 59 Greenford Green one to watch 63 Ealing In London Sponsors’ page

Fast forward to today, and that sentiment - which we hope you will find over the following pages - still remains true. Inside are features that celebrate everything that is uniquely Ealing and answer the key question, ‘why invest here?’ We have an in-depth look at the borough’s cultural history – through its enduring festivals, music and comedy scenes – and what the future holds for our creative businesses. A panel of our partners also debated how some of today’s pressing issues will affect us, from Brexit to the expansion of Heathrow. On this last issue, the council is lobbying Heathrow for £150million to mitigate any negative expansion impacts. Ealing is a great place to live, work and bring up families, with some of the best performing schools in the UK, and a suburban quality of life coupled with excellent travel connections. And the arrival of Crossrail in 2019 will make us a virtual zone 1 location with 10 minute travel times to the heart of central

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London and Heathrow from stations within the borough. Our challenge now is to build on what is great about Ealing and to make the most of new opportunities out there. We, with our private partners, are working hard to make sure we secure new investment, jobs and apprenticeships and that together we get on with the task in hand of building the mixed tenure housing, and developments – and yes that includes the Filmworks cinema site in the the town centre – to ensure that Ealing plays its part to power London forward and to be a truly stand-out borough by 2020.

Cllr Julian Bell Leader of Ealing Council

Credits Editor: Robin Das Editorial team: Iesha Anastasiou, Philip Lee-Morris, Carla Passino, Paul Shearer, Ginetta Vedrickas Designed by: Splash Creative Panayiotis Sinnos Jonathon Curtis - IDM Properties Nick Mann - Crossrail Alex Duncan Event Umbrella Charlotte Berridge Bilfinger GVA C J O’Shea Group Berkeley Group Countryside Properties Rydons Hill Catalyst Rainer Hersch

Images: June Martin Hanwell Hootie Alistair Young Jennifer Wheeler Fery Asgari Nigel Bewley – Ealing Music Club Greystar Robin Das Ealing Council communications unit The Collective Joe and Seph’s Corrina Haines Alamy photo library

Printed by PrintHouse Corporation, London, NW10 6ST, UK. Printed on 100% recycled paper. Published by London Borough of Ealing (LBE), Perceval House, 14/16 Uxbridge Road, Ealing, W5 2HL, 020 8825 5000 www.ealinginlondon.com @EalingInLondon2017 © LBE. 2017. All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of LBE is strictly forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at time of going to press, but we accept no responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of LBE.

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NEWS

The latest Ealing in London news See ‘Ealing Mapped’ pages 10 and 11

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£1.5million cash injection for Southall Manor House Southall Manor House is to be transformed into a centre of excellence for the hospitality industry, thanks to a £1.5million cash injection partly funded by the Mayor of London’s office. Ealing Council and Ealing, Hammersmith and West London College have come together in partnership with the Mayor of London on the project along with the restaurateur instrumental behind Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen restaurant. The centre will be developed as a place where youngsters can gain valuable work experience, apprenticeships and training by working in a top-quality restaurant and events venue. Work has started on refurbishing and extending the building, which

will eventually house a new purposebuilt training kitchen and 80-seater restaurant, as well as a large glazed extension at the rear for event hire. The east wing of the building will be turned into an education and business centre, including conference facilities, meeting spaces and seminar rooms. When work is finished in summer 2017, the new-look manor house will host a restaurant, landscaped pavilion and flexible function spaces open to the public. The project aims to build a network of relationships with other hotels, restaurants and companies, broadening the range of training opportunities in venues across the capital.

Large glazed extension at rear of Southall Manor House.

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Safer cycle routes under way

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Visualization of how the cycle route could look.

The first phase of an upgrade of the borough’s cycle routes is underway, with the construction of an improved route from the Mall in Ealing Broadway to the A406 North Circular Road, at Ealing Common. The work is being undertaken because existing cycle routes through Ealing’s town centre are challenging for cyclists, as bus and cycle lanes are shared and lanes are a mixture of on-road and shared footway sections. The aim of the first phase is to provide clearer, safer and more coherent routes for cyclists to and through the town centre, and to encourage more people to take to two wheels. The entire area, including footways, kerbs and carriageways, will also be upgraded. The expected costs will be met by the council, development 106 funding and Transport for London. Future phases will be carried out across the borough and the project is expected to last three years.

Innovative homes for the homeless An innovative solution to providing emergency accommodation for the homeless as an alternative to bed and breakfast is under construction in the borough by developers QED Sustainable Urban Developments in partnership with Ealing Council. The company are building two, four and six person units on a former disused garage court, Bordars Walk, in Hanwell, at the rear of Greenford Avenue shopping parade. The new units are based on heavily modified shipping containers, divided and joined to ensure robustness to create a network of attractive and secure self-contained units. The site is expected to be opened and occupied from February 2017. The units will be the first of their kind in the borough and the council plans to construct more to meet the demand for emergency accommodation and as a cost-effective response to other types of temporary housing. Bordars Walk, Hanwell

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Regeneration of Perceval House site

TRANSFORMING EALING Providing agency, valuation, regeneration and development advice across the London Borough of Ealing. Get in touch to find out more: Stephen Armitage – Director, Real Estate Advisory +44 (0)20 7198 2135 Neil Parlett – Director, Real Estate Advisory +44 (0)20 7198 2104


NEWS

Rental prices rise

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£14 million Ealing Broadway Centre refurb With its commitment to creating ‘outstanding places for modern consumer lifestyles’, commercial property company British Land has completed a £14 million refurbishment at the Broadway shopping centre. Its 340,000sq ft has been transformed with improvements to the existing malls, lighting, new shop fronts and wayfinding plus new toilet facilities. The town square is now an even more attractive hub for community activities and the car park has also been upgraded with better lighting, CCTV and more efficient ticketing services. Visitors to the centre enjoy a choice of 78 shops and restaurants, including newcomers Japanese restaurant Wasabi, sandwich shop Eat and Swedish homewares company, Clas Ohlson. The centre, opened in 1985, has become a major part of the local community. National retailers, such as M&S, Tesco, Primark and Boots, anchor the centre, along with many independent stores. Susan Adams, British Land’s asset manager, said, “The arrival of Crossrail and reduced journey times to the City and West End will have a significant impact on the wider Ealing area, increasing its attractiveness as a business and shopping destination even further.”

Council smashes 100 in 100 days Apprentice target Paul Najsarek, chief executive, Supanja Pueaboonmak-Davies, and Cllr Julian Bell, leader of Ealing Council

Ealing Council has smashed its target of creating 100 new apprenticeships in 100 days. Between September and December more than 60 businesses, including A2 Dominion and London Underground, signed up to the scheme, pledging to provide 183 quality employment and training opportunities to young people. Apprentices, along with their training assessors, employers and supervisors, were also celebrated at the Ealing Apprenticeship Network Awards last November. The ‘Network Employer of the Year’ was named as A2Dominion, and ‘Network Apprentice of the Year’ award was given to Supanja Pueaboonmak-Davies, who is part way through a placement with property developer, Countryside Properties. Sophie Tippen, a apprentice traffic clerk at Palletways UK Limited, was runner up, receiving an highly commended award. Councillor Peter Mason, cabinet member for prosperity, skills, employment and transformation, said, “Apprentices make a huge contribution to businesses and the nominations we have received speak volumes about the positive impact that they can make.”

Along with most London boroughs, rents in Ealing are on the up. Research by Savills shows that in central Ealing, the median monthly rent in October 2016 was £1,700, 12% higher than the borough average. Rents are projected to rise by close to 16% in London’s ‘prime commuter zone’ over the next five years according to local lettings agency Benham & Reeves. Their figures reveal that rental values rose by 2.81% in autumn 2016, with up to 12 tenants chasing each rental coming onto the market. Anita Mehra, Benham & Reeves director, believes that the borough has always been a great place to live but, with the coming of Crossrail, Ealing’s appeal can only widen. She said, “Professional tenants will be drawn to this area for the quick transport links the case for investment is compelling.”

870 new school places by 2019 New school places are part of Ealing’s wider strategy to keep pace with growing pupil demand and it has been estimated that 870 new school places will be needed by 2019. The council has identified the need for additional pupil places near to several new developments, including Greenford Green, Southall Waterside, and the Green Man Lane estate, and new primary schools are planned for all these sites. Ealing’s schools programme and commercial manager, Adam Whalley, said: “The rebuild of St John’s Primary School on the Green Man Lane estate with an expanded intake is part of a wider strategy to respond to a rising demand for school places. Since 2008, Ealing has installed 33 entry forms of additional school accommodation.”

£50m office block gets go-ahead

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In January this year, CEG was awarded planning permission for a new £50million, 17,000sq ft, Grade A office development at 52-58 Uxbridge Road, which will create up to 2,300 f/t jobs. It will be the first major office development in the borough for a decade. Nick Lee, head of commercial development at CEG, said it would enable Ealing to effectively compete with the West End as a prime business location. Work is expected to commence in April.

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M A P P E D

O U T

Developments are unfolding right across the borough and here we look at some of the major ones in the pipeline.

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NORTHOLT PERIVALE

A40

church rd

14 18 7

SOUTHALL greenford rd

GREENFORD B

12

eal west ealing

towards reading & heathrow

ssrail ) elizabeth line ( cro

a4020

17

16

A

M4

13

HANWELL

southall

20

10

a4020

hanwell

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Featured on pages 11 to 24:

Featured on pages 6 to 9:

1. Ealing Filmworks p12

11. North Acton Station Square p20

A. Southall Manor House p6

2. Ealing Town Hall p13

12. Green Man Lane Estate p22

B. Bordars Walk, Hanwell p6

3. Perceval House p13

13. 104 Broadway p22

C. Cycle route, Ealing Common p6

4. Portal west - 6 Portal Way p16

14. Hill infill sites – First phase Ferrymead Avenue, Greenford p22

D. Ealing Broadway Centre p6

5. Carphone Warehouse 1 Portal Way p16

E. 52-58 Uxbridge Rd, office development p7

15. Greenford Green p55

6. Copley Close, Hanwell p17

16. Southall Waterside p24

7. 301 Ruislip Road, Greenford p17

17. Toplocks, Glade Lane p24

8. The Oaks, Acton High Street p19

18. Hoover building p28

9. South Acton Estate p19

19. Dickens Yard p42

10. Acton Town Hall Complex p20

20. Crossrail p55

b455

madele y rd

haven green

3

19

the mall

D

2

A40

4

North circular rd

ling

acton main line

Ealing broadway shopping centre

adway New Bro

1

a4020

5 C

E

towards the city

11

il ) ( crossra e n i l beth eliza

ealing

B455

20

ACTON

EALING

10

9 8

London

elizabeth line (Crossrail)

Heathrow

M4 11


ealing broadway

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Ealing Filmworks Key date: Completion 2019

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early nine years after Ealing’s Empire cinema closed its doors, last December, Councillor Julian Bell, leader of the council, and Tony Pidgley CBE, chairman of the Berkeley Group, helped to shift the first shovelful of earth on the site in preparation for the Filmworks development. The Filmworks development is expected to open in 2019 and will house an exciting new Picturehouse cinema at the heart of the scheme as well as new homes plus a mix of commercial floor-space. Ealing Council has fought hard to bring a new cinema to the town centre since the Empire closed in 2008. In 2015, the council was successfully granted a compulsory purchase order by the Government, which then From left to right: Tony Pidgley – Chairman of the Berkeley Group helped to kick-start the project. Rupa Huq MP – Ealing Central and Acton Developer St George bought the site last year, adding to their Craig Carson - Managing Director – St George West London Ltd existing portfolio in the town centre at Dickens Yard. Set in city centres, Holly Smallman – Filmworks Michael Bryn-Jones – Managing Director - St George plc Picturehouses are architecturally unique venues that provide cafés, bars, Cllr Julian Bell, Leader of Ealing Council, seated. restaurants and live events alongside the traditional movie going experience. Cinema goers can expect a varied programme ranging from quality mainstream, family, art-house, independent, foreign language films and documentaries. Speaking at December’s ground-breaking ceremony on the site, pictured above, Councillor Bell said: “This is a very happy day for me and the people of Ealing. Many years ago, the council promised that we would bring cinema back to our town centre and despite many setbacks, I am delighted that work is finally starting on making this happen. “This is a very exciting time. Crossrail means that Ealing is soon going to be more open and accessible to the rest of London than ever before and this development sits at the heart of our plans to regenerate and revitalise the town centre in time for all the benefits that it will bring.”

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ealing broadway

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Ealing Town Hall Key date: Winter 2017 - work to commence subject to planning permission

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he Grade II-listed Ealing Town Hall is to be given a new lease of life for commercial use along with community usage. The council will remain the freeholder under proposals being considered, which include a boutique hotel, restaurant, bar and event and meeting space. “This will guarantee that this very special and grand building can continue to serve us, and that the urgent major maintenance that it needs can be carried out. It will help protect the future of one of the borough’s most important buildings and will be a flagship development for the borough,” explains Ealing’s head of regeneration, Henry Kennedy-Skipton . Changing the use of the building will enable the function rooms, including the 12-metre high Victoria Hall, to be refurbished and available for hire. The council would retain use of the east wing for civic purposes, including marriage and civil partnership ceremonies, the mayor’s parlour and office space for councillors. Ealing Council leader Julian Bell is excited about the proposals: “The town hall has enormous potential and we want it to accommodate a range of community and commercial activities which contribute to Ealing’s economic and cultural life.” The council agreed in July 2016 to select Mastcraft as its development partner to undertake this project and to run the hotel and building.

Perceval House Key date: Summer 2017 – announcement of development partner

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urrently the council’s main office building, this 1980s example of brutalist architecture has few fans among its workforce and local residents but there are other reasons for changing its use explains Lucy Taylor, director of regeneration and planning. Taylor says such a large building is no longer needed by Ealing’s streamlined workforce: “The council has become much more efficient and- if we were to stay in this current building - it would need a major refurbishment.” Perceval House also has a prime position, right next to one of the borough’s smartest new developments Dickens Yard. The council is currently procuring a development partner, who will be announced in the summer of 2017. As part of any deal, the council will have new slimmed down, more efficient offices, along with a library and customer service centre. There are high hopes for the development’s potential. Feasibility studies suggest that at least 380 new homes could be built on the Perceval House site with half of them being affordable homes in line with the council’s target policy. The aim is that Broadway Living, the council’s wholly-owned subsidiary, are jointly involved.

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Refurbishment of new restaurant quarter & mall begins

Limeyard & Turtle Bay restaurants open

Refurbishment of management suite, toilets & mall begins

Pandora opens

Refurbishment completed Clas Ohlson & Bubble Magik open

2014 2015

July Sept Jan Mar Nov


THE HEART OF THE COMMUNITY Well located in the centre of Ealing and close to the train and tube station, Ealing Broadway is an attractive and convenient shopping destination that has undergone a significant transformation. Attracting an annual footfall in excess of 15 million, the mixed-use centre has over 75 retail and restaurant units, a gym and 100,000 sq ft of office space. With a much improved shopping environment and a host of new retailers and restaurants, this centre is now the heart of the community.

EAT & Wasabi open

M&S install a new shop front

Crossrail arrives

July

Oct

2018/19

British Land owns and asset manages Ealing Broadway, W5. We are one of Europe’s largest publicly listed real estate companies. We own, manage, develop and finance a portfolio of high quality commercial property, focused on retail locations around the UK and London offices. Retail assets account for 50% of our portfolio which is well matched to the different ways people shop today. Visit www.britishland.com to find out more.

Planning achieved for 55 PRS apartments

Smiggle opens

Apr

Relocate library

Auntie Anne’s opens

Feb

Create a new retail anchor

future

2016


North Acton Portal West - 6 Portal Way

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Key date: Outline completion 2020

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ity & Docklands Property Group has planning approval for 578 new homes in North Acton in a high quality development ranging from nine to 42 storeys. The plans envisage a mixed-use development across four buildings providing one, two and three bed homes with 30% allocated for affordable housing plus flexible retail and commercial space providing up to 270 new jobs. Portal West will be

a neighbourhood focal point, creating a new community hub, with a diverse mix of eateries and shops, including a fitness centre and offices, in a muchimproved landscaped public realm. The development will also contribute £2.6million for improvements to a number of local roads, schools, health services and North Acton Station. The area around the station is undergoing major change, and is transforming from an underused industrial park into

Carphone Warehouse - 1 Portal Way Key date: TBA

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urrently Dixons Carphone Warehouse HQ, plans were submitted in 2015 to transform this 1.85 hectare- site into a mixed use scheme and a 10-year planning consent was granted to developers Crosstree. Planning discussions are still ongoing, but the scheme could contain up to 764 new homes plus 5,134sq m of flexible use space for a mix of retail and community use. “A new home is still to be found for Carphone Warehouse so nothing is fixed yet, but you could have all sorts of things on site such as a new doctor’s surgery, shops, restaurants or a cinema,” says GVA’s planning consultant Iain Buzzard: “One of the key things in the design of this scheme is that if you have tall buildings you don’t take up as much space below. The design will ensure that there is a lot of landscaping, ways for locals to walk through to the station, and along the way they will pass shops, green space and restaurants. At the moment, pedestrians have to cut through a rat run, which isn’t pleasant. This will make a massive difference.” The design is by Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands architects.

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a brand new community. “Portal West will become the centre for a brand new community which is emerging in the Southern Gateway Area,” explains Gary Sacks, MD of City & Docklands. “We are proud to be delivering this scheme, providing these new homes for Ealing, including so many affordable homes, set around a much-needed new green space and a new east-west route linking the surrounding area to North Acton Station,” he added.


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INVESTING TODAY FOR TOMORROW’S HOMES Broadway Living is Ealing Council's wholly owned subsidary company set up to deliver new homes for sale, private and discounted market rent, in collaboration with the private sector. The company's creative and innovative approach has enabled the development of high-quality, mixed tenure, new homes and genuine mixed communities on estates.

AVAILABLE FROM 2018/19

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RIGHT: Copley, Hanwell W7: Ealing Council’s flagship £90M scheme to deliver around 280 new homes and refurbish a further 550 on the estate. In partnership with the council, Broadway Living will be developing around 160 of the new homes for market rent, discount market rent and sale.

AVAILABLE FROM 2018/19 ABOVE: 301 Ruislip Road, Greenford: A Hill and Ealing Council partnership 16 private homes and 32 homes let and managed by Broadway Living at discount market rent.

Winner - 2014 London Planning Awards for Best Conceptual Project

OUR SUCCESSFUL TRACK RECORD

WORK WITH US Opportunities exist to work with Broadway Living on joint ventures If you are interested in working with Broadway Living in delivering homes in a borough that Property Week billed as ‘the standout area of west London’, then come and talk to us.

Eastcote Lane: Completed 2014 Ten one and two bedroom flats at market rent.

Abbotts Road: Completed 2016 Two, large four bedroom houses located in Southall for market rent.

W W W . B R OA DWAY L I V I N G . C O . U K

For an informal conversation contact: Wendy Stokes stokesw@ealing.gov.uk 020 8825 5005


Creating a thriving community with Ealing Council

ACTON GARDENS. EALING

Acton Gardens delivering over 2,800 new homes

www.countryside-properties.com/partnerships


Acton

The Oaks, Acton High Street Key date: Completion – summer 2019

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he Oaks shopping centre regeneration scheme, which is being redeveloped by the CJ O’Shea Group in partnership with ARC Ltd and L&Q, will provide a mixed use development offering retail, leisure and residential units. The works comprise the construction of approximately 80,000sqft of retail and leisure accommodation with car parking. Sited above the shopping centre, 178 apartments will be built with approximately 137,000sqft of residential living space in five blocks ranging from three to eight storeys. Pedestrians and vehicles will have access to the shopping centre from Churchfield Road, and pedestrian only access from Acton High Road. In addition, a dedicated pedestrian footpath will be provided complemented with landscape works between Acton High Road and Churchfield Road. This multi-million pound investment in the heart of Acton includes a major upgrade of the existing high street façade and will make the location a more attractive area as a place for people to work, shop and live.

South Acton/Acton Gardens

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Key date: West Quarter – completion summer 2017

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ne of London’s biggest regeneration projects, South Acton will eventually have 2,750 brand new homes to be known as Acton Gardens, a partnership between Ealing Council, Countryside Properties and L&Q housing association.  Housing association Catalyst has already built 400 homes on the 21- hectare site and, after consultation, another 2,350 homes are planned. Half of all homes will be affordable, most reserved for current tenants under the ‘target rent’ scheme, and the rest will be sold on the open market. Acton Gardens will have four distinctive neighbourhoods. South Quarter is already built and, alongside 400 new homes, a new community square next to South Acton station will have a new shop and possibly a café. The first phase of West Quarter is completed and includes a traditional-style mansion

block plus two-and-three storey town houses. More new homes will be ready by the summer including some bespoke-built private rented apartments at a later date. Demolition work is about to begin so that phase six of the regeneration programme can go ahead. Over the next two years, the development will get a brand new

‘community hub’, which will include a community hall, work space for voluntary sector organisations, plus a new youth centre, doctors’ surgery, dentist, gym and a ‘metro’- size food-store. 120 apartments for affordable rent, shared ownership and private sale will also be built. More residents will be able to stay living

locally thanks to a revised schedule to build the homes within the next three years, a key factor for the resident-focused community board. The masterplan, currently being studied, aims to build another 600 new homes, of which half will be affordable with the rest for market sale or rent.

New homes in West Quarter

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Acton/North Acton Acton Town Hall Complex

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Key date:Completion March 2018

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n 2015, plans were approved to transform the grand Grade II listed Acton Town Hall building into 71 homes, with 57 for private sale and 14 affordable homes under the shared ownership scheme. Alongside the town hall’s total refurbishment, a new block is also under construction in Winchester Street. A designated conservation area, developers One Housing Group, have been especially careful to keep as many heritage features as possible such as, the timber panelling, travertine walls and ornately plastered ceilings. “The majority is being restored, most of it is being retained,” said a One Housing Group spokesperson. The council chamber has been kept as one unit to minimise harm to the interior. Externally, there will be a private courtyard for the development’s residents. The scheme has enabled the provision of a new leisure centre, library and community hub next door - opened in May 2014.

North Acton Station Square Key date: Completion 2017

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hanges are ahead for this site, which currently surrounds North Acton underground station on the Central Line and is obscured behind a petrol station. In 2015, after lengthy negotiations, Ealing Council finally bought the site from Esso so they can now go ahead with plans to improve the area around the station so that it better meets the needs of what they describe as a ‘rapidly changing area’. The station was accessed via an alley which, over the years, has been widened to cope with the growing numbers of people using the station, but a more radical transformation is now needed, explains Ealing’s regeneration advisor David Hennings: “It’s a very well used station, around six or seven million people

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pass through it annually, and the area really has changed from an industrial zone into a much more residential spot.” Consultation is ongoing with landowners next to the site to deliver plans which include a dramatic new entrance to the station, with full disabled access, along with some brand new retail units and an attractive new public square. “The shops will be independent pop ups,” explains Hennings, who adds that the project involves altering ground levels. He believes that, “It will be much nicer living and working here and people are very keen to see it happen.” After completion, it is hoped that TfL will then tackle the station upgrade that is required to meet the growing footfall.


1985 - Murray Road W5

2019 – Portal West W3

W5 1985 - Murray Road W5

2016 - 2019 - The Oaks W3

1998 – Chiswick Green W4 1990 - Acton Bath W3

Building Contractors & Developers

Since 1966 www.oshea.co.uk 2014 – The Apex W5

2005 Gypsy Corner W3

1990 - Acton Baths Baths W3

2014 – The Apex2019 W5 – Portal West W3


Proud Sponsors of Ealing in London

hill.co.uk


West Ealing/ Greenford Green Man Lane Estate Key date: Completion 2023

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n 2010, Ealing Council partnered with Rydon and A2Dominion to transform what was the Green Man Lanes housing estate into a smart new neighbourhood. Fast forward to 2016, and more than 200 new homes have already been delivered with phase two currently under construction. The new Orchard Café has recently opened, situated at the heart of the scheme, and the new and enlarged St John’s Primary School is currently under construction, which will provide places for 630 children and includes a 100 place nursery. The masterplan, developed by Conran and Partners, delivers a new street pattern alongside public parks, landscaped piazzas and play areas with the new homes encircling public space with private

Visualisation of St John’s School

courtyards and gardens. On completion, there will be 770 new homes with a mix of one to four bed family-sized homes compared to the old estate that was primarily one bed units. Ealing’s housing regeneration manager, Peter Gaffikin, says that the high quality landscaping planned for the scheme will be a welcome change from the old estate. “It’s a move away from original public spaces that no-one

felt ownership for, which were unused and pretty horrible,” he explained. Tom Rigby, Development Director for Rydon Construction, added: “We continue to work very closely with Ealing Council and the community to ensure the aspirations and ambitions of local people are met as this exciting scheme flourishes and its regeneration contributes to West Ealing’s resurgence.”

104 Broadway, West Ealing

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Key date: Completion late 2018/early 2019

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hames Valley Housing Association (TVH) has acquired the former BHS site at 104 Broadway in West Ealing for an exciting new retail and housing development. The scheme, which is being undertaken in partnership with developer Southern Grove and Ealing Council, will see the creation of 136 new homes and over 15,000sq ft of groundfloor retail space. Geeta Nanda, TVH’s chief executive, believes that the new development will be well received among the borough’s residents: “Once again our excellent partners and partnerships are giving us the opportunity to deliver homes for local people in an area where there is incredibly high housing demand. We’re delighted to say there will be provision of much needed affordable homes within this development, and we’ll be announcing the composition of the site soon.”

Hill infill sites – First phase Ferrymead Avenue, Greenford

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Key date: First completions – December 2016 to February 2017

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cross the borough, 294 new homes are being built under a joint venture between Ealing Council and private housing developer Hill. Of these, 115 homes will be for affordable rent and 179 homes for private sale. Altogether, the new homes will be built on 22 underused brownfield sites such as garages and car parks, all owned by the council. These sites, in Hanwell, West Ealing, Greenford, Southall, Acton, Hayes and Northolt, will be transformed with new homes for sale through Hill plus affordable council properties. In December, tenants moved into three family-sized properties in Ferrymead Avenue, Greenford and 50 new homes in Ruislip Road, Greenford will be ready by the end of February. Of these, 18 will be for private sale through Hill and 32 will be let and managed by Ealing Council’s Broadway Living. The council now has a programme to build approximately 100 council homes a year on council land. Andy Hill, Hill’s chief executive, wants to see other local authorities unlock public sector land, so that new homes can be built where they are needed: “Ealing is leading the way in providing homes for local people, and we are extremely pleased to be working with them.”

Greenford Green See p59

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Southall

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Southall Waterside Key date: First phase completion late-2018

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n 2016, a new masterplan was approved for the regeneration of the former Southall Gasworks, paving the way for the creation of 3,750 new homes in the borough, plus up to 500,000sq.ft of commercial space, a two-form entry primary school, cinema, health centre and green outdoor space. The revised masterplan, by developers Berkeley Homes, will see over half the site dedicated to open space, including a substantial amount of landscaped public parkland, leisure, play spaces, and piazzas. A network of safe cycle paths, nature and fitness trails and walkways will improve connections to the bordering 90-acre Minet Country Park and open up access to a 1km waterside trail along the Grand Union Canal. The landmark development is currently one of west London’s largest regeneration projects. Consented plans for the first phase of Southall Waterside include 618 new homes, with 30% designated affordable. Subject to necessary approvals, first completions are scheduled for late-2018. Karl Whiteman, Berkeley’s Executive Director, says that commencing work on the first phase signals the start of an exciting new chapter for the site. “Our vision for Southall Waterside significantly broadens the variety of homes in the area and provides new options for all within the community, from first time buyers to families alike.” Work is expected to start on-site in early 2017 and the scheme will be delivered in a number of phases over a 25-year period.

Toplocks, Glade Lane Key date: Estimated completion: Spring 2019

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aling Council has approved Catalyst’s plans to build 26 family-sized homes -23 houses and 3 flats - on Toplocks at Glade Lane. Catalyst purchased the site in March 2014. All the new build homes will be for social rent and will be used to rehouse residents who have moved as part of the regeneration of the neighbouring Havelock Estate. The designs of the new build properties feature a zig-zag roofing design, which was chosen to reflect the industrial heritage of the surrounding buildings and area. As part of the development, a new swing bridge will be built across Maypole Dock, to allow the passage of canal boats and improve pedestrian and cycle access from east to west. The plans are part of the complete regeneration of the neighbourhood, which includes improvements to Maypole Dock and the regeneration of Havelock Estate by Ealing Council and Catalyst working in partnership to deliver 922 new homes on the Havelock Estate by 2027.

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Responding to Ealing’s rich local history and culture to create great places.

We are working with Ealing Council to develop over 900 new homes at Havelock and 270 at St Bernard’s Gate. We have plans to create more homes at Friary Park and are actively looking for further opportunities to work in the borough.

For more information please contact:

Catalyst.Developer@chg.org.uk

www.chg.org.uk


Proud to be associated with Ealing in London

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ART DECO DELIGHT

KNOCKING ON

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EALING’S DOOR aling is home to some of London’s architectural gems – from Sir John Soane’s Pitzhanger Manor to Charles Jones’ Grade-ll listed gothic town hall (see page 13). Below, we welcome you to just a few of them. Some of the earliest examples of architecture in the borough are the Georgian cottages to the south of the Broadway, each of which has its own character.

Nearby are the iconic Ealing Studios, built in the inter-war period and not too far away is Ealing Village, constructed in the mid-30s and designed by R. Thomas and Partners. The idea behind the village was to create a mini-Hollywood to attract the many film stars from the studios and, in its heyday, it had a clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis court, bowling green and croquet lawn. In the post-war period, Ealing was shaped by many new communities, particularly in Southall. Today, many of the local community attend the Sikh Gurdwara temple, which was built in 2003. A stroll around Ealing will reveal other architectural wonders and overleaf we delve inside arguably one of Ealing’s most iconic and beloved buildings. Clockwise from top left:

St Mary’s Road / Pitzhanger Manor / Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha temple / Ealing Studios / Ealing Village

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s the 1930s art deco Hoover building in Perivale experiences a sumptuous transformation to become 66 stylish apartments, Ealing In London pays homage to one of the borough’s most architecturally significant buildings. Built in 1931 by Wallis, Gilbert and Partners, Hoover vacuum cleaners were assembled here for 50 years, until the factory’s closure in 1982. The rear of the building then reopened as a Tesco supermarket seven years later. Now, developers IDM Properties are bringing the landmark building back to life and restoring many of its showstopping features including its marble floors, sweeping staircases with wrought-iron bannisters and angular emerald and golden framed signature entrance windows. “You’ll be happier with a Hoover,” sang the company’s post-war jingle, a sentiment we are sure would-be buyers of the apartments at this prime real estate will share. The following images showcase the best of this splendid art deco triumph.

From clockwise top left:

The exterior of the Hoover building. The building’s signature emerald and golden framed windows. Detail of the art deco designed window frames. The main staircase. Interior shot of the main entrance doors. Exterior shot of the Hoover building. Detail of the interior lift dial. The company’s building emblem. 28


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Ealing E Ready for Business in a Changing World

THE FIRST IN A NEW SERIES OF “EALING IN LONDON” PANEL DISCUSSIONS.

By Paul Shearer

“When Crossrail arrives, Ealing will be a an inner London borough for travel times but an outer London borough for quality of life.”” CLLR Julian Bell

ver since Cesar Pelli’s 236m 50-storey tower made its appearance in Canary Wharf in the late 1980s, London has been experiencing an amazing era of urban regeneration. The list of major schemes and iconic buildings revitalising the built environment has kept on growing; Stratford’s rebirth from its role in the London 2012 Olympics; King’s Cross restored to its Victorian grandeur; Battersea Power Station getting the TLC its four chimneys deserve; not to mention The Shard, The London Eye, The Gherkin, The Royal Docks – all across the capital streetscapes and skylines have been changing. Crossrail has recently been the catalyst for a fresh wave of construction right along the length of the Elizabeth line. The east to west, underground/ overground rail link is due to fully open in 2019 and Ealing boasts no fewer than five stations: Acton, Ealing Broadway, West Ealing, Hanwell and Southall. Reports have suggested a 50% rise in property prices in central Ealing and a ripple effect elsewhere in London’s third most populated borough. But high property prices raise a concern about affordability, and this was one of many topics discussed in the first of a new series of Ealing debates, organised by the council’s regeneration directorate. An invited panel of developers, housebuilders, councillors and business leaders joined in a free and frank discussion about the current challenges in a borough that is changing fast. Robert Gordon Clark, from the London Communication Agency, chaired the debate. In 2016, Ealing added 20,000 sq. metres of employment and retail space and is about to benefit from a £5million pound GLA grant to upgrade its town centres. It counts 15,620 small and medium sized enterprises and 150,000 jobs in the borough with a higher than average number of self-employed. Just over half (54%) of the population are from a nonwhite British background.

Cllr Bell’s opening comments

Council leader, Julian Bell, began the panel discussion saying, “When Crossrail arrives, Ealing will become an inner London borough for travel times, but an outer London borough for quality of life,” referring especially to Ealing’s abundance of green spaces.

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THE EALING IN LONDON DEBATE

“One of the things that sets Ealing Council and its officers apart is that they speak with one voice.” Jamie Hunter, Hill

Looking ahead, Bell felt that the political leadership, the council’s message of welcome to business and development and the boost from the five Crossrail stations, should inoculate the borough against possible future economic uncertainties - post Brexit and the US presidential election. The recent decision to press ahead with the third runway at Heathrow would also bring an economic uplift to west London with the expansion set to provide new job opportunities. The third runway at Heathrow is a £16 billion privately funded project, which is estimated to create around 40,000 local jobs at the airport, through construction work and employment with Heathrow’s partners and at the airport, once the infrastructure is completed. It is estimated the airport currently directly employs 2,000 Ealing residents and 30,000

indirectly. In some of the most deprived wards such as Southall and Northolt, up to 30% of the working population are employed at Heathrow. “I would like to maximise the number of job opportunities and apprenticeships for Ealing residents,” Bell said. The anticipated increased noise and pollution is a challenge and the council is calling for a £150million mitigation package from Heathrow, to be spent on improving public transport connections to the airport as well as making improvements to the road network and alleviating car congestion. Affordable housing remains an issue for the borough, and the council has been working with developers to achieve a high proportion of affordable housing on regenerated estates. Acton Gardens is a major scheme on a 52-acre site being built

by developers Countryside Properties, with 3,000 new homes, around 50% of which will be affordable. After visiting Acton Gardens with the London deputy mayor for housing, James Murray, Bell commented, “James and I were really impressed with the work that is going on in South Acton and the transformation that’s happened.”

Community engagement

Mark Ludlow, from Countryside, cited the working partnership with the officers of the council and the housing regeneration team as a key element in the success of the scheme so far. Engaging with the existing community is important in estate renewal and the groundwork had been laid by the council. “It’s about breaking down the barriers that exist with people on the estate and their fear of change,” said Ludlow.

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THE EALING IN LONDON DEBATE

Residents are being invited to relocate on the estate and this ability to keep communities together during renewal is appreciated. “Being able to work closely with the council on relocation is a big part of a programme’s success,” explained Ludlow.

Council transparency

Jamie Hunter for Hill, who are building 200 new homes in a joint venture with Ealing on council-owned brownfield sites, agreed. “One of the things that sets Ealing Council and its officers apart is that they speak with one voice, which you really don’t see in other councils and other parts of London.” Transparency in the process is also important, as is the council’s understanding of a project viability. “Ealing really do understand viability, a lot of other boroughs don’t,” says Hunter. The council uses the private sector’s expertise to maximise the affordable housing element by recognising developers’ skills in financing the cash flow of a project as well as piecing together land to bring a scheme to a critical viability. Galliard Homes have been acquiring sites for projects, most recently the Apex Tower, and also sites in Southall, notably the Honda garage, where a planning application is in for 174 apartments. “We’re interested in Southall because of the Crossrail transport link. There is a lot of demand for the mid to lower end of the market and we have a big campaign at the moment which is ‘get on the ladder’ helping owner occupiers to make that first purchase,” explains Jonathan Morgan. For Galliard, it is the overall prosperity of London which is important and it is Brexit and the details of what Brexit will look like that are an ongoing concern and more important in their calculations than the Heathrow decision.

Office space and place-making

On the commercial side, Nick Lee from CEG noted the pressure on rents in central London means a number of firms are looking to move further out. Businesses are interested in locations where there is sufficiently available talent and workforce. “Ealing is well situated here. You have a diverse residential offer which is pulling in people from other areas, but you also have a superb catchment area in terms of workforce.” Anticipating increased demand for outer London places connected to Crossrail has led CEG to look at a grade ‘A’ office scheme on a land site they have been holding since 1997. Lee estimated the level should be above the £38.50 rent being quoted on an

“Central London is overheated, so relocation is essential.” Patricia Brown, Centre for London

existing building. With Hammersmith office rents at £55, “Why is there any difference between the two with Ealing about to make a jump in terms of capacity and accessibility,” questions Lee.

“Ealing has a diverse residential offer and a superb workforce catchment area.” Nick Lee, CEG

Patricia Brown, from consultancy Centre for London, sees a move out of central London being part of a natural shift. “Land is scarce and our most expensive resource, so relocation is essential for London. Central London is overheated, not just in terms of property prices but also in terms of the sheer volume of people,” says Brown. “It is a very expensive place to work and live and so the creative economy is being pushed out more and more.” With creative industries the driver of growth in London, it is vital to work all the harder to ensure that the quality of life is maintained during an intensified programme of urban renewal. This means keeping an eye on access to culture, good restaurants and cafés as well as cyclable and walkable places. The stewardship and creation of a 21st century place is not just about building homes and transport: “It’s about nuancing and building an ecology of place that attracts the kind of people you want,” concludes Brown. An example of this in Ealing, is Sir John Soane’s Grade 1 listed Pitzhanger Manor House, which is being reimagined with Heritage lottery money as a gallery space.

Brexit pressures

Rory O’Connor, from O’Shea building contractors, expressed another impact of Brexit on the construction industry. “20 to 30% of our workforce are migrants from the EU and if they don’t come to work here it adds to the massive skills shortage in our industry.” Pressure on wages, a squeeze on developer profit margins and a downturn at the luxury end of the market, where stamp duty increases have affected market confidence, are all factors creating investor cautiousness. This has affected housing scheme starts in London. “Central London starts are down 60%; the Mayor has asked for 180,000 homes to be built, but at this rate we’ll be lucky to get 130,000,” said O’Connor. London needs foreign inward investment money to continue building, despite the mitigating fall in the value of sterling. “Money is waiting,” says O’Connor. Morgan said that sales were being squeezed by a double whammy of stamp duty increases and the removal of mortgage relief for buy-to-let investors. Galliard, unlike developers with large balance sheets and access to cheap capital, has banks insisting on a percentage of off plan pre-sales and it is these early sales to investors that allow certain schemes to begin.

Heathrow expansion

Daniel Platt from Heathrow outlined what he saw as the potential impact on west London of the Government’s airport expansion announcement. “It’s an opportunity to eradicate youth unemployment, not just in Ealing but the other four neighbouring local boroughs,” said Platt. Describing the next stages, Platt explained that the Government will produce a draft National Policy Statement on Aviation in the new year followed by

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Galliard. The pioneers of regeneration across London – and proud to be working in the borough of Ealing

020 7620 1500


THE EALING IN LONDON DEBATE

a consultation process. A vote to ratify is expected in late 2017, or early 2018. Heathrow then has to conduct its own consultation process before submitting applications for planning, which will be decided by the Transport Secretary after commentary from local authorities and the GLA, amongst others. International businesses often have access to Heathrow as a requirement, so future expansion is bound to increase demand for office space to the west of London.

Mixed tenure communities

Just as crucial, however, is the pool of residential housing stock that is both available and affordable for a workforce, most of whom will be under 35 by 2020. For that generation, getting a foot on the housing ladder is difficult. Foxtons put the average property price in Ealing at £600,000. Council estimates suggest that a combined family income of around £90,000 and close to £50,000 as a deposit is required to be able to buy. Pat Hayes, Ealing’s executive director of regeneration and housing, commented, “There’s a lot of vacuous discussion around affordable housing which focuses on percentages of market rent. What really counts is: what sort of salary do you need to earn to be able to pay a particular rent without it consuming all your income leaving you effectively no quality of life? The right supply of available rental property is very important and the solution is to make sure that there is a mix of rents and price levels within the new schemes.” Hayes continues, “We are encouraging the development of institutionally funded market rent accommodation, which we think is an important component in the market. But there are levels below that that require some kind of support from the council, whether that is through planning policy or direct development by the council.” Ealing’s response is, as far as possible, to favour tenure blind developments to create mixed communities where accommodation, municipally owned or not, is offered at different rental price levels, whether through a council rent, a discounted rent, or market rent, within the same block.

Southall - the next Brixton?

Ealing’s next wave of development will emerge in Southall with Crossrail once again the catalyst. Developments around the new station and the former gasworks are on the cusp of being built. Encouraging existing landowners, where planning consent has already been granted, not to landbank their sites and

“We want to celebrate Southall the place – it has the potential to be what Brixton is.” Pat Hayes, Ealing Council

to get on with construction, is the first stage of evolving Southall’s identity. “We want to celebrate the place, in terms of the industrial heritage that is already there, the heritage of migration, of movement, airport, railways, canals and so forth, but for it to also be a place that is genuinely affordable and dynamic. Southall really has the potential to be what Brixton is,” stated Hayes.

“Heathrow’s expansion is an opportunity to eradicate youth unemployment.” Daniel Platt, Heathrow

As a planning authority, the council’s challenge is to explore a range of different housing typologies, densities, tenures and price points as part of a creative discussion with developers for the future of what has been one of Ealing’s more deprived areas. Development sites are dependent on land, and the council plays a part in identifying areas for potential builds.

Smart planning

In North Acton – another area with potential – developer, The Collective has been sowing the seeds for regeneration in a new development - The Collective Old Oak, the UK’s biggest co-living rental hub - which overlooks a post-industrial landscape. To allow this to continue, the council has worked with The Collective to push the boundaries of the planning

use classes – another example of Ealing’s proactive approach. The next phase will be to widen the residential mix in this neighbourhood to entice, not just young people, but a more settled population. Bell concluded with an acknowledgement of the importance of maintaining the good working partnerships that have been built up with developers over time. “I think Ealing does represent a safe bet postBrexit with the arrival of Crossrail and the council’s track record for openness, pragmatism and its focus on the delivery of regeneration.” Paul Shearer is a property journalist, who has written extensively about London for the The FT and The Times and has worked for property consultants, GVA, on their ‘Evolving London’ series of lectures. You can read a full version of Paul’s debate report @ www.ealinginlondon.com

The Ealing In London debate was hosted by Charlotte’s W5 and was attended by:Cllr Julian Bell - Ealing Council Pat Hayes - Ealing Council David Baptiste - Ealing Council Patricia Brown - Centre for London Robert Gordon Clark (chair) London Communications Agency Jamie Hunter - Hill Nick Lee - CEG Mark Ludlow - Countryside Jonathan Morgan - Galliard Homes Rory O’Connor - O’Shea Daniel Platt - Heathrow Noel Rutherford - Ealing Council

35


Developing potential in

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2016

A Year in Pictures

As well as our Ealing In London debate, on the previous pages, at which our attendees grappled with the big issues of the day including Brexit and Heathrow, it has been another successful year for the Ealing In London team. Here we showcase our 2016 events that were attended by our sponsors, partners and colleagues.

Ealing In London Magazine Launch 2016 Perceval House, Ealing

Our 2016 magazine launch last June was attended by more than 150 of our partners, who travelled down our Crossrail ‘line’, see below, to network and meet up with colleagues and acquaintances post-MIPIM. On display were models of Southall Waterside, The Collective and Acton Gardens, courtesy of Berkeley Group, The Collective and Countryside.

Broadway Living Ladies Drinks

More than 50 regen industry movers and shakers – and a couple of gentlemen – enjoyed a network evening on the rooftop of The Boundary bar last October.

Ealing in London Comedy Night 37 down a And our VIP sponsors’ comedy night went hoot in the summer with everyone who came along.


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WHY EALING?

Ealing is the standout area of west London. It is fast turning into a vibrant, desirable area.”

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2019

A fifth of the borough

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1,800 homes granted planning permission

52% Affordable

ONE AMAZing Borough

...THAT’s Why Ealing! 39


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Ealing’s population 12 REASONS 5 crossrail stations Why Ealing? 1,800 homes by 2025 by 2020 - Crossrail effect

60+ ACTS 31 YEAR

TO INVEST IN THE CAPITAL OF WEST LONDON

granted planning permission

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aling is becoming an ever increasingly desirable area according to Property Week, which has predicted, that with Crossrail and the current regeneration works, Ealing’s potential could be ‘stratospheric’. Of course, those in the know can already vouch for Ealing’s charm and allure, but as the business spotlight swings away from central London and around zone 3, increasingly, Ealing is being caught in its beam. Figures by the Land Registry show that the borough’s property prices jumped by more than 25% during the 12 months to July 2015, more than twice the London average. And, as happened in other parts of London, *Average journey times such as east London before the Olympics, Ealing is from the Ealing quintet experiencing its own unique boom – all five Crossrail station areas are projected to experience between 45% to 50% house price growth by 2020. The council’s planning and housing teams have developed robust working relationships with developers to ensure that their requirements meet our residents’ needs , such as with the smart planning that led to the building of The Collective (pictured below and see page 35). One of the ways that the council aims to meet its target of building approximately 100 council homes a year on council land, is the scheme that it has entered into with Hill, a Gold ‘London in Bloom’ Borough housebuilders. This innovative partnership will see nearly 300 new properties built on 22 under-used brownfield sites across the borough, which would otherwise be hard to redevelop (see page 23). Andy Hill, CE of Hill, said that and better is green openworking space with local authorities, such as the partnership with Ealing, was vital to deliver the 50,000 extra homes every year that London needs. propertY price increase

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cross the borough, retail, restaurant and cafe culture is booming – proof that the borough has been resilient to the challenge posed by Westfield. According to leading retail market analysts CACI, Ealing town centre will be in the top 15 of London’s largest retail centres by 2018, up from its current 21st place – placing it firmly in the top 3% of retail destinations and overtaking areas such as Kensington, Wimbledon and Wandsworth. British Land has invested £14million into the Ealing Broadway shopping centre, and the centre has seen a number of retailers and eateries opening up in the past year, such as Wasabi, creating a global food quarter feel. The nearby Dickens Yard development will also deliver an extra £38million in consumer spending in Ealing and increase the amount of premium retail space by 15% with a new town centre retail, restaurant and leisure destination quarter with 100,000sqft in up to 30 retail units. While central Ealing is a retail magnet for residents, the borough’s other town centres exert their own character with their quirky street markets, specialist stores and products. Acton is in the midst of a facelift with a new shopping centre under construction by O’Shea, which will complement Churchfield Road with its independent stores, popular with a younger demographic. Street markets can also be found across the borough, but particularly in Acton, Southall and West Ealing with its farmers’ and specialist antique market, as well as at a number of growing fairs and festivals throughout the year. You can read more about some of our independent traders on page 51.

385,000 Ealing’s population by 2025

to be a top 3%

London


WHY EALING?

Why anywhere else?

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ving in Ealing means access etting to Ealing - whether it be by to some of the best schools plane, train or ‘chain’ – will be easier, in London - as Ofsted has faster and safer within a couple of rated all secondary schools years. good or outstanding along with 94% Crossrail – coming to stations in 2019 - will of primaries – meaning schoolchildren effectively make Ealing borough a zone one in Ealing are assured of a sound borough for connectivity - the average journey education. time from the Ealing quintet of stations will be Our borough is also home to the 13 minutes to central London and 12 minutes University of West London – which has to Heathrow. Long-running Ealing invested heavily in recent years with a The Government’s recommendation of £120million facelift, to create a state-of a third runway at Heathrow will benefit the art library, media school, and new us – it is estimated that the airport student facilities. In surveys, UWL has employs 2,000 Ealing residents and 30,000 found that 96% of its students have benefit indirectly. The council is working found employment within six months hard to make sure the borough reaps rway in Ealing st of graduation and has scored 100% for the expansion’s rewards, such as job student satisfaction with its courses. opportunities, while ensuring that quality Long-running Ealing Developments in the north of the of life is not adversely affected by calling borough in North Acton are also on Heathrow to provide a £150million helping to make the borough a place mitigation package. This will be partly spent to live as well as study - as new on investing in improvements to the road granted planning permission propertY price increase student accommodation is under network to alleviate traffic congestion. small by 2020 - Crossrail effect st businesses development for graduates and postNearer to home, the council aims to graduates at Imperial College and increase cycling by implementing more University of the Arts. cycle routes, to encourage people who Crossrail will also benefit students might be otherwise deterred Long-running Ealingbecause of GROWING as it is estimated that there will be an ow in its fourth decade, traffic. Work is already ongoing to create permission increase of 19% of Ealing’s university Ealing’s summer festivals are granted planning safer cycle routes into Ealing town centre small students living within one hour businesses as popular as ever, with more (see page seven). commute of their place of study. than 33,000 fans enjoying an See our Crossrail feature on page 55.propertY price increa of investment underway in Ealing eclectic, music, song and comedic *Average journey times 60+ ACTS 31st YEAR by 2020 - Crossrail eff from the Ealing quintet & local jobs GROWING line up, set among the borough’s most magnificent open spaces. 5 crossrail stations ew employment From the festival’s beginnings in tail floor-space granted planning permissio 1985, it has expanded to headline small ated in 2015/16 businesses many household *Averagenames, journey timessuch as from the Ealing quintet Rainer Hersch, Sean Hughes and Roy H A A P PY G IS & Ayers and now pulls in on average 60 local jobs GROWING a music and comedy acts every year ord f of new employment f a Ealing is also home to London’s & retail floor-space to be a top 3%52% biggest freeinmusic festival ‘The Hanwella Gold ‘London in Bloom’ Borough created 2015/16 *Average journey times Hootie’, and London’s most dazzling from the Ealing quintet H A A P P S I Y and biggest Asian festival, The Mela, retail centre (above London average) G *Office for National Statistics of the borough by 2018 which in 2017 will be a celebration is green and open space a Gold ‘London in Bloom’ Borough rate their happiness of the 75th anniversary of Indian and Pakistani independence. (above London average) Ealing now pulls off such a *Office for National Statistics of the borough green and open spacein Ealing summer extravaganceis that Bob People a Gold ‘London in Bloom’ Borough rate Salmons, founder of the Blues their happiness as 7.5 out of 10* festival, believes that by drawing (above London average) for National Statistics of the borough all these events together under*Office one is green and open space umbrella, Ealing could well become “the Edinburgh of London”. Find out more about Ealing’s festivals, music and comedy scenes on pages 45 and 52.

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41 University of West London students

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WHY EALING?

Ealing’s Apprentice Network Awards 2016

L

ooking ahead to 2027, Ealing will appear dramatically different to the borough of today, as a total of £5billion is being invested in improving Ealing’s infrastructure, residential stock and retail space. In the Broadway – the borough’s beating heart – five key sites together represent multi-million pounds of investment. St George’s Dicken’s Yard is one of Ealing’s biggest ever investment projects - and once it is complete in 2018 it will of investment underway instreets Ealing feature a complex of residential units, new pedestrian and 100,000sqft of flexible commercial space. Directly opposite is the Filmworks site, which St George began construction work on in December and will eventually sport a Picturehouse cinema, residential and retail space small centred around a plaza. businesses The plans for the Perceval House site include a mix of affordable and open market rental residential units, a slimmed down council & local jobs GROWING HQ and retail to complement Dickens Yard. The Grade II listed town hall will be redeveloped into a boutique hotel, while retaining of new employment its east and west wings for community and civic functions. & retail floor-space created in 2015/16 Long-running Ealing British Land has ploughed £14million into the Broadway Centre transforming it into a popular shopping destination. A HAPPY borough G IS cross Commercially, central Ealing’s Business Improvement District propertY price increase of investment underway in£2.6million Ealing (BID) scheme will be investing into the town centre 60+ ACTS 31st YEAR by 2020 - Crossrail effect over the next five years. 5 crossrail stations Other major investment projects include £1.1billion into nine key council housing estates over the next decade, Berkeley granted planning permission small businesses Group’s plans for a new town Southall Waterside and Greystar’s rate their happiness Greenford Green scheme, that will create another new150,000 community & local jobs GROWING as 7.5 out of 10* rdable based around the Greenford canal (see feature on page 59).

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to be a top on 3% any n Ealing, more than 100 languages are spoken one day, including Persian, Polish, Tamil and Pashto, Long-running Ealing retail centre by 2018 making this borough one of the UK’s most diverse areas 3a Goldyears running ‘London in Bloom’ Borough – a place with a truly vibrant and colourful patchwork of cultures, religions and beliefs. open space A fifth ofis greentheandborough Many cultural events and festivals are held around propertY price in Ealing to celebrate the borough’s strong community by 2020 - Crossrai st relations. One of the best known of these is Diwali, the Hindu celebration of lights celebrated in the autumn, when communities light up 5diyas (candles and lamps), crossrail stations which create sparkling arrays of colour around many granted planning per neighbourhoods, such as in Southall. small businesses While Ealing - just as any London borough - has its challenges as well as its attractions, it is good to know that the Office & of National Statistics rated Ealing as – local jobs officially –GROWING being a ‘happy’ London borough with a resident rating happiness score of 7.5 out of 10, higher than the capital’s average. The positive Ealing vibe has no doubt been bolstered by the fact that the crime rate in the *Average journey times the Ealing quintet in the local borough is at a 10-year low and from confidence H A A P P S I Y force G is high. Ealing is also a young borough – under 15s have grown by 20% since 2001 and 44% of the population is aged from 20 to 44 – compared to 34% nationally. The council’s apprenticeship scheme is also helping young people to find a positive future here, with 180 young people placed in between September and December last year. a Gold ‘London in Bloom’ Borough rateschemes their happiness The future is very much here in Ealing.

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rom the three hills of Northala Fields to the Edwardian tranquillity of Walpole Park resplendent on a summer’s day, Ealing’s treasures are its green and open spaces, which cover a fifth of the borough. This includes ten miles of tranquil canals and river and over 1,000 hectares of space designated as natural conservation areas. These open spaces define the historic character of Ealing and provide amazing and diverse spaces for residents to enjoy and where natural wildlife can thrive. Ealing has an enviable reputation for award success – it has won a Gold Britain in Bloom Park of the year for three Long-runL years running, with Walpole and Acton Park winning gold and Southall Park silver in the large park category in 2016. The Joe and Seph team on the production line at the award-winning gourmet popcorn company, based in North Acton, Park Royal industrial estate. Joe and Seph is a familyLast year, the borough also picked up 18 Keep Britain Tidy run business and employs 50 people and has seen its business go from strength to strength, since it set-up five years ago. It boasts 40 flavours, including salted caramel, Green Flag awards, which are awarded to only Britain’s very Long-running Ealing gin ‘n’ tonic and strawberries and cream and its suppliers include Waitrose. of investment underway in Ealing of investment underway in Ealing best green spaces. Ealing is also working hard to ensure the past serves the future; Southall Manor House, the historic timber built Elizabethan building in Southall, is being renovated into 5 crossrail propertY price increase 5 cross 2020 - Crossrail effect a state-of the art business,byrestaurant and 60+education, ACTS 31st YEAR training centre – while still preserving its Tudor charm (see small small businesses businesses page seven). 5 crossrail stations Ealing also has some of Britain’s most historic heritage granted planning permission & & locallocal jobs jobs smallbuildings in its green spaces – Sir John’s Soane’s Pitzhanger GROWINGGROWING businesses Manor, Brunel’s Wharncliffe Viaduct and the art deco Hoover of new building (see pages 27 to 29) – to name but a few. ofemployment new employment & retail floor-space & History crossed with nature makes Ealing a tantalizing top e & retail floor-space l created in 2015/16 GROWING b created in 2015/16 a d *Average journ London borough to visit and savour. * or

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Statistics (above London average) Paul, Waitrose distribution centre, *Office Joefor National and Seph’s *Office for National Statistics (see above) and EasyBus - and 40,000 employees and produces a third of all food consumed in London. Other companies based here include Ferrero Rocher, Brompton Bikes, Random House Books and – need we mention - the world famous Ealing Studios. Ealing also has more self-employed people than any other London borough – 19% of its work force. Within the next few years, there will be 17 work hubs across the borough from artistic Acton to multi-cultural Southall, to cater for this growing band of entrepreneurs. Already, multiflexible workspaces such as BoomZone, The Doughnut Factory, and the West Ealing workspace hub, are buzzing with activity as offices, artists’ studios, events and rehearsal space. And Acton is being seen as the west’s answer to Shoreditch – only with significantly lower office space rents. And once Crossrail arrives in 2019, nearly a million more jobs will be commutable within 45 minutes from the borough. Plus, commercial office space is competitively priced in Ealing - as CEG, property consultants, stated, “The transport network and leisure facilities will ensure that Ealing is and remains one of the most attractive places to locate a business.”

43 Walpole Park, Ealing

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Career

Undergraduate, Postgraduate and Part-time courses available

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of our graduates are in employment within six months of graduating*

*See uwl.ac.uk


EALING ROCKS

Ealing Rocks

Once the cradle of British rock, the west London borough still enjoys a thriving music, culture and festival scene, says Carla Passino

O

n a magical night in April 1962, three young men met at a dark, smoky basement club in a leafy west London neighbourhood. The place was the Ealing Club and the trio—Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Brian Jones—became the Rolling Stones and went on to change the history of music. It is perhaps surprising to discover that edgy 1960s rock was born in the Queen of the Suburbs— as Ealing was described by the late architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner, in his 1951 Buildings of England book series. But the borough—once a favourite with Victorian aesthetes looking for a retreat close to town—adds an unusually vibrant arts scene to the obligatory mix of 19th- and early 20th-century houses, gothic churches and tree-studded greens that you would expect in a pretty suburban area. “This is a creative hub,” says June Martin, one of the organisers of local music festival, the

Hanwell Hootie. “It’s heavily populated by talented, inspirational people—it overruns with creativity.” Music is one of Ealing’s most famous exports and not just because of the Rolling Stones. American musicologist Dr Roberta Freund Schwartz, of Kansas University, once named the west London borough as one of the cradles of modern music, alongside Memphis and Liverpool. “Ealing is sitting on a very important musical heritage,” explains Alistair Young, a director of the Ealing Club Community Interest Company, which highlights the local musical heritage and supports live music and artistic events. Ealing, continues Young, sprang onto the British music scene in 1962 when the jazz venue that had opened in Ealing Broadway in 1959, by then rebranded as the Ealing Club, caught the attention of the father of British blues, Alexis Korner. Korner had founded Britain’s first rhythm and blues band, Blues

Incorporated, with Cyril Davies in 1961. Having been booted out of their central London venue, the band eventually moved to the Ealing Club, where they held their first ‘electric blues night’ on March 17, 1962. “The Ealing Club is without doubt one of the most important places in the history of British rock ‘n’ roll,” says music and film critic Anthony Thornton. “Through night-after-night of electrifying sessions, it birthed the sounds that would grip first London, then Britain and eventually the whole world. The influence of this club is practically immeasurable.” Top: Charlie Watts of the Rolling Stones at the unveiling of the Ealing Club blue plaque 2012 Bottom: Ealing Club blue plaque

Rollin’ Stones flyer for the Ealing Club – early 1960s

45


EALING ROCKS

“The Ealing Club is without doubt one of the most important places in the history of British rock ‘n’ roll.” Film critic Anthony Thornton

Every Saturday, the small, dank basement room—so crude that rain came in and drenched the musicians until a tarpaulin sheet was fitted above the stage—drew extraordinary musicians from across the country. Over the years, Charlie Watts, Jack Bruce and Graham Bond all played with Blues Inc. at the Ealing Club, but the venue also offered young talents, such as Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, an opportunity to shine. It is perhaps fitting that more than 50 years after first meeting, the Stones latest album, ‘Blue and Lonesome’, released last December, sees the band return to their passion for rhythm and blues. “The Ealing Club became the key venue to perform or just hangout for a roll-call of people who went on to shape British music for decades: Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, Rod Stewart, Paul Jones, proto-Who band The Detours and The Animals,” says Thornton. “Perhaps most importantly, one night in April 1962, Alexis Korner introduced Mick Jagger and Keith Richards to Brian Jones and so the nucleus of the Rolling Stones— arguably the most important rock ‘n’ roll band ever—was forged in Ealing.” A documentary film that is being made in the borough right now salutes Ealing’s musical history. Directed by Italian-born, Ealing-based filmmaker Giorgio Guernier and featuring previously unseen photos and video footage of the Rolling Stones and The Who, among others, Suburban Steps to Rockland tells the story of the Ealing Club, the explosion of British R&B and the development of British rock. “It will help define the narrative of Ealing’s music heritage,” says Young. And if the club put Ealing on Britain’s

46

The Who, who once performed at Hanwell Community Centre, mid-1960s, London

musical map, many other local venues also helped shape the sounds of modern music. Dusty Springfield made her first recording in Uxbridge Road, while Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin and The Who all rehearsed at Hanwell Community Centre. Although the Ealing Club has morphed into a bar and night club called the Red Room, their legacy—highlighted by a commemorative blue plaque — remains strong and keeps providing fresh inspiration for the musical renaissance that has been taking place across Ealing during the past 30 years. “Great things have happened here in the past and are still happening today,” says Young. “There’s no better place to make music than Ealing.”

“Great things are still happening today - there’s no better place to make music than Ealing.” Alistair Young, The Ealing Club

Bob Salmons is perhaps the man that has done the most to restore the borough’s musical glory; harking back to the roots of the Ealing Club, he launched the Ealing Blues Festival in 1985. “When I founded the festival, Ealing’s music heritage was being largely ignored,” he explains. But what started as “little more than a picnic in a park” soon became a

cornerstone event drawing thousands of people. Held in Walpole Park, it is now one of the country’s largest Blues festivals, where artists of the calibre of Earl Thomas, Paul Cox, Zoe Schwarz and Tom Ivey have all made an appearance. These days, Ealing’s music scene could hardly be more thriving. The Blues Festival and the Hootie are just two of a packed calendar of events that also includes a jazz festival—last year’s was headlined by top American vibraphonist Roy Ayers—and two musical carnivals, one in Acton and one in Greenford. “Other local authorities in London look at us as a leader in terms of a successful culture offering: we are running a national-scale programme and we are really proud of that,” says Alex Duncan, contract manager at festival organisers The Events Umbrella. “From the start of 2012 to the end of 2013, we launched three new festivals,” adds Salmons. “We are starting to see young musicians beginning to say: ‘I come from Ealing’ in the same way as they’d have said: ‘I come from Liverpool.” Alongside its rock star heritage, the borough can draw on an extraordinary pool of creative residents. In the area that schooled Peter Townshend, Ronnie Wood, Freddie Mercury and Roger Ruskin Spear (all of whom attended Ealing Art College), there’s a fine tradition of harnessing talent from local universities and colleges, whose students often take part in local cultural events. Last year, for example, the Hanwell Hootie introduced a youth stage where musicians under 20 years of age could perform their own music.


EALING ROCKS

The Hanwell Hootie Many Ealing musicians in the early 60s—from Pete Townshend to Ronnie Wood, Eric Clapton and even American ‘import’ Jimi Hendrix — became customers of a music shop in Hanwell Broadway, a little more than a mile west of the Ealing Club. The store was run by former drummer Jim Marshall and it was to him that Pete Townshend once complained about needing a ‘bigger, louder’ amplifier than was available on the market. Marshall set to work

and eventually came up with a new amp, which, says Thornton, became an intrinsic ingredient in the sound of the sixties: “It’s impossible to imagine rock ‘n’ roll without Ealing.” In 2013, a group of friends decided to approach Marshall Amp to create a festival in remembrance of Jim Marshall but also to support up and coming, original music in Ealing. The first Hootie, recalls organiser June Martin, saw 13 bands play free live music in three local pubs. Cut to 2016, and “the Hootie is London’s largest independent free music festival,” with more than 80 acts, ranging from funk to heavy metal, performing in 14 venues across Hanwell and drawing an audience of 16,000 people. “The directors have skills right across the board and this has allowed us to get music talent, financing and manage the event well,

all supported by Ealing businesses and the local council,” says Martin, who adds that the team behind the Hootie is now helping get other music projects off the ground.

Top left: Headliner, Roy Ayers and his band at the 2016 Jazz Festival. Top right: Dur Dur Band International at the Soundbite Festival 2016. Bottom right: Earl Thomas at the 2016 Blues Festival. Bottom left: Acton Carnival

47


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EALING ROCKS

The 2017 Festival Low-Down What’s On When & Where The Ealing Summer Festivals:

Blues festival - 22, 23 July - Walpole Park Jazz festival - 29, 30 July - Walpole Park Greenford Carnival - 8 July Acton Carnival - 15 July

www.ealingsummerfestivals.com

“I don’t see why Ealing couldn’t be the Edinburgh of London.” BOB SALMONS FOUNDER EALING BLUES FESTIVAL

The many ethnic groups that have made Ealing their home also add a rich, multicultural twist to the local culture scene. “The Asian and Caribbean communities are among our greatest supporters,” explains Salmons. “There’s real potential and people are not shy in coming forward.” In particular, Ealing’s global atmosphere comes deliciously alive in the Soundbite festival, a free one-day event held in September to celebrate the borough’s diversity through music, food and crafts. You can tuck into grilled ribeye steak scented with sesame and coriander, while perusing handmade gifts and listening to the deep, haunting notes of the oud or the vigorous beating of the drums. “When people think of Ealing, they think of the Rolling Stones and The Who, but there’s a strong link with African-American music so last year, we explored African sounds with Somali bands,” says Young. Complementing Soundbite is The Ealing Eclectic Project an initiative funded by The Arts Council of England that showcases Ealing’s music heritage via street performances. Indeed, many exciting plans are afoot for the future. “We intend to build on our success and offer Ealing even more,” says Duncan. “This

The Ealing Summer Festival in Walpole Park

year, we have extended the summer festivals’ operating hours, and we are now looking at growing the number of days and expanding the line up to include more international artists.” For starters, 2017 sees the return of the London Mela—a lavish celebration of South Asian arts, music, food and entertainment—to Gunnersbury Park, which has hosted it for 13 years from 2002 to 2015. “It will span two days and it will be a Mega Mela to mark the 75th anniversary of Indian and Pakistani independence,” Duncan explains. Other plans potentially in the pipeline include expanding the festival fringe to involve local pubs and restaurants. “We need a fringe music and marketing manager to do that because landlords know about the food and drink industry, not the music industry,” says Salmons. “But if we could get someone to do that, I don’t see why Ealing couldn’t be the Edinburgh of London.”

The Hanwell Hootie takes place this year on Saturday 6th May For more information visit: www.hanwellhootie.co.uk The London Mela Gunnersbury Park - September 2017 2017 SoundBite Festival Second week of September To find out more about Ealing’s legendary music scene and the forthcoming film ‘Suburban Steps to Rockland’ contact Alistair Young alistair@ealingclub.com

Carla Passino is a London-based freelance journalist specialising in culture, lifestyle and property. Carla has written for Forbes Real Estate and Country Life.

The 2015 London Mela

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Setting Out Your Stall By Carla Passino

F

ood, drink and artisan products make for a cracking combination with music, and also take centre stage in many other events across the borough. The latest arrival on the gastronomic scene Event Umbrella’s Eat, Drink Ealing – is a mouth-watering festival bringing together food, music and art with an international vibe. For two days in July, Ealing Common is filled with the aromas of Spanish churros, Vietnamese rice and Venezuelan arepas bursting with meat and fresh vegetables. Alongside stalls brimming with fine chocolates and creamy cheeses, are handcrafted jewellery, ethical clothing, and plenty of great music curated by the Ealing Club Community Initiative Company. The long running thirst-quenching beer festival, is organised by the Campaign for Real Ale. With more than 370 real ales - including many west London creations - plus cider, mead and more - this perennially popular festival brings together the very best in British imbibing against the lush backdrop of Walpole Park. Local event organisers Eat Me Drink Me have launched the W5 Food Market outside the town hall. Every Thursday, food stalls selling everything from jerk chicken wraps to wickedly rich brownies converge on Uxbridge Road to brighten up the lunch hour of local residents and office workers. Every second and fourth Sunday, the market showcases handpicked produce, as well as a pop-up bar, children’s crafts and live music. “I’m a big foodie and

Left: Charlotte Berridge’s fun Ealing prints at the Crafted W5 market Right: Eat Drink Ealing Festival

when I moved to Ealing a couple of years ago there wasn’t anything similar to the markets you get elsewhere in London, so I wanted to change that,” says Kate McKenzie, the woman behind Eat Me Drink Me. With the support of the council, she launched the now popular W5 markets: “Markets are really good for the community: people can enjoy themselves and support local businesses.”

“Markets are really good for the community” Kate McKenzie

It is a view she shares with Andrea Laffey, the borough’s economic regeneration project manager. As well as working with W5 to help new traders start selling in markets, Laffey says there are plans to expand the Southall market with a monthly offering that combines Asian cuisine with artisanal products and performances by students of the nearby University of West London. McKenzie has also launched the Crafted W5 market, showcasing works by Ealing’s best designers, makers and small businesses; the Ealing Christmas Market; and the Wonderland Collective, a pop-up shop full of inspirational products, such as the fun townscape prints of Ealing landmarks like the Hoover building, by local artist Charlotte Berridge. McKenzie explains, “It’s a very pleasant way to shop.” Ealing, says McKenzie, is definitely on the up when it comes to culture, and it is down to an encouraging council and

a great community. “Everyone is keen to work together to make Ealing even nicer,” she says. “Everyone is incredibly supportive and I haven’t always found that elsewhere in London. I think Ealing is a very special place.”

What’s on where: Event Umbrella organises: Eat Drink Ealing - Part of Ealing Summer Festival every July / Walpole Park Eat Me Drink Me organises: W5 Food Market Outside Ealing Town Hall: Every 2nd and 4th Sunday Every Thursday 11am-3pm + Crafted W5 Markets 1st Saturday of the month March - November, Ealing Broadway shopping centre www.eat-me-drink-me.co.uk Local markets; Farmers’ Market -

Leeland Road, West Ealing - weekly Acton, street market - weekly

Southall, street market - weekly Avenue vintage / antiques market, Ealing - last Saturday monthly www.ealing.gov.uk

CAMBRA organises: The Ealing Beer Festival every July / Walpole Park

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COMEDY CENTRAL EALING HAS LONG BEEN KNOWN AS THE HOME OF COMEDY Every July, stand-ups from around the country descend on Walpole Park for the borough’s comedy festival, which is now in its 24th year. Organised by Simon Randall, of the comedy company Headliners, the event runs for five laugh out loud riotous nights. Over the years, it has has pulled in the likes of Julian Clary, Stephen K. Amos (pictured left), Shappi Khorsandi and Ricky Gervais, who have all strutted their stuff on the main stage, while splitting the sides of around 1,300 punters every night. For those who want to enjoy comedy all year round, stay tuned as Randall is looking to set up a new pop-up comedy club in Ealing borough.

EALING’S COMEDIC CONDUCTOR

T

he borough also has its fair-share of home-grown comedians and one of those is Rainer Hersch, a comedian and musician, who has performed on every major comedy stage in Britain and abroad. He has appeared 13 times at the Edinburgh Festival, three times at the Ealing comedy festival, had numerous comedy-concerts at the South Bank in London, featured in comedy clubs all across Europe and in TV shows around the world. One of Rainer’s most exciting musical adventures features him as a conductor of his own nine-piece orchestra with a zany offering of musical comedy and guaranteed to have the audiences rolling in the aisles. Rainer Hersch and his ‘orkestra’ communicates, connects and corrupts some of the great works of classical music. A popular highlight is when Rainer invites members of the audience to participate in a conducting competition with hilarious results. Ealing In London was fortunate enough to catch up with Rainer in his lovely Ealing Common home and settled Rainer down by lamplight to some tough questioning.

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I conduct the orchestra but...

Tell us about your career so far? Oh a tough one but in 60 seconds; in my teenage years I became passionate about two things – comedy such as the Pythons and I gained a great interest in classical music, practising the piano obsessively and I obtained my distinction grade eight at only 17 years old. I read Economics at Lancaster University but I started my career in music as I knew this to be my ultimate interest – all the while moonlighting on the comedy circuit, or the ‘cabaret circuit’ as it was once known. The problem being if you’re good you get drawn into doing more and more gigs. At this stage, comedy became my full-time vocation with my last musical position being the touring manager for the festival orchestra. I didn’t want to be one of those people that didn’t take that step, so I ignored the risk and went for it, cementing at aged 30 my calling as a stand-up comedian. I never thought that I could write a standup piece on music as it’s thought to be too serious; but in 1996 I wrote a show about classical music. It was a risk but worth it and – 20 years later – I haven’t looked back. I formed an orchestra performing classical

...between pieces I involve the audience with my brand of humour


THE RAINER HERSCH INTERVIEW

music with a comedic twist; I conduct the orchestra but between pieces I involve the audience with my brand of humour, the sort about classical music that everyone can get, you don’t need to be any kind of musical expert, just all round jokes that appeal. My career now involves a great deal of conducting large-scale orchestra hall setups and some solo shows – I’ve just recently come back from America. I enjoy a lot of writing; I have a column in the BBC Music Magazine. I enjoy writing funny things about music, but I’ve always thought that I could write about anything. To be honest, I could write about the contents of our interview; professional writers should be able to take anything and turn it into a piece, whether comedy or simply serious.

Who has influenced you? Those early comics like Monty Python, it’s the wit and intelligence behind the humour. Those early sketches, you repeated them when you were younger as you knew it would generate pleasure and taught you delivery early on. It’s a bit dated now but they remain classics. Also, my mates who work the circuit - you see the same faces over again. It’s a form of education appreciating their work and sets, all adds to your own development as a comedian.

My musical comedy is my own creation; I’ve taken my two main passions, music and comedy, and mashed together an ability to practice both simultaneously. I can’t honestly say I’ve followed any sort of example; I’m inspired by the energies and passions I’ve seen.

Why Ealing? I was born in Thames Ditton, but settled in Ealing more than 20 years ago, because of my wife. Before then I lived with my brother in Brixton. My wife worked nearby and it made sense for my needs. I travel extensively and you can’t beat the transport connections in Ealing - 20 minutes on a good day from Heathrow. At worst 20 quid for a cab, best pounds ever spent! I feel sorry for those people you see arriving at the airport knowing they’ve got an epic journey home ahead and I’ll be home with a cup of tea in only half an hour. We first lived near South Ealing tube, then Northfields and now we’ve been in this house for 14 years. We like it even though my wife now works in Slough, as the transport options are great but it still has that village leafy feel of Ealing that’s perfect for us.

I feel sorry for people at Heathrow knowing they’ve got an epic journey and I’ll be home with a cup of tea in only half an hour. When we first moved here, the Ealing Common parade didn’t have what there is now, only the hairdresser perhaps. There was the usual bank and post office stuff, but nowhere to relax back then. I remember the excitement of the first proper supermarket, where you could get what you needed just down the road. The parade has completely changed, now with a quality butchers and great cheese. I’m a vegetarian but it’s nice to know that a decent meat shop is there. I try as much as possible to shop locally, I think it’s important to support your local businesses - if we don’t then these things could go.

The fact that we have a circus that rides into town - that’s so cool. What’s also amazing are the parks; recently the improvements in Walpole Park - simply amazing. The greenery in Ealing is fantastic; the variety gives you so many options. It’s the circus that gives me the greatest excitement. Dragging endless friends and relations’ children with me so I have a reason to be there! The fact that we have a circus that rides into town - that’s so cool.

If you were in charge of the borough what would be your top priority? Well the one thing I want to get done is already in progress. I’ve missed having a cinema in Ealing and that beautiful frontage has been left for such a long time. I’m so glad that finally the council has pulled through and we will get our cinema back. We used to go there a lot and now ‘coming soon’ will be ‘now showing’!

EALING COMEDY FESTIVAL 2017

20, 21, 26, 27 and 28th July Walpole Park, Ealing

Simon Randall - Headliners Club www.headlinerscomedy.com

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“WHEN CROSSRAIL ARRIVES, EALING WILL BECOME AN INNER LONDON BOROUGH FOR TRAVEL TIMES, BUT AN OUTER LONDON BOROUGH FOR QUALITY OF LIFE.”

I

t is Europe’s biggest infrastructure project and will have been more than ten years in the making and created 13 miles of new underground tunnels when it fully opens in December 2019 – Crossrail is well and truly arriving soon at a platform for Ealing’s residents and commuters. Ealing will be the London borough with the most Crossrail stations – five – Acton, Ealing, West Ealing, Hanwell and Southall – with a sixth station Greenford having a direct rail link to West Ealing Crossrail station. Journey times to central London and Heathrow will be slashed to a borough average of 13 minutes to Bond Street and 12 minutes to Europe’s busiest airport. The areas around the Ealing quintet are also benefiting from a £7.5million council investment to upgrade their forecourts, with new provision such as cycle hubs, paving, street furniture and pedestrian crossing facilities Matthew Gilbert, head of Savills, Ealing, believes that the borough is undergoing what he calls an ‘unprecedented transformation’ due to Crossrail. He said,

“Ealing ticks many boxes for young professional families with good schools, an established town centre and more open space than any other London borough. Crossrail will provide the missing link to reach London at speed.” Matthew Gilbert, Savills, Ealing

CLLR JULIAN BELL, LEADER, EALING COUNCIL

CROSSRAIL AT A GLANCE CROSSRAIL – IN NUMBERS 5 stations in Ealing borough 26 miles of new tunnels under London 13 minutes – average time from Ealing’s quintet to Bond Street 12 minutes – average time from Ealing’s quintet to Heathrow 27 minutes – average time from Ealing’s quintet to Canary Wharf

10% extra rail capacity from Ealing stations 24 trains at peak hours in each direction 10 peak hour trains Ealing Broadway and Southall 4 peak hour trains Acton, West Ealing and Hanwell

THE CROSSRAIL EFFECT £7.5million upgrades to the five Ealing station forecourts

300,000 extra jobs available within 30mins commute from Ealing***

Development desirability - Ealing (2), Acton (5), West Ealing (6), out of all 38 stations*

600,000+ extra jobs available within 45mins commute from Southall***

Long-term potential – Southall (5), Hanwell (11), out of all 38 stations* 45% to 50% projected property↑ price increase around the Ealing quintet by 2020* £5.5billion added value to property prices on route by 2021** 50% of planning applications within 1km of a station cite Crossrail as a reason to develop**

1,200 predicted jobs growth in Ealing Broadway and 1,700 in Southall by 2021*** 10% residential growth in Ealing Broadway by 2021*** 20% development growth in Southall by 2021*** 19% more students within 1 hour commute of Thames Valley University*** *JLL Residential **TFL/Crossrail ***Colin Buchannan Consultants

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CROSSRAIL

SOUTHALL A new, bright, spacious ticket hall and forecourt will reduce congestion at the entrance to the station. A new footbridge with three new lifts to provide step-free access to every platform. Platform extensions so the station can accommodate the new 200m long Elizabeth line trains.

17 31

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New lighting, customer information screens, station signage, help points and CCTV. Adjacent sites with potential for development.

HANWELL

15 29 10

A new station information system, security systems and CCTV. Transport for London will install lifts at the station prior to Crossrail service commencing. READING

southall

hanwell

west ealing

HEATHROW

13 27 11

WEST EALING A new, bright, spacious ticket hall. A glass and steel structure to let in natural light and surrounded by a large canopy. A new station footbridge with lifts and stairs connecting the platforms to the station building providing step-free access from the street to all platforms. Longer platforms to accommodate 200m long Crossrail trains. A new bay platform for Greenford branch trains by widening platform four plus a new canopy. Adjacent sites with potential for development.

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CROSSRAIL

EALING BROADWAY

11 25 15

A new long, curved canopy running the length of the forecourt, with a new glass structure and a new entrance twice the size of the existing one to give the building a much more spacious and brighter feel. A ticket hall more than twice the size of the existing one with capacity for 17 standard ticket gates and one wide gate. Four new lifts to provide step free access from street level to all platforms. Improved staircases for platforms one, two and three. Platform extensions to accommodate the new high capacity Crossrail trains. New toilet facilities. New customer information screens, station signage, help points and CCTV.

STRATFORD BOND STREET

ealing broadway

LIVERPOOL STREET

acton mainline PADDINGTON

TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD CANARY WHARF

ACTON MAINLINE A new, bright, spacious ticket hall will provide a more welcoming environment for passengers.

9

23 17

A new footbridge with four new lifts to provide step free access to every platform. Platform extensions to accommodate the new 200m long trains. New lighting, customer information screens, station signage, help points and CCTV. Forecourt improvements including new cycle hub. Work due for completion by summer 2017. Adjacent sites with potential for development.

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GREYSTAR GREENFORD GREYSTAR IS A WORLD-LEADING RESIDENTIAL OPERATOR WITH OVER 25 YEARS OF INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE IN DELIVERING AND MANAGING SUCCESSFUL RENTAL APARTMENT COMMUNITIES. WE INVEST IN OUR DEVELOPMENTS FOR THE LONG TERM AND ARE COMMITTED TO CREATING HIGH-QUALITY, WELL-MANAGED NEIGHBOURHOODS. THE PLACE • The UK’s largest purpose-designed ‘Build to Rent’ scheme to date • A vibrant mixed-use neighbourhood on the banks of the historic Grand Union canal • The result of extensive consultation with LB Ealing, the Greater London Authority, local businesses, residents, and other stakeholders • A revitalised place, bringing the currently derelict 20.3-acre site back to life • A model of modern canalside living in the heart of Greenford THE HOMES • Approximately 2,000 new homes across seven main buildings, with on-site management • Approximately 75% will be available for rent from Greystar, with the rest for sale • A range of apartment types from studios to 3 bedroom homes • Resident amenities including courtyard gardens, gyms, roof terraces and club rooms • A genuinely tenure-blind neighbourhood, including discount market rent and shared ownership homes OTHER FEATURES & AMENITIES • A wealth of new amenities for residents and the local community alike • Local shops and workspaces, a supermarket, restaurants, cafes, public gym and offices • Attractive, curated public open spaces, including a landmark central square • New connections through Greenford, including the reopening of Berkeley Avenue • A new pedestrian bridge over the Grand Union Canal • A new two form entry primary school and accommodation for a new on-site healthcare centre • The creation of around 1,200 onsite jobs beyond the construction phase

Stay up to date at www.greystar-greenford.co.uk


GREENFORDGREEN One to Watch

Greystar unveils plans for transforming a long-neglected industrial site into a creative canal-side quarter, which could be London’s next property hotspot. By Ginetta Vedrickas

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reenford is one of Ealing’s lesserknown neighbourhoods – not as streetwise as Acton or as wellheeled as Ealing – it is currently best known for housing the former HQ of GlaxoSmithKline and Sunblest bakery. Together they once employed more than 3,000 workers in the factory and surrounding offices on site, although today nearly all traces of manufacturing activity are long past. However, things are about to change as the landscape looks set for a dramatic transformation. Developer Greystar, the largest operator of rental communities in the States, is determined to breathe life into this little known quarter with plans underway to create a whole new community and make Greenford Green one of the capital’s new hotspots and most sought after neighbourhoods.

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GREENFORD GREEN

Grand designs In January 2016, the Greenford Green site was bought by American company Greystar, who have worked closely with Ealing Council to plan an ambitious scheme for the area and truly put Greenford Green on the map. Plans for the 26.5acre site will transform the neglected land and buildings into a thriving mixed-use and well-managed development with a focus on rented housing but also with some brand new homes for sale.

Connections, Crossrail and all the amenities Well-connected Greenford Green is the perfect site for the proposals thanks to its excellent transport links with the mainline, underground and a connection to West Ealing station and its Crossrail trains from 2019. Almost 2,000 properties are planned for the neighbourhood at Greenford Green - 1,439 of which will be for rent - along with shops, offices, restaurants plus a new primary school and space for a proposed health centre. It will be the largest purpose-designed rental community to be developed in the UK to date. The proposals are still being worked on to make sure the improvements are exactly right for the area explains Ealing’s borough planner, David Scourfield, “Many of these amenities weren’t in the original plan, but one of the great things about the project is the way we’ve been able to work with Greystar, who have been very receptive. They have listened carefully as they really want the area to benefit from the scheme and give people what they want to see. The site is big enough to include these much needed facilities.”

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Greystar’s vision for new rented homes Greystar are one of the most experienced companies working in ‘build to rent’ purpose-built rented housing. Currently managing over 410,000 homes in more than 140 cities across the world, they are the States’ biggest operator of this type of community (also known as ‘multifamily’ housing). Large rental developments are more established in the States, where schemes typically have lots of facilities and amenities on site, such as gyms, roof terraces, lounges (or ‘club rooms’), and even nurseries. Renters can be single people, sharers, couples or families and Greystar promise that this ‘multifamily model’ reflects rental housing for flexible modern lifestyles, whatever your age. Greystar’s mission is to give renters a better experience than is currently available in the UK private sector, across a range of affordability levels. They promise high-quality, well designed accommodation with a full on-site management service and amenities along with the creation of a genuine new and sustainable community. In consultation with Ealing Council, Greystar wants to transform the old site into a sought-after neighbourhood and bring the best of their knowledge and practise to the British market. As they will be managing the development into the future, Greystar is keen to achieve a long-term integration with the surrounding community.


GREENFORD GREEN

View of the new primary school

Council commitment to residents It is important to integrate this new neighbourhood with those, who are already living in and around the area. One crucial key to success is that all local residents will be able to enjoy the new green spaces and wide array of shops and amenities that are planned for the site. The proposals include the reopening of Berkeley Avenue - which will be planted with an avenue of trees providing a much needed link connecting Oldfield Lane to Greenford Road and acting as the ‘front door’ to the exciting new neighbourhood.

Green space for all

Live, work and play at Greenford Green Ealing is popular with young professionals and young families thanks to its great amenities and ever improving transport links. Greystar believe that Greenford represents a ‘good investment opportunity’ but that creating an attractive quarter where people actually want to live, work and play is crucial. Mark Allnutt, MD of Greystar UK’s Investment Team, explains: “Greystar’s approach allows us to offer residents the benefits of a high-quality home without compromise. We are working closely with the local community and Ealing Council to regenerate the site and create a truly sustainable neighbourhood.” Allnutt believes that up and coming Greenford Green is a great way of showcasing what his company can do and hopes that it will introduce a whole new way of living to the UK. “The multifamily model allows people of all ages and life stages to enjoy the benefits of fully-managed properties with superior specifications and amenities. We believe that this marks the beginning of a revolution in the UK property market, and are proud to be leading the way.” Plans for the new rented homes certainly look revolutionary, with great facilities planned within each building for residents, such as a rooftop club room, building-wide wifi network, fitness centre, customer service managers, package delivery storage, secure cycle spaces and bike hire.

The scheme will improve connections to Horsenden Hill parkland, where there is an abundance of green space including playing fields, a nature area, farm plus visitors’ centre and even a golf course and the Capital Ring Trail. “One thing that is important is to really open up the site so that pedestrians and cyclists have access. The plans include building a new pedestrian and cycle bridge so that you can cross the canal and there will be public squares and plenty of open space with pedestrian activity that will bring vitality to the neighbourhood,” says David Scourfield. Cosy landscaped courtyards for relaxing and socialising will abound with views of green space and the canal providing the perfect peaceful setting.

New jobs, new homes, new opportunities The new housing is crucial as Ealing’s population is booming. Over the next 25 years, 60,000 extra people will be living in the borough, and many of them will need new homes, jobs and schools. An estimated 1,200 longterm jobs will be created at Greenford Green across a range of sectors and these are in addition to construction jobs. “There will be a real mix,” says Scourfield, “across all industries from retail to restaurants as well as people needed to service the rental flats in management and maintenance roles.” There are also some exciting design challenges ahead. The grade II listed Glaxo House will be refurbished, extended and re-used to provide high quality office accommodation. Ealing Council and Greystar have consulted with Historic England to agree the removal of the later additions and sympathetically restore the original building. It is also proposed that Greenford Green will provide opportunities for uses such as flexible work space, a micro- brewery and boutique cinema.

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GREENFORD GREEN

View of the GlaxoklineSmith building from Greenford Road

Hotspot Greenford is ‘one to watch’

Playground in the sky As a result of space constraints, the two-form entry primary school will have a modern contemporary design, unlike a traditional low level site with a playground attached. “Urban schools today are different to what we are used to. This site is no exception and it will feature a rooftop playground,” adds Scourfield. Much of the proposals are still being decided, for instance, the proposed health centre, with a planned 2,400 square metres of space, is currently being negotiated with the NHS Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). Within the mix of retail units and office space there will be room for business start-ups and small and medium enterprise ventures. These initiatives could bring more jobs and opportunities to the borough as Ealing recognises the growing need for co-working and the remote working that technology increasingly allows.

Programme of delivery Following Greystar’s planning application and local consultation about the proposals in 2016, a planning decision will be taken by the council’s planning committee, in consultation with the Mayor of London, in early 2017. Construction is planned to commence later in the year. The site’s sheer size means that it is a long term project, estimated to fully complete in around six years. “That’s actually quite fast for a site of this size,” Scourfield adds: “Most of the homes are rented, which means that the scheme will be finished and ready quicker than building new homes for sale.”

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As a nation of homeowners, many of us are increasingly being priced out of the housing market and Ealing’s residents are no exception. An average terraced house in central Ealing costs £645,000 according to estate agency Savills, who say that regeneration and investment, much of which is thanks to Crossrail, is attracting many young professionals and families to the area. Estate agents believe that Greenford Green will soon be on any buyer’s or renter’s radar as it ticks the boxes of affordability in a wellconnected area with plenty of amenities.

Homes to suit all The new rented homes in Greenford Green will be a real mix of sizes to suit young professionals and families and, as well as homes to rent, there will also be homes for sale, and some shared ownership properties, which are part rent, part buy and discounted rented homes. Before too long this creative quarter will come alive as new residents and locals stroll its buzzing high street or cycle along the paths and trails in this amazing new neighbourhood. Ealing Council’s vision is summed up by David Scourfield: “We want to get the best deal possible for local people.” Ginetta Vedrickas is an award-winning property journalist and has written for many UK and overseas titles including as Metro property editor, London Evening Standard, Independent, The Telegraph and The Observer. She writes for many property magazines including First Time Buyer, A Place in the Sun and is a columnist for Showhouse.


MIPIM 2017 SPONSORS’ PAGE EALING IN LONDON ARE PROUD TO HAVE BEEN SPONSORED AT THIS YEAR’S MIPIM BY THE FOLLOWING: We would like to thank all our partners, whose support made the Ealing In London stand at MIPIM 2017 possible. Ealing In London works closely with all our sponsors and advertisers throughout the year. The benefits of sponsorship include invitations to Ealing In London debates, events and regular newsletter updates. If you are interested in becoming a 2018 Ealing In London sponsor or advertiser and would like to find out more about the work of Ealing In London, then please contact Robin Das or Iesha Anastasiou on 020 8825 9046, email dasr@ealing.gov.uk or contact us via our contact page on www.ealinginlondon.com For more information about our above sponsors, please visit our dedicated sponsors’ page at www.ealinginlondon.com

EALING IN LONDON – LOOKING FORWARD TO MIPIM 2018. 63


www.ealinginlondon.com

EALING IN LONDON / Issue 8 / Spring 2017  

The regeneration magazine for the London borough of Ealing.

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