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Wednesday, July 14 , 2010

Volume 8, Issue 30

www.eaglenews.org

Save your pennies Tuition raised 15 percent for the second year

Icy summer drinking game

By Samantha League News editor and Amarin Cannon Staff writer

Read about Smirnoff Ice as the preferred beverage in a new twist on a national pastime.

O

See A&E on page 6

By Allison Gagliardi Editor-in-Chief

Get your piece of indoor football Regional Indoor Football League club to resume play in2011 at Germain Arena. See SPORTS on page 12

A new student shares advice An incoming freshman writes about Orientation. See NEWS on page 10

Read reviews for the iPhone 4G A staff writer and a student give their opinions on the newest Apple product.

Hookah vs.cigs: which is worse? New studies show that smoking hookah can be just as bad for you as smoking a tobacco cigarette. See NEWS on page 4

Index News ....................... See page 3 A&E ......................... See page 8 Opinion ................. See page10 Sports .................... See page 12 Fun & Games ............ See page 9 Classifieds ............... See page 9

Regulation sets rules for acceptance as Greek

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How much per credit hour?

Resident Undergrad espite economy woes, new students $166.04 will pay 15 percent more for their Non-Resident FGCU education. The Board of Trust- Non-Resident Grad Undergrad ees exercised its right to raise FGCU’s tuition $1,117.08 in their June meeting, approving a 15 percent $710.27 increase for incoming students, including transfers. A new undergraduate student completing the academic year with the standard 30 credit hours will pay $4,981 in tuition. The tuition rate in a student’s first year at any Florida university remains the same throughout that student’s undergraduate years, thus the new increase does not impact current FGCU students. Resident Grad This is the second consecutive year the trustees approved a 15 percent tuition hike, $322.08 making FGCU one of the most expensive schools in the state. However, compared to the national college tuition average, an edu- selves. It is tough.” cation at FGCU is a relative bargain. The 15 percent raise adds an additional According to Joe Shepard, vice president $15.74 per credit hour for undergraduate stufor administrative services, it would take the dents. Out-of-state tuition went up $51.33. university six years of 15 percent tuition in“High out-of-state tuition makes us creases to reach the national average. (FGCU) less competitive on a national scale,” New trustee and Student Body President Ryther said. Peter Ryther was the only vote against the inThe state Legislature made it mandatocrease. Ryther is concerned about FGCU’s tu- ry for Florida universities to increase tuition ition being one of the most costly in the state. 8 percent and left it to the discretion of each He is also concerned about students afford- school to raise tuition as much as an addiing it during the current economic slump. tional 7 percent. All 11 public Florida univer“It is a really tough time for students, es- sities raised tuition to the maximum level alpecially students who are supporting themlowed by the state.

A BMX beauty queen amongst us By Megan Hoolihan Senior staff writer

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iss Florida US International, one of FGCU’s own, is defying stereotypes. Donna Snow, a senior majoring in forensics and psychology, will compete for the title of Miss United States International on July 21, but that is not her only profession. The beauty queen doubles as a professional BMX racer. Snow won the title of Miss Sarasota USA 2009 prior to becoming Miss Florida US In- Snow after wining Miss Florida ternational 2010. International. Photo courtesy of Donna Snow In a week she could become Miss United States International, titlist of the offi- 4 Morning show, been in a few cial USA preliminary to Miss fashion shows, and I am now International. trying to work something out Snow, who grew up in Cape with MADD (Mothers Against Coral, started training for pag- Drunk Driving),” she said. eants three years ago. When her appearences as “I get to do many cool ap- Miss Florida US Internationpearances and community al subside, her bike keeps her events. I have been on the Fox busy.

As a professional BMX racer, Snow travels around the country to compete. She claims that because there are cash prizes in the professional class, it can get pretty rough. “We crash each other … a lot.” She has the injuries to prove it. Snow has broken dozens of bones during her career, including her back. While many would assume that devoting so much time to being a professional BMX racer would hinder Snow’s ability to succeed in such a diverse world as pageantry, she says the two aspirations complement each other. “BMX has helped me in pageantry … it taught me how to compete,” she said. Snow believes her professional BMX career has taught her how to handle the great amount of stress and the principles of sportsmanship. Please see BEAUTY on page 5

n June 15, a regulation was approved that outlines qualifications and procedures for social fraternities and sororities. Any fraternity or sorority registered with FGCU must be an active member of a Greek governing body, such as the Interfraternity Council, the National Pan-Hellenic Council, the Panhellenic Association, or any subsequently registered fraternity or sorority. But the new regulation was not in response to Kappa Sigma’s unhappiness at not being recognized as part of FGCU’s Greek Life. “We’ve always had this process and we just decided to make a regulation for it,” said Mike Rollo, vice president for Student Affairs. While other universities don’t have clear expansion policies for Greek organizations, FGCU decided to implement its policies from the beginning, Rollo clarified. FGCU is still a young university compared to others, so the council can be selective, but does not overlook the demands and interests of the students each year. “We really want strong (Greek) chapters and organizations here; these are life-long commitments,” Rollo said. On March 23, the FGCU Interfaternity Council (IFC) voted on whether to bring another fraternity to campus. Kappa Sigma had asked the council to immediately recognize them.Under a secret ballot, the council cast a 4-1 vote against the fraternity. According to David Mavsonet, president of Kappa Sigma, the group originally came to FGCU two years ago. “[The campus colony] started here on Dec. 10, 2008, with 25 members,” he said. Even though the colony has existed at FGCU for a while, and will continue to function off campus, they must continue to operate independent of fellow Greek chapters. Travis Mann, a freshman and first year Kappa Sigma member, feels that there was a misconception about how to apply. Although he agrees Kappa Sigma “went about it the wrong way,” and that previous members had done some unethical things, he believes the fraternity deserves a second chance. “We have grown from what we used to be, grown as a whole, and made better decisions than from before,” Mann said. Kappa Sigma has made efforts to formally apologize to the university. In November 2009, an email was submitted in order to reconcile with the IFC. “We were trying to open up a more formal way to apologize but we never got the chance,” Mann said. President Mavsonet feels that the IFC has been fair to the fraternity. “They have been fair in enforcing their rules,” he said. please see GREEK on page 4


Campus

2 eagle news • July 14, 2010 •WWW.EAGLENEWS.ORG

Eagle News staff Editor-in-Chief Allison Gagliardi

editorinchief@eaglenews.org Business Manager Shane Biltz

businessmanager@eaglenews.org Advertising Manager Melanie Adams

adsales@eaglenews.org Web Editor

Kasie Molnar

webmaster@eaglenews.org Production Manager Elliot Taylor

productionmanager@eaglenews.org News Editor

Samantha League

news@eaglenews.org Sports Editor Josh Siegel

sports@eaglenews.org Opinion Editor Sara Gottwalles

opinion@eaglenews.org Arts and Entertainment Editor Katie Sartoris entertainment@eaglenews.org Photo Editor Mike Ricci

photoeditor@eaglenews.org Senior Staff writers Megan Hoolihan

Staff writers

Melissa Bell Amarin Cannon Adrienn Wiebe Jacob Welch Veronica Vela Carlos Soria Katie Egan Katie Donnellan

Locations 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 36

Griffin Hall Reed Hall Library Howard Hall McTarnighan Hall Wellness Center Central Energy Plant Broadcast Center Family Resource Center Campus Support Complex Academic III Whitaker Hall Information Booth Egan Observatory Arts Complex Alico Arena Student Union Margaret S. Sugden Welcome Center Athletic Building Kleist Health Ed Center Academic 5 Lee County FGCU Aquatics Center Sugden Hall Lutgert Hall Holmes Hall SoVi Dining- South Village Dining Facility South Central Energy Plant Academic 7 Campus Rec Sports Modular Grounds Maintenance North Lake Village Housing South Village Housing Complex North Modular Village South Modular Village Music Modular

Compiled by Eagle News from public logs available at the University Police Dept., Police Beat is in no way associated with the UPD. Some details have been left out in accordance with Eagle News policy to protect privacy. Police Beat is intended to provide raw data regarding the reports generated by UPD officers in the course of their duty. We urge readers not to draw conclusions from this unanalyzed information. Any questions or concerns about the Police Beat should be directed to the Eagle News Press Room at 239-590-7996. Suspects are innocent until proven guilty by a court of law.

Crime & Safety info is now available at http://admin.fgcu.edu/police/homepage.htm

Animal-related

Media reporters Caity Kauffman Danielle Koleniak Alex Pena Amarin Cannon Johnny Yang

Alchohol-related

Police Beat

Vandalism

To report crimes, call UPD: 590-1900

Vehicular incident

Narcotic paraphernalia

July 4, 2010, through July 12, 2010 To advertise, please call: (239) 590-7996 FIND US: Eagle News is on the second floor of the Student Union 218, across from the ballroom in the office complex. Published weekly during fall and spring semesters, and monthly in summer, at Florida Gulf Coast University

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Copyright 2010 Eagle News. The information contained in this newspaper may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of Eagle News.

Wednesday, July 7 at 3:06 p.m.: UPD was advised that an individual at the Fitness Center had his right middle finger crushed between two barbells. The individual drove himself to receive medical attention. Wednesday, July 7 at 5:03 p.m.: An individual near Whitaker Hall needed medical attention after suffering a seizure. After being evaluated by Emergency Medical Service, the individual refused any further treatment. Thursday, July 8 at 10:46 a.m.: A student at the Wellness Center needed Emergency Medical Services. He was transported to Gulf Coast Medical Center.

Thursday, July 8 at 7:04 p.m.: A mother called requesting access to the Student Union. Her son left belongings in the Student Union during Freshman Orientation. Friday, July 9 at 6:22 p.m.: A complainant reported that she was eating food outside of Whitaker Hall. She stepped away for a second and returned to find a raccoon eating her food at the table. The animal had not left after being approached by the individual. Officers responded and the raccoon ran off. Saturday, July 10 at 11:20 a.m.: UPD received a phone call from a complainant stating that his ex girlfriend stole his cell phone and refuses to return it. He complained that his ex is making harassing phone calls.

Corrections and clarifications n In Volume 8 Issue 29, “SG President, 4 others beat pot smoking claims” Peter Ryther was quoted incorrectly at the end of the article. The quote should read: Ryther also wanted to make it clear that “there is no animosity between us.” “Take One” Policy

Members of the state university community may take one copy per issue. Additional copies may be purchased, when available, for 50¢/ea., by contacting Eagle News.

Newspaper theft is a crime. Those who violate the single copy rule may be subject to civil and criminal prosecution and/or subject to university discipline.


Campus News

WWW.EAGLENEWS.ORG •JuLY 14, 2010 • eagle news 3

Infant lab in search of pre-term babies By Samantha League News editor

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on’t be alarmed if you hear a baby’s cry while walking through Modular 1. Hidden in Modular 1 is the Infant Development Lab, where Lakshmi Gogate and select undergraduate students have been conducting studies about infant language development. However, the lab is struggling. They are reaching the end of their grant period and are having trouble recruiting mothers and their infants as participants. The research is being funded by an FGCU research grant and by the March of Dimes, which is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health of babies. The current study in the lab compares language development in pre-term and full-term infants. According to the Infant Development Lab website, pre-term infants are at a greater risk for developmental delays in language due to immature sensory and motor systems. “We’ve been able to get a good number of full-term infants to participate, but our main focus now is to get more pre-term infants,” said Dr. Madhavi Maganti, who is conducting her post-doctorate research in the lab. The longitudinal study, which is expected to end in May 2011, focuses on the infant’s ability to pair words with objects. The mother is given time to teach her infant what an object is by saying the name of the object and moving the object around. Then, the infant is placed in front of a screen that plays video clips of the toys. In half of the clips,

the word and the object match up, and in the other half, they don’t. Two observers see how long the infant is attending to the clips to determine if they’ve learned the object. According to the Infant Development Lab’s website, a delay in the ability to pair words and objects may lead to a delay in language development. If word-object pairing predicts language development, earlier diagnoses and interventions could be done to prevent at-risk infants. “It’s definitely rewarding knowing that the research I’m helping with now can have an impact in the future in determining how infants learn language,” said Paul Milford,

a senior majoring in psychology and a student in Gogate’s directed study course. Milford originally joined the lab because he thought it would be a great opportunity to get firsthand experience. Maganti, who has worked with about 700 infants in the past, said this study has given her the best experience. “This experience has been a very different (one), in terms of knowing a lot about the language of babies and especially comparing full-term and pre-term,” she said. “That’s the most exciting and curious part.” Maganti also enjoys working with local doctors and pediatricians,

who have been recruiting many infants for the study. “The support is also rewarding,” she said.

• If you would like to support the Infant Development Lab, call 239-5907349.

TOP: Ashley Frantz and her daughter, Clementine, participate in studies in the infant lab. EN Photos/Allison Gagliardi LEFT: Clementine watches video clips of objects she has learned about.

Distracted driving month raises awareness in Lee By Miguel Lopez Staff writer

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y this time in our lives, most of us know of someone who has suffered because of careless driving, whether they were the one driving or an unfortunate passenger or victim. That is why June 29, the Lee County Board of County Commissioners passed a resolution recognizing July as “Distracted Driving Awareness Month.” The Lee County Sherriff ’s Office has teamed up with Lee Tran and the “Stay Alive… Just Drive (SAJD)” program to bring awareness to the tragedies that occur because of careless driving. Three busses now display the SAJD logo along with slogans including: “Hang Up & Drive,” “Avoid Distracted Driving” and “Texting & Driving Reduces Surviving.” SAJD is a nationally recognized crash prevention, education and awareness program that began in Lee County in 2006. The program was created by Jay Anderson, who serves as the executive director, in response to a distracted driver hitting Anderson’s wife. Anderson’s wife was out walking one morning when she was struck by a young man who ran off the road while on his cell phone. She was left in a ditch with multiple fractures while the driver fled the scene of the crime, never to be found. Although the man wasn’t caught, he did leave a lasting impression of the carelessness of distracted drivers and the consequences that come with it. The SAJD program tries to reach drivers everyday with its message of “Safe Driving is not Expensive, It’s Priceless.” In a poll of 40 FGCU students, 22 admitted to texting while driving while 32 said that they talk on the phone while driving. According to a 2009 Virginia Tech Transportation Institute study, texting while driving is 20 times more dangerous than not using a phone while driving. Not watching the road for 4.5 to 6 seconds

equates to traveling the length of a football field at 55 mph without looking at the road. Dialing the phone is 2.8 times more dangerous, and talking or listening to someone on the phone is 1.3 times more dangerous than driving while not distracted. “These drivers often display errat-

ic behavior such as failing to maintain their lane, failing to maintain their speed, abrupt lane changes without signaling, and failing to stop at stop signs and red traffic signals,” said Anderson. There are many variables when driving, and even if we drive the biggest metal vehicle on the street, we are all still

TIPS TO AVOID DISTRACTED DRIVING 1. Use your voicemail. Change the message to indicate you might be driving. 2. Put your phone in the glove compartment, console, purse or backseat. 3. If you can’t turn the phone off, put the ringer on “silent-mode.” 4. Safely pull over if you must take or make that call. 5. Don’t D.U.I.T. — Drive Under the Influence of Texting. 6. Avoid using the vehicle phone charger. 7. Always properly adjust your mirrors and use them to increase your field of view. 8. Don’t eat behind the wheel. 9. Apply make-up or shave before you leave the house. 10. Be sure children are properly and safely buckled up — provide items to occupy their time to minimize distractions. 11. Buckle up, every time.

susceptible to mistakes that not only harm us, but possibly others as well. “Driving is the most dangerous activity we participate in on a daily basis,” said Anderson.

TOP 10 DRIVING DISTRACTIONS

1. Rubbernecking (looking at a crash, roadside incident, traffic, or construction) – Keep traffic moving by avoiding this one. 2. Driver fatigue/drowsy driving – Never be afraid to pull over for a quick nap. 3. Looking at scenery or landmarks – Take advantage of roadside stop-offs. 4. Passenger or child distraction – Be sure children know how important it is that you focus on driving. 5. Adjusting radio or changing CD/tape – Common cause of right turn on red rear end crashes. 6. Cell phone/text messaging – Is it necessary and is it worth the risk. 7. Eyes not on the road – Leads to trouble all the time. 8. Not paying attention, daydreaming – Nothing is more exciting than today. 9. Eating or drinking – Don’t drink and drive. 10. Personal grooming – Apply your make-up or shave before you leave the house.


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Campus News

eagle news • July 14, 2010 • www.eaglenews.org

campus briefs

Volunteer opportunity on move-in day Students can earn servicelearning hours helping new students move into South Village. The Office of Housing and Residence Life promotes that aside from service learning credit, students get the opportunity to introduce themselves and any organization that you may be a part of. Move-in day is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 19. More than 800 students will move in throughout the day during staggered move-in-by times. Volunteers are needed in two shifts: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help direct traffic, monitor parking lots and assist families and students with their luggage. Student organizations are encouraged to wear their group’s T-shirts to show their FGCU pride and make a good first impression on incoming students and their families. If you or your organization are interested in assisting in any way, please contact Becky Kroeger at rkroeger@fgcu.edu. Please include the total number of volunteers and the shift you would like to participate in. You can volunteer during both shifts.

Southwest Fla. restaurants join cancer fight On Thursday, local restaurants have pledged to donate 10 percent of their sales to the American Cancer Society. Monies donated go directly to helping search for the cure of cancer. The following is a list of the participating restaurants: Arizona Pizza,Rodes, Beef ’O’ Bradys, Geo’s, Chicago Pizza Bianca’s, County Roads Café, Sasse’s, The Loose Caboose, The Jacaranda, Foster’s Grille, Ritas, Marker 92, Jason’s Deli, Leapin’ Lizards, Ratmary Street Grill, Old 41. See AmericanCancerSociety.com for participating locations. — Eagle News staff

Greek continued from page 1 However, Brett Trembly, District Grand Master of the Southern Florida District of Kappa Sigma, thinks the university’s application procedures violate students’ constitutional rights. “Our stance is that because [FGCU is] a public institution, they cannot fail to recognize us as a student organization merely because

the IFC does not want us in their group,” Trembly said. However, FGCU requires that a fraternity be accepted and affiliated with IFC before it’s recognized. In the first step of the application process, the fraternities give presentations to the IFC. The IFC then chooses only one fraternity to move on and become approved by the Greek Life Expansion Committee. The other fraternities have to wait to be invited to present again. Trembly views the university’s application process as discriminatory. “They have failed to treat us equally and we see it as a violation

of the equal protection law under the Fourteenth Amendment,” he said. Trembly also thinks the member’s First Amendment rights have been violated, according to the 1967 U.S. Supreme Court case, Hammond v. South Carolina State College. This case ruled that students are free from a public university’s restrictions of assembly and speech. “We’ve tried numerous times to reserve campus facilities in order to hold meetings and we have been denied every time,” he said. Consequently, Kappa Sigma held their chapter meetings at Cos-

tal Village. Mavsonet believes Kappa Sigma has a lot to offer the university. “If you look at other fraternities and look at us, we are very different, we are very diverse… multicultural… we have everything,” he said. Mavsonet also thinks that as an on-campus fraternity, Kappa Sigma would enhance Greek life in general. “We want to be better at everything such as sports, grades, helping out the community … which increases competition among the Greeks [and] in turn … would make all the other Greeks want to excel,” he said.

together through preservatives and nasty chemicals.” Although cigarettes have 599 additives, hookah smoke isn’t completely free of toxins. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hookah fact sheet said that because of the mode of smoking, which includes frequent puffing and deep inhalation during a long session, hookah smokers may even absorb higher concentrations of toxins. “The idea that the water is filtering out any toxins is a myth,” said Tracey Barnett, an assistant professor at the University of Florida’s Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health in the FloridaTrend magazine article. “Cigarettes have filters, too, but we know you can’t filter out all the toxins associated with it.” There is also a significant threat for a specific toxic gas in hookahs: carbon monoxide. A 2006 study performed by Katharine Hammond, the chairwoman of the division of environmental health science at the University of California, suggests that an hour of smoking hookah delivers the same amount of carbon monoxide that a pack-a-day cigarette habit would. The burning charcoal, which sits on top of the tobacco and heats it, is the culprit of these high carbon monoxide emissions. “You aren’t allowed to barbecue inside with charcoal because the carbon monoxide rate inside your apartment would just go through the roof,” Barnett told FloridaTrend. In Hammond’s study, it was found that participants smoking hookah exhaled an average of 42 parts of carbon monoxide per million. Cigarette smokers only exhale 17 parts per million. Not only are those levels harmful to the smoker, they are a serious risk for the nonsmokers sitting with the participants at the social hookah bars. This social phenomenon is not just facing opposition from

health critics. A federal bill, the “Tobacco Tax Parity Act of 2010” (H.R. 4439), was introduced to Congress on Jan. 13, which would raise the tax on pipe tobacco by 775 percent. A box of hookah tobacco that currently retails for $5.99 would cost more than $20. Hookah bars would have to switch to herbal hookah, which is a nicotine-free product made from tea leaves, or they’d go out of business. While hookah business own-

ers continue to keep an eye on that bill, hookah fans will continue to enjoy their hookah sessions despite the newfound risks. Joe Angius, a sophomore majoring in environmental science who moderately smokes hookah, is one of them. “If you told me that hookah had fiberglass, traces of rat poison and toxic chemicals to get you buzzed, then yes, I’d stop smoking hookah,” Angius said.

Studies show hookah just as bad

By Samantha League News editor

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wo lighters are lit. One is held to the end of a cigarette while the other is held to a piece of charcoal on top of a hookah. Both items are being lit to produce tobacco smoke. We know tobacco causes multiple health problems, but is one method of smoking it safer than the other? In an anonymous poll of FGCU students, cigarettes were deemed worse. Out of 35 students polled, 63.2 percent said they believed smoking a cigarette is safer than a 45-minute hookah session. Dylan Ceresoli, a sophomore majoring in criminal justice, falls in the 63.2 percent. “Cigarettes are worse — they have addictive qualities, stink, and are more unattractive.” However, recent research suggests smoking hookah may not be that much safer than smoking cigarettes. According to FloridaTrend magazine, a single cigarette holds about 500 milliliters of smoke. A single water pipe use episode, which holds about 90,000 milliliters of smoke, is associated with 1.7 times the nicotine, 6.5 times the CO, and 46.4 times the tar. So why is there such a common misconception of hookah being safer than cigarettes? If Erin Fitz-Patrick, a sophomore majoring in hospitality, had to choose between a smoking a cigarette and smoking hookah, she’d choose hookah. “I’ve never done it, but they have bars for it and stuff… seems kind of harmless, you know?” This social acceptance, along with the flavored smoke that isn’t as harsh on your throat and lungs, often leads participants into thinking it’s a milder, and therefore safer, experience. “I’d assume cigarettes are worse,” said Chealsye Bowley, a junior majoring in English and philosophy. “Cigarette tobacco is held

You are cordially invited to our first ever Internship night! •Day: Thursday, July 29, 2010 •Time: 6:00-7:00 PM •Location: The office of the Northwestern Mutual Financial Network: The Naples Group located at 2325 Vanderbilt Bch Rd #201, Naples, FL 34109 (We’re on the second floor of the Ever Bank building, located between CVS and Starbucks, and across from Pei Wei in “The Collection at Vanderbilt”)

At this event you will learn about the paid-internship opportunity with the Northwestern Mutual for the upcoming fall 2010 semester for both sales and marketing. Business attire is required. Snacks and refreshments will be served. Please bring your resume to the event. Northwestern Mutual has been ranked “America’s Top 10 Internships” 14 years in a row according to Vault Guide to Top Internships, 2009. Our ideal candidate for this internship program possesses the following characteristics: *Love working with people *Business-savvy *Passion for sales *Loves being a part of a team

*Self-motivated

*Great communication skills

To RSVP, please call Jesse M. Bouchard at 239-961-5759, or e-mail him at Jesse.Bouchard@nmfn.com

For more information visit us at www.nminternship.com Northwestern Mutual Financial Network is the marketing name for the sales and distribution arm of The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, Milwaukee, WI (Northwestern Mutual) and its subsidiaries.

STAND

FOR THE

COUNT Census 2010

HAVEN’T FILLED OUT YOUR 2010 CENSUS FORM? Call the Telephone Assistance Center at for a phone interview. REMEMBER, college students living away from home should fill out their own census forms.

Students, Stand Up for the Count! Stand Up For The Count @StandUp4Count

Census.gov


Campus News

www.eaglenews.org • Jul y 14, 2010 • eagle news 5

FGCU’s Snow is nighttime beauty queen and daytime biker

Ryther gets FSA spot as promised

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Eagle News Staff

Beauty continued from page 1 “Both of these aspects have enabled me to compete successfully in pageants,” she said. Snow does acknowledge that the world of pageantry was very different in many ways from what she was used to, and she did have some trouble assimilating. “Some things that did not come naturally to me were wearing dresses and doing my hair and makeup. I

have been riding bikes my whole life and have never done anything like pageants, so in the beginning I was a wreck.” In addition to the responsibilities that come with her title and her BMX career, Snow works selling hardwood flooring and cleaning model homes while pursuing her education. She aspires to eventually become a detective and possibly work for the FBI after earning her master’s degree. “Trying to balance school, BMX racing, work and pageants can be tough but I have

learned how to manage my time more successfully,” she said. Snow says that the best part of her experience in the pageant world is the chance that she has to inspire people to defy the boundaries of stereotypes just as she did. “The most rewarding part is that I am a role model in the community,” Snow said. “Since I have won the pageant, the BMX community has been great to me. A few girls from around the state have entered pageants, and at the races they come up and tell me that I have been an inspiration to them. That is the great-

SHINEDOWN Wednesday, July 21 @ 5:00 pm Tickets As Low As $29.50 Breakaway Sports Pub opens 1 hr prior to events. Enjoy dinner overlooking the stage. Reservations: 239.948.7825 x 1309. For more info visit, www.GermainArena.com.

LEFT: Snow after wining Miss Florida International. Photo courtesy of Donna Snow TOP: Donna Snow is shown BMX racing. Photo by Andy Morris courtesy of Facebook

tudent Government President Peter Ryther is sticking to his word. During the SG debates, Ryther promised that upon taking the position of SG president, he would run for vice chair of Florida Student Associations. “(It) allows me to fight on a state level against tuition increase and fight about the restructure of bright futures,” Ryther said. FSA is the official representation of the more than 300,000 students enrolled in the state university system. “They (FSA) hold the Rally in Tally to bring students to get involved in lobbying, and we meet five times a year and discuss the issues at the forefront of student needs,” Ryther said. Among his responsibilities, Ryther will represent FGCU in the next Board of Governers meeting in Septemeber, where they will be voting on approving the decision to buy College Club Apartments. Ryther will keep the position until his presidency is over.

WWE Presents RAW WORLD TOUR August 1 @ 5:00 pm Tickets As Low As $17.00 Tickets can be purchased in person at Germain Arena’s T.I.B. Box Office & all Ticketmaster outlets, via telephone at 800.334.3309 or online at www.Ticketmaster.com.


Arts & Entertainment Your Tunes What are you listening to? Kathleen Equite Communication Senior

“Give me a sign” by Breaking Benjamin

YOUTUBE:

Featured video of the week

ICED Summer drinking game turns search for hidden Smirnoff into real bender By Adrienn Wiebe Staff writer

F

Search ”Single Ladies Devastation”

n A little boy breaks out in tears when his father tells him he is not a “single lady” Try these flavors

Top 5

Movies of the Weekend 1. ”Despicable Me” $60.1 million 2. “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” $33.4 million (237 million total) 3. ”Predators” $25.3 million 4. “Toy Story 3” $22 million 5. “The Last Airbender” $17.1 million

Orginal Pomegrannate Green Apple Bite Raspberry Burst Strawberry Acai Wild Grape Black Cherry Mango Passion Fruit

even receiving its own Facebook page. “The first time I found out about ‘icing’ is when I got iced on my 21st birthday,” said Sean Hearn, a senior majoring in business management. Another student says he found out about the game from his roommate. “He came home and told me he had been iced at (a sports) practice,” said Dan Hamilton, a senior majoring in finance. Students have found many creative places to hide the drinks. Locations range from the shower, to the pull chain on a fan. “I hide them in random places,” said Hearn, “I hid one in my roommate’s bed so before he went to sleep he had to chug.” Some students are worried about the effect the game will have on Greek life’s reputation. “While I understand and appreciate the merit of bonding activities within Greek life such as Bros Icing Bros, I fear the perpetuation of negative stereotypes about Greek life that can occur through the social publication and emphasis on these types of activities,” said Jake StresenReuter, a graduate student. And some students share his opinion. “Icing is a fad — just like everything else, it will come and go,” said Andrew Mease, a graduate student. But the game continues to go on. “I’m not getting tired of getting iced, but I would rather be doing the icing than getting iced,” Hamilton said.

orget beer pong. Iced has proven to be the new summer drinking game on campus. Creativity is key is in the game becoming rapidly popular on Florida college campuses. The game has gotten press from The New York Times, Huffington Post, Fortune Magazine, and numerous television show. The rules are simple. One person must hide a Smirnoff Ice (which come in many different flavors) in a creative way, like in the refrigerator, under blankets or in doorways. When someone finds the hidden Smirnoff Ice, they must get down on one knee and chug the entire bottle. It is often common for those standing around the person who has been “iced” to take pictures and post them on social networking sites — good blackmail. The origins of the game are unclear. It has been rumored to be a marketing campaign devised by the makers of Smirnoff Ice. Others say that a fraternity brother came up with the idea and it rapidly spread to other “bros” across the country. The game is played predominantly by males, hence the name “Bros Icing Bros.” This is partly because Smirnoff Ice comes with the stereotype of being a feminine drink. Therefore, males aim to make their other male friends drink a feminine drink on their knees for a good Best places to strike laugh. Icing has become very popular at FGCU,Shower

Are you a serious player? If you mean business you can always be protected with a beer holster. It keeps your favorite beverage on your side. You can purchase one for as cheap as 10 bucks.

Pizza box Washing machine Underwear drawer Ceiling fans Driver’s seat Backpack

These figures are courtesy of boxofficemojo.com.

Photo courtesy of Anthony Rety


Arts and Entertainment

www.eaglenews.org • July 14, 2010 • eagle news 7

Apple does it again iPhone 4G makes a ripple in technology world

By Melissa Bell Staff writer

A

pple freed the new iPhone 4G version, letting it spread its wings with hopes to soar past its competitors to dominate the market, like previous siblings­­ — and it was susccessful. The new model was released this June. Some fan reviews fell short of preconceived notions and intended aspirations. “I don’t find it much different, but then again I don’t know everything about it really,” said Heather Kubik, a sophomore majoring in public relations. “I’ve had them all, but I do think it has improved,” Kubik said. One of the main reasons for the disappointment: Apple engineer Gary Powell leaked the new version a month before it was actually supposed to be public. The story goes that Powell mistakenly left his 4G on the table at a bar after drinking one night.

Despite the 4G’s less than rousing debut, there are still some newer exciting features incorporated in this little gadget, of which many are fans iPhone 4G’s new screen is made of aluminosilicate glass, which is also used in the windshields of helicopters and highspeed trains. Some other features include: a new retina display, stainless steel band wrapping around the outside layer, a faster processor great for gaming developers, and with an advanced camera and speaker. “The display is incredible,” said Eric Cosma, a junior majoring in resort and hospitality. “The battery life is much better than before, too,” Cosma said. There is one major drawback to the new version, however: Its new antenna placement causes signals to be randomly dropped. Reports of this surfaced after it debuted. “The reception is kind of flaky due to the new antenna band,” Cosma said.

“Sometimes when you hold it a certain way, it’s possible to lose all reception.” AT&T currently holds power to the iPhone market with Verizon having rumored to eventualy get in the game, too. The clouds soon covered the sky as John Johnson, Verizon communications executive, said in an interview with the BET network that there are “no plans to carry the iPhone in the immediate future, but you’ve gotta look at the incredible excitement around the Android devices.” “I think the Droid is strange, being somewhat touchscreen and still having some buttons,” said

Ashley

Blanchard, a junior majoring in biology. “It’s trying too hard to be an iPhone; my best friend has one and she is constantly having an issue with it … . “ I would definitely choose an iPhone over a Droid.” Even though this product might have been a minor disappointment, Apple still ranks highest among the competitors in the technology market. “I’ve used other companies’ products and they just don’t compare; not only are their products reliable, but also the Apple customer service is great,” said Kubik. “I will definitely stay an Apple customer, because for me, Apple is the best.”

What do you think of the new iPhone 4G?

AP Photo

Jimmy Ninehouser, a junior majoring in biology, waited in line for the release of Apple’s iPhone4. Ninehouser has been a fan of Apple products his entire life. His favorite applications are Facebook and Pandora. He would recommend the new phone to anyone and everyone. EN: How long did you wait? JN: I waited four hours at the Apple Store on June 24th (the release date) and then because of complications with billing had to return it the same day, and wait till the 29th, when AT&T released it, and waited for three hours at 6 a.m. there, and got the second-to-last one. EN: Was it worth the wait? JN: It was definitely worth the wait. I love this phone more than I could love a newborn human child. EN: Have you noticed any problems with the iPhone 4? JN: Yeah, the rumor about it dropping calls is quite true, but as Steve Jobs said, “just don’t hold it that way.” it’s really not that big of a deal and definitely not an issue to keep you from getting one.

iPhone 4G features FaceTime is a feature that allows users to see the person to whom they are talking. Apple is not the first to do this, but they made it the easiest.

EN: Would you recommend it to others? JN: Absolutely. The world would be a far better place if everyone had an iphone. It would solve world hunger.

Camera

Interview by Adrienn Wiebe

Video

The phone has Retina display, giving the device a 960 x 640-pixel resolution, four times that of the iPhone 3GS

iPhone 4 boosts 300 hours of standby, the longest of any smart phone on the shelf.

Battery Life

MTV show tracking job hunting grads gone, not forgotten By Katie Sartoris A&E editor

I

n these economic times, it is often discouraging for anyone job-hunting, even those looking for part-time work. MTV’s “Hired!” was a new show airing early in the summer that showcased recent grads applying for their dream jobs. The show has since been pulled, but in its short stint on air, it gave hope to grads around the country searching for a start of their ideal careers. Just watching one episode of the show, you can find hidden gems of advice for interviewing for your dream job. First impressions such as resumes can make or break whether or not you get the interview. And from there, you’ll need to have done your research, picked out the right outfit, practiced interview questions with yourself (including the ever-so-nervewracking question, “What is your

MTV’s “Hired!” showcased recent grads attempting to job hunt. The show was recently pulled off the air. Photo courtesy of No Regrets Entertainment

weakness?”) and have found creative ways to show that you’re the best choice for the interviewer. If it sounds a little scary, it’s because it is. Interviews are not to be taken lightly, but the most important thing is to remember to stay calm, cool and collected. Preparation is the best defense. One of the creators, Noah

Scheinmann, called the show a “learning process.” Not only could the applicants literally see themselves from a bird’s-eye view after the interviews, but the viewers of the show could also sit in the room during the interview and take notes on what went well and what went not so well.

Scheinmann has a deep connection to the show itself. Scheinmann owns his own company in New York called No Regrets Entertainment, which is the company that was producing the series. The University of Florida alum doesn’t forget where he came from, though. He was once a struggling student looking to land an internship as many of us are today. Noah was looking for a career in sports broadcasting. He struggled through the interview process, but finally got an internship with ABC Sports. From there, he grew as a person and watched his career grow with him, but always kept grounded. “On my dresser, I have an envelope of the rejections I got (during my career).” The show getting pulled was a major disappointment to those who can identify with the problem The show offered a “message of inspiration” according

to Scheinmann. It gave a positive outlook to an otherwise discouraging economic time, and actually gave hope to recent grads. Seeing real people like yourselves on television going through what you’re going through is the epitome of reality television, and this was a truly a gem. Most of the episodes are online now, and the rest should be up on the MTV website soon. Rumor has it that an episode featured an FGCU grad, so cross your fingers that this particular episode shows up on the site. If you’re looking for materials to better your interviewing skills, FGCU offers an interviewing class. Unfortunately, it is full for this fall, but if you’ve got time in your busy schedule in the spring, I highly recommended that you take it. In the class, you’ll learn everything you need to about interviewing and then some. So, when you get into the interviewing processes, you’ll be unstoppable.


Arts and Entertainment

www.eaglenews.org • Jul y 14, 2010 • eagle news 8

Latest installment in ‘Twilight Saga’ eclipses previous films EN Eagle Rating:

By Melissa Bell Staff writer

NATIONAL MOVIE REVIEWS

C

razed fans anxiously awaited their chance to file through the doors to find their spot where the ever-loved actors and actresses will grace the big screen. The line wrapped around the corner of the Regal Movie Theater in Gulf Coast Town Center on the night of the June 29 premiere of “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse.” “It wasn’t that bad for me because I had a later showing, but I heard the 12:01 a.m. showing was crazy,” said Lina Nardiello, senior majoring in resort hospitality. “The worst part (for me) was two girls trying to save six seats and having to turn away people when they made angry faces at us.” “Eclipse,” the third film in the “Twilight” saga, had once again left the bars, clubs and other local gathering sites empty. “Eclipse” broke the record for the largest Wednesday night premiere turnout in history, ranking in $68.5 million opening night alone; this threw out the only other close competitor, “Transformers II Revenge of the Fallen.” “This movie was my favorite for sure,” said Valeria Ferrer, junior majoring in biomedical engineering. “They get better in everything with each movie that comes out and this one had dominated in action and special effects.” As the books get deeper, the movies become more intense, giving both film creators and cast members more to work with in terms of creativity. Special effects are enhanced; action scenes have more emphasizing stunts and the actual characters

n “The teen vampire series finally hits its stride with an entertaining mix of romance and action fantasy.” ­­—Kirk Honeycutt, The Hollywood Reporter

Alice Griffin, 23, of New Mexico got in line for the midnight premiere of “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” at 3 p.m. June 28. AP photo

transform from untouchable myths into relatable creatures. “Nothing looked fake, which, to me, is a sign of great special effects,” said Kevin Dowty, senior double major in civil and environmental engineering. “ In “Eclipse,” the audience is told the individual stories of how each member of the Cullen family was transformed into vampires. This gave “Eclipse” positive feedback from viewers because it created more personal connections. “The story was a lot better because it had more dialogue and they

explained more about the story of the characters,” said Ferrer. When it comes to the ongoing battle between teams, some of the fans were persuaded to convert after this third feature. Hardcore Edward fans became more opening to Jacob’s side after his more down-toearth appeal was revealed. “I think he needs more time with his shirt off,” said Nardiello. “On a serious note, his acting was better than the last two movies, though.” Not only the girls were getting a little wild about this premiere. The men were caught wearing dress

shirts and ties; with painted faces, fake fangs in mouth and even colored contacts were intact all to match their vampire characters. Not many dressed as werewolves, but a man with extremely long hair was caught at the scene … real or just playing the part, nobody knows. “I think dressing up is a bit overboard, but at the same time it’s part of it,” said Ferrer. With the fourth movie, “Breaking Dawn,” set to debut on Nov. 18, 2011, there is debate as to whether this final film will air in two parts or not.

n “‘The Twilight Saga: Eclipse’ is back with all of the lethal and loving bite it was meant to have: The kiss of the vampire is cooler, the werewolf is hotter, the battles are bigger and the choices are, as everyone with a pulse knows by now, life-changing.” — Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times n “‘Eclipse’ ... is a more robustly entertaining film than either of its predecessors.” ­— A. O. Scott, New York Times

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Contributing Writer

Opinion

Eagle news editorial BOARD

Orientation view from new Eagle By Taryn Kerber

Incoming freshmen

A

s the anticipation for the fall semester grows stronger, the summer seems to fly by. I recently participated in an Eagle-View Orientation and boy, was I impressed. I don’t think any other university in the state of Florida goes to the extents FGCU does to try to welcome their new students or to make the transition and “letting go” process for the parents that much easier. Although I wasn’t prepared for the college placement test, I enjoyed every minute of my orientation experience. With the extensive tours, the proactive slide-shows, the detailed lectures, the overnight preparation, and the high-energy orientation leaders, I am thoroughly ready to start my life as an eagle fledgling! However, I somehow missed the fact that we were registering for classes. If I had known that, I would have scheduled myself an earlier Orientation! By the time my group got to register for courses, more than half the classes were closed.

Understandably, we are the lower end of the food chain now, and I knew we were getting whatever was left. But I feel bad for the students attending the later Orientations. They might as well hand over their schedules to the First Year Advising staff and say “pick my classes.” There will be nothing left worth taking besides the required Comp 1 and math classes. I wish them all the luck in finding decent courses. Now that I’ve experienced the process, I’d like to offer some advice. Listen to your orientation leaders; they are there to help you. Don’t think you don’t need to take the tours— just because you’ve been there before doesn’t mean you know everything about the campus. The rules are there for a reason, so follow them. Other than that, all I can say is get involved. There are so many things to do at FGCU! We should take advantage of the outlets and have fun. Studying should always be your main priority, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have a little fun on the side. Why wait? This is your life, start living it.

Do you have educated opinions? Pay attention to the world around you? Are you an investigator of new concepts and an open and fair-minded critic? Are you tough enough to take some heat? If you answered all of these questions in the affirmative, we want to talk to you! Contact Sara Gottwalles at opinion@eaglenews.org to contribute to the opinion section.

Commentary From your nest to ours: Separation anxiety for new students and parents By Sara Gottwalles Opinion editor

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ith the Eagle News office being located in the Student Union, I see a lot of incoming freshmen and their parents. I find the behaviors of new students and their parents fascinating. Students, do you feel that your parents are too clingy? Do they insist on trying to schedule your classes with you or for you? Do they want to meet your professors or tell your advisers to call them if they notice you slipping? Do they insist on following you into the bathroom when it was your last excuse for solitude? It’s hard for your parents to let go. You’re moving out of the house, they won’t be seeing you everyday, and they’re probably going to go all hormonal on you. You know, like you did, say, three to five years ago. I can sympathize with your desire to be seen as an adult. You want your freedom. College is a time for independence, self-realization and to construct yourself and your future. Parents, I understand it is hard to see your child grow up and leave you. But take pride and comfort in knowing that you helped get them to this point. Give yourself a pat on the

Sara Gottwalles

back; not all high school grads go on to college. You helped your child get to this point — they made the decision to go to college. Chances are, they will continue to make beneficial decisions. The tighter you pull, the more they will resist. It’s not uncommon to see a student walk into class on their phone and say: “OK, I’ve got to go Mom/Dad, I love you.” See what I did there students — I just bonded you out. Don’t make me a liar — they can find my e-mail address. Assure your parents that you will keep in contact with them and that they are still a huge part of their life. What your parents are feeling is mostly seperation anxiety. Set up a time to talk to them. Let them know they’ll hear from you at least once a week. That is reasonable. Don’t get tied up on the phone with your parents several times a day if you don’t want to. Defend your space. This is your time for self discovery. You can’t make choices that will shape the person you become if someone is always holding your hand and telling you which paths to take. Keep your parents involved in your life enough that they feel important, yet not used. They are your most important support team. Sara Gottwalles is a senior. She is majoring in history with a minor in education and philosophy and holds a BA in communication. She likes to look into different philosophies of life and gives more credit to the unorthodox than “the norm.”

Allison Gagliardi

Sara Gottwalles

Editor-in-Chief editorinchief@eaglenews.org 10501 FGCU Blvd. South, Fort Myers, Florida 33965

Opinion editor opinion@eaglenews.org www.eaglenews.org

(239) 590-7945

Commentary

Obama taxes tanning beds, sunshine still free By Mandie Rainwater Staff Writer

T

axes, taxes, everywhere are taxes and not a bit of relief. This has been true since, well ... forever. Our country’s very independence was spurred by unwillingness to pay certain taxes. And here we are 234 years later and we are still focusing on taxes. Our current taxing pet peeve is not tea leaves, but our right to have a beach bronze tan all year round. According to the Affordable Care Act section 10907, a new 10 percent tax will be imposed on tanning establishments that Mandie have devices that use more than Rainwater one lamp and put out between 200 and 400 nanometers to bronze the bodies of those who use them. I see nothing wrong with this tax for a few reasons. First, I haven’t used a tanning bed in 15 years— so it won’t cost me anything. Second, according to leading authorities on cancer such as the FDA and International Agency for Research on Cancer, tanning beds are “carcinogenic to humans” (that means bad), so why not tax it? And lastly, the revenue generated will go to fund portions of health care reform as well as initiatives to reduce tanning bed dependencies. This is similar to what happened to the tobacco industry. According to a report on CNNMoney.com, the U.S. spends $1.8 billion on skin cancer treatments a year, $300 million of that being on melanoma alone. This tax, like the tobacco tax, has the potential to curb usage and make treatments more affordable. Opponents to the tax claim is discriminatory, racist and unfairly raises prices. The tax appears discriminatory because most tanning salon owners are women and most of their patrons are women. Women tend to be more self conscious and the tanning bed’s golden bronze look can be considered an ego booster. If the look of golden skin makes you feel good, go for the sunless spray on tans.

The tax seems racist to others due to the assumptions that mainly light-skinned people use the beds. I don’t agree with the opinion that the tax is racist, but I do agree that light-skinned people use tanning beds— they want darker skin. A study published in Cancer, Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention (May 2010) shows that people who use tanning devices are 75 percent more likely to develop cancer, regardless of age, gender or device. Salon owners and their representative organizations claim the price for the luxury of bronzing indoors will increase to a proportion as to chase patrons away— to where, the free outdoors? The average price of a $50 tanning package will increase to a whopping $55. If a person can’t afford a $5 increase then they don’t need the 20 minutes under the UV bulbs in the first place. I suggest the free, eco friendly alternative for all of your skin-toning, cancerous needs. In a separate, yet equally as powerful debate, the masses (60 percent of the population), according to an International Communications Research poll, openly support tax increases on tobacco. Citing cancer risk increases, the people surveyed said they would continue to support the tax hikes to curb usage. This is, in my opinion, no different than how the proponents of the tanning bed tax feel. If you were part of a group that was 20 times more likely to develop melanoma, why would you want to continue to put yourself even more in harm’s way to look darker? Baz Luhrmann advised us all in 1997 to wear sunscreen. I think we should finally heed his warning.

Mandie Rainwater is a sophomore. She is majoring in secondary education focusing in social sciences. She is married with two children and is an active volunteer for C.A.R.E.S. suicide prevention. She is a contributing author to “UnspOILed:Writers speak for Florida’s Coast” and has been featured in the Southeast Review Online Journal.

Commentary Civicly engaged in motorcycle and vehicular safety By Melissa Mears Staff writer

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ccording to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, more than two-thirds of fatal motorcycle crashes involve a motorcycle and another vehicle. FGCU continues to be a paragon of community involvement. The university’s phenomenal commitment to the improvement of our environmental awareness and the efforts of its collective student body, faculty and staff make FGCU a wonderful place to study, work and live. I can say so in good confidence because of my experience in all three of Melissa those categories here on campus. My intention, however, is to place Mears great emphasis on the “study.” Currently, I am in the process of taking two summer classes that pertain to my major. One of these classes, Foundations of Civic Engagement, has made an enormous impact on me. A group of four students, including myself, have ventured out on a shaky idea to promote motorcycle safety awareness in Florida. How did we come up with this topic? Well, according to Gov. Charlie Crist, this past May was the first ever Florida Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. At first we were unsure of what or how to go about promoting this, but finally we settled on the old, but firmly trusted “presentation” idea. In an amazing coup, we were able to secure trained instructors from ABATE of Lee County and a Lee County Sheriff’s Office representative to come and

speak to students, staff, faculty, and people from the community who came out to support our event, on Friday, June 11. We offered valuable information on keeping safe on the road, no matter if participants rode a motorcycle or drove a car. Unique to this state is the number of tourists that we pull in annually—80 million and above! Only half of those 80 million people arrive by air, meaning the other 40 million will be navigating our roads. We see this every year. Some 977,000 motorcycle endorsements are held by Floridians alone. Not counting the race-crazed masses that flock to the South for the amazing racing spots, the 124 percent increase in motorcycles on the road makes safety knowledge important for many. On July 1, a new law was passed to ensure that motorcyclists first pass a safety course before they are licensed. The new law signed by our governor is a plea to Floridians to consider all the vehicles that use our roads. If you are a driver, you know that sometimes motorcycle riders get annoying.If you are a rider, you know that drivers are often careless to a damaging degree. The law asks for both drivers and riders to be more aware of each other and to take into consideration the difficulties faced by both categories of people. Melissa Mears is a sophomore. She is majoring in communication with a public relations concentration. She hopes to someday become the Chief Communications and Public Affairs officer at the United Nations in New York. She believes nothing in life can take the place of success and ambition.


Sports

Stingrays hope to turn football into forum for helping disabled ByJosh Siegel Sports editor

— Lawrence was vice president of operations under the old wing — did little to dampen his expectations. “I’m very passionate about what I’m doing so I know it can work,” Lawrence said. “I played baseball in high school and I’ve always loved football. The fact that the RIFL holds its season in the offseason of college and pro football is a boon as well.” Lawrence’s motivation to reinvigorate the Southwest Florida sports scene lies in his deep, personal connection to a charity and a cause that both stand to benefit most from the operation. The roots of H.A.N.D.S. U.P. charity were sewn when Lawrence fell asleep behind the wheel of a car as a 20-yearold in 1996, resulting in a crash that left him paralyzed

from the waist down. Mishaps in attaining treatment for the injuries, and the buoyancy that came refusing to passively accept the misfortune, led Lawrence to become involved with The Buoniconti Fund, the largest fundraising arm for the world’s most high profile neurological research facility, The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. His experience with Buoniconti, and his desire to impact the Southwest Florida Community he calls home more directly, inspired Lawrence to found H.A.N.D.S. U.P. Charity, a nonprofit organization that strives to acquire medical supplies for people with disabilities who are not covered by insurance. “When I first got in the accident there was a situation with a product I need-

ed,” Lawrence explained. “I couldn’t get it with my insurance so I had to buy the product myself. What would have happened if I couldn’t afford to do that? That is why I started the charity.” Fitting in with the salvaging-a-life theme, the Stingrays are looking to employ players who have vulnerabilities and need a positive outlet to recover. “Players in the RIFL are usually between 25 and 32 years old, but we are also looking at 18-year-olds and kids fresh out of college who maybe have gotten in trouble who need an extra year of growth,” Lawrence said. “We will personally recruit kids in Southwest Florida, a football-rich community, with our objective being to take them to the next level.” College students serve as the target audience, a demographic that’s likely to revel in the fast-paced, frantic nature of arena football, so much so that Lawrence would consider having home games played at FGCU’s Alico Arena rather then at Germain, “if given the opportunity.” “Arena football is more like a rock show, with lots of scoring in a fun, family-oriented, safe environment,” says Lawrence. And beyond the singularly focused, community oriented nature of Lawrence’s mission, the hope is that the reach extends to large-scale affairs. “Ultimately we think the Stingrays will put money back into the economy,” says Lawrence. “A lot of people will be affected by what we do. Germain Arena is not having many events this summer, so they’re not employing a lot of people. With the Stingrays we plan on employing medical people, front office people, a coaching staff, and 30 players.” You can contact the team at www.floridastingraysfootball.com.

vised correctly so that their dreams are not shattered with unrealistic goals.” The best way to duplicate the intensity of a collegiate game is to compete in amateur leagues across the country, something that gives a player unique exposure that might not be offered during the season. In that vein, Josey Portillo, Westin Vallentine, Christian Raudales and Jonathan Hohn are participating in the USL Premier Development League, considered the top men’s amateur soccer conglomerate in the United States. Additionally, Alexei Reyes and William Morse are showcasing their skills for club teams, while Jelani Smith is representing his country on the U-20 Canadian National Team. All together, players will compete in varied sites ranging from Louisiana, Texas, and Iowa to Florida, with the goal staying static: joining a team that preaches similar ideas to those of the FGCU

coaching staff, and that features roster types that maximize the talents of the individual. Finding a match proves to be strenuous. “It can be difficult to find a team that fits our style of play at FGCU, and that fits with our talent,” Butehorn said. “In reality there are few teams that resemble the type of competition, day in and day out, and the training and professionalism that occurs in a collegiate environment.” Without the watchful glare of Butehorn, it would be easy for players to display apathy, surrendering to the foreign principals and surroundings. A change of pace can be beneficial, however. “It can be detrimental to play for a different coach who plays a different style,” says Butehorn. “One guy can be a dictator or a yeller and screamer and another can be a player’s coach. But experiencing those things gives a player flexibility that makes

them attractive for the pros.” Ultimately it falls on the individual to craft a routine that allows for him to carry out the message established in the beginning of summer meetings, no matter the circumstances. “A coach can only do so much, so really it’s up to the individual to work on their fitness, technical ability, and speed of play. It’s a challenge that tests a player’s maturity.” If a player confronts these demands with a long-range, ambitious perspective, they have the potential to fulfill the promise Butehorn visualized when he left the University of Pennsylvania for FGCU. “The reason I took this job is because the weather in Florida allows us to train 365 days a year outdoors,” Butehorn said. “This, combined with the type of kid we can attract in Florida and our school’s good academic foundation, promises a good opportunity for guys to make the pros.”

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ike his model, the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League, Jay Lawrence aims to localize and make lucid the operations of a sports organization. Just as the Packers function as a nonprofit, community-owned company rather then having one dominant owner — the only such set-up in all American major sports leagues — Lawrence will guide the Florida Stingrays of the Regional Indoor Football League (RIFL) using the same template. After the Stingrays folded in 2008 under a more traditional, monopolized format, Lawrence — under the umbrella of his charity H.A.N.D.S. U.P., which looks to aid disabled people in Southwest Florida — plans to split ownership of the team into 20,000 shares. A total of 10,200 (51 percent) of those shares will stay with H.A.N.D.S. U.P. while the remaining 9,800 (49 percent) shares will be sold to any interested person, business or organization. Each share comes with a season ticket (eight games) and costs $150. The Stingrays will become an official member of the RIFL, a year-old indoor league that holds various teams from Southwest Florida and that hopes to eventually spread nationally, in November with sufficient support, and begin play in 2011 at Germain Arena. “Our vision is to bring together local football fans and businesses to bring football back to Southwest Florida with a focus on helping disabled people,” Lawrence said. “While funds will help provide for my charity organization, the Stingrays will provide low-cost entertainment to an area that needs it.” Seeing the collapse of the Stingrays in 2008 firsthand

Photo courtesy of Jay Lawrence

Summer’s no time to take soccer siesta

By Josh Siegel Sports editor

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efore his players migrate for the summer, men’s soccer coach Bob Butehorn conducts oneon-one meetings with each, intending to lay out a blueprint for individual improvement. While Butehorn’s voice carries weight, the player is expected to show initiative and dominate the discussion in order for the plan to satisfy its intent. Such a process foreshadows a theme for the off-season, where the emphasis is on laying tracks and instilling habits that translate to the next level, whatever that be. “The summer is not the most important part of the year for the team, but it can be most important for the individual,” Butehorn said. “It is a time for a player to decide how he wants to proceed in his soccer career. My job is to make sure the guys are ad-

Americans don’t get kick from soccer By Katie Donnellan Staff writer

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f it’s not broken, don’t fix it. But can we tweak the nature of soccer in America slightly so it can be marketed better in a country that may not want it? In 1863, the Football Association in England codified the rules of soccer. Almost a century later, the United States decided to change them. The North American Soccer League (NASL) adjusted a few rules in the new league to make soccer more appealing and comprehensible to Americans. Rule changes included: two 35-yard lines for offsides instead of a midfield line; a clock that counted down instead of up; and matches that ended in a draw took penalty shots to find a winner. The league ended up overmatching itself by expanding too quickly. New franchises were being formed, and there wasn’t enough interest to provide enough money. The NASL didn’t have television contracts to broadcast games, and average attenDonnellan dance averaged from 5,000 to 15,000 people. Even with the rule changes, Americans didn’t buy into a revamped “beautiful game.” The NASL folded in 1984. So what else can be done to the game of soccer so it will increase in popularity? Nothing. In most countries, soccer is a religion. The World Cup, which is played every four years, is the Holy Grail. According to MSNBC, countries such as Germany and Italy actually lose around $2.3 million of their gross domestic product during the tournament due to employees not working. That’s dedication. I have come to a conclusion as to why soccer is not as popular here as it is in the rest of the world: It’s not the game that needs to change; it’s the level at which it’s played. Passion for soccer in the U.S. is obviously not here, but it is coming. ESPN, along with its affiliated stations, broadcast live every single World Cup 2010 game, recapped during SportsCenter and created “World Cup Live” (Alexi Lalas should not have been an analyst). Major League Soccer (MLS), for now, only gets minor coverage by ESPN, however. Even though the MLS is growing, the quality of play isn’t quite up to the level of other international leagues. Just as the NASL brought Brazilian star Pele and German star Franz Beckenbaur into the league at the end of their careers to create more interest, the MLS is doing the same with David Beckham. Yes, he has been injured quite a bit. Yes, he has been loaned to European teams (AC Milan, Arsenal) for short periods of time. But when he does play for the LA Galaxy, he shows that he is still more than capable of competing with America’s professionals. European players at the end of their careers should not be able to come and start for MLS clubs. It proves that the level to draw viewers and fans still isn’t there. The U.S. Men’s National Team receives a bit more attention from domestic fans, especially during the World Cup. Because of recent success against European and South American sides, the Yanks are starting to show the world that they can consistently play on an international level. So where’s the gap from the MLS to the MNT? On each team, 17 players of the 23-man squad play for clubs in Europe. U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard was quoted in an interview on ESPN saying “it was a dream come true” when he signed with English powerhouse Manchester United. And why? Because of the level of play. Howard signed with one of the top clubs in the world. American players are still looking to be challenged and prove themselves as big-time players, so they go overseas for that confirmation. In order to increase the popularity of soccer in the U.S., the MLS has to find a way to keep its domestic players and draw foreign stars in their prime. Unfortunately, building a successful league is a slowgrowing process. The NFL and MLB weren’t built in a day either. The full-fledged fanatic support will come. My final note on the subject matter is to casual fans: Hopefully, you cheered for the U.S. in the World Cup! It takes almost three years of matches just to qualify for the tournament, and only 32 countries do so. Getting into the World Cup is a feat in and of itself. And now, keep watching now that it’s over. Right now, America is bidding for the 2018 or 2022 World Cups. I think we as fans will be again ready to host (last time was 1994), and this time there will be even more home-team support. The U.S. will win the World Cup some day ... just maybe not in the immediate future.


Volume 8 Issue 30