Page 1

12-14 JUNE 2013 le Palais du Pharo Marseille, France

2nd announcement Global organising committee

Scientific committee

Anthony J. Costello, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Alex Mottrie, OLV Clinic, Aalst, Belgium Ash Tewari, The New York Presbyterian Hospital — Weill Cornell Medical Centre, New York, USA

Gert De Meerleer, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Nandita Desouza, Department of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK Steven Joniau, Department of Urology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Francesco Montorsi, Department of Urology, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy Peter Wiklund, Department of Urology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

Local organising committee Alberto Bossi, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France Karim Fizazi, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France Nicolas Mottet, University Hospital, Saint Etienne, France Arnauld Villers, Hospital Claude Huriez, Regional University Hospital Centre of Lille, Lille, France

www.prosca.org


Changing tomorrow Changing tomorrow

Astellas has made a commitment to change tomorrow – a commitment that we are bringing to the field of oncology. We aim to create innovative treatments that will genuinely improve the lives of cancer patients. To do this we are focusing our R&D and partnership efforts into precision medicine that will Astellas has made aor commitment change tomorrow – aresulted commitment that create first-in-class best-in-classtoprogrammes. This has in no fewer we the fieldunder of oncology. aim to create innovative treatments thanare 12bringing separatetotherapies clinicalWe development into conditions including that will genuinely improve the lives like of cancer patients. To do this we are and prostate cancer, other solid tumours pancreatic cancer, breast cancer focusing R&D and partnership efforts into precision medicine that will advancedour renal cell carcinoma, as well as haematological malignancies. create first-in-class or best-in-class programmes. This has resulted in no fewer Changing tomorrow These are the challenges weunder have clinical set ourselves becauseinto than 12 separate therapies development conditions including is more than just words – it is what we must do to give cancer patients real prostate cancer, other solid tumours like pancreatic cancer, breast cancer and hope of a tomorrow worth looking forward to. advanced renal cell carcinoma, as well as haematological malignancies. These are the challenges we have set ourselves because Changing tomorrow is more than just words – it is what we must do to give cancer patients real www.astellas.eu hope of a tomorrow worth looking forward to. © September 2011 Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd. CSC0461 ASTELLAS, Leading Light for Life, the Star logo, Changing tomorrow and the Ribbon logos are trade marks of Astellas Pharma Inc. and/or its related entities.

www.astellas.eu © September 2011 Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd. CSC0461 ASTELLAS, Leading Light for Life, the Star logo, Changing tomorrow and the Ribbon logos are trade marks of Astellas Pharma Inc. and/or its related entities. 019050_P_ASTELLAS_ONCOLOGY GENERAL AD CSC0461.indd 1

24/10/2011 18:14


Welcome Dear colleagues, dear friends, In June 2012, the first Global Congress on Prostate Cancer took place in Brussels, Belgium. More than 500 delegates and 50 leading experts in various fields of urology, radiology, radiotherapy and medical oncology discussed state-of-the art diagnosis and treatment of patients with various stages of prostate cancer. It is therefore with great excitement that we invite you to this second edition, which will take place from 12-14 June 2013 in Marseille, France, European Capital of Culture 2013. This second Global Congress on Prostate Cancer will continue to focus on topics which are actual and controversial, and which are of interest to all specialties dealing with prostate cancer. Unfortunately, many of the practical questions are not addressed at congresses today. In order to do so, we think we need to go in depth and beyond classical congress formats as well as geographical and disciplinary boundaries.

As this congress aims to be the major educational multidisciplinary event purely focusing on prostate cancer, we hope to attract up to 700 delegates from various specialties, actively contributing in the discussion on how to deal with dilemmas when managing the disease. We are very proud with the team of experts we have brought together. Their fabulous amount of expertise and different backgrounds will help us to create a high quality congress. So let us all meet at the stunning ‘Palais du Pharo’, which offers amazing views on the Mediterranean Sea whilst dominating the ‘Vieux Port’ and was completely renovated. We look forward sharing some exciting days with you. Welcome to Marseille!

The local organising committee,

Therefore, we will evaluate the areas of uncertainty before Alberto Bossi, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France the congress, using the uniquely built interactive decision Global Congress on Prostate Cancer 2012 Congress on so Prostate Cancer algorithms ‘MirrorsGlobal of Medicine’ (MiMe) that at the Global2012 Karim Fizazi, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France Congress, we can focus our interactions and discussions when Nicolas Mottet, University Hospital, Saint Etienne, France reviewing research findings and key decision making. We would Arnauld Villers, Hospital Claude Huriez, Regional University Delegates perbefore, country like to invite you during(500 and from after 50 thecountries) congress to share Hospital Centre of Lille, Lille, France Delegates per country (500 from 50 countries) and discuss your vision on how to translate the scientific clinical evidence into best daily practice.

Facts & figures

Facts & figures

100–200 30–100 20–30

100–200

10–20

30–100

6–10 3–5 2 1

20–30 10–20 6–10 3–5 2

View the 2012 edition facts & figures View the 2012 edition video


Faculty Confirmed faculty members (non exhaustive) Walter Artibani, Department of Urology, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy

Karim Fizazi, Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France

Dmitry Pushkar, Moscow State Medical Stomatological University, Moscow, Russia

Lodovico Balducci, Medicine and Oncological Sciences, University of South Florida College of Medicine and Moffitt Cancer Centre, Tampa, USA

Alexander Govorov, Department of Urology, Moscow State Medical Stomatological University, Moscow, Russia

Mack Roach III, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Fransisco, USA

Jelle Barentsz, Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre Radboud, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Gwenaelle Gravis, Department of Medical Oncology, Paoli-Calmettes Institute Cancer Centre, Marseille, France

Olivier Rouvière, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Lyon, Lyon, France

Dominik Berthold, Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

Henrik Grönberg, Department of Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

Michel Bolla, Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Grenoble, Grenoble, France Alberto Bossi, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France Alberto Briganti, Department of Urology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy François Cornud, Department of Radiology, Medical Imaging Centre Tourville, Paris, France Anthony J. Costello, Department of Urology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia

Ferran Guedea, Department of Radiation Oncology, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain Bertrand Guillonneau, Department of Urologic Surgery, Hospital of Diaconesses, Paris, France Ashok Hemal, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Centre, Winston-Salem, United States Peter Hoskin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, UK Steven Joniau, Department of Urology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium R. Jeffrey Karnes, Department of Urology, Mayo  Clinic, Rochester, USA

Juanita Crook, Department of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Kelowna, Canada

Laurence Klotz, Department of Urology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada

Gert De Meerleer, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium

Deborah A. Kuban, Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Centre Orlando, Houston, USA

Maria De Santis, Department of Oncology, Kaiser Franz Josef Hospital – SMZ South, Vienna, Austria David Dearnaley, Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK Nandita deSouza, Department of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK Jean-Pierre Droz, Department of Medical Oncology, Léon Bérard Cancer Centre, Lyon, France James A. Eastham, Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA Mark Emberton, Department of Urology, Centre for Urological Care, London, UK

Christophe Massard, Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France Raymond Miralbell, Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland Francesco Montorsi, Department of Urology, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy Nicolas Mottet, Department of Urology, University Hospital, Saint Etienne, France Alex Mottrie, Department of Urology, OLV Clinic, Aalst, Belgium Joel Nelson, Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, USA Thomas Powles, Department of Medical Oncology, St. Bartholomew’s Hospital and the Royal London Hospital, London, UK

Martin Spahn, Department of Urology, University Hospital of Urology, Bern, Germany Andrew J. Stephenson, Department of Urologic Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, USA Ash Tewari, Department of Urology, The New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Centre, New York, USA Karim Touijer, Department of Urologic Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA Riccardo Valdagni, Department of Radiation Oncology, IRCCS National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy Uulke Van Der Heide, Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKIAVL), Amsterdam, the Netherlands Jeroen van Moorselaar, Department of Urology, VUmc Cancer Centre Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Inge van Oort, Department of Urologic Oncology, University Medical Centre Radboud, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Geert Villeirs, Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Arnauld Villers, Hospital Claude Huriez, Regional University Hospital centre of Lille, Lille, France Jochen Walz, Department of Urology, PaoliCalmettes Institute Cancer Centre, Marseille, France Anders Widmark, Department of Radiation Oncology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden Thomas Wiegel, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Ulm, Ulm, Germany Peter Wiklund, Department of Urology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden Michael J. Zelefsky, Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, USA


Registration fees Don’t wait to register and go to www.prosca.org Until 30 April 2013

From 1 May 2013

Physician

€ 690

€ 850

Resident, student, nurse, researcher*

€ 230

€ 300

Exhibitor

€ 300

€ 400

Industry (non-exhibitor)

€ 1400

€ 1600

* You are required to provide an official proof of your status. You can e-mail it to info@prosca.org or fax it to the Congress organisers at +32 491 82 71.

Main scientific programme Day 1 — Wednesday 12 June 2013 14.00

MiMe workshops: where practice meets science (parallel sessions) CRPC: how to avoid Russian roulette? Prof. Andrew J. Stephenson - Dr. Dominik Berthold - Prof. Gert De Meerleer - Prof. Nicolas Mottet How to manage the risks in high-risk prostate cancer patients? Prof. Mack Roach III - Dr. Alberto Bossi - Mr. Thomas Powles - Prof. Jeroen van Moorselaar

16.00

Break

16.30

Official opening by Alex Mottrie

16.45

Management of localised PCa: vision for the future Chair: Prof. Andrew J. Stephenson - Prof. Michael J. Zelefsky

AUA and ASCO congress highlights

17.30

supported by an educational grant from

Chair: Prof. Gert De Meerleer - Prof. Nicolas Mottet

18.30

A true MDT approach in clinical practice: threat or opportunity? Chair: Prof. Francesco Montorsi - Prof. Gert De Meerleer

18.30 Multidisciplinary care and self-referral in the management of prostate cancer 18.45 19.15 19.30

Prof. Jeroen van Moorselaar MDT in clinical practice: how and why? Dr. Alberto Bossi - Dr. Riccardo Valdagni - Mr. Thomas Powles Q&A

Welcome drink with view on the ‘Vieux Port’

Please visit www.prosca.org for more information.

  Keynote lecture

  Clinical case discussions

  Active debate


Day 2 — Thursday 13 June 2013 08.20

Welcome by Nicolas Mottet, chairman morning sessions

08.30

Modern imaging in prostate cancer: the light at the end of the tunnel? Chair: Prof. Walter Artibani - Dr. Uulke Van Der Heide

08.30 08.45 09.00 09.15 09.30 09.45

Role of imaging in PCa detection Prof. Geert Villeirs Role of imaging in prostate cancer staging Prof. Nandita deSouza Role of imaging in treatment planning Prof. Arnauld Villers Role of imaging in treatment follow up Prof. François Cornud Q&A

Quality of care in prostate cancer: does volume matter? Chair: Prof. Anders Widmark - Prof. Karim Touijer

09.45 09.55 10.05 10.20 10.30 10.40

MRI, excellent tool but only in very dedicated hands? Prof. Jelle Barentsz RP excellent results only in high-volume centres? Dr. Ash Tewari EBRT excellent results: a matter of quality control? Prof. Deborah A. Kuban Quality indicators in prostate cancer: a Trojan horse? Dr. Inge van Oort Quality indicators in GU cancer Mr. Thomas Powles Q&A

11.00

Break

11.30

Satellite symposium

12.30

Lunch break and poster viewing

13.25

Welcome by Alberto Bossi, chairman afternoon sessions

13.30

What is the future of local treatment in localised PCa? Chair: Prof. Bertrand Guilloneau - Prof. Thomas Wiegel - Ass. Prof. Alexander Govorov

13.30 14.00 14.30 15.00

Is a robot useful or not? Prof. Alex Mottrie - Dr. Joel Nelson - Prof. Ashok Hemal Active monitoring: yes or no? Prof. Bertrand Guilloneau (moderator) - Prof. Laurence Klotz - Dr. James A. Eastham High dose rate brachytherapy: the best option for dose escalation? Prof. Thomas Wiegel (moderator) - Mr. Peter Hoskin - Prof. Raymond Miralbell Focal therapy: still utopia? Ass. Prof. Alexander Govorov (moderator) - Mr. Mark Emberton - Dr. Alberto Briganti

15.30

Break

16.00

MiMe session: challenge the experts

17.00

Non-systemic relapse after local treatment: facts and fiction Chair: Prof. Andrew J. Stephenson - Prof. Juanita Crook

17.00

Challenging cases Prof. Peter Wiklund - Prof. Ferran Guedea - Dr. Dominik Berthold - Prof. Olivier Rouvière

Please visit www.prosca.org for more information.

  Keynote lecture

  Clinical case discussions

  Active debate


Day 3 — Friday 14 June 2013 08.20

Welcome by Arnauld Villers, chairman morning sessions

08.30

Dealing with PCa in seniors, be prepared for the pappy boom! Chair: Prof. David Dearnaley - Prof. Dmitry Pushkar

08:30 08:45 09.45

The pappy boom in PCa Prof. Henrik Grönberg How to define an elderly patient? Prof. Anders Widmark - Dr. Lodovico Balducci - Prof. Jean-Pierre Droz

High-risk prostate cancer: what’s in a name? Chair: Dr. R. Jeffrey Karnes - Prof. Michel Bolla

09:45 10:00 10:15 10:30

Current role of radiation, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy in high-risk prostate cancer Prof. Mack Roach III Radical prostatectomy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer: don’t deny it to your patient Prof. Karim Touijer Postoperative radiation therapy for high-risk PCa: to wait or not to wait? Prof. Juanita Crook Q&A

11.00

Break

11.30

Satellite symposium

12.30

Lunch break and poster viewing

13.25

Welcome by Karim Fizazi, chairman afternoon sessions

13.30

Treatment of patients with newly diagnosed metastatic disease

Satellite symposium

Chair: Mr. Thomas Powles - Dr. Jochen Walz

13:30 13:45 14:00 14:15 14:30

Preventive treatment of the primary tumour & treating local complications Dr. Steven Joniau Non-systemic therapy in low volume metastatic disease Prof. Gert De Meerleer Systemic treatment of patients with newly diagnosed metastatic disease Dr. Gwenaelle Gravis New data, new perspectives? Prof. Nicolas Mottet Q&A

14.45

Best poster session

15.30

Break

16.00

Personalised medicine for PCa? Dream or reality? Chair: Dr. Martin Spahn - Dr. Maria De Santis

16:00 16:20 16:40 17:00 17.15

Beyond PSA: the next generation of prostate cancer biomarkers to be confirmed Personalised medicine: example from non-GU malignancies Dr. Christophe Massard Personalised medicine in GU malignancies: where to go? Dr. Karim Fizazi Q&A

Closing remarks and farewell by Alberto Bossi

Please visit www.prosca.org for more information.

GLOBAL CONGRESS ON PROSTATE CANCER

NURSES PROGRAMME 14 JUNE 2013

  Keynote lecture

  Clinical case discussions

  Active debate

Nurses programme On Friday 14 June 2013, a special whole-day programme for nurses will take place during the Global Congress on Prostate Cancer in Marseille, France. Registration open as of 1 May 2013. The programme is supported by the EAUN Prostate Specialist Interest Group.


General information Congress Venue

Welcome cocktail

Palais du Pharo

Meet colleagues, friends and experts with a glass of wine, have some fingerfood and enjoy the music, all against the setting of the splendid ‘Vieux Port’, bathing in the sun beneath you. Join us at the Palais du Pharo on Wednesday evening for this welcome drink!

The congress takes place at the Palais du Pharo, which dominates the entrance of the ‘Vieux Port’ of Marseille and offers an amazing view on the harbour. On top of that, Marseille will be entirely renovated and at its best as it will be the European Capital of Culture 2013!

When

Palais du Pharo 58 Boulevard Charles Livon 13007 Marseille, France T +33 4 91 14 64 95 palaisdupharo.marseille.fr

Wednesday 12 June 2013, 19h30

Where Congress venue - Palais du Pharo

Accommodation

Language

Please visit the website for more information.

English is the official language of the Global Congress on Prostate Cancer. No translation is foreseen.

How to get there

Accreditation

By car From Paris and Lyon: take the A7 (Route du Soleil) and A51 to Marseille (follow Vieux-Port and Le Pharo) From Italy and Nice: take the A8, A52 and A50 to Marseille (follow Vieux-Port and Le Pharo) From Aix en Provence: take the A51 and continue the road on the A7 to Marseille (follow Vieux-Port and Le Pharo) From Spain and Perpignan: take the A9, A7, A50 and A55 to Marseille (follow Vieux-Port and Le Pharo)

By train Take the train (TGV) to the international railway station Marseille St. Charles. The congress venue is at 3 km from here.

By plane The international Airport Marseille Provence is located 25 km outside the centre of Marseille, in Marignane.

European accreditation has been applied for.

Abstract congress awards Publication All the accepted abstracts are published in: ‘Mirrors of Medicine 2013: Proceedings of the Global Congress on Prostate Cancer’ (ISSN 2034-8398). On-site, the accepted posters will be displayed on large panels. The authors of the three winning posters are invited to give an 8-minute presentation in the main auditorium on Saturday afternoon to present their work. They will also receive an award.

At the Airport, there are several trains and shuttle buses to railway station Marseille St. Charles.

Congress organiser e-HIMS bvba  Duwijckstraat 17 2500 Lier Belgium

Femke Arnouts (general contact)  T +32 3 800 06 54  femke.arnouts@e-hims.com

Luc Van Ruysevelt (sponsoring)­ T +32 3 491 87 45  M +32 476 25 82 94  luc.vanruysevelt@e-hims.com


Thanks to our sponsors Principal

Gold

Bronze

Exhibitors

In collaboration with

Time is everything* *L’essentiel, c’est le temps 1er Inhibiteur sélectif de la biosynthèse des androgènes* ZYTIGA® est indiqué en association avec la prednisone ou la prednisolone dans : le traitement du cancer métastatique de la prostate résistant à la castration chez les hommes adultes asymptomatiques ou peu symptomatiques, après échec d’un traitement par suppressionn androgénique et pour lesquels la chimiothérapie n’est pas encore cliniquement indiquée ; Traitement local

Suppression Androgénique

[Nouvelle indication] Indication non remboursée à la date du 15/01/2013

ZYTIGA® Suppression Androgénique

Chimiothérapie à base de docétaxel

ZYTIGA®

le traitement du cancer métastatique de la prostate résistant à la castration chez les hommes adultes dont la maladie a progressé pendant ou après une chimiothérapie à base de docétaxel. ZYTIGA® 250 mg, comprimés. Acétate d’abiratérone. FORMES ET PRESENTATION.* COMPOSITION.* INDICATIONS THERAPEUTIQUES. ZYTIGA® est indiqué en association avec la prednisone ou la prednisolone dans : le traitement du cancer métastatique de la prostate résistant à la castration chez les hommes adultes asymptomatiques ou peu symptomatiques, après échec d’un traitement par suppression androgénique et pour lesquels la chimiothérapie n’est pas encore cliniquement indiquée (voir rubrique Propriétés pharmacodynamiques) ; le traitement du cancer métastatique de la prostate résistant à la castration chez les hommes adultes dont la maladie a progressé pendant ou après une chimiothérapie à base de docétaxel. POSOLOGIE ET MODE D’ADMINISTRATION.* Posologie.* La dose recommandée de ZYTIGA® est de 1000 mg (4 comprimés de 250 mg) en une seule prise quotidienne et ne doit pas être administrée avec de la nourriture. ZYTIGA® doit être pris avec de faibles doses de prednisone ou de prednisolone (dose quotidienne recommandée de 10 mg). La castration médicale par analogue de la LH-RH doit être maintenue pendant la durée du traitement pour les patients n’ayant pas subi de castration chirurgicale. En cas d’oubli d’une dose quotidienne de ZYTIGA®, de prednisone ou de prednisolone, il convient de reprendre le traitement le lendemain à la dose quotidienne habituelle. Populations particulières.* Hépatotoxicité.* Chez les patients développant une hépatotoxicité au cours du traitement (augmentation de l’alanine ou aspartate aminotransférase [ALAT ou ASAT] de plus de 5 fois la limite supérieure de la normale [LSN]), le traitement doit être interrompu immédiatement. Après le retour des tests fonctionnels hépatiques à leurs valeurs initiales, la reprise du traitement, peut être effectuée à une dose réduite de 500 mg (2 comprimés) une fois par jour. Chez les patients pour qui le traitement a été réintroduit, les taux de transaminases sériques doivent être surveillés au minimum toutes les 2 semaines pendant les 3 premiers mois et ensuite tous les mois. Si l’hépatotoxicité réapparaît à cette dose réduite, le traitement doit être arrêté. Si les patients développent une hépatotoxicité sévère (ALAT ou ASAT 20 fois supérieurs à la limite supérieure de la normale) à un moment quelconque au cours du traitement, celui-ci doit être arrêté et ne doit pas être réintroduit chez ces patients. Insuffisance hépatique.* L’utilisation de ZYTIGA® doit être évaluée avec précaution chez les patients atteints d’une insuffisance hépatique modérée, chez lesquels le bénéfice doit être nettement supérieur au risque potentiel. ZYTIGA® ne doit pas être utilisé chez les patients atteints d’une insuffisance hépatique sévère. Insuffisance rénale.* Population pédiatrique.* Mode d’administration. ZYTIGA® doit être pris au moins deux heures après avoir mangé et aucune nourriture ne doit être consommée pendant au moins une heure après avoir pris les comprimés. Ceux-ci doivent être avalés en entier, avec de l’eau. CONTRE-INDICATIONS. Hypersensibilité à la substance active ou à l’un des excipients. Femmes enceintes ou susceptibles de l’être. Insuffisance hépatique sévère (Classe C de ChildPugh). MISES EN GARDE SPECIALES ET PRECAUTIONS D’EMPLOI.* Hypertension artérielle, hypokaliémie, rétention hydrique et insuffisance cardiaque dues à un excès de minéralocorticoïdes.* ZYTIGA® doit être utilisé avec prudence chez les patients présentant des antécédents de

maladie cardiovasculaire. Avant le traitement par ZYTIGA®, l’insuffisance cardiaque doit être traitée et la fonction cardiaque optimisée. Toute hypertension artérielle, hypokaliémie et rétention hydrique doit être corrigée et contrôlée. ZYTIGA® peut entraîner une hypertension artérielle, une hypokaliémie et une rétention hydrique en raison de l’augmentation du taux de minéralocorticoïdes résultant de l’inhibition du CYP17. L’administration concomitante d’un corticoïde entraîne une baisse de l’incidence et de la gravité de ces effets indésirables. La prudence est recommandée pour le traitement des patients présentant des pathologies sous-jacentes pouvant être aggravées par l’augmentation de la pression artérielle, par une hypokaliémie ou par une rétention hydrique, un angor sévère ou instable, un infarctus récent ou une arythmie ventriculaire et par une insuffisance rénale sévère. Hépatotoxicité ou insuffisance hépatique.* Des élévations marquées du taux d’enzymes hépatiques entraînant l’arrêt du traitement ou une modification de la dose sont survenues lors des études cliniques contrôlées. Si les patients développent une hépatotoxicité sévère (ALAT ou ASAT 20 fois supérieurs à la limite supérieure de la normale) à un moment quelconque au cours du traitement, celui-ci doit être arrêté et ne doit pas être réintroduit chez ces patients. Sevrage des corticoïdes et prise en charge des situations de stress.* Densité osseuse.* Utilisation précédente de kétoconazole.* Hyperglycémie.* Utilisation avec une chimiothérapie.* Intolérance aux excipients.* Ce médicament contient du lactose et du sodium (plus de 1 mmol soit 27,2 mg par dose de 4 comprimés) à prendre en compte chez les patients suivant un régime hyposodé. Risques potentiels.* INTERACTIONS AVEC D’AUTRES MEDICAMENTS ET AUTRES FORMES D’INTERACTIONS.* Prudence lors de l’administration de ZYTIGA® avec des médicaments activés ou métabolisés par le CYP2D6. ZYTIGA® est un inhibiteur du CYP2C8. Les inhibiteurs et inducteurs puissants du CYP3A4 sont à éviter ou à utiliser avec précaution au cours du traitement. FECONDITE, GROSSESSE ET ALLAITEMENT.* Femme en âge de procréer.* Contraception chez les hommes et les femmes.* Grossesse.* ZYTIGA® est contre-indiqué chez la femme enceinte ou susceptible de l’être. Allaitement.* Fécondité.* PRICIPAUX EFFETS INDESIRABLES.* Les effets indésirables très fréquemment observés avec ZYTIGA® sont : œdème périphérique, hypokaliémie, hypertension artérielle et infection du tractus urinaire et ceux fréquemment observés sont : hypertriglycéridémie, insuffisance cardiaque, angine de poitrine, arythmie, fibrillation auriculaire, tachycardie, élévation de l’ALAT et de l’ASAT, dyspepsie, rash, hématurie et fractures. Les conséquences pharmacodynamiques du mécanisme d’action de ZYTIGA® peuvent entraîner une hypertension, une hypokaliémie et une rétention hydrique, effets les plus fréquemment rencontrés chez les patients traités par ZYTIGA®. SURDOSAGE.* En cas de surdosage, l’administration de ZYTIGA® doit être suspendue et une prise en charge générale doit être mise en place, incluant une surveillance de la survenue d’arythmies, d’hypokaliémie et de signes et symptômes de rétention hydrique. La fonction hépatique doit également être évaluée. PROPRIETES PHARMACODYNAMIQUES.* Classe pharmacothérapeutique : Endocrinothérapie, autres antagonistes hormonaux et agents

* Premier à avoir obtenu l’AMM. apparentés classe ATC : L02BX03. PROPRIETES PHARMACOCINETIQUES.* PRECAUTIONS PARTICULIERES D’ELIMINATION ET DE MANIPULATION.* ZYTIGA® peut nuire au développement du fœtus, par conséquent, les femmes enceintes ou susceptibles de l’être ne doivent pas manipuler ZYTIGA® sans protection comme, par exemple, des gants. Tout médicament inutilisé ou déchet doit être éliminé conformément à la réglementation en vigueur. DUREE DE CONSERVATION*. PRECAUTIONS PARTICULIERES DE CONSERVATION.* CONDITIONS DE PRESCRIPTION ET DE DELIVRANCE. Liste I. Prescription initiale hospitalière annuelle réservée aux spécialistes en oncologie ou aux médecins compétents en cancérologie. Renouvellement non restreint. CONDITIONS DE PRISE EN CHARGE ET PRIX. Indication dans le cancer métastatique de la prostate résistant à la castration chez les hommes adultes asymptomatiques ou peu symptomatiques, après échec d’un traitement par suppression androgénique et pour lesquels la chimiothérapie n’est pas encore cliniquement indiquée : non remboursable à la date du 15/01/2013 (demande d’admission à l’étude). Indication dans le cancer métastatique de la prostate résistant à la castration chez les hommes adultes dont la maladie a progressé pendant ou après une chimiothérapie à base de docétaxel : Agréé aux Collectivités. Remb Séc Soc à 100 %. ZYTIGA® 250 mg, comprimés (B/120): 3 612,58 €. ZYTIGA® 250 mg : AMM (09/2011 rév. 01/2013) EU/1/11/714/001. CIP 34009 217 497 4 8 : boîte 1 flacon (PEHD). Chaque flacon (PEHD) contient 120 comprimés. TITULAIRE DE L’AUTORISATION DE MISE SUR LE MARCHE. Janssen-Cilag International NV, Turnhoutseweg 30, B-2340 Beerse, Belgique. REPRESENTANT LOCAL. Janssen-Cilag, 1, rue Camille Desmoulins, TSA 91003, 92787 Issy-les-Moulineaux Cedex 9. Information médicale et Pharmacovigilance : . E-mail : medisource@its.jnj.com * Des informations détaillées sur ce médicament sont disponibles sur le site internet de l’Agence européenne du médicament http://www.ema.europa.eu/.

Janssen-Cilag Société par Actions Simplifiée au capital social de 2.956.660 Euros, immatriculée au Registre du Commerce et des Sociétés de Nanterre sous le n° B 562 033 068, dont le siège social est au 1, rue Camille Desmoulins, TSA 91003, 92787 Issy-les-Moulineaux. 1301 66425614 PM009 – JA1212ZYT2899 - MLR 01.13.A


A Gene Expression Test to Predict Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Prolaris helps you to make better treatment decisions by identifying patients: • With aggressive disease who would benefit from immediate treatment • With slow growing cancer appropriate for active surveillance • At high risk of cancer recurrence • Who are candidates for closer observation or additional treatment

Predictive Power. Prognostic Confidence. The first prognostic test that reveals the molecular biology of Prostate Cancer

Myriad Genetics: Saving lives every day Myriad Genetics is a leading molecular diagnostic company dedicated to making a difference in patient’s lives through the discovery and commercialization of transformative tests to assess a person’s risk of developing disease, guide treatment decisions and assess risk of disease progression and recurrence.

Please visit: www.Myriad.com

Myriad, the Myriad logo, Prolaris and the Prolaris logo are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Myriad Genetics, Inc., in the United States and other jurisdictions. ©2013, Myriad Genetics, GmbH.


Global Congress on Prostate Cancer - Announcement  

12-14 June 2013 - Marseille, France

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you