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(Hamlet and Claudius, continued from page 5…) For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? ( Hamlet , 3.1:64-84) Hamlet was facing serious life altering decisions. He was considering taking his life. Similarly, Christians must not allow trials and broken relationships to alter their lives. They must remain strong in their faith and evaluate their life with the mindset that they are on the earth equipped with a passion and purpose. This relates to Claudius and King Hamlet in the way that King Hamlet puts his faith in the good people surrounding him and the kingdom, but Claudius allows himself to slip into the Galatians 6:7 says, “Do treacherous hands of evil that blindly deceive him into killing his not be deceived: God is brother. Galatians 6:7 says, “Do not be deceived: God is not not mocked, for whatever mocked, for whatever one sows, that will he also reap.” Throughout the play, Claudius sows evil, and he ultimately one sows, that will he reaps death. Moreover, King Hamlet, before death, is genuinely also reap.” satisfied with his position his life. He has the kingdom, a wife, and a son, and he feels fulfillment. At the same time, Claudius feels discontentment in many aspects of his life to the point where he covets everything his brother has. However, despite the fact that Claudius is able to gain everything his brother once possessed, there happens to be one exception to his master plan, and that is Hamlet. Claudius experiences deep hatred towards Hamlet which propels him towards desperate lengths, such as planning Hamlet’s death. The feeling is mutual, because Hamlet also displays hatred towards Claudius, and in the end kills Claudius. King Hamlet, in his life, has never considered killing his own son because he deeply cares for Hamlet. The most frightening part of this tortuous play is the fact that Hamlet’s qualities actually resemble Claudius’s more than those of his own father. Hamlet has killed Polonius in an attempt to kill Claudius, he has aggressively spoken to women, he has committed treacherous actions based on emotion alone. Hamlet exemplifies Claudius’ behavior. He says that he is getting revenge for his father, but in reality he is torturing himself by becoming more like his villainous uncle. Furthermore, violence manifests itself within both Hamlet and Claudius, but King Hamlet exemplifies peace and honesty. In conclusion, King Hamlet and Claudius have an overwhelming amount of contrasts, and few similarities. Their love for the same woman, desire to rule Denmark, and their lineage all serve as comparisons between the two men. Contrastingly, King Hamlet is the depiction of what a respected and honored king is expected be, while Claudius represents a liar and a murderer who only cares for his own selfish ambition. Also, their relationship with Hamlet differs greatly in the sense that the King loves his son and has only wanted the best for him, but Claudius wants Hamlet to die. All in all, Claudius and King Hamlet are extremely different, and their differences were the backbone behind the horrific tragedy in the play. Works Cited: The Holy Bible ESV: English Standard Version: Containing the Old and New Testaments. Crossway Bibles, 2007. Shakespeare, William. Hamlet . New York: Simon & Schuster 6

Profile for Eagle's Landing Christian Academy

Luminescence  

Eagle's Landing Christian Academy Literary Magazine

Luminescence  

Eagle's Landing Christian Academy Literary Magazine

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