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EAGLE’S EYE October Vol. 8 ISSUE 1

RUSKIN HIGH SCHOOL 7000 E. 111TH ST KANSAS CITY Mo. 64134

www.Hickmanmills.org/Ruskin

www.RuskinNews.com


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Table of Contents RHS DAY 1 Activities for the first week of school kick off

Welcoming students on Ruskin’s first day of school the Varsity cheerleaders senior Shriya Darrington, sophomore De’Anna Campbell, juniors Destinee Brown & Karemah Hazziez, head Principal Torrence Allen and Dr. Yolanda Cargile, superintendent, greet students. Principal Allen and Dr. Cargile were named in their new positions this summer. “I’ve been cheerleading at Ruskin for 3 years,” senior cheer captain Darrington. “I plan on taking it into college with me.” Photo Credit: Robyn King

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A NEW RUSKIN Students return to many new additions.

BACK 2 SCHOOL RALLY Students are treated to an exciting event to welcome the new school year

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2020 ADVICE RHS welcomes the class of 2020 and provides advice from upperclassmen

On the cover: Dancing on the court during the

Homecoming Pep Rally senior Derrion Williams, juniors Jayquwon Brown and Treyon Brown perform. The Bandits dance team was created by Williams. “I got tired of just seeing the girls dance and I’m a dancer,” Williams said. Photo Credit: Jaquon Purdy

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BACK 2 BACK RHS Band continues its legacy at Lincoln University SOLAR EXPERIENCE A once in a lifetime experience

EAGLE’S EYE STAFF EDITORS: Destnee Walton, yearbook, online and newsmagazine Jazlynn Smith, online Marchelle Miller, co-editor Carlo Terrell, sports Malcolm Murphy, photo Kaylah Carter, photo ShaRon Mitchell, photo REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS: Angel Hudson Brandon Holley-Nelson William White Photographers Maurice Stuckey Ronnell Brown Coriana Forshee Christina Lenore Cire Oliver Jaquon Purdy Kendra Sanders-Baskin Ariel West Keion Salmond Ryah Williams ADVISER: Robyn King Visit us online at www.RuskinNews.com Twitter @ruskinnews

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NATIONAL NEWS DACA, Black Power, Hurricanes & N. Korea

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Drum Majors junior CirĂŠ Oliver and senior Kalan Hooks hitting their signature Poison routine with Hooks hitting the splits in the end. Homecoming came early this year in September instead of October. Photo Credit: Jaquon Purdy

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Photo Credit:

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A New Ruskin by Marchelle Miller & Jazlynn Smith

Torrence Allen preparing to greet students on his Day 1 as head principal for Ruskin High School. Allen took over after previous principal Dawn Smith was named associate superintendent. “It has been exciting, rewarding and it has been draining,” Allen said. “I’ll just be honest but I enjoy being principal of Ruskin High school.” Photo Credit: Robyn King

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One of the gifts from the class of 2017 is a new water bottle fountain. Students services also received an update over the summer. Photo Credit: Malcolm Murphy


NEWS The 2017-2018 school year has started off right with new leadership, new rules, a new wing of classrooms, and new teachers and staff have joined the Ruskin High School family this year. While last year’s Principal Dawn Smith left to work as the District’s Associate Superintendent of the Student Services department the new Principal named for Ruskin High School was past Business and Finance House principal Torrence Allen. “I’m really enjoying this journey,” Allen said. “It’s a daily grind that you have to look forward to every single day and I do.” Allen was replaced by the new B&F house principal Ryan Beatty. Beatty has 13 years experience in Special Education. Beatty was at Grandview for 15 years and 2 years at Plattsburg before returning to the southside. “I heard great things about Ruskin and wanted to come back to the southside,” Beatty said. The new Superintendent of the Hickman Mills School District is Ruskin graduate Dr. Yolanda Cargile. “As I embark on this new journey, I am guided by a firm belief that ‘It starts with me’ and ‘Failure is not an option’,” Dr. Cargile said. The new counselor this year is Angela Swearingin. She is very excited to work with students making sure that they have exactly what they need to get throughout the school year and students graduate. “I like working with the students,” Swearingin said. “I’ve met some really neat students so far and it’s just fun, I really enjoy my work.” She was meet with some difficulties at the beginning of the school year but with her and the other counselors they are getting through it.

The new mural for Ruskin in the main office was unveiled for the new year. Photo Credit: Malcolm Murphy

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but it is to make them realize their potential and find the success they deserve,” Agin said. “I enjoy getting to know my students and giving them a teacher they look forward to seeing and learning from.” Agin didn’t always think she was going to become an art teacher or a teacher at all but she is happy that she did. “I started my college journey as an Architecture student, but after several years, I realized that even though I found great joy in it, it was not something that I wanted Taking over as head principal for the 2017- 2018 school year is Torrence Allen. Allen was the vice principal over to do for the rest of my life,” Agin the Business and Finance house for two years at Ruskin. said. “I always loved math and art Photo Credit: Malcolm Murphy in school and even after I graduated, so I decided to use my talents to become a teacher to spread the joy for both contents to students.” Assistant principal Gayla Curtis has taken the place of the former Arts and Communication principal. With Allen as the new top administration it was a must to get other principals that were ready to work with the students and teachers. Ruskin get a new horizon wit the new construction for the 2017“The staff is great,” Curtis 2018 school year. The new addition has rooms for art, Project said. “Everyone is welcomLead the Way and Science. Photo Credit: Malcolm Murphy ing and willing to do the work that is needed for our “We had a lot of schedule changes, students to be successful.” perhaps too many, I’ve been trying to Curtis has had lots of experience work through them,” she said. working in administration but she is One of the new teacher additions to always looking to improve herself. the Arts and Communication house “I chose Ruskin because I have is a Danielle Agin. After working as a worked in the district at the middle math teacher at Hickman Freshman school level for 6 years,” Curtis said. Center she has come to Ruskin to “I wanted to expand my territory and teach as an art teacher. gain experience with older students in “I graduated from Hickman when the secondary setting.” it was a high school. This is home to me. Most of my teaching career has been here, and upon leaving, I realized Ruskin is where I need and want to be. My ‘kids’ are here,” Agin said. “Watching my freshmen grow up and become incredibly successful, talented, and wonderful young adults is a huge perk for me in being a teacher at Ruskin.” Agin also stated what she thought she could bring to The new counselor Angela Swearingin takes Ruskin while being here. over for previous counselor Shelli Copas in stu“Well my Awesomeness of course. I dent services. Photo Credit: Malcolm Murphy may be strict and push my students, August - October 2017


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Back School by Destnee Walton

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Giving a motivational speech to students and teachers, Dr. Adolph Brown, the guest speaker. The Back to School rally took place at Hickman Mills Aug. 5. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter


NEWS

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Speaking live on the air to Hot 103 Jamz, Dr. Adolph Brown (left) and Superintendent Dr. Yolanda Cargile (right) answer interview questions. The teen talk show Generation Rap from Hot 103 Jamz broadcasted live from the Back to School Rally. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

Before school started this year, the district planned an event to get the students ready for the 2017-2018 school year. Aug. 5, 2017 at the Hickman Mills Freshman Center the district hosted a Back to School Rally to hype the returning and new students to the Hickman Mills School district. The district put on the rally to get students prepared on what to expect and what to look forward to this school year. The Back to School Rally had many events and activities including dance

A young child from the crowd displaying Dr. Adolph Brown’s PHD graduation regalia. Dr. Brown allowed the young child to wear the robe during his speech. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

that attended this event. Dr. Brown talked with the Hickman Mills family and community. “I had a good experience at the back to school rally. I enjoyed the drill team and drum lines and motivating speakers,” junior Deshiya Williamson said. “I really got a lesson from what they were saying.” Have a great 2017-2018 school year. Reenacting his teenage years Dr. Adolph Brown demonstrates how unprofessional he looked back in the day. Dr. Brown made visual points to the audience. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

teams, drill teams, Marching bands, backpack giveaways, the teen talk show Generation Rap from Hot 103 Jamz was live on location before the rally started, and motivational speaker Dr. Adolph Brown came to speak to the students and the parents of the Hickman Mills School District. “Ms. Sheila from Smith-Hale, her drill team performed, the band and the dancers danced and they gave away backpacks too,” sophomore James Evans said. The Back to School rally was exciting for students, teachers, parents, and the community with all the different events that took place. “They were jamming. They really looked like they we’re having a good time,” sophomore Justice Thomas-Scott said. There were many students from Ruskin

Senior Ava Lofton being told by Dr. Adolph Brown to never allow herself to lower her standards for men who do not deserve her. The impromptu dance between the two was not planned. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

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WELCOME by Destnee Walton

Sophomores visit Ruskin on their first day of school. Sophomore first day was held the day before all students returned to school. Photo Credit: Destnee Walton

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NEWS

Welcome class of 2020 to Ruskin High School. Coming from the Freshman Center into their sophomore year it’s just like being a freshman again. Entering into a new building filled with upperclassmen, making sure that they know what to expect and what to do. There is nothing wrong with a little bit of advice for them to survive in the hallways of the Gold and Blue. Sometimes you need to have advice from those that have the experience. Make sure that your schedule is well put together and make sure that you have all the classes that you need. “Start knocking out all the classes you need and stay focused,” senior Brandon Holley- Nelson said. Maybe some days you might not feel like going to class or even just coming to school but everything adds up and there is no do overs in high school. “Remember this is a High School every thing counts,” assistant principal Christopher Barker said.

EAGLE’S EYE We all have those friends that we enter high school with but might not leave with from high school. Having a mind of your own is the key so get to know you and find yourself. “Don’t let your friends influence you. Decide the type of person you want to be before you get out of High School,” senior Ava Lofton said. Coming home from school might be the best feeling ever. Then kicking off your shoes from walking in the halls and stairs or just throwing your bag in the corner of your room, but you might just need to pick your bag up because there might be some work that needs to be done “Stay up with all your work,” coach Michael Weiler said. You don’t want to fall behind because sometimes you have to do a lot to catch back up. Class of 2020, Ruskin High School wishes you the best of luck and to work hard during the school year of 2017-2018 and don’t forget, “It’s always a great day to be an Eagle.”

What activities are you involved in at Ruskin?

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2020 Advice

“Heed the advice of your elders. Do not let extraneous things take you off your path of success.” Col Glasco

“Do what you need to do to pass all your classes.” Shayon Finley, 11

“I play volleyball. Volleyball is good.” Nevaeh McConnell, 10 “Try your hardest in every class.” Karemah Hazziez, 11

“ Yes I’m in band.” (The Golden Eagles Band to be exact!) Iyinolu Karimu, 10

“Go to all your classes and don’t skip not one.” Sadaria Evans, 12

What do you like about RHS ? “The school being right next to my house.” Makell Willson Shepard, 10

“Pass all your classes.” Destinee Toombs, 12

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The seniors of 2018 showing how much pride they have for their last year at Ruskin. This was the first pep rally of the school year. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

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RHS DAY 1 & First Pep Rally of the Year

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Click here for videos from the 1st pep rally


NEWS

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Seniors arrive to Ruskin on their first day of their last year of high school. Seniors meet in the gym to pick up class schedules and catch up with friends. Photo Credit: Robyn King

Members of the community from the Greek organization Phi Beta Sigma arrive for RHS Day 1. The organization donated back to school supplies for Ruskin students. Photo Credit: Robyn King

Ruskin Eagles football team gets ready for their first home game during the first pep assembly. The Eagles played William Chrisman. Photo Credit: Malcolm Murphy

Performing for students as they arrive to the first day of school the Eaglettes dance team greeted them with a routine. The Golden Eagle Band provided the music for the dance team. Photo Credit: Robyn King

Torrence Allen the new head principal of Ruskin high school speaks to the students and staff at the first pep rally. This was Allen’s first time addressing the entire student body as head principal. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

Viewing the first pep rally of the year the class of 2018 represents. Seniors created posters to show pride of their class. Photo Credit: Malcolm Murphy

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A A Solar Solar Experience Experience

The moment that the total eclipse was occurring in the Kansas City, Mo. area. The 2017 total solar eclipse hadn’t occurred since 1979. Photo Credit: Ronnell Brown

by Kaylah Carter

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Aug. 27, 2017 was the day the total solar eclipse made its way from Oregon all the way down to South Carolina, being viewed from all 48 contiguous states for the first time since 1979. The path of totality being centered on the central U.S., made St. Joseph, Missouri the best viewing spot in all of America with the total time of darkness being two full minutes. As the moon slowly began covering the sun, millions of people witnessed the day quickly descend into night with even Venus and stars unveiling themselves. But as quickly as the eclipse started, it was over, with the total duration of totality only being two minutes and 40 seconds. It is estimated that over 500,000 people flocked to St. Joe, Missouri from different states, and some even from overseas to get the perfect view of the eclipse. Though most of those who traveled from all around the world were experiencing this for the very first time, there were some that had in fact witnessed or been alive for the Feb. 27, 1979 total solar eclipse. “It was a once in a lifetime event and there won’t be another one in Kansas City for a very very long time,” biology teacher Marlyn Miller said. “I think it’s like 200 years and it was about 200 years since we had the last total solar eclipse in our area.”

Though many didn’t get to witness this event, there were some who were lucky enough to see it here at Ruskin. Despite the rain and thunderstorms that were occurring in the Kansas City, Missouri area, the weather seemed to calm down and the skies opened just in time for the eclipse as if to shine light on such an amazing event. “I’m glad I got to see it because if I didn’t I would spend the rest of my life regretting not looking at it,” junior Kelly Menjivar said. “Also after it happened I really started thinking about how life just goes on and no one and no thing will stop it.” While the weather had cooperated for most of the event, Mother Nature seemed to have had enough and brought clouds back to obscure the path of view. “I was frustrated that the clouds came back just in time to block our full view of totality,” math teacher Amanda Howard said. Since the eclipse though, there have been many events happening with the sun. The morning of Sept. 6, the sun unleashed two of the strongest solar flares in a decade. According to National Geographic, the sun is reaching its minimal amount of activity in an 11 year cycle and sunspots could in fact continue flaring up in the upcoming days. If you did in fact miss the total solar eclipse of 2017, don’t worry, there will be another opportunity to experience it in 2024.


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Photo Courtesy: @Darnell Kirkwood

NEWS

Click for the KC Star article on Ruskin Grad Darnell Kirkwood.

An Eagle’s Success by Kendra Sanders-Baskin

Darnell Kirkwood the actor from “Young and the Restless” who plays character Jordan Wilde is also Ruskin High school’s very own Alumni. Kirkwood came back to his alma mater Aug. 25. He gave a very heart felt speech about his Ruskin days and how he overcame the adversity of being in a lower middle class area. “His speech was a moment that will live on through Ruskin forever,” said Kirkwood’s former oral communications teacher Carla Sole. Kirkwood’s speech was very encouraging to those that had the chance to hear him speak. “Darnell made most of us that heard his speech realize that life is only as bad as you make it,” senior Marquan Henderson said. Since Kirkwood came from the same area and the same seats as current Ruskin students it gave Kirkwood an advantage to impact the students. “It’s really refreshing knowing that that’s someone made it out of the bad environ-

Posing for a picture are current students with Darnell Kirkwood, Ruskin Alum and Young & the Restless soaps star. Kirkwood graduated from Ruskin in 2003. “This is what I do it for,” Kirkwood said. “I’ve been wanting to go back to the high school I attended and speak to the kids for a long time now. Photo Courtesy: Carla Cole (Click the picture above for a special message from Darnell to Ruskin students)

ment everyone thinks we are in and made something of themselves that we can be proud of as Ruskin students,” senior Lameia Oliver said. Kirkwood was a huge eye opener for both students and staff, he is an inspiration to

all, pushing all Eagles to do better not just for ourselves but for the community. “I finally got to say ‘I was sitting in the same seats that you are sitting in right now,’” Kirkwood said. “I remember being that kid living in KC with a vision.”

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Ruskin Golden Eagles Marching band marches at the state capitol Jefferson City, Missouri taking home another win. The band has won first place at the LU parade three consecutive times. Photo Credit: Ali Nassir

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Back to Back to Back by William White Many may think that becoming a champion can happen over night. Well try 3 consecutive years becoming a champion making it back to back to back. The Ruskin Golden Eagles Marching Band put in the time and effort day in and day out for them to be as efficient as they are today. Ruskin has won first place at the Lincoln Homecoming Parade 3 years in a row, no matter the weather they still managed to handle their business. “My experience at Lincoln this year was great but brutal because we were marching in full uniform and it was 93 degrees,” said head drum major senior Kalan Hooks. “On top of that the uniforms made it feel like 10 more degrees were added so it was brutal but it was worth it.” The band performs a lot throughout the school year. Band members had different opinions on which were their favorite. “My favorite performance so far would

have to be the KU parade. I mainly say that because we had the chance to battle another school while we were out there,” sophomore Ishyia Briscoe said. “I think that we are good when we are up against other schools because we can show what we are made of.” The band and the Eaglettes dance team will have another opportunity this school year to get their name out around Missouri. They will be taking a trip to St. Louis, Missouri where they have won first place the previous year. “I think we will do great in St. Louis and I’m also happy about it because it will put Ruskin High School on the map some more, so it will be giving us a little more exposure,” Band director Brent Wheeler said. “We know that when we perform a lot of people are viewing us so we do our best to represent.”

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OPINION

A Dream Deferred by Jazlynn Smith

After the Twitter Tweet storm by President Donald Trump concerning the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals the nation expected the program to end. This program has helped 800,000 undocumented youth who were illegally brought here to America at a very young age by their parents or love ones. The Attorney General Jeff sessions had the pleasure of announcing that Trump’s administration will be ending DACA on Sept. 5, 2017. “I am here today to announce that the program known as DACA, that was effectuated under the Obama administration, is being rescinded,” Sessions said. Kellyanne Conway, who is currently serving under the trump administration, revealed on Fox and Friends that Trump wants to do what’s fair to the American workers and what’s fair to people in this country who are competing for jobs and other benefits. “He (Trump) says we have to keep people, and poison out of our communities, people who are here illegally and competing for those jobs,” Conway said. According to the Chicago Tribune, it has since been calculated that if DACA were to end the U.S. Gross Domestic Product will lose at least 433.4 billion

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dollars. As a result Trumps turned the issue over to Congress and gave them 6 months to come up with a legislative fix for the program. The Dreamers are not what’s wrong with our communities. They are not “poison.” Out of all DACA participants, according to historian Keith Hughes, 95 percent are going to school or have jobs, 63 percent got better working conditions, and 12 percent bought a home for the first time. It seems as though these Dreamers are bettering their communities. They may have not choose to come to America but they stay to better their life. For some DACA participants America is all they know. Once the Dreamers and their supporters found out about the ending of DACA they came together to rally and protest. People from all over America showed their love and support through social media. Mark Zuckerberg, a computer programmer and the founder of Facebook, used his app Facebook Live to go live and talk about this topic. “To offer the American Dream to people, then take it away and punish people for trusting their government and coming out of the shadows ...is one of the most trouble things I think I’ve seen in a long time in our country,” Zuckerberg said.


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March and rally/protest in response to the rescission of Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in New York City. The march began by the Trump International Hotel and Tower to Central Park. Photo Credit: Rhododendrites

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Inside: California Air National Guard conduct water rescue operations in Texas in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Balinda O’Neal Dresel

OPINION

Above: A South Carolina Army National Guard helicopter flies over Edisto Island in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard courtesy Photo by Sgt. Ken Burton

Climate Change and Hurricanes: Correlated or Nah? by Angel Hudson What was the reason for President Donald Trump to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement? “As president I can put no other consideration before the well being of American citizens…..The Paris agreement was a disadvantage to the United States,” Trump said in a June 2017 statement. The Paris agreement is an agreement within the United Nations on climate change dealing with greenhouse gas emissions mitigation, adaptation and France starting in the year 2020. It’s interesting how in summer of 2017 when Trump withdrew from the Paris agreement not even a year later the people in the United States are suffering after several natural disasters in the same year. According to Independent.co.uk, the two hurricanes within one week have done approximately 290 billion dollars in damage. Hurricanes Irma and Harvey have been reported to not have been started by climate change. Hurricane Irma showed at 150 miles per hour winds when it hit landfall which turned into a tropical storm later in the week. Over 55 million dollars has been raised by Hand and Hands and Apple company for the hurricane survivors.

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Spanish teacher Kelly Kriesel thinks Florida. the hurricanes are due to global warm“They had no power for a week and flood ing which causes warm water and strong waters came in two houses down before it storms. She also wishes she could do more finally decided to go down,” Hankins said. to help those affected by the hurricanes. Ocean water gets warm and hurricanes “I feel lucky that I don’t live there, but sad because I wish I could go and help because it’s devastating,” Kriesel said. “It truly affects everyone in the United States. When hurricane Harvey hit Texas the United States gas prices went up, because we get our gas from Texas.” Senior A’mya Randolph’s extended family was affected by the hurricanes. Homes lay in ruin as seen from a Black Hawk during a flyover of Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. Photo Credit: U.S. Customs and Border Pro“I feel that it is a tragedy and that no tection and Kris Grogan one should have to go through that,” Randolph said. gain strength. I think that Global warming Marketing and web design teacher Ron has a lot to do with the hurricanes.” Hankins’ daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren were affected by the Hurricane in


OPINION

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At the North Korea Victory Day 143 the missiles are on display during the parade. North Korea had tested 15 missiles this year. Photo Credit: Stefan Krasowski

North Korea: Potential Attack by Marchelle Miller

With the potential attack from North Korea, U.S. citizens have the fear ingrained in the back of their minds that North Korea could attack the United States or its territories at anytime. Kansas City, Missouri being the literal and figurative heart of America we are a potential target for an attack. An Intercontinental Ballistic Missile is a missile that can travel at an estimated 3,400 miles to potentially attack other countries and can be equipped to fit a modified nuclear warhead. North Korea has had 15 tests this year with each missile going farther than the last. North Korea has boasted about their missile program and their increasing ability to “...reduce the U.S. mainland to ashes and darkness,” according to North Korea’s official news agency KNCA. The last missile North Korea tested was on Sept. 15 was six times more powerful than the bomb the U.S. dropped on Hiroshima. The U.S. and other countries including China, Russia and formed sanctions against North Korea on oil imports, textile exports and ending additional overseas labor contracts, suppressing smuggling efforts, and stopping joint ventures with other region. According to CNN, in a foreign ministry statement, North Korea

said that increasing the sanctions and pressure would only accelerate their missile program. Some of the students at Ruskin High School genuinely fear for the safety of Kansas city and their own lives. “I feel that North Korea is a major threat to the U.S.,” senior Brittney McBride said. “If there was a bombing I feel that we wouldn’t be prepared to fight back.” Students are concerned with North Korea’s power and harsh words by both presidents. “I’m scared that we’re going to die,” senior Diamond Taylor said. “We are going to die because of Trumps wrong decisions and words to provoke Kim Jong Un.” Other students have a sense of safety from our American military’s and aren’t afraid of what North Korea has planned. “I feel that if North Korea attacked we would destroy them real quick,” senior Ikenna Enechukwu said. “They wouldn’t stand a chance.” Teachers at Ruskin have a different outlook on North Korea. “If they try to do anything they’ll be wiped off the face of the Earth,” history teacher Kevin Utterback Stating there isn’t anything to really worry about even if North Korea does

try something there would be total and complete backlash from the U.S. and it’s citizens. “North Korea is a dangerous situation. Their national leader is insane and they have nuclear weapons. Any conflict on the Korean Peninsula would undoubtedly go nuclear and result in the destruction of Seoul, which would have world economic consequences, “ history teacher William O’Brien. “No one will invade America because the invaders wouldn’t just have to fight the American military, they’d have to fight the American people….and we have guns.” At a recent UN meeting, Sept. 22, Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho made a statement about President Donald Trump after his blatant disrespect towards North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un. “None other than Trump himself is on a suicide mission. In case innocent lives of the US are harmed because of this suicide attack, Trump will be held totally responsible,” he said. There are a lot of mixed emotions about North Korea and their power. One thing can be for certain, North Korea will shoot a ICBM somewhere whether it is South Korea or the United States and no one knows exactly when.

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When Will All Lives Matter ? by Ryah Williams

NYC action in solidarity with Ferguson, MO, encouraging a boycott of Black Friday Consumerism. Protest have taken place all over the country and the world this year on topics such as women rights, equality and immigration. Photo Credit: The All-Nite Images for BLM

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OPINION

Where do we go from here 2017? That’s the concern I have with the chaotic events happening nationwide. We live in 2017 where we have the rise of white supremacist, neo-Nazis, and other hate groups. Why are we driven to be ashamed of being Black? Many people say “All lives matter” as if they don’t understand why we say “Black lives matter.” Why do we say, “Black lives matter?“ “We say Black lives matter because not only are we humans, but we are powerful humans,” junior Brianda Carter said. For 400 years we’ve been told that we’re nothing, even less than nothing, and part of us believed it. Black lives didn’t matter to anyone, but now we have gained a voice and the strength to speak

Click here for a video on Black Power by Kevion Long, Kalan Hooks, Ikenna Enechukwu and Muhammad Waleed

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and stand against inequality in the country that we’re all ‘created equal.’ Black lives are to be valued because we know how to take a hit and keep going even when we had nothing left. When our ancestors would risk or even lose their lives to live like a human being. When our mothers, fathers, sisters and brothers were taken away from us and sold into slavery never to see them again. When we’re criticized, discriminated against, stereotyped, sold, chastised, tortured, mistreated, lied to, and killed for one of the many things we cannot control, the color of our skin. The United States of America needs to understand that there are Black lives that are scared to walk the streets, drive their car, or even speak their rights because they ‘don’t matter.’ Was the anthem we sing and pledge supposed to be a lie? Ask the Black lives. I wonder how things like the Black power movement start, but then something stood out to me. So often this is how it starts, one man or woman decides they can’t take what’s going on anymore, so they don’t. Then next thing you know a movement has start-

went on for weeks. I feel that we need to stand up and let them know we are strong and will fight for justice because if we don’t then who will? We have to be heard, it is important for us to stick together and embrace our black power. In my opinion Black power is not a threat it is a unification. What is Black power to you? “Black power is unity amongst our people, respect amongst our people, strength amongst our people and all those things we need to uprise and overcome those self inflicted issues that we have, so that we can come together and fight the haters,” English teacher Shelia Locke said. I agree completely, it’s all about unity and strength. I can’t wait till the day when the world will not have to worry about things like “fighting for justice” but worry and focus on providing for the world. Ask yourself this, why are there 40 million poor people in America? Why is nearly half of the world’s population in poverty? According to BorgenProject.org. Think about a world where the people won’t be judged on the color of their skin, but be judged on the basis con-

ed such as the Colin Kaepernick Case. Kapernick the former quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers, who made the decision to kneel during the national anthem rather than stand like the rest of the team. Why did he do it? Well my answer is somebody has to do it. Where do we go from here 2017? After the decision Kaepernick decided to make a movement began. Others began to kneel. The stories about Kaepernick’s protest and photos of him kneeling during the National Anthem

tent of their character. Think about a world where we will not shout “white power”, when nobody will shout “Black power” but will all shout “human power.” We’re all human here, everybody is to live equal. Where do we go from here 2017? I say we continue to shout “Black power” and “Black lives matter” until we are heard. That’s where we go from here 2017.

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HOMECOMING 2017 An Autumn Night

Seniors Rae’Lyn Proter and Jordan Richmond dance at the Homecoming dance. The theme was “An Autumn Night.” Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

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EAGLE’S EYE

Click here for videos of Homecoming


EAGLE’S EYE

FEATURE

Homecoming King & Queen

Shakespeare Williams

Maribel Munoz

Homecoming Prince & Princess Steven Childs

Yusuf Khan

JUNIORS

SOPHOMORES

Destinee Brown

Lakenzie Baily House

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Spirit Week Kick Off

by Ariel West

Spirit week allowed students to be themselves and wear the things they loved the most and not only students but teachers got a chance to tap into the fun by wearing and showing off what makes them comfortable or their crazy and fun side. The Ruskin High School spirit week started off right with pajama day where students got to wear their comfy pajamas and relax unlike on any other boring Monday. Senior Teah Duley had her and her friends not only dress comfortable but dress alike on this relaxing day. “We thought it would be really cute so we went out and bought some cute pajamas from WalMart and…. we did that,” Duley said. On Tuesday it was a spec-tacky day when it came to tacky Tuesday. Kids came in their weirdest combinations wearing polka dots with stripes oh how fun it was to see all the tacky outfits. Wednesday is when everyone showed just how much they were crazy for that one color they called their favorite. “I participated in the monochromatic day because he wanted to be apart of spirit week and chose the color white to wear,” senior Aldo Salinas said. Thursday was a twinful day where all the kids dressed as twins and made the best of it. Senior Carlyn White was encouraged to participate with her teammates on this twinful day. “Me and my team are a unit so we chose to look as a unit for twin day so my Coach just told us to look all the same,” White said. Spirit Friday was the day that seniors, juniors and sophomores went head to head wearing their class colors. “I have never done it since I actually started high school but I got the feel of it,” Nelson Bolen said. “I think it’s fun especially with doing it with the people around me and my friends.” Seniors won showing the most spirit by wearing black, the prize was winning a pizza party. Mrs. Locke says “I thought it was fun. I like participating in those kinds of things, but I wish more students would’ve participated,” teacher Shelia Locke said. “Also I felt like teachers were more into the spirit than the students were.”

August - October 2017


EAGLE’S EYE

Crystal Rhodes

Tues: Wed: Tacky Trend Monochromatic

Aldo Salinas , 12

Darrell Harden, Deja Brown, Brittney McBride, Ava Lofton, Zadiyah Collins, Makyla Allen, Shayria Darrington, Emliy Caudillo Gonzalez, Sidney Bailey, Isis Thompson, Demetria Byers, Mahreen Ansari

Carla Sole and Kelly Michale

Zavion Moore, Lauren Beach, Rebekah Dreyer, Symone Callwood, Marshawn Burnett, Walter Verge, Cire Oliver, Nadine Rainers, Diana Discher, Javon King , Jocelyn Vann, Ahkrista Payne

August - October 2017

Shelia Locke

Sakiyyah Manning, Delvin Wilson, Lethal Davis, Marnet Wright, Terranae Love, Brianda carter, and Davon Bowman (all juniors)

Diana Discher, Shelia Locke, Kelly Pittard

Essence Blake, Teah Duley, Charlee Garcia, Keneyia Drake

Spirit

Marnet Wright, 11

Mon: Pajama Day

Ryan Beatty, AP

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Week

FEATURE

Thurs: Duo-Squad

Shakespeare Williams and Jaylon Kitchen

Isis Thompson, Moriah Isenhower and Monah Isenhower

Eleshea Banks, Ava Lofton, Darrion Williams, Jalexis Vansant

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Fri: Rep yo class

SOPHOMORES: Cardon Bolen, Mariah Taylor, Mouada Allan and Damese Vineyard

JUNIORS: Roneece Henderson, Jeannette Batson, Tyasia Turner, Arianna Price, Andrea Brown, Kelly Menjivar

Science Teachers: Lee Crow, Bethany Kelly, Marlyin Miller

Jessica Willis, Zayhon Hicks, Samuel Colone, Lakenzie Bailey

Lauren Beach and Diana Discher

SENIORS: Zahir Miller, Jamilah Bani Almarjeh, ReAona Bell, Jeresha Young, Moriah Isenhower, Davaughn Burris

August - October 2017


28

EAGLE’S EYE

The Eaglettes dance team getting ready to show the school what they have been working on with the Purge theme. Photo Credit: Destnee Walton

The Bandits dancing during Homecoming pep rally. The dance team is new this year created by Senior Derrion Williams. Photo Credit: Destnee Walton

The Color Guard present the colors while junior Rebekah Dreyer sings the National Anthem. Photo Credit: Jaquon Purdy

The different grades face off with an obstacle course to see what class is the best. The junior class of 2019 won the obstacle course. Photo Credit: Ariel West

Standing in the huddle the Ruskin football team patiently waits for their quarterback. The Ruskin Golden Eagles were excited to hear the play so they can punch it in the end zone. Photo Credit: Angel Hudson

Senior Shakespeare Williams running down the sideline while an Oak Park defender chases him. Williams picked up an additional 10 yards after making the Oak Park defender missed. Photo Credit: Angel Hudson

August - October 2017


FEATURE

2017 HOMECOMING

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Junior princess Destinee Brown and Junior Ishyia Briscoe pose for a picture during homecoming night. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

Senior Eleshea Banks smiles for the camera at Homecoming dance. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

Winning Homecoming Senior Queen candidate Maribel Munoz posing with friends (left to right) junior Fabian Valtierra, senior Kimberly Villarreal, guest student Dianna, and senior Nasser Matrane. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

Juniors Ishyia Briscoe, Jazymn Chalmers, and Nadine Rainers is smiling while having a great time. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

Seniors Kiara Warren, Aliyah Fleeks, and winning Homecoming Junior Princess Destinee Brown. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

Juniors Maurice Stuckey, Cire Oliver, senior Da’Jionne Brown, and junior Ronnell Brown posted up at Homecoming. Photo Credit: Kaylah Carter

August - October 2017


30

EAGLE’S EYE

SPORTS

High Hopes

by Carlo Terrell, Sports Editor The Ruskin Eagles soccer team had a lot of hope coming into this season only losing three starters, yet it hasn’t got off to a hot start. Sadly, their win total was only 6. “I just think it’s a few mistakes here and there that’s stopping us from winning,” junior Fabian Valtierra said. With nearly the season halfway over there is still something to be proud about. The team has only lost their games by no more than two goals. “It’s tough being a leader

and the team isn’t doing good,” senior Ivan Sanez said. One player the school and parents are sharing high praise about is goalie junior Naguib Nassir. With Nassir being a lock down goalie this team has potential of reaching new heights. “I knew I had to really step up and help my team this year,” Nassir said. In high school sports play-

offs are what matters and this team has potential to wreck things in the playoffs, so District 4A watch out for the Golden Eagles team during the playoffs.

Preparing to kick the ball, sophomore Andres Perez gets in position. Perez played on the Eagles Junior Varsity team ending the season with a 7-10 record. Photo Credit: Ali Nassir

August - October 2017

Eagle's Eye October 2017 Issue  

A news publication of the journalism students at Ruskin High School in Kansas City, MO

Eagle's Eye October 2017 Issue  

A news publication of the journalism students at Ruskin High School in Kansas City, MO

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