Issuu on Google+

TABLE OF CONTENTS

WORK EXPERIENCE La Hacienda Casitas 1 Iglesia de la Sagrada Familia

5

Addressing Food Insecurity 7 The Poultry Project 9 Kent 1020 11 ACADEMIA Improving Mass Transit in the Triangle Area

13

NC Film Institute 17 Redefining the Sprawled American City Interpretting the City through Layered Analysis

21 23


LA HACIENDA CASITAS HARLINGEN, TEXAS NOVEMBER 2011 - PRESENT

Client: Community Development Corporation of Brownsville (CDCB) Project Cost: $5.5 million Project Team: Emily Axtman (Designer), Brent Brown (Project Architect), Benje Feehan (Lead Designer), Omar Hakeem (Project Manager) Cameron County is one of the poorest counties in the U.S. Predominantly an Hispanic population, many families are well below the poverty line. Home-ownership is a difficult, if not impossible task. The La Hacienda Casitas project, is a 56-unit housing development, ranging from eight, 1-3 bedroom“casitas”, or small houses.The design focuses on ideas of community, sustainability and site preservation. Project completion is slated for July 2013. (Above top) Cameron County is the southern-most county in Texas, bordering Mexico. (Above middle) Lower Rio Grande Valley & Site location. (Across top) Site Plan. (Far right) 4 of 8 unit designs. (Right) View down “center” street.

1


1

2

3

4

2


5

6

7

8

(Above) 4 of 8 unit designs. (Above right) 2B/2BA Floor plan. (Across) 1 of 6 community buildings: the Meeting Hall.

3


4


IGLESIA DE LA SAGRADA FAMILIA NEWTON GROVE, NORTH CAROLINA AUGUST 2010 - PRESENT

Client: Episcopal Farmworker Ministry (EFM) Project Team: Emily Axtman (Designer), Victoria Bell (Project Architect) Project Size: 20,000 sq. ft.; Project Cost: $5.5 million (Above top) Site Plan & View facing northwest. (Left) NC vernacular; South American architecture; Prefabricated construction. (Middle) Floor plan.

5


The EFM currently worships in an outdoor sheltered space that can only fit about 70 people. The attendance at the ministry balloons to 600 in the summer months, necessitating a new worship center. The ministry additionally desires to include an adjacent elementary school. The design of the new worship space and school seeks to weave together traditional movement within the Episcopal church while reflecting the rural vernacular of North Carolina. Exploring options of pre-fabricated building systems has allowed the center to be economical and broken into phases. The rural flat site has informed and shaped the design to be a low-lying, horizontal “L� that hugs and provides distant views to the untouched forest to the southwest. (Above top) Entrance walkway. (Middle) East elevation. (Above lower) South Elevation.

6


orps

t farmworker population in nings are the lowest of all ween $2500 and $5000 in ecent data, over sixty-one erty.

ty remains a harsh realrest University School of rmworker families experi8% experience moderate unger.

e laying hens provides an e. The chicken coop is system that is constructed mworkers’ residence by a ced by ideas of mobility, ructability, and references .

n coop is designed as a orkers’ lives and the issues coop, farmworker families e course of the on-site s of construction and exdea of empowering comg for under-represented

T s daily. Weekly this adds provides 140 calories and commended daily con-

mworker rights, the chicken nd message of what has ng the four to five million

ADDRESSING FOOD INSECURITY NORTH CAROLINA AUGUST 2010 - JUNE 2011

Client: Farmworkers of North Carolina; Episcopal Farmworker Ministry Project Cost: $400/coop Project Team: Emily Axtman (Designer), Rosa Saavedra (Community Organizer)

7


8


1

2

ALLEVIATING POVERTY. MBALE, UGANDA JANUARY 2011 - MAY 2011

Client: 50+ AIDS/HIV affected Ugandan families Project Cost: $70/coop Project Team: Emily Axtman (Designer), Emily Flamos (Dietitian), Kelly Flamos (Co-Director), Kevin Kopanski (Photographer), Joe Pavlick (Co-Director) 1. In a population of 34.5 million, 35% of Ugandans live below poverty line, 1.2 million people are afffeced by HIV/AIDS, 150,000 of those being children and 1.2 million children are AIDS orphans (*children under age 17 who have lost one or both parents)

9


3

2. The Poultry Project, a US/Ugandan-based non-profit, works with HIV/AIDS orphans, to provide a platform for participants to generate additional income through small start-up poultry businesses. The Poultry Project was created in 2006 by The AIDS Support Organization (TASO [the largest indigenous HIV/AIDS NGO in Africa]) and two fellows from George Washington University to address the persistent poverty and malnutrition plaguing HIV/AIDS-affected children. 3. 2010 Project Evaluations revealed that particpants’ poultry projects were in need of sufficient shelter for the poultry due to loss of free-range birds to predators and unhealthy living conditions due to cohabitation of the birds and participants.

10


Cross Ventilation

Thermal Mass

Sealed Crawl Space

low e-glass windows

MASTER BEDROOM

fly-ash concrete

cedar porch

Hardi siding

metal roofing

cistern

vegetable garden

green screen

the 2007 north carolina sustainable design competition challenged students to design an energy efficient, affordable house located in a 1930s, bungalow style neighborhood in durham nc. at a cost of $52/sq ft, this project addressed two great dilemmas of my generation: sustainability and affordability.

KI

RECYCLING CENTER

KENT 1020 2007 NC Sustainability Competition DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA OCTOBER 2006 - SEPTEMBER 2008

the 2007 north carolina sustainable to design an energy efficient, affo style neighborhood in durham nc. at dressed two great dilemmas of my ge ity.

Design Team: Emily Axtman, Kaitlyn Baird, Maria Hill, William Lambeth, Josh Wheeler Project Size: 1,200 sq. ft.; Project Cost: $56/sq. ft. Project Advisor: Randall Lanou Construction Team: Build Sense + Studio B Kent 1020 is located in a low-income bungalow-style neighborhood in Durham, NC. Designed for a single mother with two children, the house addresses issues of home-ownership and affordability, sustainability and preservation of historic characteristics of a community. (Above) Rendering. (Above lower) Kent 1020 in neighborhood.

11


BATHROOM

MASTER BEDROOM

MASTER CLOSET

WASHER/DRYER

LINEN CLOSET

CLOSET

FOYER CLOSET

a two bar sceme was used to separate public from private space

CLOSET

PANTRY

KITCHEN

DINING

LIVING

RECYCLING CENTER

4” Continuous Soffit Screen sealed @edges between truss bays Formaldehyde-Free Blown Fiberglass-13” R-39 24” 2x10 Blocking 1/2” Gypsum Board sealed at joints (continuous air barrier) Light colored shingles 15# Roofing Felt 1/2” Radiant Roof Sheathing 1/2” OSB Nailer for Roof Shingles

Primed and sealed exposed truss eaves Hurricane Ties 8.25” Hardiplank rainscreen siding 30# building felt drainage plane 36” x 62” double-hung window w/ low-e + argon glass Hardtrim Sill Board (45 deg. mitered return at window) 2x6 Plate 12” vertical Hardiplank rainscreen 1” Thermal mass concrete tile 6” Structural Insulated Panel 5/8” Advantech Subfloor 1/2” x 3” Pressure Treated furring strips Laminated Rim Board

I-Joist (OSB Web + LVL Flanges)

J-Bolt anchored to foundation

2x Pressure treated sill plate

Whole House Fan

Ventilated Roof Cavity

Sill gasket (or sealant) 6 mil. polyethylene vapor/air barrier (all joints taped) 3” Rigid Roam Insulation taped/sealed @ joints

Continuous Thermal Envelope CMU w/ fly ash foundation Dampproofing/sealant Capillary break over footing

Cross Ventilation 4” Foundation drain

Thermal Mass

Sealed Crawl Space

ent, affordable house essed two great dilemmas of

The plan is derived as a 2 bar scheme with private spaces to the north and gathering spaces to the south.The southern-glazed wall allows for maximum natural lighting in the daytime spaces: the kitchen, living and dining rooms. Kent 1020’s sustainable features include proper solar orientation, SIPs (Structural Insulated Panels) construction, low-E glazing, Hardi-plank siding, fly ash concrete and a garden and cistern. (Above top) View of completed house. (Above middle) Column detail. (Above lower) Floor Plan. (Above left) Section Cut. (Above right) Section Detail. (Above lower) Floor Plan & Completed project.

12


IMPROVING MASS TRANSIT IN THE TRIANGLE AREA RALEIGH/DURHAM/CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA JANUARY 2011 - MAY 2011 Project Advisors: Patrick Rand & Dennis Stallings The Triangle is one of the fastest growing metropolises in the nation with a current population of 1.5 million, expected to steadily grow to 2.5 million in the next decade. This rapid growth necessitates adequate mass transportation for all.

13


Sited on a green patch of land left-over from a highway interchange, the proposal untilizes the entire site. Two long linear bars delineate the fast-moving traffic on the exterior of the site and are positioned to create a great plaza of movement within the interior of the site: cyclists, pedestrians, two light rail lines, buses and vehicular traffic all flow through the core of the site allowing for a complete transparency and celebration of movement. (Above left) View facing north to shops. (Above middle) Site Plan & Concept/Programming diagram.

14


(Top) 1/16� Model (Middle) Longitudinal Section (Above) Section Cut. (Across) Floor Plans

15


Model @ 1/16=1�

Longitudinal Section

16


1

2 4

14

15 13

3

16

11

12 5 10

9

6

7

8

GROUND FLOOR @ 1” = 16’ 17

18

1. WALK / BIKE PATH 2. GIFT SHOP 3. PERMANENT EXHIBITION 4. WATER COLLECTION 5. ARCHIVE 6. MECHANICAL SPACE 7. CHILLER / DUMPSTER SPACE 8. FAN ROOM 9. KITCHEN 10. CAFE 11. OUTDOOR SEATING 12. OUTDOOR CINEMA 13. TERRACED STEPS / COURTYARD 14. LILLY POND 15. CATTAIL LINE 16. SMOKESTACK 17. TERRACED SEATING 18. DELIVERY ACCESS

NORTH CAROLINA FILM INSTITUTE RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA AUGUST 2009 - DECEMBER 2009 Project Advisor: Jeffrey Lee

17


1

2

3

4

5

(Above left) Rendering of west view. (Above right) 1. Site; 2. Old smoke stack on-site; 3. Old film marque 4. North Carolina vernacular barn; 5.1950s film studio (Across lower) Ground floor plan. (Above lower) Model @ 1/16�=1’

18


6

7

reflection of the design process through a r a n d o m stream of thoughts huge site, so green; typical north carolina scene. bike paths. the site is filled with bike paths. there are breaks in the path, pauses ---> the sculptures. the institute will be a break on the path, a moment of pause - it could range from five seconds to five hours. public space - where is all the public space? this building will provide for just as many outdoor spaces as indoor spaces. light - film is all about light. the building will try to shape the light in interesting and sensible ways depending on program. context - rather than the focus of the design be on creating an object, the focus will be on exploring the possibilities of the spacial relationships created between fragments of program. materials - local mama terials constructed through understandable building techniques. the building will be modest not only in its material palette, but in its overall presence. placement of material and choice of material chosen as a reaction to what’s happening on either side of site ie: fast cars, road, machine [blue ridge] v. serene, green landscape, cyclist, walker. idea of process of evolution rather than revolution. the building will try to use as many already existing features on the site as possible. CONNECTED ISOLATION. how do we connect our isolated environment? How do we re-establish the idea of what a COMMUNITY is? 1. Parti Diagram : Greater Context 2. Smokestack on site 3. NY movie theater, 1910. 4. Barn 5. Glass movie set, 1920s. 6. Site from Blue Ridge with Smokestack in background. 7. Design concept

(Above) Concept for institute. (Across) Entry level floor plan & Elevations.

19


NORTH ELEVATION @ 1” = 16’ 1

17

18

3

2 4

15

14

13

5

7 10 6

8

9

10

10

10

10

4

12 11

ENTRY FLOOR @ 1” = 16’ 1. ENTRY / WELCOMING / PRE-POST CINEMA GATHERING SPACE 2. LOBBY 3. OUTDOOR WALKWAY 4. WATER COLLECTION POOL 5. TEMPORARY EXHIBITION SPACE 6. LIBRARY 7. WAITING / RECEPTION 8. DIRECTOR’S OFFICE 9. COFERENCE ROOM 10. OFFICES 11. SCHOLAR’S APARTMENT 12. OUTDOOR CINEMA 13. TERRACED STEPS / COURTYARD 14. LILLY POND 15. CATTAIL LINE 16. TELEPHONE ROOM 17. STORAGE 18. FAN ROOM 19. SMOKESTACK

SOUTH ELEVATION @ 1” = 16’

EAST ELEVATION @ 1” = 16’

19

EDOCTSE

16

EDOCTSE

16


REDEFINING THE SPRAWLED AMERICAN CITY ANYWHERE, USA JANUARY 2008 - MAY 2008

Project Advisor: Jota Samper The density of the city is consolidated with the horizontality of the highway to create a megacity structure. Buildings become horizontal spaces intertwined to create open permeable space. Green screens provide massive interior plazas with shade and present possibilities of vertical farming. Neighborhoods attach themselves to the city through existing highway interchanges.

21


“Inside every house is a city and inside every city is a house.”

2

My goal for this project is to blur the line between highway and city; to create one language as opposed to the language of the highway and the language of a city as two separate entities. 1. Language of highway vs language of a city 2. One unified language of highway + city

4

3

9

A successful city is one that is built in response to the needs of the people who inhabit it. 3. Intimate spaces within a city

;

Clothes hanging to dry ; Venice, Italy

4. Great communal spaces within a city 5. Balance of Public : Private spaces

; ;

Plaza ; Sienna, Italy Plan of Rome, Italy

4

7

8

10

11

If we look at our movement through cities today, can we manipulate that movement to better the quality of life? 6. Raleigh, NC Skyline ; street movement : horizontal / building movement : vertical 7. Flip 8. Extrude ; street and building movement : horizontal ie: one language 9. Raleigh, NC Downtown Plan ; street movement : grid 10. Tilt 11. I-540 City

5

The freeway is fast, crazy, and exactly what its name depicts: free. The freeway is a different realm of society. It’s like a slow moving snake weaving its way through our cities.

110 and 105 freeway; Los Angeles

2

6

110 and 105 freeway; Los Angeles

1

The freeway is fast, crazy, and exactly what its name depicts: free. The freeway is a different realm of society. It’s like a slow moving snake weaving its way through our cities.

5

3

1

1. Language of highway vs language of a city 2. One unified language of highway + city My goal for this project is to blur the line between highway and city; to create one language as opposed to the language of the highway and the language of a city as two separate entities. 2

extrude

city : flip

intertwine N

The I-540 city is an attempt to create a new language and dialog within a city. Using the nature of the highway, the components of the city are added to make a fluid whole. Important to the idea is to create a breathable environment that does not act as a highway usually does, dividing the territory into two separate pieces, but connects them through green space. The city is rooted to its site through the communities that surround it. Dense areas of the city organize to form plazas as well as smaller inimate spaces. Long streches of unbuilt territory is dedicated to green space. The cities are connected through the highway which intertwines throughout the city. In this sense the highway and buildings of the city begin to be of one language.

1 110 and 105 freeway; Los Angeles The freeway is fast, crazy, and exactly what its name depicts: free. The freeway is a different realm of society. It’s like a slow moving snake weaving its way through our cities.

1. Language of highway vs language of a city 2. One unified language of highway + city My goal for this project is to blur the line between highway and city; to create one language as opposed to the language of the highway and the language of a city as two separate entities.

highway : city

2

highway : neighborhoods 1

interior perspective of “I-540” city

study model

site plan

The city of the future seeks to combine the language of the highway with the language of the city in order to create a new urban typology responsive to environmental issues and present urban conditions. (Above right) 1. Horizontal system of highway; 2. Vertical system of city; 3. Vertical system flipped; 4. Vertical system turns horizontal; 5. Horizontal & Vertical systems consolidate into new typology. (Above middle) Rendering of city. (Above lower) Site Plan.

22


river

houses streets typography lakes

3 DIMENSIONAL INTERPRETATION OF THE CITY RICHMOND, VIRGINIA AUGUST 2005 - DECEMBER 2005 Project Advisor: Ginger Kreig Model: 18” x 36”; bass wood

23


The analysis explores how geographical characteristics of site have shaped and affected the built environment of Richmond. The interpretation thereafter depicts the city as a transparent system of chronological layers, connected and built up through time.

24


EAA 2013