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C O N N E C T I C U T

H E A L T H

A N N U A L

Grant

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

R E P O R T

F O U N D A T I O N 2 0 0 7


TABLE OF CONTENTS (Grant) Making a Difference Children’s Mental Health Children’s Oral Health Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities General Operations Support Grant Awards Strategic Plan Grant Guidelines Financial Statements Foundation Leadership

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The mission of the Connecticut Health Foundation (CHF) is to improve the health status of people in Connecticut. With this mission, the Connecticut Health Foundation aims to make qualitative and measurable differences in the health and well-being of individuals and families. The foundation actively strives to serve the unmet needs of the state and its communities, and to be responsive to unserved and underserved populations.

To fulfill its mission, the Connecticut Health Foundation pursues the following goals:

• Increase access to quality and affordable health services for all Connecticut residents • Promote wellness, prevention of disease and active management of chronic illnesses and conditions • Encourage improvement of health outcomes and wise use of health care resources


“When we started, we knew that while we could never totally meet the pressing needs of the underserved in Connecticut, we could work toward changing the systems that created disparities in quality and access to health care. In Franklin D. Roosevelt’s words, ‘Progress … is not measured by giving more to those with abundance, but by providing enough to those who have so little.’ ” Jean Rexford, Board Member and former Program Committee Chair


(GRANT) MAKING A DIFFERENCE Grantmaking for the Connecticut Health Foundation goes well beyond writing a check and saying, “Do good work.� When we commit our financial and human resources to a portfolio of grantees, we are making long-term, strategic investments in partners who have taught us an important lesson: Improving the ability of organizations, institutions and public policies to be more responsive to the health needs of Connecticut residents is complex, difficult and time-consuming.


With that lesson, and the compelling findings of our Community Health Data Scan for Connecticut front and center, the foundation’s new 10-year (2007-2017) strategic plan focuses on large, multiyear grants that promote health care systems change and meet strategic objectives built around CHF’s three program priorities: • Reducing racial and ethnic health disparities • Expanding oral health services for publicly insured children • Improving children’s mental health services


The four grantees featured in the foundation’s 2007 annual report are passionate about accomplishing their objectives and ours. Together, they demonstrate the commitment, capacity, vision and leadership to change systems and make a measurable, lasting difference in the health of Connecticut’s under-represented and underserved.


“ULTIMATELY, WE HOPE A FAMILY WILL BE ABLE TO WALK INTO A SCHOOL AND KNOW IT IS WARM AND RESPONSIVE, THAT THE COMMUNITY IS PRESENT AND SUPPORTED BY ALL SYSTEMS, AND THAT IT IS COMMITTED TO THE DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS OF EVERY CHILD IN THAT COMMUNITY.” Hector Glynn, Vice President of Community and Youth Services at The Village for Families and Children, and Coordinator of the System of Care Project


Children’s Mental Health Childhood trauma is just one circumstance that can impact a child’s mental health. Left unidentified, without intervention, these experiences can lead to intensive mental health treatment and/or placement in the juvenile justice system.

I N V E ST I N G I N L E SSO N S L E A R N E D

A variety of childhood experiences contribute to an alarming incidence of mental health problems in youngsters from virtually all Connecticut communities. These communities “know best” about understanding these problems’ roots and solutions. The Connecticut Health Foundation responded in 2007 by awarding grants to 11 community collaboratives to develop comprehensive plans for reducing the number of children ages 6-14 entering the juvenile justice system or needing intensive mental health services. Among the grantees taking on this 18-month, community-based planning effort is the Hartford/West Hartford System of Care (SOC). This collaborative is comprised of parents, providers, neighborhood organizations, schools, police and the courts, as well as the state Department of Children and Families, and key mental health agencies, that provide services to families raising children with mental illness and complex behavioral needs. “We are identifying an at-risk target neighborhood and schools where we can implement screening, early assessment and brief intervention strategies,”

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says Marie Mormile-Mehler, vice present of planning, performance and accountability at The Village for Families and Children, Inc. “Specific interventions will come from ideas generated by that local community and through technical assistance from the foundation.” “If you are going to change systems, you must be willing to give parents and communities some control of what they need to be successful,” says SOC Co-Chair Merva Jackson, executive director, African Caribbean American Parents of Children with Disabilities, Inc. “That’s when you will really see change.” “We want to create a system that has every adult looking for signs that a child may be struggling and need support,” adds Hector Glynn, vice president of community and youth services at The Village and coordinator of the SOC project. Long term, “we want to create local prevention systems that will help these children develop a sense of self-worth and, ultimately, a model the state can follow,” says Will Crimi, foundation vice president of program & evaluation.


“ONE OF THE GREATEST THINGS ABOUT OUR COLLABORATIVE IS THAT ALL THE MEMBERS ARE STRONG, COMMITTED DECISION-MAKERS WITH THE CAPACITY TO CHANGE SYSTEMS AND CARRY OUT OUR VISION.” Kim Doan, Danbury School System Dental Services Coordinator


Children’s Oral Health

Tooth decay is the most common — and preventable — chronic disease among U.S. children.

I N V E ST I N G I N S E L F-S U F F I C I E N C Y

Yet, thousands of Connecticut children are slow to smile because of limited access, if any, to quality, affordable dental care. That is why the Connecticut Health Foundation (CHF) recently awarded sustainability grants to the Danbury Public School Community Oral Health Initiative and several other promising oral health collaboratives committed to building on their important work after CHF funding ends. “Through a school-based program started from scratch, the Danbury collaborative has more than doubled the number of children on Healthcare for UninSured Kids and Youth (HUSKY) who receive treatment and nearly tripled the number who get preventive care,” says Joanna Douglass, BDS, DDS, CHF’s oral health consultant. “They also have done a great job integrating their nondental community partners (physicians, pediatric health centers, social service agencies, etc.) into Danbury’s health care delivery system.”

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Kim Doan, Danbury School System dental services coordinator, says the collaborative is developing a plan to demonstrate how it will sustain and enhance direct programming, while strengthening its ability to realize its ambitious goals. “While recent increases in Medicaid reimbursement rates will help us achieve financial sustainability, our new CHF grant will enable us to achieve other important efficiencies. Technical assistance from the foundation also will help ensure that collaborative members continue communicating, so the need for dental care among the children we serve will be continually reinforced.” Looking ahead two years, Doan envisions a self-sustaining community collaborative overseeing oral health programs that will include mobile dental units serving both the Danbury and New Fairfield school districts; dental care at the Roberts Avenue School; continuation of prenatal and age-one outreach programs through the Women, Infants and Children program; and an independent Head Start dental program. Now that’s something to smile about.


“FAIR HAVEN’S DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM IS ALREADY BEING RECOGNIZED NATIONALLY. PERHAPS IT WILL BE THE NEXT EXAMPLE OF WHAT WORKS.” Anne Camp, M.D., Fair Haven Community Health Center


Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities

After adjusting for age differences in the populations, African-Americans living in Connecticut are three times more likely to die from diabetes-related conditions than whites, while the rate of diabetes-related deaths in Hispanics is twice that of whites.

I N V E ST I N G I N W H AT WO R K S

Those were among the disturbing findings of a CHF-commissioned report, Community Health Data Scan for Connecticut (March 2007), on the health of Connecticut residents. To help address this racial and ethnic health disparity, the foundation awarded grants to four federally qualified health centers, one of which, Fair Haven Community Health Center, is taking a unique, family-centered approach to preventing diabetes among at-risk Latina women in its vibrant New Haven neighborhood. “Foundation funding has helped us expand our electronic patient registry to confirm what we knew in our hearts,” says Anne Camp, M.D. “We have a significant number of obese patients at risk for diabetes.” At the start of the CHF-funded initiative, more than 1,000 Latina women were identified as being at risk, 300 of whom have received oral glucose tolerance tests. These measure the body’s ability to use glucose — the body’s main source of energy. An astonishing 40 percent or 120 of the women screened had pre-diabetes.

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Fair Haven’s Erin Ruppe, APRN, is confident that a 10-week, family-centered lifestyle intervention program will make a difference in the health of these women. “Our intervention is based on a National Institutes of Health (NIH) program, which showed it is more effective to lose an average of 15 pounds and exercise regularly to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes than it is to use medication or usual care.” Unlike the NIH model, the Fair Haven initiative is a group program, all instruction is in Spanish and exercise classes include moms — and their children. “We believe it is very important to create a new model through these women,” says Ruppe. “Children need what their moms need.”


“WE WANT TO BE SURE THAT GREATER HARTFORD LEGAL AID AND ITS PARTNERS HAVE THE LAWYERS THEY NEED TO ADVOCATE FOR THEIR CLIENTS’ HEALTH NEEDS … AND ENHANCE THEIR ABILITY TO CREATE HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS CHANGE FOR PEOPLE THROUGHOUT CONNECTICUT.” Patricia Baker, Foundation President & CEO


General Operations Support

We are advocates — primarily lawyers and paralegals — who use our resources and know-how to serve people with little money. We seek to equalize power and influence, and see that all

INVESTING IN SUCCESS

That, essentially, is the mission of Greater Hartford Legal Aid (GHLA). Its good work, along with the work of Connecticut’s three other legal aid agencies — Connecticut Legal Services, New Haven Legal Assistance and the Legal Assistance Resource Center of Connecticut — has been enhanced through a Connecticut Health Foundation grant program that provides general operations support to organizations that are getting the job done.

are treated justly. “Funding from the foundation gives our consortium the equivalent of five full-time attorneys dedicated to health care work,” says GHLA Executive Director Elam Lantz, Jr. “That support, and the extraordinary education, advocacy and technical services the foundation provided, played a huge role in recently settling a class action suit (Carr v. Wilson-Coker), in which we represented more than 280,000 children. This settlement moves us closer to the day children on Medicaid will have the same access to quality, affordable dental services as families with private insurance.”

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For the foundation, grantees like GHLA are its most important resource for reaching its goals. “They have a proven track record and are aligned with our vision,” notes Will Crimi, foundation vice president of program & evaluation. For GHLA, funding by the foundation and others is indispensable. “It has helped us leverage more than $100 million over the next four to five years in additional benefits for low-income families and children,” says Lantz. “That’s incredible advocacy.” “The general operation grant we awarded GHLA not only helps them meet the needs of the state’s poorest, it also provides flexibility to reprioritize health programs in a way not possible with initiative-oriented funding,” adds Crimi. And Lantz agrees: “We are delighted to receive general operations support because it enables us to pick up new issues, with a focus on health care. Frankly, it keeps health care work a top priority in our organization.”


Grant

AWA R DS

Amounts may include multiple grants distributed over various time frames. For a brief description of each grant award, please visit www.cthealth.org under “Whom We’ve Funded.”

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

ACCESS Community Action Agency (Willimantic) Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. (Hartford) Asylum Hill Family Resource Center — Catholic Charities (Hartford) Bridges … A Community Support System, Inc. (Milford) Capitol Region Education Council (Hartford) Center for Children’s Advocacy, Inc. (Hartford) Center for Medicare Advocacy, Inc. (Willimantic) Child Guidance Clinic for Central Connecticut, Inc. (Meriden) City of Norwalk Department of Youth Services (Norwalk) Community Catalyst (New England)

$7,350 $20,000 $25,000 $127,300 over 18 months $74,386 $225,000 over three years $2,300 $15,750 $125,000 over 18 months $100,000 over two years

Community Health Resources (Enfield) Community Renewal Team, Inc. (Hartford) Connecticut Center for a New Economy (New Haven) Connecticut Center for Patient Safety, Inc. (Statewide) Connecticut Health Policy Project, Inc. (New Haven) Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance (Bridgeport) Connecticut League for Nursing (Statewide) Connecticut Oral Health Initiative (Hartford) Council on Foundations (Washington, D.C.) Danbury Public School Community Oral Health Initiative (Danbury)

$125,000 over 18 months $80,000 $2,300 $135,000 over two years $25,000 $266,500 over three years $10,000 $135,000 $16,010 $360,000 over three years

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GRANTEE

AMOUNT

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

Education Connection (Litchfield) Education Development Center, Inc. (Nationwide) Environment and Human Health, Inc. (North Haven) Ethel Donaghue TRIPP Center, University of Connecticut Health Center (Farmington) Faith Congregational Church — Living Well Health Ministry (Hartford) Families United for Children’s Mental Health (Colchester) Families USA (Washington, D.C.) Foundation for Educational Advancement, Inc. (Simsbury) Grantmakers for Effective Organizations (Washington, D.C.) Grantmakers in Health (Washington, D.C.) Hall-Brooke Behavioral Health Services, Inc. (Westport) Hartford Food System (Hartford) Hartford/West Hartford System of Care (Hartford) Health Leadership Fellows (New Britain) Hill Health Corporation (New Haven) Hispanic Center of Greater Danbury, Inc. (Danbury) Hispanic Health Council (Hartford) Hospital for Special Care Pediatric Dental Clinic (New Britain) Human Resources Agency of New Britain, Inc. — Free to Grow (New Britain) Junta for Progressive Action, Inc. (New Haven) Latino Community Services, Inc. (Hartford) Lawrence & Memorial Hospital (New London) Lawyers for Children America, Inc. (Hartford) LEARN — Southeast Mental Health System of Care (Old Lyme) Lower Naugatuck Valley Parent Child Resource Center, Inc. (Derby) Malta House of Care Foundation, Inc. (Hartford) Manchester Youth Service Bureau (Manchester) Mercy Learning Center (Bridgeport)

$7,500 $600,000 over two years $125,000 $381,522 over two years

Middlesex Hospital Center for Behavioral Health (Middletown) Naugatuck Valley Project, Inc. (Naugatuck) New Britain Youth & Family Services, Inc. (New Britain) New Haven Adult Education Center (New Haven) New Haven Oral Health Collaborative (New Haven) Northwest Caring Connection (Torrington) Norwich Adult Education (Norwich) Nubian Sisters Cancer Support Group (New Haven) Office of the Healthcare Advocate, State of Connecticut (Statewide) One World Progressive Institute, Inc. (New Haven) Operation Fuel, Inc. (Bloomfield) Oral Health Bridgeport Initiative (ORBIT) (Bridgeport) Prayer Tabernacle Church of Love — Going Forth Boldly (Bridgeport) Saint Joseph College (West Hartford) Southwest Community Health Center (Bridgeport) Stamford Public Schools Adult & Continuing Education (Stamford) The Charlotte Hungerford Hospital (Torrington) The Hospital of Central Connecticut (New Britain) Town of Wallingford Department of Youth and Social Services (Wallingford) United Community & Family Services, Inc. (Norwich) United Way of Eastern Fairfield County — The Partnership for Kids/PARK Project (Bridgeport) University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine (Farmington) URU, The Right To Be, Inc. (West Haven) Waterbury Prevention Policy Board — The Governor’s Prevention Partnership (Waterbury) Waterbury Youth Service System, Inc., fiscal agent for Waterbury Family Focus Partnership (Waterbury) Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center (Derby)

$125,000 over 18 months $150,000 over two years $125,000 over 18 months $75,000 $20,000 $50,000 $75,000 over 15 months $25,000 $14,000 $151,500 over two years $75,000 $360,000 over three years $25,000 $27,126 $24,239 $71,314 over 15 months $40,000 $8,000 $125,000 over 18 months $2,300 $125,000 over 18 months

Total

$6,339,713

$25,000 $2,300 $103,800 $10,000 $5,000 $5,500 $9,000 $25,000 $125,000 over 18 months $10,000 $117,820 $20,000 $25,000 $23,868 $25,000 $50,000 $34,500 $25,000 $100,000 over two years $185,000 over two years $125,000 over 18 months $5,000 $125,000 over 18 months $75,000

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$79,520 $125,000 $125,000 over 18 months $14,048 $54,960


Strategic

P L A N The Connecticut Health Foundation adopts the following strategic plan for 2007 to 2017.1

PRIORITY AREAS The foundation will recommit to its three priority areas: children’s mental health, racial and ethnic health disparities, and children’s oral health.

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The foundation has established goals and objectives in each priority area to guide its work, as follows:

CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH GOAL:

RACIAL AND ETHNIC HEALTH DISPARITIES GOAL:

CHILDREN’S ORAL HEALTH GOAL:

Reduce the number of at-risk children ages 6-14 entering intensive treatment and/or the juvenile justice system due to mental health problems.

Decrease racial and ethnic health disparities.

Improve the oral health of children covered by Medicaid.

Objective 1: Create public will to decrease racial and ethnic health disparities in access and treatment.

Objective 1: Increase utilization of preventive and treatment visits to the levels achieved by children insured in the private sector.2

Objective 1: Promote a community-based system of early identification and intervention for children at risk of mental health problems.

Objective 2: Improve the patient-provider interaction. Objective 2: Identify and promote models of care that improve oral health outcomes for children covered by Medicaid in our funded communities.

Objective 2: Support the development and dissemination of knowledge in early identification and effective interventions relating to children’s mental health.

ADDITIONAL POINTS In addition to these goals and objectives, several other points will guide the work of the foundation, as stated below: • The foundation will actively keep issues associated with health data and sustainable resources on its radar screen to inform its three priority areas. • Responsiveness to opportunity will be considered a value of the Connecticut Health Foundation. If specific criteria are met, the foundation may respond to opportunities that arise outside its three priority areas and their associated goals and objectives. 1 2

Progress will be measured against benchmarks on shorter time intervals, such as every three years. A large benchmark group will need to be identified by the foundation; data should be compared across same-age categories. 20


Grant

G U I D E L I N E S

IDENTIFYING A GOOD CANDIDATE FOR A CONNECTICUT HEALTH FOUNDATION GRANT

Historically, we have asked applicants to define a problem and provide a solution. Now, we are asking them to demonstrate the ability to solve the problem with programs and actions that lead to health care systems change — new policies, practices, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors that will improve community well-being.

Note: This year’s report includes abbreviated guidelines. For a full set of grant guidelines, visit our web site at www.cthealth.org.

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CONNECTICUT HEALTH FOUNDATION GRANT GUIDELINES To make a difference, CHF funding must be directed to organizations and institutions dedicated to effecting positive, sustained change in health care systems. The following guidelines will help prospective applicants: • Understand the types of projects the foundation funds and does not fund • Evaluate if a proposal is a good match with CHF’s strategic grantmaking objectives • Determine how to apply for grant funding • Understand CHF’s grant review and notification process

TYPES OF GRANTS CHF awards two types of grants: • Full proposal — solicited or unsolicited • Discretionary

Solicited grant proposals describe the problem an applicant is expected to address about one of our three program priorities: children’s oral health, children’s mental health, and racial and ethnic health disparities. These proposals are solicited through a request for proposal (RFP) process.

Unsolicited grant proposals not only respond to one of CHF’s three strategic grantmaking priorities, but they also support the foundation’s overall mission to improve the health of Connecticut’s residents. Unsolicited applications are initiated by prospective grantees, not in response to a CHF invitation or RFP.

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Discretionary grant proposals are accepted occasionally if they respond to CHF’s mission. These grants — not to exceed $25,000 — are made at the discretion of the foundation’s president & CEO and/or chair of the board of directors, and/or chair of the program committee.


ELIGIBILITY

PREPARING AN APPLICATION - GRANT PROPOSAL PROCESS

CHF funds two types of organizations: nonprofit and government/public agencies. Nonprofit organizations must have a valid tax-exemption status under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and be classified as a public charity and not a “private foundation” under Section 509(a). If a proposal is submitted by an unincorporated organization, collaborative or community project, a fiscal agent with documented tax-exempt status is required. A letter of agreement stating the organization’s willingness to act as a fiscal agent must accompany the proposal with signatures from their organization’s chief executive officer, president or executive director.

Solicited grant applications respond to RFPs and should follow the application process outlined in the RFP. Unsolicited grant applications have a two-phase process. The first requires submission of a concept paper that briefly describes the proposed work to be completed under the grant. If the concept paper meets CHF expectations, the applicant will be invited to participate in the second phase — the full proposal.

Phase I: Concept Paper This two-page summary of the proposed project highlights the importance of issues to be addressed. Applicants submitting concept papers that “add value” to the foundation’s strategic objectives in any of its priority areas — children’s oral health, children’s mental health, and racial and ethnic health disparities — may be invited to submit a full proposal. Responses to concept papers are usually provided within two weeks of being received.

CHF does not fund grants for: • Construction, alteration, maintenance of buildings or building space, unless specifically allowed in an applicant’s instructions • Tuition or awards to individuals • Billable services supplied by physicians or other providers

• Capital projects, endowments or chairs associated with universities and medical schools • Projects that do not benefit Connecticut residents • Lobbying or influencing the outcome of specific municipal, state or federal legislation, or elections

Phase II: Full Proposal Applicants who have completed the concept paper for an unsolicited grant and have been invited to submit a full proposal are required to submit the following: 1. Cover sheet 2. Executive summary 3. Relevance of the proposed project 4. Program narrative 5. Evaluation 6. Sustainability of effort 7. Logic model worksheet 8. Budget worksheet 9. Budget justification 10. Operating budget 11. Board of directors

See www.cthealth.org under “How to Apply” for a complete list of requirements and quarterly proposal deadlines.

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GRANT REVIEW PROCESS

NOTIFICATION PROCESS

The foundation’s application review and approval process includes:

Upon receiving an application, CHF’s grants manager will email the contact person to acknowledge receiving the application — and explain the grant review and notification process. If the program committee does not recommend a proposal for approval to the board of directors, the applicant will be notified in writing or by phone within 10 business days of the committee meeting. All applicants whose grant proposals are considered by the CHF board will receive a written or verbal notification of the board’s decision within 10 business days of its quarterly meeting.

• An internal audit of completed proposals to ensure all required documentation has been submitted and each application section is complete. • A review by CHF staff and external experts to ensure an application addresses one or more of the foundation’s three program priorities; is programmatically sound and fiscally responsible; and presents methods that can be measured and evaluated. Reviewers’ comments and opinions are incorporated into recommendations to CHF’s program committee.

To review application procedures for a full grant proposal and discretionary grant, please click on www.cthealth.org under “How to Apply.” For additional information on the grant application/evaluation process, please contact Will Crimi, vice president of program & evaluation, at will@cthealth.org.

• The program committee, which consists of CHF board members, reviews applications to make recommendations to the board of directors. • The board of directors votes whether to accept or reject grant applications at its regularly scheduled quarterly meetings. The review process takes approximately three months from the application submission deadline date.

“THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE BRINGS TO LIFE THE SPIRIT AND INTENT OF THE CONNECTICUT HEALTH FOUNDATION’S MISSION BY OVERSEEING, ACTIVATING AND MONITORING GRANTS ACTIVITY. THIS WORK MAINTAINS THE CRITICAL CONNECTION TO OUR MAIN CONSTITUENCY — THOSE WHO DESERVE, BUT HAVE LIMITED ACCESS TO, QUALITY HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL SERVICES ASSOCIATED WITH THAT CARE. I AM PROUD AND HUMBLED BY THE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE.” Tina Brown-Stevenson, Program Committee Chair

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Financial

STAT E M E N T S

STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES

2007

2006

Revenues & Gains Interest & dividend income from investments Net realized investment gains Net unrealized investment gains

2,861,897 21,595,654 (13,709,180)

3,262,134 4,857,789 8,767,793

Total revenue & gains

$10,748,371

$16,887,716

Expenses & Losses Grants & program-related expenses General & administrative expenses Investment expenses

9,265,543 901,889 872,751

9,559,507 613,932 546,151

Total expenses & losses

11,040,183

10,719,590

Change in unrestricted & total net assets Net assets, beginning of year

(291,812) 141,893,521

6,168,126 135,725,395

$141,601,709

$141,893,521

Net assets, end of year

2007

2006

Assets Cash & cash equivalents Dividends & interest receivable Prepaid expenses & deposits Marketable securities Fixed assets, net of accumulated depreciation

3,354,120 61,865 162,590 144,420,574 126,253

372,537 60,921 40,770 146,677,265 113,239

Total assets

$148,125,402

$147,264,732

Liabilities & Net Assets Liabilities Accounts payable & accrued liabilities Grants payable

403,428 6,120,265

167,165 5,204,046

Total liabilities

6,523,693

5,371,211

141,601,709

141,893,521

$148,125,402

$147,264,732

STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION

Net assets - unrestricted Total liabilities & net assets

Our auditors have rendered an unqualified opinion on our financial statements. Our audited financial statements may be obtained by visiting www.cthealth.org under “About Us.�

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Foundation

L E A D E R S H I P

OFFICERS

STAFF

Leo Canty, Chair Susan Addiss, Vice Chair Corine T. Norgaard, Treasurer Marilyn Alverio, Secretary

Patricia Baker, President & CEO Onell Jesús Calderas, Program Officer William F. Crimi, Vice President of Program & Evaluation Monette Goodrich, Vice President of Communications & Public Affairs Maryland M. Grier, Public Affairs Officer Elizabeth M. S. Krause, Program Officer Midge Mongillo, Part-Time Administrative Assistant Nancy Nolan, Office/Grants Manager Madeline Pérez, Program Coordinator Carol Pollack, Vice President of Finance & Operations Yolanda Wilson, Administrative Assistant

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Jean Adnopoz Raymond S. Andrews, Jr. Tina Brown-Stevenson Gregory B. Butler Sanford Cloud, Jr. Martin Gavin Laura Green Katherine Ill, M.D. Henry Parker Jean Rexford Arthur Sperling, DMD Margarita Torres Michael Williams

“IT WAS A PRIVILEGE TO SERVE AS INTERIM CHAIR OF THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE … AND TO PERSONALLY EXPERIENCE THE COMPLEXITIES THAT SURROUND DECISION-MAKING IN THE GRANTING PROCESS. MAKING CHOICES IS NEVER EASY, PARTICULARLY IN A FINANCIALLY DISTRESSED ENVIRONMENT … THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE OFFERS A FORUM FOR AN INTELLIGENT DIALOGUE ON RESOURCE ALLOCATION THAT STRENGTHENS ALL ASPECTS OF THE FOUNDATION’S WORK.” Jean Adnopoz, Interim Program Committee Chair

Annual Report Team Editor-in-Chief: Maryland M. Grier Writing and Research: Todd H. Rosenthal Design: E.K. Weymouth Design Editing: Michael Sette Proofreading: Carol Macdonald Photographer: © 2008 galezucker/www.gzucker.com Printing: Hitchcock Printing

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT & CEO AND BOARD CHAIR Wise, consistent investments can create stories of positive health outcomes for your neighbors, your communities and this state. This annual report offers a glimpse of just some of these stories from this past year — investments in health literacy, children’s mental health, organizational leadership capacity and oral health. The fact is, in 2007 the Connecticut Health Foundation invested more than $6 million in over 70 grants to organizations that offer the promise of change. Our role in creating these stories is to ensure that long-term investments are made in promising and proven strategies that can make a difference. The Community Health Data Scan for Connecticut published in March 2007 revealed that African-Americans in Connecticut are three times more likely to die from diabetes-related conditions than whites, which guided the development of our diabetes grant initiative. If we are to change this inequity for African-Americans, as well as Latinos/as and Native Americans, or ensure continued access to oral health — prevention and treatment — for children covered by Medicaid (HUSKY), multiyear grants are the means. And they must be coupled with strong data, public policy analysis, advocacy, leadership development and communication. Our job is to invest in you and our communities to inform, model, advocate and integrate so that not only do those today benefit, but also those who follow. This is not the Connecticut Health Foundation’s story, it is how we contribute to creating a new and improved story for those affected today and more importantly for those to come.

Patricia Baker President & CEO

Leo Canty Board Chair


74B Vine Street New Britain, CT 06052 phone: 860.224.2200 fax: 860.224.2230 www.cthealth.org

CT Health 2007 AR  

annual report

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