Page 1

1


Inspirations of a Digital Media Addict and things that would be easy for him to write about

E. A. Keefer  

2


Table of Contents Author’s Foreword Everyone Dies Non-fiction

Welcome to the Club* Short Story

Joel’s Bullet Microfiction

Left Turn* Rendezvous* Our Hero* Pranksters* Crushed Pipes* Twit-fiction

Portal BioShock Tetris Haiku

Majora* Villanelle

Thy Foolish Maiden Triolet

Controller Hell’s Hallway Masquerade* Empty Orchestra* Free-Verse Poems

To The Moon Novella Excerpt 3 


Author’s Foreword In reflection over this creative writing course, many subjects, styles and concepts were  discussed, of course, as any class curriculum would, and here are the few I think that truly make  an author stand out from the rest. The first being the art of showing without telling. The second  being meter, and the construction of words effectively in style. Whereas the third concept being  dialogue, and the portrayal of information through emotional character.   These three ideas all work in congruence, really, but the foundation of them all is in the  act of showing and not telling. As any author, your duty to the reader is not only to capture them  and feed them an enticing story but to create a world for them to fall back into and consume  without creating a new sense of reality. The secret to this I have always held dear is that people  love when they feel accomplished. If you can write a story where the reader in themselves feels  like they are contributing to the creativity of it’s whole, they are already reaching a level of depth  within themselves and the story. That being said, it isn’t always so easy, because creating a new  realm for a reader to dwell in is a tough task. You don’t want to pile on literal details that they get  bored with your traditionalist painting style, but you don’t want to form scenarios so abstract they  get lost between the lines. In my short story below, “Welcome to the Club”, the setting is thrown  out to the reader in a way that isn’t obviously spilling out information but more layering it in like so;  Countless  sun­bathed  afternoons  over  the  plains  of  their  countryside  home were wasted to him. [...] The ranch they lived  on was one  of   a  quaint,  quiet  and  personable,  in   a  tan­blue  siding  and  modestly  decorated  window  sills.  The  carpet  was  a  strange  gray,  worn  down  to  almost  the  weaving  and  mismatched  furniture  atop  and  the  wildest  of  knickknack  collections  littering  the  home.  Acres  of  trees  to  the  west  and  ever­expanding  crop fields to  the east. A young,  mischievous boy's dream  land, but Daniel kept inside and to himself. 

4


The next level of a successful writer is dialogue. To be able to capture the internal  feelings and complex layers of a character is just the first step however. Anyone can portray  emotion, to a degree where the reader will comprehend sadness, or happiness, or anger, the  real task at hand in effective dialogue is getting your character to reach into the chest cavity of  the reader himself and just pull on heart strings viciously. That being said, the technique is only  efficient in some cases where the narrator is a character like first person, and not so much as in  third person. In my short story, “Joel’s Bullet”, the dialogue plays a prominent cog in the machine  of portraying emotion, and not as much story;  "Look, I solved the puzzles, I found you, I made it here didn't I?" He  yelled fiercely with a rumble under his tongue over the loud racket of rain  pouring down between them, soaking their clothes and having it hang over  their bodies. "Give it up!"   Although, it does portrays strong emotion, that doesn’t mean you can use dialogue to just  throw out random speech, it has to be relevant. On the other hand, dialogue can be a nice  transition from paragraph after paragraph of information dumping to throw in some perspective  information, like in the novella below, “To The Moon”;    "Once we lay down the waypoints in your childhood memories for  direct access, we will return here. That's when you'll need to help us  influence your younger self to become an astronaut."  "...or to get in a giant catapult."  "Point is, you'll need to have more to say than just 'I don't know'."  "As long as you can take me to the moon, I will do everything in my  power to help."  The third, final, and probably arguable the most difficult and effective writing  strategy is meter and rhythm. Whether you realize it or not, there is a musicality in  everything everyone may do, say and feel. Nature in itself is formed in a  5 


mathematical and rhythmic balance. If as an author you can create a stylized  conglomeration of language that flows of the tongue in such a nostalgic manner,  you will end up portraying such a finesse, more than you even intended.    

Everyone Dies Yes, they do. Death is real. Yes, it is. People die. Animals die. They will someday cease  to live, and the only thing you can do right now? Put it off. You can dedicate your whole life, it's  entirety, to trying to live longer, but then in the end, didn't you just waste your life to live longer, so  you could keep trying to live longer? It's nothing, that right now, can be stopped by anyone.  To be honest, until about the Summer of 2002, this wasn’t necessarily a concept that I  had understood. To a six year­old, the world is pretty great, full of frosted animal crackers,  soccer balls, and light­up shoes. Six year­olds don’t realize death, because if it wasn’t living it  wouldn’t be around, right? Six year­olds don’t understand it, they don’t think about it.  The sunlight cast in a solid beam through the white paned windows gave the room a  strange warm glow. Dust hanging in the air. My grandmother’s house was always a sort of  mystery to me, with it’s raggedy blueish gray carpet and the oddest little commodities laying  around. In the corner stood an unstained wood china cabinet to host her green glass collection.  Glass wasn’t really supposed to be green, I thought, but she had it in any form you could imagine  from tall bottlenecks to coke bottles, plates, ashtrays, vases and little birds. Against the left wall  stood a handmade shelf, which was home to dozens of books I’d never seen anyone actually  read. At six, it’s not like I could read them either, let alone remember the titles. Atop the shelf also  sat the most fascinating little trinkets as well of various pastel colors, animals in pairs,  a  husband and wife, and their ark. Her box television with it’s rabbit ear antenna sat beside and  across from mismatched furniture. To this day, everytime I sit down in that awful looking chair,  my grandmother recounts the time she bought it for one quarter at an auction. Of course, there  was more to the house, the web­slung basement, the sewing room full of scary porcelain dolls  (which to this day I still avoid), the vacant spare room I’d eventually spend an entire summer and  the kitchen with the clock on the wall that regrettably never held true to the correct time of day.  It’s in the living room though, that this day takes it’s shape. Wooden chairs and stools  were propped up, unfolded and set around the room, where most of my family had been sitting  when my father and I arrived. The back door was left unlocked as we entered, but no one was  there to greet us. Being an innocent child and excited to see my grandmother, cousins, aunts  and uncles I rushed right down the hall and turn the corner, stumbling out of my shoes and over  my own feet as I turned the corner. Everyone sat palm in palm, heads down or tilted back, no  one spoke, but a collective breathing could be heard. 

6


It never was a custom for our family to be very attached, with so many busy schedules it was  only ever common to see everyone at Christmas Eve service. For some reason a real sense of  unity had amounted today though, and I just wasn’t quite sure why.        My father soon lay a hand on my shoulder, bent down, pointing to an empty chair in my vision  and whispered for me to sit down. Of course, I nodded, smiled and just went right to it, managed  to swing my little legs up onto the seat, wiggled around until I was situated, my feet barely  surpassing the edge. I looked around to make sure I wasn’t out of place until my eyes met with a  man I had never seen before.  He didn’t seem uninviting. He did smile quickly before glancing back down at his book, pulling a  ribbon to the page and closing it. He then rested it upon his lap and crossed his hands.  “We gather here today to mourn the passing of our beloved, and to cherish the life that he once  had, as he passes into a higher peace.”  And all at once, it hit me; the fact that my father wasn't here and that strange robed man was our  preacher.  My grandfather had died and at six years­old, it wasn’t emotion I was ready to withstand.       

7


Welcome To The Club (original)   In Daniel's childhood, much like any other's, his father and his mother took him to the theater.  The lights, the props, the actors and the script always created a sense of reality to occupy his  mind, but like any young boy it was never too much to hold his attention for long. In fact, most of  his time was spent twiddling away the hours to the imagination of what lie far behind that long  flowing velvet curtain.      You see, this is a story of not such a usual boy, nor one of grace and elegance that may say  life will always turn out. Daniel does not long through this story to meet the perfect girl. Daniel  does not get into a scuffle with the playground bullies only to be mangled to a pulp. Daniel does  not think like a normal boy; Daniel is special.      Countless sun­bathed afternoons over the plains of their countryside home were wasted to  him. Although, sometimes the occasional hour would take place where he could lie and envision  the shapes of clouds into mythical beings, it was not what he really enjoyed. The ranch they lived  on was one of a quaint, quiet and personable, in a tan­blue siding and modestly decorated  windowsills.  The carpet was a strange gray, worn down to almost the weaving and mismatched  furniture atop and the wildest of knickknack collections littering the home. Acres of trees to the  west and ever­expanding crop fields to the east. A young, mischievous boy's dreamland, but  Daniel kept inside and to himself.   

Daniel enjoyed the simplicity of things nonetheless, but he did not wait for society to 

invent the next big toy on the market, or animate the next funny Saturday cartoon, he did it  himself. He would find himself on the carpet of the living room with stacks of scrap paper half as  high as his waist and a pencil. Hardwood too, never with the fancy mechanical contraptions, oh  no.  Only lead as well, never with colorful crayons or fluorescent markers, no sir.      The things Daniel could create were phenomenal, wild and immense with layers upon  complex stories of illusion. Sadly though, no one could ever comprehend his writings and fables.  Hours of days and days of weeks spent concentrating on the best solution to a curtain draw  Daniel could possibly muster in his special mind; to no avail.      You see, these days of weeks or even weeks of months, Daniel spent with his distant and  frankly, quite aged grandparents.  Don't get me wrong, nothing they did for him was particularly  bad, he was fed, he was bathed, he had a suitable time, sure, but they also felt so far away. In  honesty, his grandfather died when Daniel was only seven, and when he was alive, he could  barely hear, forced to yell any point he felt he had to get across. Daniel's grandmother was  sweet, always baking cookies somehow, cross­stitching and rocking in her chair on the porch,  letting the wind rustle over her vegetable garden.     Perhaps, Daniel would have been better off if they paid more attention to him and listened to  his wild intriguing and deep stories. In hindsight it could have saved him from the pain, the agony  of himself. Yes, they say ignorance is bliss, but soon that ignorance will turn to realization.        8 


That realization, sadly, came to Daniel when we was alone, walking over a beaten path  through the forested wood from school one day. Stones crunched under and wedged through  the treads on his sneakers as he trudged through trampled weeds, wild flowers and over muddy  hills. Occasionally, Daniel would stop and detract from the trail to peer into small whispering  creaks where tadpoles flopped and frolicked.       Did they look up at his towering figure and wonder what hell bent destruction he could have on  their lives? Did they even recognize his presence? Daniel debated this within himself for a few  moments before peering up the seemingly mile high trunks of oaks, pines and cedar trees that  tickled the sky, letting only the most persuasive beams of sun to rest on his face.      A tiny speck dwarfed by even the tiniest of objects, he was, and he knew it. The universe  above those trees, above those clouds, above that sky and beyond that Sun, was endless  oceans of matter and material living their own lives and he was only a minuscule piece of it all,  he thought.      With this Daniel cast his face down and proceeded on his way until he stumbled, tripped and  cracked over a fallen forest limb that had crossed his stride. The sudden break under his weight  wallowed through to it's fellow branches in a final sigh of despair as birds fluttered away. Except  for one.      "Daniel, don't you see? Even the slightest of actions send ripples through all of space, through  all of time," a faint beckoning called to him.      Daniel swung his head around looking for who could have possibly found him here, but with no  one in sight, he shook it off and kept trudging forward.      "Over here, Daniel, in the trees," it spoke again.      "Who are­" He stopped, stunned by the sight that had cast into his vision. A bird, but no normal  bird; a different bird.      "Do not be disturbed by my appearance," the bird tweeted.      The bird's body constantly shuttered between two lenses, of various and fluctuating color, as if  Daniel were watching a 3D film without his glasses on.      "I represent Chaos, the superposition of influence on all things."      "But what­"      "Never doubt yourself in this grand world, Daniel," it replied as it shook in it's static and flew off  into the open air, and disappeared.      Daniel contemplated the ideas, feeling an intense burn inside as his eyes rested on the empty  space. Was it some mirage that he let his mind discover in the thick of the brush? Of course,  from time­to­time, he would feel eyes against his skin, or a figure passing in the distance, but  nothing like this.      Whether or not it was, Daniel kept walking forward in hopes to retreat to his illustrations soon  until he met with a fork in the road. The split had never been there before, he thought. Did 

9


someone find his walkway and create their own in turn? He stuttered in his mind which direction  would take him home but sadly couldn't.   

  Daniel just could not rack his brain enough to remember when suddenly over his  shoulder a whisper, "You know, that little chirping friend of yours, Chaos, got it all wrong."      "What the­" Daniel gasped as he stepped away from the voice and turned to face a seemingly  normal man, dressed to the nines, hands in his pockets and without one moving hair on the top  of his head.      Daniel let the features of the man wash over him for a second, the slight wrinkle in his fore  head and his overall casual vibe.      "Well actually, I am Causality. Close, sport, you were on the cusp of something there! You  really were," the man responded in a sleek tone.      Daniel stood speechless and confused.      "What? Oh, excuse me!" He chuckled, "I guess I should have led with the whole mind reading  thing."      "You can read my mind?" Daniel mustered, taking slight quiet steps back over the pounded  dirt.      "Well, actually I can read all minds. If reading is what you want to call it, it's more like  processing," he said, waning his face up to the tall towering trees just like Daniel had moments  ago. "Sure, your actions might ring through everything but it's not like you're making a real  choice, you know that right, Daniel?"      "But, the universe," Daniel trailed off timidly.      "But, the universe, nothing! It's all chemical, it's just reactions going off, you don't have a say!"  The man met his eyes again and strode close to Daniel, leaned down like his father used to and  whispered, "just remember, you don't carry the weight of it all on your shoulders."      "But, I­ What about the­" Daniel tried to piece together his thoughts but before he knew it, the  sharply dressed man stood back up and turned his head quickly away from Daniel, but then  suddenly back again.      A golden glow took over his eyes and he snarled only a few words into his face, "Causality is  lying! Not lying! Lying! Not lying!"      The man seemed to be possessed, Daniel thought, as tears of fear whelped up in the ducts of  his eyes. He turned his body to run from the man rapidly but couldn't seem to divert his eyes as  the man seized and shook between personalities.      Just before Daniel could get away he saw the man fall to his knees and splattered up mud on  his pinstriped suit and scream, "It's all Quantum, Daniel! Don't believe everything you hear!"      With this notion, he fled, furiously, in fact, he was unsure if he even chose the right direction.  All he knew was that he wanted to get away, fast. Daniel leaped and bounded over stumps and  weeds, flowers and ripened wild berries that strode across his path.  10 


"Young man! Wait!"      Daniel slipped as he turned his head towards the echoing mutter in the distance, tracking mud  up and down his school jeans.      "Wh­who's there?"      "Over here, lad!" It shouted again as Daniel tracked the woman to a cabin front porch, waving  frantically, "Please, why don't you come in a rest? You look quite worried."          "I don't think I should, I, um, need to get home."      "Your mother isn't going to be very happy with you after dirtying up your pants. How 'bout I give  them a wash?"      Daniel solemnly agreed, with only mild regret and trekked off the beaten path, through the thick  pines and fallen sticks, mossy stones and presumably, animal remains. Stepped up onto the  porch and swung open the filter door.      "What's your name, sonny?"      "D­daniel," he replied, obviously stuttering.      "What are you in such a hurry for, Danny?"      "There was a man, and he was talking to me but then he­"      "Oh, don't get yourself all worked up," she replied grinning and gesturing for him to come  inside. "You know what makes me feel better, Dan?"      "What's that?"      "Well, come here and look for yourself," she said swinging her arm for him to join her at the  back window.      She was really just a normal elderly woman, but Daniel never let the idea of his own grandma  cross his mind. They weren't really so similar it seemed, of course, they were both frail looking  positively aged, but Daniel never really saw his grandmother grin so freely like she just had.      "Look at that, isn't it just serene?" She chuckled.      Daniel sat on a stool, which creaked under his weight and peered out the misty stain four pane  window, leaning in for a better angle. Squirrels, chipmunks, bunnies and random other small  woodland creatures leapt and frolicked in her overgrown home garden, playfully interacting like  Daniel had never seen in the empty countryside.      "Isn't it all so peaceful, Daniel?"      "It really is," he said, distracted.      "Sometimes all it takes to relax is stopping for a moment and smelling the roses."      "I guess you're right," Daniel said turning away from nature to speak, when in fact, she was no  longer sitting next to him.      Worried, Daniel spun his head around the scene frantically but she was nowhere to be seen.  Where was she, he wondered. He soon turned back out the window before he stood, but the  animals were gone as well.      "Where did they," he paused as he pressed his palms against the glass for focus, but it was  all gone.  11 


Daniel turned away from the sight again in a swift take, only to find that the cabin he thought he  had been standing in itself had faded from reality, and all that remained was a filter of white. He  felt a knot lump into the deepest capsule of his throat, unable to speak, or shout in distress.  Endless halls and corridors, walls of only plastered untouched and pristine white almost glowing  ambiance.      "Daniel," a heavenly deep presence rang in the chamber. "These fables of the forest speak of  insanity, have you not yet realized the truth?"      He still couldn't form any sound off his tongue.          "Existence is void of meaning, and only fools seek to rationalize it all."      "That can't be true!" Daniel spilled out in frustration.      "You child!" It shouted, "You're just like them all! You distract yourself from life, the greatest lie  of all!"      "Without meaning, then why do we exist?" Daniel screamed into the abyss.      There was no reply and silence fell over as he felt weariness flow and falter on his quivering  skin. Daniel slowly turned his head to find his way through but it all still looked the same, and  soon he found confusion in which way he even began.      Daniel soon sat down, crossed his hands in his lap, curled his knees and fixated his  moistening eyes on the endless depths. He lowered his head into his hands and wept to himself,  lost, and without his way.      Soon, he pried his forehead up and found a note, single folded and engraved in a golden  plating. Daniel at this point racked his mind at the turn of events that had befell him, and thought,  how could this have even gotten here? Nothing made sense, and Daniel only wanted to go  home. Not the countryside ranch of his grandparent's anymore, no. Daniel wanted to get up and  run back to the only place he knew was home. As faded and faint as the memories did still last of  his parents, Daniel knew they were all that still made sense. No more shouting, no more clinking  crosshatch needles and absolutely no more days wasted and gone long by.      He reached his hand with outstretched fingers towards the letter in front of him, shaking as  they meet it's grasp. Nervous, Daniel let out a light and peaceful sigh, whips his last trailing tear  with the side of his palm, and opened the fold.      It read; "Welcome to the club,"      He contemplated the one and only handwritten line before tracing his eyes down further.      "Sincerely, God."      Daniel looked up from the ink as the sound of a slow creaking door breaking to concurrency of  the pale, pale walls.   

Daniel noticed his invitation was gone, his arms tied down along his sides, unable to 

move his legs from their crossed position, and a strain on his neck.      "Are you ready for your lunch today, Daniel?" A woman spoke sweetly.      12 


Welcome To The Club (edit)   In Daniel's childhood, much like any other's, his father and his mother took him to the theater.  The lights, the props, the actors and the script always created a sense of reality to occupy his  mind, but like any young boy it was never too much to hold his attention for long. In fact, most of  his time was spent twiddling away the hours to the imagination of what lie far behind that long  flowing velvet curtain.      You see, this is a story of not such a usual boy, nor one of grace and elegance that may say  life will always turn out. Daniel does not long through this story to meet the perfect girl. Daniel  does not get into a scuffle with the playground bullies only to be mangled to a pulp. Daniel does  not think like a normal boy; Daniel is special.      Countless sun­bathed afternoons over the plains of their countryside home were wasted to  him. Although, sometimes the occasional hour would take place where he could lie and envision  the shapes of clouds into mythical beings, it was not what he really enjoyed. The ranch they lived  on was one of a quaint, quiet and personable, in a tan­blue siding and modestly decorated  windowsills.  The carpet was a strange gray, worn down to almost the weaving and mismatched  furniture atop and the wildest of knickknack collections littering the home. Acres of trees to the  west and ever­expanding crop fields to the east. A young, mischievous boy's dreamland, but  Daniel kept inside and to himself.   

Daniel enjoyed the simplicity of things nonetheless, but he did not wait for society to 

invent the next big toy on the market, or animate the next funny Saturday cartoon, he did it  himself. He would find himself on the carpet of the living room with stacks of scrap paper half as  high as his waist and a pencil. Hardwood too, never with the fancy mechanical contraptions, oh  no.  Only lead as well, never with colorful crayons or fluorescent markers, no sir.      The things Daniel could create were phenomenal, wild and immense with layers upon  complex stories of illusion. Sadly though, no one could ever comprehend his writings and fables.  Hours of days and days of weeks spent concentrating on the best solution to a curtain draw  Daniel could possibly muster in his special mind; to no avail.      You see, these days of weeks or even weeks of months, Daniel spent with his distant and  frankly, quite aged grandparents.  Don't get me wrong, nothing they did for him was particularly  bad, he was fed, he was bathed, he had a suitable time, sure, but they also felt so far away. In  honesty, his grandfather died when Daniel was only seven, and when he was alive, he could  barely hear, forced to yell any point he felt he had to get across. Daniel's grandmother was  sweet, always baking cookies somehow, cross­stitching and rocking in her chair on the porch,  letting the wind rustle over her vegetable garden.     Perhaps, Daniel would have been better off if they paid more attention to him and listened to  his wild intriguing and deep stories. In hindsight it could have saved him from the pain, the agony  of himself. Yes, they say ignorance is bliss, but soon that ignorance will turn to realization.        13 


That realization, sadly, came to Daniel when we was alone, walking over a beaten path  through the forested wood from school one day. Stones crunched under and wedged through  the treads on his sneakers as he trudged through trampled weeds, wild flowers, the occasional  dirtied linoleum tile, and over muddy hills. Occasionally, Daniel would stop and detract from the  trail to peer into small whispering creaks where tadpoles flopped and frolicked. He always  thought it so strange how the water in the creeks would run so sporadically, as if someone held  it’s faucet handles.       Did the tadpoles look up at his towering figure and wonder what hell bent destruction he could  have on their lives? Did they even recognize his presence? Daniel debated this within himself for  a few moments before peering up the seemingly mile high trunks of oaks, pines and cedar trees  that tickled the sky, letting only the most persuasive beams of sun to rest on his face. The sun  was directly above him, like it was at all times of the day, everyday until he decided it was time to  sleep.      A tiny speck dwarfed by even the tiniest of objects, he was, and he knew it. The universe  above those trees, above those clouds, above that sky and beyond that Sun, was endless  oceans of matter and material living their own lives and he was only a minuscule piece of it all,  he thought.      With this Daniel cast his face down and proceeded on his way until he stumbled, tripped and  cracked over a fallen forest limb that had crossed his stride. The sudden break under his weight  wallowed through to it's fellow branches in a final sigh of despair as birds fluttered away. Except  for one.      "Daniel, don't you see? Even the slightest of actions send ripples through all of space, through  all of time," a faint beckoning called to him.      Daniel swung his head around looking for who could have possibly found him here, but with no  one in sight, he shook it off and kept trudging forward.      "Over here, Daniel, in the trees," it spoke again.      "Who are­" He stopped, stunned by the sight that had cast into his vision. A bird, but no normal  bird; a different bird.      "Do not be disturbed by my appearance," the bird tweeted.      The bird's body constantly shuttered between two lenses, of various and fluctuating color, as if  Daniel were watching a 3D film without his glasses on.      "I represent Chaos, the superposition of influence on all things."      "But what­"      "Never doubt yourself in this grand world, Daniel," it replied as it shook in it's static and flew off  into the open air, and disappeared.      Daniel contemplated the ideas, feeling an intense burn inside as his eyes rested on the empty  space. Was it some mirage that he let his mind discover in the thick of the brush? Of course, 

14


from time­to­time, he would feel eyes against his skin, or a figure passing in the distance, but  nothing like this.          Whether or not it was, Daniel kept walking forward in hopes to retreat to his illustrations  soon until he met with a fork in the road. The split had never been there before, he thought. Did  someone find his walkway and create their own in turn? He stuttered in his mind which direction  would take him home but sadly couldn't.   

Daniel just could not rack his brain enough to remember when suddenly over his 

shoulder a whisper, "You know, that little chirping friend of yours, Chaos, got it all wrong."      "What the­" Daniel gasped as he stepped away from the voice and turned to face a seemingly  normal man, dressed to the nines, hands in his pockets and without one moving hair on the top  of his head.      Daniel let the features of the man wash over him for a second, the slight wrinkle in his  forehead and his overall casual vibe.      "Well actually, I am Causality. Close, sport, you were on the cusp of something there! You  really were," the man responded in a sleek tone.      Daniel stood speechless and confused.      "What? Oh, excuse me!" He chuckled, "I guess I should have led with the whole mind reading  thing."      "You can read my mind?" Daniel mustered, taking slight quiet steps back over the pounded  dirt.      "Well, actually I can read all minds. If reading is what you want to call it, it's more like  processing," he said, waning his face up to the tall towering trees just like Daniel had moments  ago. "Sure, your actions might ring through everything but it's not like you're making a real  choice, you know that right, Daniel?"      "But, the universe," Daniel trailed off timidly.      "But, the universe, nothing! It's all chemical, it's just reactions going off, you don't have a say!"  The man met his eyes again and strode close to Daniel, leaned down like his father used to and  whispered, "just remember, you don't carry the weight of it all on your shoulders."      "But, I­ What about the­" Daniel tried to piece together his thoughts but before he knew it, the  sharply dressed man stood back up and turned his head quickly away from Daniel, but then  suddenly back again.      A golden glow took over his eyes and he snarled only a few words into his face, "Causality is  lying! Not lying! Lying! Not lying!"      The man seemed to be possessed, Daniel thought, as tears of fear whelped up in the ducts of  his eyes. He turned his body to run from the man rapidly but couldn't seem to divert his eyes as  the man seized and shook between personalities. 

15


Just before Daniel could get away he saw the man fall to his knees and splattered up mud on  his pinstriped suit and scream, "It's all Quantum, Daniel! Don't believe everything you hear!"      With this notion, he fled, furiously, in fact, he was unsure if he even chose the right direction.  All he knew was that he wanted to get away, fast. Daniel leaped and bounded over stumps and  weeds, flowers and ripened wild berries that strode across his path.      "Young man! Wait!"       Daniel slipped as he turned his head towards the echoing mutter in the distance, tracking  mud up and down his school jeans.      "Wh­who's there?"      "Over here, lad!" It shouted again as Daniel tracked the woman to a cabin front porch, waving  frantically, "Please, why don't you come in a rest? You look quite worried."      "I don't think I should, I, um, need to get home," he contemplated peering his eyes over the  oddly modernized cabin. It was white, purely white with large glass panes and only the sharpest  of edges coupled with soft comforting surfaces.      "Your mother isn't going to be very happy with you after dirtying up your pants. How 'bout I give  them a wash?"      Daniel solemnly agreed, with only mild regret and trekked off the beaten path, through the thick  pines and fallen sticks, mossy stones and presumably, animal remains. He looked around and  proceeded to step up onto the porch, which for some reason shifted back to what he imagined a  cabin ought to be, wood panels and such with creaking windowpanes and swung open the filter  door.      "What's your name, sonny?"      "D­daniel," he replied, obviously stuttering.      "What are you in such a hurry for, Danny?"      "There was a man, and he was talking to me but then he­"      "Oh, don't get yourself all worked up," she replied grinning and gesturing for him to come  inside. "You know what makes me feel better, Dan?"      "What's that?"      "Well, come here and look for yourself," she said swinging her arm for him to join her at the  back window.      She was really just a normal elderly woman, but Daniel never let the idea of his own grandma  cross his mind. They weren't really so similar it seemed, of course, they were both frail looking  positively aged, but Daniel never really saw his grandmother grin so freely like she just had.      "Look at that, isn't it just serene?" She chuckled.      Daniel sat on a stool, which creaked under his weight and peered out the misty stain four pane  window, leaning in for a better angle. Squirrels, chipmunks, bunnies and random other small  woodland creatures leapt and frolicked in her overgrown home garden, playfully interacting like  Daniel had never seen in the empty countryside.  16 


"Isn't it all so peaceful, Daniel?"      "It really is," he said, distracted.      "Sometimes all it takes to relax is stopping for a moment and smelling the roses."      "I guess you're right," Daniel said turning away from nature to speak, when in fact, she was no  longer sitting next to him.      Worried, Daniel spun his head around the scene frantically but she was nowhere to be seen.  Where was she, he wondered. He soon turned back out the window before he stood, but the  animals were gone as well.        "Where did they," he paused as he pressed his palms against the glass for focus, but it  was all gone.      Daniel turned away from the sight again in a swift take, only to find that the cabin he thought he  had been standing in itself had faded from reality, and all that remained was a filter of white. He  felt a knot lump into the deepest capsule of his throat, unable to speak, or shout in distress.  Endless halls and corridors, walls of only plastered untouched and pristine white almost glowing  ambiance.      "Daniel," a heavenly deep presence rang in the chamber. "These fables of the forest speak of  insanity, have you not yet realized the truth?"      He still couldn't form any sound off his tongue.        "Existence is void of meaning, and only fools seek to rationalize it all."      "That can't be true!" Daniel spilled out in frustration.      "You child!" It shouted, "You're just like them all! You distract yourself from life, the greatest lie  of all!"      "Without meaning, then why do we exist?" Daniel screamed into the abyss.      There was no reply and silence fell over as he felt weariness flow and falter on his quivering  skin. Daniel slowly turned his head to find his way through but it all still looked the same, and  soon he found confusion in which way he even began.      Daniel soon sat down, crossed his hands in his lap, curled his knees and fixated his  moistening eyes on the endless depths. He lowered his head into his hands and wept to himself,  lost, and without his way.      Soon, he pried his forehead up and found a note, single folded and engraved in a golden  plating. Daniel at this point racked his mind at the turn of events that had befell him, and thought,  how could this have even gotten here? Nothing made sense, and Daniel only wanted to go  home. Not the countryside ranch of his grandparent's anymore, no. Daniel wanted to get up and  run back to the only place he knew was home. As faded and faint as the memories did still last of  his parents, Daniel knew they were all that still made sense. No more shouting, no more clinking  crosshatch needles and absolutely no more days wasted and gone long by. 

17


He reached his hand with outstretched fingers towards the letter in front of him, shaking as  they meet it's grasp. Nervous, Daniel let out a light and peaceful sigh, whips his last trailing tear  with the side of his palm, and opened the fold.      It read; "Welcome to the club,"      He contemplated the one and only handwritten line before tracing his eyes down further.      "Sincerely, God."      Daniel looked up from the ink as the sound of a slow creaking door breaking to concurrency of  the pale, pale walls.   

Daniel noticed his invitation was gone, his arms tied down along his sides, unable to 

move his legs from their crossed position, and a strain on his neck.      "Are you ready for your lunch today, Daniel?" A young woman in white spoke sweetly, with a  cross in red painted against her breast.     

Joel’s Bullet    The cold menacing lips of the pistol nozzle pressed once more with a strong force into his left  sweating temple, pushing his head into a sway against it.      "Give it up, Joel," he shouted. "You've lost! You're at the harsh end of life, so just give it up!"      "You think my times up, Rich­"      "Shut up, just shut up!" He screamed in rage, the bellows of his voice echoing off the harbor  dock. "I played your damn game, now where is she?"      "Played? Why, Richard, you are still playing. I haven't lost at all."      His greasy damp backhand met Joel's face with a harsh slap that rang through the shipping  containers, forcing him to fumble over from his knees to all fours.      "You play rough, I see," he replied with a shuttering laugh, and simultaneously spitting out  blood over the wooden planks. "But, when you're playing my game, you're playing my rules,  Richie."      "Don't ever let that name slip off your tongue again," Richard replied in anguish, distress and in  a shaken tone. "What are you talking about?"      His pistol remained cocked, loaded and aimed at his head as he built the strength to regain his  footing and stood up, with a leaning limp.      "Don't you see? I've been writing this charade as we go!" He yelled, turning away his arms  held high into the air where Richard noticed the graying clouds of the night.      "I've had you as a puppet on a string this whole time, my friend. I made the pieces, hell, I made  the board!" He turned around, arms outstretched still, "and I feel like making a few renovations."      "Shut up, Joel! This is ridiculous, why are you even doing this?" Richard shouted at him,  pulling in closer with his gun raised to the menace's heart but stopped suddenly when rain feel  onto his arm. "What the­"      "I told you, I felt like mixing it up," and as he lowered his arms gradually the rain began to pour,  the waves crashing up at the their feet on the pier.  18 


"You sick psycho, why are you doing this to me?" Richard said with a shaking hand, "What do  you want from me?"      "I want you to shoot me."      "Shut up!" Richard said, beginning to falter at the raging rapids crashing against the floor.      "Make me, Richie," he replied, as softly as he could over the loud ocean. "It's the only way to  win."      "We don't have to do this, Joel, just tell me where Carol is and we can go!"      "Go? You want to leave now? You don't want to finish our game?" He replied with a grin,  coupling a maniacal laugh. "I knew you were afraid, I knew you were smart, but I didn't think you  were a quitter, Richie­boy."      "Look, I solved the puzzles, I found you, I made it here didn't I?" He yelled fiercely with a rumble  under his tongue over the loud racket of rain pouring down between them, soaking their clothes  and having it hang over their bodies. "Give it up."       "Puzzles, hm? I love a good one." Joel said with a nostalgic intrigue washing over his face,  mocking him with a thinker style look and twisting his body to look over the wild currents.  "Perhaps we need another?"      "Are you kidding me?" He ravished in anger.      Joel took his fist off his chin and down into his inside blazer pocket, and pulled out a glistening  wet revolver.      "What the f­" Richard shouted as he took an involuntary step back onto the creaking boards  behind him, pistol still anxious to be met with the warmth of it's barrel.      "It's a twist, old sport! Don't they have those any more? Pah, of course they don't! World's too  traditional nowadays, why, with everyone covering their rears. Stories aren't what they used to  be, huh, buddy?"      "This isn't any story, Joel, this is real life!"      "Ah, life, here we are again," he said, taking a few dangerous steps closer to the edge where  waves lapped and seduced it's warped cliff.      "Where's my wife, Joel?"      "You know the rules, sport, shoot me right here on this pier and it's all over!"      "I can't do that, and you know it!"      "Then I guess you're the one who's lost, Richie," he said raising his firearm up and just at the  right scope for fatality.      The shot rang across the furious storm, through the rapid rainfall and around the shipping bay,  against metal containers and cargo cruise liners as Joel's revolver fell from his cold hand, and  skidded to Richard's feet.      "Joel!" He screamed as if he'd be able to hear through the new hole in his skull, his body  thumped against the panels and bled down into the depths below. All knowledge of Carol's  demise washed away. 

19


He fell down to his knees with an empty and echoing thud, letting the pistol fall from his palm,  tears and sweat joining the mix of cold harsh and icy rain over his cheeks.     

20


#TwitFic (original) Left turn After taking two turns, he had became lost in the city, no hope to finding his way, and angry. I  guess two rights don't make a right either. 

Rendezvous Diamonds in a silver band, unpolished, except the inner wall, in the one nightstand beside the  creaking bed. He would never have to know. 

Our Hero Our princess was taken by barbarians! Will our hero ever triumph over them to save her? Nope,  go for her slightly less attractive sister. 

Pranksters A professor recently admitted to a health clinic because unknowingly his students were playing  cruel jokes. I guess he’s seeing things. 

Crushed Pipes Loca papers spoke of a benefit concert against bullying. Too bad the enthusiastic and loved lead  took his own life yesterday.     

21


#TwitFic (edit) Left turn After taking two turns, he had became lost in the large city, little hope to finding his way. I guess  two lefts don't make a right either. 

Rendezvous Diamonds in a silver band, polished in wear only along the inner wall, lay within the one  nightstand beside their creaking bed. He would never have to know. 

Our Hero Our princess was taken by barbarians! Will our hero ever triumph over them to save her? Nope,  go for her slightly less attractive sister. 

Pranksters A professor recently checked into a mental health clinic because his aggravated students were  playing cruel pranks. He must be C­ing things. 

Crushed Pipes Newspaper headlines today read, "Benefit Concert Combats Bullying". Too bad a hand tied  noose crushed his award­winning voice yesterday.     

22


Haiku Portal Endlessly testing,  in the cold chambered rooms but,  the cake is a lie.    

BioShock Rapture has fallen;  Andrew Ryan is dead but,  not his ocean's dream.    

Tetris Colored squares falling,  in the most obscure of shape;  with never a win.     

23


Majora (original) Do not go gentle into that third night,  for time stopped and fallen has the moon;  Run, run, from the mask of solemn grief's might.    Southern Swamp the boy hero must right,  whispers in anger of hollow king's doom;  Do not go gentle into that third night.    Atop the Snowhead Mount they fight,  by their denial, lost, set in maroon.  Run, run, from the mask of solemn grief's might.    Plagued by distress the Great Bay sways slight,  with the fair spoken lives by the only tune,  Of do not go gentle into that third night.    Empty and forgotten, a dull grim site,  bottomless red canyon and miles of golden dune.  Run, run, from the mask of solemn grief's might.    Only by the children's restoring light,  may the village be saved, the lovers lay swoon.  Do not go gentle into that third night,  And run, run, from the mask of solemn grief's might.     

24


Majora (edit) Do not go gentle into that third night,  for time stopped and fallen has the moon;  Run, run, from the mask of solemn grief's might.    Southern Swamp the boy hero must right,  relinquish the spirit of a hollow king's rage;  Do not go gentle into that third night.    Atop the Snowhead Mount, they fight,  by their denial of lose and set in maroon.  Run, run, from the mask of solemn grief's might.    Plagued by distress the Great Bay sways slight,  with only the fair singing in silence,  Of do not go gentle into that third night.    Empty and forgotten, a dull grim site,  bottomless red canyon and miles of dune.  Run, run, from the mask of solemn grief's might.    Only by the children's restoring light,  may the village be saved, and the moon must halt.  Do not go gentle into that third night,  And run, run, from the mask of solemn grief's might.     

25


Thy Foolish Maiden Poetry, yes, thy foolish maiden of our written word,  teasing children's lullabies and torture of teen ambition.  Close cousin of the sung and harmonized language of the heard,  yet so lost in the foundations of English tradition.  What would be so wrong with your textbook omission?   

Controller smooth edges  with the accompaniment  of rigid frustration  countered by the solemn  aroma of sweaty palms  salted and robust remnants  of victory  and the aura of bested friends  and bonding brothers  sticky spilled fruity beverage  and stale orange Cheeto dust     

26


Hell’s Hallway Always so cluttered,  Rampage and riot.  Stomps and shoves,  Occasional,  Fisted throw.    Far too wild,  and much too hot.  Really just,  awfully terrible  for us all.    People stopping.  People gawking.  People kissing,  Whom aren't war torn,  And just gross.    No denying that,  The hallways of this,  Place are narrow.  Revolting,  And rabbid.    We're locked,  In this hole,  For who can even,  Feel how long?  Eternity.    Lost in time,  It seems to be,  An era,  Of boredom,  And lost ambitions.     

27


Masquerade (original) By the shadows of hollowed caverns and unmentioned dreams,  to the reminiscent beauty of potential life lost in time,  are the masques of bustling at the feet of marble extremes,  worn by the masses and constructed by crime.  Masque of the suit tie clad who lay swoon in the copy room,  Masque of education who slumbers on the reading chair,  Masque of a salesman who keeps his stand on his tomb,  Masque of the Washington Man who can't speak prayer,  Masque of the boy who studies by premium of death,  Masque of a family bake who relies on the thieving life,  Masque of hard work brute who watches her every breathe,  Masque of his lover, bearing child from a heated night's strife,  Masque of the driver who can't speak to them,  Masque of Eden's child left with only her flowers to cherish,  Masque of law's badge to his own life he soon will condemn,  and masque of the minority who can't leave without perish.  Cast in the divinity's ballroom, forgotten in an ever swaying symphony,  are the prisoners of it's grasp and gone by their own regimes.  You create these plagues and as do I; society of tyranny,  by the shadows of hollowed caverns and unmentioned dreams.     

28


Masquerade (edit) By the shadows of hollowed caverns and unmentioned dreams,  to the reminiscent beauty of potential life lost in time,  are the masques of bustling at the feet of society’s extremes,  worn by the masses and constructed by crime.    Masque of the suit tie clad who lay swoon in the copy room,  Masque of an educator who slumbers on their cluttered desk,  Masque of a salesman who keeps his shop on his tomb,  Masque of the Washington Man who dare not speak prayer,    Masque of the boy who studies by premium of death,  Masque of a family bake who relies on the thieving life,  Masque of construction brute who watches her every breathe,  Masque of his lover, bearing child from another’s heated night's strife,    Masque of the driver without a language to converse with,  Masque of a barren womb left with only her flowers to cherish,  Masque of law's badge to his own life he soon will condemn,  and masque of the minority who can't walk without perish.    Cast in the divinity's ballroom, forgotten in an ever swaying symphony,  are the prisoners of it's grasp and gone by their own regimes.  You create these plagues and as do I; society of tyranny,  by the shadows of hollowed caverns and unmentioned dreams.     

29


Empty Orchestra (original) secluded and modest  lined in leather  and on the face  of cold stiff cedar  stood under the bridge  of lonely ivory  and it's ebony cousin    standing concrete  chilled  is the marble  and the tent it support  towering  from the base  proud and forgotten    still vibrant in the cast  of unspoken bulbs  seas of plenty  but not one holds  the value of another  looking down at others  cursed to the floor    no more melodies  harmonies  concertos  sonatas  and the lively protege  to be rung in it's chambers  now that they have gone       

30


Empty Orchestra (edit) secluded and modest  topped in leather  stood atop the stage  of cold stiff cedar  empty under the bridge  of lonely ivory  and her ebony cousin    standing concrete  and chilled marble  are pillars of her life  and the tent they support  towering from the base  lost in time. pristine,   proud and forgotten    once vibrant in the depths  now only seen by unspoken bulbs  in the seas of plenty  but without one full  lost to another  locked in place  and cursed to the cold    no more melodies  harmonies  concertos  sonatas  and her lively protege  to be rung in it's chambers  now that they have gone       

31


Author’s Notes In the following section, I’d like to recount and review the series of revisions I’ve had to  endure as inspired by this class to further a few of my works. These works published above  include, Welcome to the Club, Left Turn, Rendezvous, Our Hero, Pranksters, Crushed Pipes,  Majora, Masquerade, and Empty Orchestra.  The first revised piece to be found in this anthology, and perhaps the most controversially  written is Welcome to the Club. This short story recounts the tales of a young boy on his walk  home from school through the woods; or is it? The original inspiration of the story led me to write  about a schizophrenic perhaps middle­aged man, incorrectly imagining his childhood. In the  original however, it was only revealed in the last line, and without much obvious exposure. It all  seemed very fiction fantasy with some strange personal perspective themes until a strange  conclusion attempted to wrap it up. During the revision process, heavy emphasis was put on the  final line, to recreate it in a solid manner, as well as dropping in strange, but almost believable  details to combine the memory of a young Daniel with his mental institution reality. In the original,  the woods was a normal green forest full of tall trees, a river and winding streams, but during  revision, I attempted to bring in these white floor tiles, hanging single bulb lights, institutional  sounds and other details that may have squeezed their way into the patient’s dreams. It is  proven that even while sleeping and in the dream state one can withhold influence on this  sleeping reality, but outside forces like sound, smells, visions of light and especially touch. It was  a difficult task to take but in order to build up to the final reveal, much needed to encapsulate the  entire theme and concept.  The second revised work within this anthology is a set of five twitter fiction pieces. Now,  the art of twitter fiction is all based on the idea of writing a complete and concluded story with a  setting, characters, progression, plot and twist in one­hundred and forty words or less. As easy  as it may seem, every word counts and one misplaced or misused word can not only offset your  count, it can change the emotion of the entire piece. To say that one word can alter it all is a big 

32


accusation, but with one out­of­rhythm word, the reader can be caught up on all the wrong     details they you as an author may be trying to convey. The most trouble I’ve had with this  concept was in Rendezvous, where I couldn’t quite accurately portray the scenario without telling  it all and ruining the dynamic. On the other hand, my favorite and most difficult to construct  twitter fiction piece is Crushed Pipes. This piece has had five title changes alone, from Benefit,  to Musicality, Noose Against Bullying, to Music for Bullies. The title of twitter fiction in itself is  almost just as as important as any of the other one­hundred and forty words, because it’s  actually an extension of the story; it’s free words! Two of my other pieces, Pranksters and Left  Turn, originally were just sad excuses for quickly completing a project with silly word play but  they soon worked their way into my heart with tweaking them to fit the catch even better.   Majora, my villanelle, and third revision piece was effective in it’s first revision, if I must be  honest. They being said, it was effective for me. I had played the video game this poem was  based on, and of course read the poem this poem was also based on, so in my head, reading it  over to myself I could make sense of it all. My task with this piece was to turn this into a story  that anyone without prior knowledge could take in and enjoy on what ever level they could find.  The motif behind the story here is that a young boy in search of his lost best friend stumbles onto  a town left in denial that at the end of their festival the moon will fall on them. This phenomenon  leaves the villagers in a three day cycle, bound to be repeated again and again unless the hero  can save them. This was not the part of the story I thought needed worked though, but how our  hero would go about doing so. Our young hero must travel to the four corners of the region, the  mountain, the bay, the swamp and the canyon, and cast away the four separate levels of grief  that has fallen over them. Only then can the curse be lifted and the spirit of evil vanquished. In  order to fully portray this plot, many words and meters, were thrown out and switched around to  effectively stay in keeping with the mood.  The fourth revision in this anthology was entitled, Masquerade. This, as well as Welcome  to the Club, is a controversial and strangely written work with an underlying truth to it all that I  didn’t want to outrightly say. There is a duty as an author to keep you reader asking questions,  because questions keep readers interested and in turn, reading. The original of this piece, I admit  33 


was very very vague and loosely understood by many different people, only a few of which even  sort of took in the correct idea. The original thought and inspiration behind this piece was the     crossing of paths between twelve separate people all forced to wear their own ‘masques’. These  masques are created by faults, and the fact that society does not accept what they have to deal  with. This complex situation tied in with the tricky language of poetry made for an initially rough  write. To correctly construct and tell the story of these people quickly enough that the details  don’t bog down on the reader, and still get the point across is a heavy agenda. This poem went  through countless swaps and slight alterations to everything that it held, in all honesty, now it  feels like a completely different poem, but much much stronger as well. If you as a reader have  some sympathy for this homeless teacher, in debt salesman, parentless student, uneducated  taxi driver, suicidal policeman, widowed gardener, and few more unlucky suspects, then I guess  I’m doing my job.  The fifth and final revision is one of a long forgotten opera house, left to rot, cold and  empty with only a solemn piano left behind by the name of Empty Orchestra. This work was  originally written to cast a sense of sadness and loneliness in the reader, and leave them asking  questions and looking within themselves for answers. Another important job for the author is to  empower the reader to bring their own emotions and thoughts into the writings. If an author can  physically tie the reader into the story with their own relations, a reader will be forever intrigued  and captured by it’s words. The descriptive tones of an echoing empty, dusty, dirty and chilled  theater in the original of course tell this story well, but not nearly as well as it could. Even now, in  the revised section, I’m not entirely sure it’s as successful as it could be. Nothing in the theater  has changed, of course, no one has been there to move anything or clean anything off, but  through all the times I’ve gone back to write about it, it’s me that has changed and has perceived  it differently. There feels like there’s something missing from this entire charade, but perhaps  that’s how it’s supposed to feel?  

34


To The Moon Excerpt

by E. A. Keefer  

35


Chapter One A crisp autumn breeze curls the opaque smoke forming from the crumpled black  wreckage into the air. Glowing white reflections bouncing off the crinkled metal panels and  throughout a light chilled mist. It was shortly after the sun cast below the horizon of the secluded  countryside that they finally arrived.          "Where were you looking, Neil?" She said, with confrontation.          "Well, excuse me, for heroically evading that squirrel that came out of nowhere!"          "...You ran it over anyways."          "Oh." He replied sheepishly.          "You ran it over and hit a tree..."          "Look, don't worry, it's a company car."          "I'm sure the boss won't appreciate it," she replied, observing the damage.          "We were saving a, uh, puppy. He likes puppies, right?"          "He's more of a cat person."          Through the bickering of the two white lab coat clad, a young women, dressed in a modest  red blouse, and an apron around her waist, with two small children, one boy and one girl, rushed  out onto the front lawn, alarmed by the commotion.          "Dr.Watts and Rosalene, I presume?" She spoke in a light and sweetened tone. "Thanks for  coming on such short notice."          As he turns over his shoulder from the wreckage, Dr. Neil Watts replies, "Don't worry about  it, I tend to be bad at predicting deaths as well."          "Are you kidding me?" Dr. Rosalene whispers, "How could you be so insensitive?"          "You'd think after so long, you'd be used to it."          "Excuse me?" The woman inquires.          "No, excuse him. I'm Dr. Rosalene." She says confidently with a handshake. "Are you the  patient's daughter?          "Oh no, I'm just his caretaker, Lily," she replies as the kids quickly lose interest in their new 

36


guests, and run off into the lush garden. "And these are my children, Sarah and Tommy. It's not  exactly a nine­to­five job anymore, so Johnny has us live here."          "I suppose Johnny is our patient?"          "Johnny? Listen, if this is a child we're dealing with, we aren't the people you are looking  for."          "Oh no, it's just that nowadays he prefers a less serious name. He's upstairs with his  medical doctor. Would you come in?"          "Of course. Neil, could you fetch the equipment from the trunk? It's open."          "I’d gladly carry all that shit up a flight of stairs, by myself. No worries."          As the children run and roll through the mud of freshly planted orange Dahlias, the adults  head inside. It's not a glamorous home, nothing particularly special about it, but the ivy growing  on it's siding and the craftsmanship of it's construction gave it a strange characteristic style for  sure.          The interior however was quite the contradiction. Even though dust covered and squeaking  floorboards made it's base and a simplistic pale caramel wood paneling made it's walls, it was  elegantly decorated. In fact, in the very foyer of the room was drawn in a red throw and atop it, an  ebony grand piano. Its body illuminated by the shining beams through the window across the  hall.          "Follow me, please. The stairs are just at the end of this corridor here."          "This stuff isn't getting any lighter, I’d like to add."          "Neil!" Dr. Rosalene snaps.          "Would you like to carry it instead?" He replies, grunting.          As the adults trekked up the wooden stairwell, with every creak the children slipped back  into the front door.          "Okay, they're gone! First one there get's the top notes!"          The pattering of youthful sneakers covered in the slapping sound of tracking in mud  accompanies the kids as they rush back into the mansion.          "No fair, you pushed me!" Squeals Sarah.          "Did not!" Combats Tommy.  37 


"Whatever, let's just play!" She spoke, while swinging her little legs over the bench and by  her brother’s side, arching her fingers over the ivory.          And they began to play. Much like their home, it was nothing particularly full of complex  layers or harmonies or inversions but on the inside of every note held a meaning no one yet  understood. Not even me, and especially not them. The singing sounds of their simple song rang  through the entire house and was still faintly heard in the upstairs bedroom, second door, open,  on the left.          "Those kids are pretty good for their age," commented Dr. Rosalene.          "They learned from the composer himself," Lily replied as she sat down at the bedside and  placed her hand on the cold skin of his, and sighed.          He sat upright with a pillow behind his head, wires and an oxygen mask linked to his mouth  over a scruffy gray beard. His chest would solemnly exhale in an adagio under his dim orange  nightgown, and tan comforter.          "He's unresponsive at this point, but by the looks of things, he's still hanging on. It's hard to  say how long you'll have, but I would hurry," the in­house doctor chimed in.          "Are you ready to set­up?" questions Lily.          "Yes, it'll be just a moment."          "Are you sure a common household power outlet will be sufficient?" she asks again.          "Don't worry, we're the experts here."          "Neil, seriously? Just get the machine running, we don’t need to cocks about this."          Dr. Watts set down the steel package silently onto the pedestal countertop, and begins to  unlatch, unfold and assemble it's every complicated part. Soon enough the mechanism starts to  take shape like a sort of futuristic computer desktop, and the whole machine begins to produce  an ominous deep hum as it’s lighting fixture warm.          "It takes just a few minutes to warm up before we can really begin processing," says Neil.          "How is he doing, Doctor?" Asks Eva.          "Not so well, from the monitors, it's seem that, by my calculations, he has a day or two left."          "Oh dear..."          "Don't worry, Lily, that's plenty of time," Dr. Rosalene reassures.  38 


"So, you two can grant him anything he wants? Like a wish."          "We try, at least. Sometimes it just doesn't work out. Do you know what his wish was?"          "The moon."          "The moon? He wants a celestial and interstellar rock?"          "The moon, yes, but no... He wants to go to the moon."          "These geezers just keep getting crazier huh, Eva?"          "So, can you do it?"          "It depends."          "She meant to say 'yes'" Chimed in Neil.          "Could you tell us about our client first?"          "That... I don't really know much. Johnny's an odd man. Through the years that I've worked  here, he rarely spoke. He worked as a craftsmen for most of his life and his wife passed away  four years ago... before I was around."          "For Christ's sake, I would've known more if was his paperboy!"          "Neil, for once shut up and get that machine going," Eva said with angst.          "I'm sorry, but I know in the basement he has many old journals and books, could there be  something to learn there?" Lily remembered.          "It's worth a shot."          "Tommy and Sarah would be happy to show you the way, Dr. Rosalene. It sounds like  they're still playing downstairs."          She nods, smiles and exits the room, wanders back down the hall in which she came, and  observing photos of such varying sizes and colors hanging on the wall. The occasional hanging  in a crooked slant and dulled chipped off paint frames. Lighthouses mostly, beaches, open fields  with the most glorious expanses of sky in the background. Lending a hand to the railing she  stops for a second to admire the children sitting so peacefully together, looking over music they  probably don't even quite understand and the faded keys of the grand.          "Tommy? Sarah? Could you lend me a hand?"          Both of their heads turn to the stairs simultaneously, but neither of them speak. Before too  long Tommy speaks up, "Whatcha want?"  39 


"Your mother told me you two could show me to the library in the basement?"          "Alright... maybe we will." Chimes in Sarah.          "Maybe...?"          "...I think we just need a little convincing, that's all! Whataya think, Tommy?"          "Yeah!"          "Uh, what would you like?"          "We want... one trillion dollars!"          "Or those candy canes mom hides from us."          "Yeah, or that!"          "Huh?"          "There's a bag of candy canes on one of the kitchen shelves we can't reach!"          "Get it for us, and we'll give you the tour!"          "Well... I suppose I could do that­ but tour first."          "Deal!" They shout in unison. "Follow us." They say as they run off down the hall, skid  across the bare floor, grabbing the brass door knob and down the stairs with speedy steps.          Dr. Rosalene was forced to follow these clearly already too rambunctious children,  wondering if what they really needed was more sugar. Down another hall, first white door on the  right.          "I'm looking for the lightswi­ Ahah! Here, got it," says Tommy.          "Woah..." Utters Eva.          Of course, within the house there was not that much of a grandiose presence in any sense  of the word. Just the casual decor to light up the living space. The library, however, was another  story. Towering bookcases without an inch of shelf space going unused by broken bindings or  those that appear to have the thickest layers of grey dust. This was not what shocked the doctor  so, though.          "What… What the hell is with all these bunnies?"          Yes, origami rabbits. White small precisely folded paper bunnies. Not quite in the proper  amount for a simple Sunday afternoon hobby, or even the slightly passionate Wednesday night  folding party. Hundreds of them. Spread over the worn carpet, thrown into shelves, side tables  40 


and hanging drawers.          "Yeah... I never liked them, they creep me out. The old man never wanted anyone to come  down here, so we just never told him we knew.”          "This isn't even all of them!"          "Do you know anything about them?"          "Nothing!"          “Where are the rest?”          "Inside the abandoned lighthouse, on the cliff."          "Wanna go see? We know where the keys are!"          "You aren't supposed to go in there either, are you?"          Sarah giggled and replied, "so you wanna go see them?"          "Well, it's rather cold outside, but I probably should­ is the lighthouse far?"          "Just over the hill behind the house."          The kids then again took off speeding up the steps, full of energy, not a care in the world.  Did Tommy and Sarah not understand what was going on? They never even asked who the  doctors were, or why they were here. Perhaps it just wasn't something that kids thought about.          The trio meandered out into the foyer and through the dilapidated wooden front door, out  onto the stone walking path that slowly morphed into plain dirt, mud and rock. Dr. Rosalene  couldn't help but reflect on the expansive array of various warm colored leaves, towering into the  deepened night sky, the Moon solemnly peeking through the foliage. Wild flowers straggling  along the path stomped against the matted ground.           Soon enough they could see the gray precipice of a monumental structure in the distance  and before long, they found themselves in an open clearing. Just a few pine trees around it's  base, on the edge of a high cliff, that same quiet breezing wind, and the full cast of moonlight. In  the same old mossy grey color at the footsteps of the lighthouse, was a stone slab, protruding  from the ground in the perfect angle.          "Hold on, what is that over there?" inquired Eva as she shuffled closer and bent over to take  a look.          It read through the dirt and grown ivy, "In Memory of River E. Wyles"  41 


"...River Wyles? Was she John's wife?"          "Dunno, but c'mon! The lighthouse is right here!"          "Alright fine, let's go inside­ did you grab the key?"          "It's right here actually," Tommy replied as he rotated the bronze cross on it's one rusted  nail, to reveal a slot, just big enough.          "Very clever." Dr. Rosalene.          Tommy took the old steel and turned the barrels of the door, but in all honesty, the door  probably could have just been pushed over. By the sound it's hinges made, they were probably  only a few rotations away from falling off the frame.          They stepped inside and immediately Eva looked up again, but this time not at such a  natural foliage, but at the weakened structure of a centuries old colossus, and a spiraling  staircase illuminated by the cracks within the walls. The nailed in boards didn't really keep out the  cold chill of the night either.          They ascend to the top with every frightening step and crackle only to be met with an unlit  lanthorn filled with the same carbon copied paper rabbits. The lantern was actually cracked,  broken and cold. It probably hadn't been used in decades.          "Well, this is it."          "What's this little guy doing in here? He's not origami, or rabbit­ what is this anyway?"          "I think that's a platypus," chimes in Tommy. “Weirdest stuffed animal I’ve ever seen for  sure!”          Sarah laughed along with him at it’s awkward shape.          "I think I'll bring this back with me, it'll probably annoy­ speak of the devil," she mutters as  her phone rings in the emptiness. "Is everything ready?... Alright, I'll be right there."   

42

Portfolio Project  

E.A.Keefer

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you