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ISSUE 01: GENRE, BODY, OBJECT, BALANCE

A CONTEMPORARY CIRCUS PUBLICATION

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ISSUE 01

GIVING

LIFEPETER RAHBÆK JUEL MAYOR OF ODENSE

LOVE

ALL ENDURING CO LL A G E BY GRY L AM BERTS EN

RUNE VADSTRØM ANDERSEN & GRY LAMBERTSEN ARTISTIC DIRECTORS OF DYNAMO

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The recent global health crisis has changed, like a lightning strike, our society and our everyday lives. It has been a time of uncertainty, worries, and deprivation for many people. And at such a time, it is particularly important to appreciate the things that create joy and community and that make Odense a fun and exciting city. Something the crisis has taught us is that our everyday lives are poorer without culture. In Odense, we have a vibrant and colourful cultural life that forms an important part of the core of the city’s community. With events ranging from HCA Festivals to Tinderbox and Denmark’s biggest drag show, Queen of The Night, we have something for everyone in Odense. With its four years of activity, DYNAMO is one of the newer additions to the Odense cultural scene, but it has already become a regular part of our city’s cultural life. Odense is in the midst of an impressive development – A development that we must drive even further, for Odense must be a modern metropolis, with all that it entails. We have seen the physical expression of the city change character with new buildings and projects popping up everywhere. But community still stands as the basic premise and heart of the city. This is exactly why we need DYNAMO. Since 2017, DYNAMO has been working on reinventing the circus and performing arts, with new creativity and new ideas, right in the heart of Odense. Contemporary circus is a circus for a new era; for a time when speed takes primacy and where the easiest is often just to stream an episode of the favorite series on the web, rather than go out into the world and experience culture. I remember myself the magic of going to the circus, as a child. Being fascinated by acrobats and magicians felt like entering an entirely new world. That is why, today, I am delighted when new creative souls work hard to reinvent art and magic, and when they invite us into their universe, to experience something other than everyday life.

CULTURE

Performing arts can be something very special – it can bring us together across age and background. Therefore, it is not “just” talk of beautiful art and good entertainment. It’s something that brings people together, and that’s the whole foundation of a city like Odense.

After three years in the old decommissioned silo building in Odense Harbour, DYNAMO Workspace for circus & performing arts has begun to take shape. We have moved from the touring circus life into more permanent settings, because we believe that modern circus should have a centre and a place that invests all its love in circus in Denmark.

FOR CIRCUS

For those of you who don’t know us yet, DYNAMO is a circus house, an international workspace and a stage for professional contemporary circus. We present an annual circus festival in August with the best circus from Europe and we curate an ongoing programme with national and international performances, concerts and open circus training.

We, the two artistic leaders, Gry and Rune, have been working together since 1998, when, after reading the only book about circus we found in the library, started performing together on the street. We both trained in circus schools and later set out to Europe to perform for all sorts of stages and festivals. We landed like a UFO in Odense, where our hearts beat every day with desire for change and love for circus. We all work tirelessly to show you what circus has to offer today, because we know it kicks ass! DYNAMO is your new friend in the middle of Denmark and we hope to meet you here soon. In the meantime, welcome to DYNAMO Magazine issue 01.

CO V ER IMA GE: PHOTO BY COSMIN CIRSTEA . AMIR & HEMD A PERFORMING ZO O G AT DYN AM O C IRC U S FE ST IVAL 2019


P HOTO BY RI CO FE LD FO SS. DYN AM O CIRC US FESTI VAL 2 019

ISSUE 01 EDITORIAL


NO

DEFINITIONS ELENA STANCIU EDITOR

As any other art form, contemporary circus is commonly expected to explain itself, to define itself and occupy a clear space in the spectrum of stage arts today. At DYNAMO, circus is a universe of “untameable creativity;” a field where range and diversity take priority over definition and uniformity. This publication will not tell you what contemporary circus is – not because it wants to be vague or eclectic, but because to state a definition is to lay a trap, to confine the genre to limits, and create situations of exclusion, when some artists or visions risk being left out. This magazine aims to take the pulse of where in its evolution circus is today (particularly in Denmark), through articles, essays, poems, and interviews selected to offer a glimpse into the abundance of creativity and diversity of expression; the range and depth of talent – an immaterial backstage of circus, occupied by thoughts, emotions, memories, and visions. This issue looks at four main elements that, at one point or another, might prevail in the work of the contributors: genre, body, object, and balance. Some engage with the GENRE itself and recognise its indefinable qualities; others turn towards the BODY, lending their own to the process of exploring themes and topics relevant to us all; some embrace the OBJECT as the grounding element in their being and thinking in circus; while others use BALANCE as a driving philosophy for creating. Journalist Michael Eigtved sets a frame for the history of traditional and contemporary circus in Denmark, while Archaos co-director Guy Carrara recalls the first contact of the iconic French company with Scandinavia. Producer and curator Lina B. Frank gives a beautiful account of intellectually swimming against the current, when it comes to defining contemporary circus. At the interdisciplinary borders of circus with dance, performance, and visual arts, artists Kitt Johnson and Iona Kewney recall their encounter with circus, in an interview and essay, respectively. Juggling master Jay Gilligan speaks of innovation in juggling, while aerial rope artist Tom Brand . reflects on the paradoxical grounding this apparatus offers. Hula hoop artist and clown performer Giedre . Degutyte writes a poem to frame her artistic enquiries. Artist and choreographer Rebecka Nord, artists collective Right Way Down, and artist and creator Sade Kamppila recount their latest productions – all stories of support, togetherness, and collective creativity. Taken separately, the following articles show individual energy, passion, and dedication. Taken together, they show interconnectedness and similar experiences – proof of our collective, shared (albeit short) past of contemporary circus, and indication of our common goal for the future.

JUST

CIRCUS PAGE 5


FROM

PHOTO BY CO SM IN C IR STE A . K AR L STE TS P E R FO R M IN G C U E R D O AT DYN AM O C IRC U S FE STIVAL 2019

ISSUE 01 GENRE

TRADITIONAL MICHAEL EIGTVED

Danish traces. A short history of the genre.

TRADITIONAL CIRCUS: ORIGINS The history of circus in Denmark is almost as long as the genre itself. As early as the late 18th century, British and French circus companies toured regularly, and circus quickly became a well-known form of entertainment in this country. As early Danish circus emerged, for well over a century from the 1870s onwards, it meant large, travelling tent circus which were – at least in periods – of international class. Names such as Miehe, Schumann, and Benneweis paved the way for what we would call traditional circus today. In addition, several venues in Copenhagen hosted circus performances in the winter. The crux of these was – and is – the display of the spectacular: physical endurance, dexterity and balance; clown comics that create mental journeys between the physical, and dressage of both well-known animals and of the world’s rare and wild animals, from elephants and sea lions to exotic camels and snakes. All directed to achieve the sublime – the moment when surprise and enchantment, together with hearts that would skip a beat and breathless moments, condense the entire experience in a blink of a second; when the pursuit of ever-new heights drives the performance and the artist at its helm. In the beginning, circus gained a certain status by placing horse dressage at its center, during a period when horses were valuable and prestigious in both social and cultural life. However, traditional circus has also been a form that contained much more than acrobats and animal dressage. What we would call traditional circus today was in fact a crossover of circus, theater, dance, and variety show – a mix popular for a long period of time. In Circus Miehe, for example, pantomime was often a supporting, and extensive, part PAGE 6

of the performance right up to the 20th century, when silent film outperformed it.

TO CONT

The circus we know today as traditional did not really emerge until the first decades of the 20th century, when changing conditions of the entertainment industry of the time (the so-called entertainment tax of up to 40%) meant an inclusion of sensational elements otherwise seen in street performance and variety. Other forms of entertainment and competition, akin to a carnival aesthetic, did the same – the public was invited closer and closer to the circus sensations: they were themselves standing on a galloping horse or wrestling a circus superman. Thus the circus performances we would call classic developed with imported acts, foreign troupes, clowns, and audience-engaging moments – with a focus on the sensational, emotional appeal, and excitement to stimulate the senses.

On the cultural stage, circus was and is in a double position. On the one hand, there is a fascination with a free life, both disciplined and touching on the artists’ skills; on the other, there is some disdain for the travelling rascal life, and a slightly condescending attitude towards circus as an art form. Traditional circus has mainly been regarded as entertainment, which ranks in line with amusement parks and travelling big top tent performances. Circus has remained popular well into the 2000s and there are travelling tent circus companies that still enjoy quite a lot of audience support, despite some downstream and general decline, in the past decades.


A NEW CIRCUS COMES TO TOWN

MADE IN DENMARK

In the late 1970s this was the circus found in Denmark, at the same time as a new type of circus was beginning to stir, originated and developed especially in France under the designation Nouveau Cirque – today known as contemporary circus. These performances were characterised by the meeting between classical acts and a stage setting inspired by both avant-garde theater and performance art, but also rock music and film. The idea for contemporary circus was largely derived from the theater environment, not from acrobatic circles; it emerged more as a reaction to traditional theater than to classical circus. Around 1975 a renewed interest in circus could be observed. This led to the opening of new circus schools both outside Paris and Montreal in Canada, and since then to a number of other places, where new generations of artists have been trained both in traditional skills and in various theatrical modes of expression. A certain modernisation and professionalisation of the artist’s work replaced the phenomenon in which one had to be born into a circus family, to become an artist. At the same time, both actors and sport professionals discovered the art as an opportunity to express themselves.

In 1998, a group of young Danish artists with international experence formed the contemporary circus ensemble Nova Exit and presented the first Danish contemporary circus performance, Apropos, in 2001. Most Danish artists began their education at the Academy of Untamed Creativity in Copenhagen (AFUK), a mix of various youth education programmes, professional school, and college. AFUK collaborated with, among others, Moscow State Circus School, and here one could truly begin an artistic education. Most Danish artists who work professionally in contemporary circus today have a background here.

EMPORARY This is the kind of performance that came to Denmark starting in the early 1980s, and it is through international groups that the genre of contemporary circus was introduced to Danes. This new type of circus was seriously discovered by Danish audiences when the French company Archaos performed in Copenhagen in 1989. Their show knocked the audience off of their seats: roaring chainsaws, milling motorcycles and a rock’n’roll approach to circus. The mix of techniques and an aesthetic inspired by theater and performance, as well as popular culture and film, caught on immediately. It was Copenhagen International Theater (KIT) that hosted the show and, in the years that followed, KIT continued to set the tone for circus, with three-four international companies invited annually to play as part of their Summer Stage event.

Michael Eigtved is a professor at the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies at the University of Copenhagen. He has published extensive academic work on popular theater, musicals, stand-up comedy, circus, and variety.

A number of reports and evaluations were made, partly by the Danish Artist’s Association (DAF) and partly by independent statistics institutions, all showing that from 2010 there has been a solid and rising foundation in Denmark, both for contemporary circus performances and a market for trained artists. Contemporary circus has managed to attract a large audience, and is a genre that both sells tickets and generates publicity. Unfortunately, the government at the time had no desire to make the education programme permanent, which is why, today, there is no formal circus education for artists in Denmark.

CIRCUS

In the 1970s and1980s, therefore, a large number of ensembles emerged, which cultivated a modernised version of circus. This followed a cultural momentum of youth rebellion focused on free life, creativity, and the clash with authorities and institutions. It resulted in performances that included both traditional skills, pop culture, elements of clowning, street theater, and took inspiration from the world of sports and often politics.

The most recent development in the Danish education of contemporary circus artists was the Academy of Modern Circus (AMoC) (2014-2018), a very successful experimental institution under the Ministry of Culture. During the inception period, AMoC educated 21 professional artists.

AMoC educated its students in what is unique about contemporary circus, especially in the Nordic version of it: it is not about sensationalism, but about sensuality; about building a whole, independent, coherent universe in the performance, where the elements intertwine and complement each other. The performance does not split the body into the various disciplines; instead, it speaks to the whole body and the entire perception apparatus.

THE STRENGTH OF THE GENRE The core of contemporary circus lies in the artistic intention of the genre, rather than in its technical means. The skills of the art are basically the same as in traditional circus: control, timing, training, strength, and balance – the same parameters as for any other performing artist, from dancers to stand up comedians. But in contemporary circus, this is inserted into a theatrical framework, creating a performative situation where the artistic skills express the very specific abilities of, say, juggling or trapeze, while being part of a larger picture; a unifying concept or idea that governs the performance, not the desire for more saltos or a higher trapeze. At AMoC this was brought together in the concept of theatrical innovation, which was about strengthening the individual artist’s ability to think about themselves and their skills in a context that created a theatrical universe closely connected to the world surrounding contemporary circus. This is the strength of contemporary circus and where it differs most clearly from traditional circus. PAGE 7


ISSUE 01 GENRE

ARCHAOS GUY CARRARA On the European circus scene, Archaos stands as the moderniser of the genre. Its early radical, anarchic take on circus embraced a punk, edgy aesthetic that sent the public’s sense into overdrive and pushed the boundaries of the genre. Today Archaos is a giant of the circus world, on a mission to shock and excite society, under the co-direction of Guy Carrara and Simon Carrara.

In the 1970s many artists in Europe believed that the organisation and representation of culture were elitist and reinforced the divide between the intellectually and economically dominating agents and the rest of the population. This social and cultural ethos led to the emergence of street theater festivals in France and then in some countries in Europe. Following this decade of countercultural shifts, the 1980s saw emblematic companies making history in Europe: Archaos, Royal de Lux in France, and the Catalans of La Fura dels Baus. Archaos has marked the emergence of contemporary circus internationally. At the same time, in the field of education and training, the opening of the National Centre for Circus Arts in France has played an important role in the emergency of many companies. With more than 30 productions and shows all over the world and more than 2000 artists having toured for 30 years, Archaos is considered a myth, especially in Great Britain, where it received “The Best Name” award for the best artistic proposal, as early as 1989.

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In France, the same year, Archaos received the first National Grand Prix of Cirque awarded by the Minister of Culture. From then on, Archaos became a reference name in Brazil and in many other countries. Archaos was also present in Denmark, Sweden and Finland with tours between 1989 and 1991. The media success of these tours is probably what allowed the beginning of the Scandinavian contemporary circus. After attending the show Metal Clown in Stockholm, Tilde Björfors (according to her testimony) knew what she wanted to do, and went on to create Cirkus Cirkör, today the leading circus company in Sweden. Three phases have marked Archaos’ journey: Archaos Trash: from 1986 to 1993. This was the rock’n’roll era; punk aesthetics, denunciation/provocation, parodic, grunge and rock, with world tours in circus tents and invention of new architectures for the circus tents.


P H OTO S FRO M TH E ARC H A O S O N LIN E ARC H IVE . CO U RTE SY O F ARC H A O S

A LEGACY Contemporary Archaos: from 1994 to 2015. It marked the development of writing for new stage spaces, with contemporary aesthetics and a focus on circus staging in concert halls and theater for international tours. In 2001 Archaos developed and financed the CREAC (European Research Centre for Circus Arts) and its activities in Marseille. Archaos Centre: In 2012 Archaos was labelled National Circus Centre by the French Ministry of Culture. The Centre welcomes many companies in residence and develops projects to support artists, train and integrate them professionally, as well as promote their work. Archaos puts this dynamism in the heart of the working-class districts of the great city of Marseille.

The 2019 edition of BIAC gathered over 115.000 people in the audience for 288 performances. For Archaos, supporting the creation of circus work means investing in co-productions, hosting residencies, showing productions in premiere, and promoting performances through the BIAC programming. Audiovisual programming, restaging of performances, and establishing a European mobility network for circus festivals are also part of the work being done today at Archaos. In all, the company continues to push circus to new heights, in light of its decades-long legacy of making circus a bolder, freer, cooler and more radical art form.

Archaos is at the helm of International Biennale for the Arts of Circus (BIAC), a large event in a large metropolis, to accompany and showcase the creativity of this young and vibrant art form.

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ISSUE 01 GENRE

DYNAMO IN CONVERSATION WITH KITT JOHNSON Kitt Johnson is a Danish choreographer and dancer. Since 1992, as artistic director of the X-act company, she has created numerous solo and ensemble works for stage, as well as site-specific works, laboratories, and festivals in Europe, Southeast Asia, and North America. Her latest endeavour is the contemporary circus festival C!CAF. The company tours regularly in Denmark as well as internationally.

SPACE

Can you tell us a bit about your story with contemporary circus and how it played in with your career as a choreographer? I don’t actually see myself specifically as a choreographer – I’ve always had trouble with these boundaries in defining what we do. But I’ve always been interested in the body and how the body and the mind coexist and inform each other, also in existential quests like: “How and why are we in the world?” This led me to work with people from different disciplines. As for circus: I came to work in the same house as AFUK, many years ago; that was my first introduction to contemporary circus. In parallel to that, the Copenhagen International Theater (KIT) opened their new circus festival and started to invite international companies to Denmark. I could see how circus was developing, exploding I would say, mainly in France at that time. I felt very inspired by these encounters and decided to “give it a go.” Karl Stets and Samuel Gustavsson were the first artists I worked with on stage for the piece The Lemonkeepers (2004) – my first artistic excursion into the field of circus.

What was it that circus added to your perspective about the body, at the time? In different fields, people obtain different kinds of physicality; in contemporary circus, the physicality goes really to the edge, and the element of danger is very present. I have a sports background myself, so I’ve always been attracted to extreme physicality. The element of straightforward and still very sophisticated humor (when it is well done), that often prevails in this genre, has also informed my work.

Regarding your work with C!CAF – Copenhagen Circus Arts Festival. What, in your perspective, is the DNA of a circus festival, as a cultural product in itself, and what does it do to further the genre of circus, specifically in Denmark? C!CAF is very inspired by what’s happening around Europe today and by my work as jury member in CircusNext. I am very intrigued by the works I see there. When KIT closed their festival in 2016, I felt an obligation to do something, because I have all this network accessible. I never expected to organise a contemporary circus festival myself and I wouldn’t have done it, if not for KIT shutting down theirs. But there is a blank space and we missed this kind of festivals in Copenhagen. When we started, it was also a very precarious moment for AMoC and AFUK, and I thought that anyone who has some means to do something should do something. Festivals nowadays are so many different things; personally, I don’t care that much about genres. I don’t look so much for the strict position of circus in the performances I bring, I look for good work for stage, or off stage: it might be site specific, community work. So far, it has been on stage, partly because of limited resources. The scale and diversity are not as wide as we’d like – this is something to look forward to in the future.

TO BE FILLED

A BLANK

What’s at the core of curating C!CAF? It’s important that we address it to “normal audiences,” whatever normal is, as well as to professionals, internationally and locally; to upcoming artists; and to academics. We do workshops, lectures, and laboratories and a critique workshop; this platform to exchange within the art form is really important. For the workshops, we ask the individual artists to bring what they would like to share; they develop the concept and we program it in a good mix with the other artists’ concepts. In this way, the artists do what they find relevant, which means they bring ideas that are urgent for them. Some do research for future pieces, and it’s very interesting for other people to participate and get an insight of the creation process, with all its questioning and try-outs. Did you find you had to define and explain to your audiences what C!CAF or circus is? Not so much – I am privileged to have worked for a long time, and there are people who follow what I do and trust me; audiences that are used to the interdisciplinary and used to the fact that they never know what to expect – especially with site-specific and community work. I also insist a bit on not being too pedagogic; I just say: “Go for it, take a risk!”

KITT PORTRAIT & PHOTO: PER MORTEN AB RAHAMSEN. COU RTESY OF KIT T J O H N SO N


What makes C!CAF unique as a circus festival – or, as an art festival in Denmark? I don’t know if it’s unique – we are trying to do what we feel is needed here and now, and we share it with other people in the country. We would really like it not to be just for the capital, so the artists can show their work in other places as well. We’re collaborating with DYNAMO, with Bora Bora, Kappelborg in Skagen, the Helsingør Theatre, and we’re slowly starting a collaboration with Cantabile in Vordingborg, to show performances we curate for C!CAF. This network is important for us. There seem to be some barriers today to an organic development of circus in Denmark; either lack of infrastructure for the art form; struggle to communicate or define the genre; the absence of dedicated academia or the scarcity of circus critics. What, in your view, raises these barriers and who should take the lead in removing them successfully? I think AFUK does some great work, and they have been battling politically for many years. The Danish Artist Union (DAF) have been battling for many years. KIT have been fighting for the same cause – all work I really respect. The artists themselves also do a lot to promote the genre; I try to do something where I am. There are presenters also who try to take it more in, but there is some resistance, still. The lack of a proper stage space here in Copenhagen is a big problem though, and we hope to make up for that in the future. When all this is said we should acknowledge that in fact one of the strongest critics and academics in the country has been following and writing about contemporary circus: Monna Dithmer. But there is a lot of culture writing that doesn’t make the editors’ cut; they rarely, nowadays, trust culture to sell newspapers.

WITH

CIRCUS

PHOTO BY GEERT ROELS. CIRCU S K ATOEN PERFORMING AT C !C AF 2019. CO U RTE SY O F KITT J O H N SO N

CircusNext is the point of origin for C!CAF; the festival is solidly grounded in the cooperation Kitt has had with CircusNext since 2015. As an EU-supported programme led by the French organization Jeune Talents Cirque Europe, CircusNext aims to identify, stimulate, support and promote innovative contemporary circus artists. Starting from a sharp selection process, through residency programs, conferences, reciprocal mentoring programs and platform presentations, CircusNext is a major focal point for the development of the art form. It consists of 10-17 European platform partners, as well as an external jury of 14 members and 40 loosely affiliated European partners in 17 countries. In addition, the programme has established important networks in Asia, Africa, and America. www.circusnext.eu

It is interesting that you use the word “battling” to describe the momentum for circus in Denmark. To focus a bit on the future, hopefully a time where battles are won – how do you see the future of circus in Denmark? Just now, it looks like there is still a lot of work to be done. For me, it was a big disappointment that AMoC closed. It’s a disappointment that AFUK still have to fight for their legitimacy – because these are our basic educations. The future is uncertain – but let’s hope AMoC will return in force! I really appreciate the work you’re doing at DYNAMO – you’ve been growing fast; you should be really proud of that work! My motto is: “The road appears as we walk,” which means we must walk with attention. It means I never dream far ahead; I try to be and make choices in the present to unfold the potential of the moment and trust that this will bring on a good future.

PHOTO BY MARTA G ARCIA . FANG PERFORMING AT C!C AF 2019. CO U RTE SY O F KITT J O H N SO N

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ISSUE 01 GENRE

LINA B. FRANK

P H OTO BY AN SE L AD AM S

WHAT IS

CONTEMPORARY


In 2018 I wrote a report commissioned by the Region of Skåne (Southern Sweden), to provide a deeper understanding of contemporary circus, as well as a snapshot of its situation and potential in Skåne. Writing for the regional cultural committee and politicians, I found myself needing to articulate a definition of contemporary circus, in order to lay a base for my report. The definition I used reads as follows: “By contemporary circus we mean contemporary performing arts (indoor or outdoor) where any circus discipline is present to significantly form part of the creation of a scenic art piece or performance; i.e. disciplines such as acrobatics, aerial acrobatics, magic, juggling, etc actively form part of the artwork.”

ABOUT

In another definition, what constitutes contemporary circus at any given moment is any performance made by or considered relevant to our field of professionals. That and a vague idea that contemporary is any circus work made in the last 10 years or so. I’m writing this, of course, with a smirk on my face and a twinkle in my eye. Once an art form is definable, hasn’t it stagnated? Definitions of an ever-changing and evolving field are, therefore, impossible. But I still love the challenge of trying to pin an artform down, even whilst failing.

CONTEMPORARY C I R C U S?

As such, the term contemporary circus is in itself flawed, if we try to look for contemporaneity in its relationship with the present. The actual present is something like three seconds. The cultural present is perhaps something like three years. We can assume performing arts can act in the present, but never truly tackle the present other than by chance. The difficulty with an idea of present is also that it implies a kind of lineage; of chronology. To make the term useful we need to alter the concept of contemporaneity and separate the present real time from the present movements of the art form. I prefer the idea of a current circus. Here, “current” defines a reaction to a series of circumstances; it’s an ever-changing direction; it responds to external forces, albeit with some aim which is destined or unknown. But what about contemporaneity? To be truly contemporary you have to not only be in the present, but challenge it. To be truly contemporary you need to change reality in real time. Do I think circus can do this? Most definitely. Not many people know that it can take years to learn a specific circus trick. Some tricks are passed down for generations; others might not have been performed previously, but are a result of generations of work. Any trick is a direct link, in real time, to its lived history and a snapshot of how far the present has come. Circus highlights the limits of the possible in the present, and, in every moment, it reaches into the future. The very act of practising a trick contains within it a future where the impossible becomes possible. In performance, this unsatisfiable quest to conquer the limits of possibility is immediately clear to the audience, without any filter. Does it alter reality? Yes, I believe it does. Contemporaneity is not a prerequisite to altering reality. You can very well change the world, if you are ahead of your time, or deeply rooted in traditional practices! To alter reality, circus needs to connect to that reality and to people in current situations; to reach them where they are and inspire change. This also means that, by inspiring change and altering reality, circus ultimately changes itself. Any definition of contemporary circus is, therefore, short-lived – which might just be a way for the genre to fight its own stagnation, and remain, at all times, present, current, and, if you will, contemporary.

Lina B. Frank is a producer, programmer, curator and arts consultant from Sweden working across Europe. She works mostly with contemporary circus, cross-disciplinary arts and live art – always with bold and brave people, explorers and visionaries at heart. She’s interested in how art can be used to facilitate democratic participation to challenge the status quo. Lina is currently acting Network Coordinator for Baltic Nordic Circus Network and co-manages Cirkus Syd.

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ISSUE 01 BODY

THE

DYNAMO IN CONVERSATION WITH REBECKA NORD In partner acrobatics, the human body enters a relationship of direct, unmediated dependency. Someone carries, someone else is being carried. The body is simultaneously a burden and a foundation of strength. Writer, choreographer, and circus artist Rebecka Nord considers all these in her latest performance with company Circus by Me, Det får bära eller brista (2020).

What is Det får bära eller brista? Why is this project important for you? It’s a performance with six partner acrobats and two live folk musicians, all female, telling a story about what women have been carrying for the last hundred years. This is a very personal project that sprang from interviews I did with my grandmother about her life, and the lives of her mother and grandmother. There is a metaphysical connection between the experiences of women in the last century and today. Through this connection we observe the beauty that lies in the strength that women needed, need, and will need to have. The idea of a woman’s body carrying a burden speaks a lot, culturally today. How does this show add to the larger conversation about women’s bodies? I’m sure that women still carry a lot in their everyday lives, mentally and physically, despite many things being (seemingly) simpler today. The fact that women are presented as weak or less physical is just absurd. The whole idea of women carrying women, that the woman also can be a strong base and the stronger partner in acrobatics, is a good way to turn the common (mis)belief on its head. I love the nod to personal history in this performance – a call to return to what we’ve inherited from our ancestors. Why do you think this is important as a creative source for (circus) artists? Every artist has different sources of inspiration. I prefer subjects that touch me deeply, especially if I’m aiming for a show that will impact the audience. The theme coming from my family’s history put this production very close to my heart, helped me with being creative, and also gave me the motivation to make it happen.

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CARRYING

BODY::

This show makes a strong argument for how contemporary circus can be a space where art and social critique meet. And this is a part of the conversation for most art and stage art today – should it be “socially-engaged”? What do you think? I believe that, as artists, we are responsible, as everyone else in society, to do work that creates a better world. At the same time, art can be socially engaged and engaging without social critique. A circus show can be a moment where the audience relaxes and is transported into a different universe. Contemporary circus offers a great environment where art and social critique can meet. But neither the environment nor the art necessarily compel to social critique. Ultimately, this is a choice that each performance takes into consideration, in an individual way. You spent quite some time doing research for this performance, among others, in your 2019 residency in DYNAMO – could you describe this process? Creating this show has been a long process for me; I think it’s good to let an idea mature before starting the creation. However, when creation begins, the incubation does not stop; it is an act of balancing the two. In the case of Det får bära eller brista we used both incubation and spur-of-the moment creativity throughout the process and within residencies. How did you balance the two? In residency we focused on being primarily creative, improvising and discovering new ideas. In between residencies we looked through the material, let the work sink into into our bodies and minds and prepare us for the next period of intense creativity. With fragility and strength as central concepts in this performance – how do you relate to these using disciplines of circus as tools? I find the interface between fragility and strength very interesting. In partner acrobatics you need a lot of strength, for example to hold up a pyramid. But you can also illustrate strength on stage through its (perceived) opposite: fragility. So, we created a scene where one of the artists is singing a song as we’re slowly climbing up on her one by one. In the scene you can hear how the voice is trembling, at the same time she’s showing incredible strength lifting almost the entire team. It’s beautiful to see strength and fragility at the same time; often fragility adds to strength. We are always both fragile and strong and, sometimes, it’s a strength to show our weaknesses.


Talents behind Det får bära eller brista: Acrobats: Anna Nerman Sylla, Katja Kortström, Linda Petersson, Rebecka Nord, Seela Wanvik & Signe Veinholt; Musicians: Anna Rynefors & Anna Cederquist; Research and creation: All artists; Composition: Anna Cederquist; Light design: Sofie Gynning; Costume design: Sus Soddu; Director: Åsa Johannisson

CIRCUS

AND

SYMBOLS

PH OTO BY ALEX HI N CHCL I FFE

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THROW

AND A

A

ISSUE 01 OBJECT

CATCH

ELENA STANCIU IN CONVERSATION WITH JAY GILLIGAN What is an object? What can it do? Does it tell a story? Does it have a voice? Juggling master Jay Gilligan uses the materiality of objects to create abstract worlds. His experimental approach to juggling has pushed the discipline to explore new formats and novel creative possibilities within the genre. Juggling has been around a while. What’s new in the discipline? Is innovation (as more than a buzzword) something that plays a part in your practice? To speak of innovating in juggling, we first need to recognise what juggling is; or, what do we think of, in our world today, when we think of juggling? Juggling is only a little older than 100 years, although there are older traces, objects, and techniques. So, to innovate, you don’t have to go very far from the starting point of juggling. Anything innovative must be done out of necessity and not for mere novelty. Even though an infinite number of things could be created, it doesn’t mean that they should be created. The task for innovation must fit the context in which it arises and respond to specific situations and processes. My general rule is to make sure that I try to create work that is necessary, not just simply new.

PAGE 16

In a similar direction of “tyrannical” buzzwords - how do you engage with the idea of “story” or narrative, when creating your performances? To answer this, we need to both consider the art form itself and how that art form fits into society and culture at a given time. Juggling is an abstract art form; good at expressing abstract shapes, emotions, ideas, and concepts. It can easily have an abstract narrative. Performing juggling in which the technique has a concrete narrative has either rarely or never been done; not that I can recall. Any narrative in the art form of juggling is self-referential or on a meta level. Where would you say this need for a story comes from? An interesting concept is hierarchy. Art today is bought and sold according to a clear hierarchy, and juggling is not at the top. Our cultural gatekeepers (in charge of cultural programming) chase a balance: they must be relevant and they must make money for their institution, to keep their job. They know that theater, for instance, is a “valid” art form: more popular, more well known, and more explored than circus. The necessity to tell a story might generate here – as these gatekeepers use words and concepts from theater: “You’re doing a circus show? Well then, what’s it about? Oh, it’s Romeo and Juliet with a trapeze? Then, welcome to our theater!”


AND A

What is the thrill of juggling, past the skill of playing with gravity? I don’t find the skill part of juggling interesting at all in terms of performance. As a hobby, I love it every day since it is a challenge. But I find the same challenge to be dreadfully boring as the premise for a stage presentation of juggling. What I appreciate about performing cannot be put into words – I should just show you some juggling. It holds something unique that no other art form can exactly copy. I like that it stops when I stop. I like how the shapes constantly change as they move in space. I like the patterns and the repetition.

We’ve seen you juggle some balls made of threads, fabrics and glitter, which were coming undone while being thrown. Quite a brilliant way of exploring the nature of an object. How did you come up with this idea? The game in juggling is to take an object available to everyone and do some new trick with it; use it in a unique way. It’s a fun game, I have to admit. However, this is a limiting process for an artist: imagine you were a painter and you could only have a one-size paint brush? As an artist today, as a juggler, I look around at other art forms and start to question the lack of diversity in my tool set. Juggling as an art form is just starting out; we still experiment, and, at this point, that includes juggling every type of object we can imagine. It’s an elementary process that has not even properly started yet.

IN

WORLD

Are there any misconceptions people have about juggling? One common misconception I hear is from performers who present juggling themselves. I’ve often heard them say: “The general public hates juggling.” Or: “People don’t like juggling, you have to do something more.” I’ve personally found this attitude to be simply untrue. My answer to this is simple: First of all, the general public doesn’t hate juggling, because they never think about juggling, it’s not an issue in their lives. Secondly, people usually hate things which are bad. I’m not saying I always manage to do good juggling, but the starting premise in my work is that people will be interested in what I’m doing, if I can make it good.

PHOTOS BY COSMIN CIRSTEA . J AY GILLIG AN PERFORMING MELODIC OB JEC T S AT DYN AM O 2019

BETWEEN

Beyond the materiality of objects, how do you experience the language of juggling? Does speaking of juggling add or take away from it? The language of juggling is as intuitive and tangled up as its history and context today. To illustrate: the word “juggling” means both the overall genre and a specific activity inside of that genre. As a genre, it includes techniques such as balancing a stick or spinning a ball on your finger, but there’s also an act called juggling. You can call this “toss juggling:” throwing and catching balls in rapid succession. Imagine you played sports and, when asked which one, instead of saying football, you answered again with “sports.” Language is one of the most important things to an art form, especially one as young as juggling. Just now starting to take these first steps into the language of juggling has changed my life as a juggler.

PAGE 17


ISSUE 01 BALANCE

THE

AN ESSAY BY IONA KEWNEY

Dancer, visual artist, performance artist, circus artist, choreographer, and teacher. Iona Kewney is all these and more. Here, she tells the (short) story of her winding artistic journey within contemporary circus.

My interest in performing lies in the fine line between balance, control, and falling apart; the combination of order, disorder, and transformation. From within the self and drawing from outside influences. Creating performance for me is not just a matter of showing skills and techniques, but of using the techniques to create underlying structures, which amplify life in all its emotions; in glory, nonsense, dreams, and failures. A parallel unbalanced universe. I came to circus through a long but deeply connected history of visual art, competitive sports, performance art, with a career as a dancer in touring companies. Throughout, there has always been a relentless drive and vision in all I choose to obsess with. To see and try for myself. To experience personally. A kind of arising of the spirit into action. An unsettling of the balance to search out the new. Whilst making work, the understanding of different art forms from different viewpoints can strengthen ideas and reasonings. Ways of looking, dreaming, and composing become an ability to see multiple layers of details within the bigger picture. Striving at the edges of how the body is, or is not, seen. Engaging the feelings of physicality and imagination to embody certain energies and states of being. In all, searching a totality of hyper awareness and playing on the boundary of no control. As a painter uses palette and canvas, a performance artist uses the body as a means of expression; a visual dreaming sensation. Imagination empowers the way into forms of physicality. The dancer’s body is the vessel used to search inside themselves. The circus artist uses props and equipment to make work. By blending circus techniques with the emotional, transformative essence and vibrational charge of dance, other creative methods can be found. Whether through circus, dance or theatre, what matters more to me is the focus on the thinking body and intent, rather than a particular choice of physical medium. Although I almost always choose to present myself through dance or as a visual artist, my work is shown more frequently in the circus world. Perhaps because of my visceral dance qualities that take the body to mental and physical extremes. Movement attained through trance-like qualities and fragile emotive states. The edge. A breaking point and transformation. It is said that purple is the colour that wants to be red the most, maybe circus is the art that wants to dance the most.

PAGE 18

OF BEING

DANCE


LE VITATIO N TO TH E FU TU R E . ART W O R K BY IO N A KE WN E Y. TH IR D IN TH E TR IP T Y C H W AITIN G FO R TH E SE A E A GLE – 2020

HUMAN

For all the interlinked theories and methods employed in the arts, it could be interesting to teach art history at circus school. Within each visual art discipline there are many art forms. These methods and understandings can apply to circus as well: how we see and shape space; our perspective of weight, rhythm, tension, composition, light; the qualities we employ. I feel circus more as a way of thinking, rather than a particular chosen art form that installs a method within. How the artist dissects and grows in each form. Being able to cross over art forms fluidly. In all, some things should just be. The power and completeness of circus in its own right is enough. Like any art form there is a great magic and awe in the class of traditional work. In society, the balance of new methods, theories and movements arises through evolving art forms such as circus. Circus openly extends its range of methods, applied arts, and contexts in which it is shown. In turn, it expands on its diversity. The meeting between the audience and the work can be the connection that keeps the magic alive. Here the transitory, fleeting nature of live work and the atmospheric connections that can arise can be truly astonishing when experienced first hand.

PAGE 19


PHOTO BY EINARKLINGODENCRANTS. COM. COU RTESY OF MAXAN DBR ISCO E .CO M / IG: @E KO P IC S, @BR IKSO AN D @M AXIM E BL AN C K AE RT W

ISSUE 01 BALANCE

RIGHT WAY DOWN

LESSONS ABOUT OUR BODIES

Right Way Down is a new company, a collective of six hand balancers whose work tampers with common definitions of circus. Experimenting with the absurdity of reality upturned, they challenge us to see the world the right way down. We invited Right Way Down to share with us thoughts, feelings, and lessons they’ve learned while making their performance, Váld.

Despite our handstand training being so similar, we all carry personal and very different movement patterns. We’ve learnt that even though we are the same hand balancing body, we are very different and the scope for individual flavour and character as a hand balancer is endless. These differences are incorporated into our production, Váld, and they make it interesting. During the process we were reminded of how heavy the practice is; that we need to explore vocabulary that takes us off our hands and gives us time to recover. We’ve learnt how much we benefit from variation, and how entwined movement and handstands are. It’s an incredible discipline to crossbreed with physical theater and dance, which is what Váld encompasses.

Artists in Right Way Down: Imogen Huzel, Matt Pasquet, Lisa Angberg, Sunniva Byvard, Isak Arvidsson & Mikael Kristiansen

PAGE 20


HANDSTANDING AS STORYTELLING

LESSONS ABOUT BALANCE When working collectively, the focus extends from only balancing ourselves to balancing one another. It has all to do with concentration: while some people learn through patience and repetition, others learn through playing and testing their balance.

A COLLECTIVE APPROACH By transforming a solo focus into something more expansive we are able to use our bodies to explore a much more intricate narrative. The way we choose to relate to one another can say so much more than we would manage to say individually. On our own, we are limited – the act ends up being more about skill rather than feeling. Working with hand balancing as a collective offers many new and interesting options as the entire creation moves away from the tricks and towards a common idea or picture. Technical achievement is also normalised very early on.

VÁLD: SKILLS AND METAPHORS The decision to make a show with specialists in only one discipline, forced the creation to go in depth. This in itself moves us further away from the traditional spirit of circus. Our theme actually evolved organically – after researching physically together, the forest appeared. Having this theme is very inspiring for creating and thinking in ways different from the skill-based practicalities that hand balancing entails. With a group that is as comfortable on their hands as on their feet, it became natural to use this as the conceptual framework for Váld.

HANDSTANDS: LESSONS FROM A DISCIPLINE Handstands bring to circus the option of not needing an apparatus. This is a similarity to dance, which enables the two art forms to coexist comfortably. The most significant trait about handstands is the length of time it takes to master them. Balancing takes patience, repetition and commitment. It is very simple but complex at the same time, and within this simplicity it opens up a huge umbrella of creative opportunities.

PHOTO BY RIGHT W AY D O WN

FOREST

A

HANDSTANDS

OF

There is something very simple about handstands in the way it is just humans turned upside down. People can relate to this – to how hard, fragile and human it is. This relationship of standing the right way up vs. on our hands is already a powerful image. With the image of a forest as our starting point, the theoretical understanding of the nature of a forest gives us impetus to create physically. Váld uses hand balancing as its paintbrush to draw upon destruction, decay and regrowth. Mirroring the symbiotic nature of the forest, and the dangers us humans pose to it, we establish relationships on stage which reflect some of these realities.


ISSUE 01 BODY

Aerial artist and one of the creative directors of Svalbard, Tom Brand, discusses creative freedom and constraints, the solitude of the aerial rope, and the necessary process of artistic reinvention, beyond patterns and routine.

How did you navigate towards aerial rope and what attracted you to it? How much has the discipline influenced your identity as an artist so far? I think I become what I practise. My journey with the rope and my practice have shaped me and it is an ongoing process. I started with rope at AFUK in 2010-2011 and it was more of a coincidence rather than a particular choice; I’m not generally a monodisciplinary type of guy, but I gave it a try. What I enjoy is the feeling of being suspended, hanging and swinging, for a moment of zero gravity. I was attracted by its dynamism and I still rather work with simple knots, swings, and positions. I am not the “knotty” kind of rope artist. I like the visual simplicity of the rope in a space, and love to work without a mat on the floor. Technique was like learning a language, in the beginning – essential vocabulary. That changed during my time at DOCH (Today: Stockholm University of the Arts) and with injuries starting to appear. I got interested in movement and dance rather than tricks and my practice changed drastically.

THE BODY

PAGE 22

How would you characterise the balance between freedom and constraints, in your discipline? Constraints are a great tool for creativity and I use them often. My freedom comes partly from having practised so much – I feel able to do whatever I want. It also comes from focusing on the things I couldn’t do without it. The rope becomes an additional limb and connection to the floor that gives me the possibility to lean and move in unique ways. The game of pushing, pulling, and letting go is the most interesting part of being an aerialist. When people see and think of aerials they “think up.” I think down as much as I think up. The rope and the floor are equal. It is actually possible to stand “in the rope” and still have a connection to the floor. I see a plus in limitations: the rope always comes back to the same place; gravity is at work; try throwing it away, it’s right back in front of you. It’s equally annoying and reaffirming, centring.

IN ROPE


This sounds quite poetic; do you work with symbolism or is your focus primarily on technique? My focus now is definitely elsewhere than technique. It’s on imagination, transparency and physical sensation. I aim to remove myself and let my body be a vessel, while being transparent with that challenge. I have discovered that a lot of my tendencies for movement qualities are almost as if there is something else than me moving my body. I’ve found myself crawling and worming around on the floor a lot. For my rope performance in the 2019 DYNAMO Festival, I decided the image of somebody drowning was the point from where I would enter the act. I like to let things happen, improvise and trust my intuition while I perform. I like to adapt within the space and let the audience impact me. I try to be as awake as I possibly can be. How do you integrate your rope act when creating wider pieces with Svalbard? We have quite an anarchic way of creating within Svalbard. We are facilitators and inspirations for one another and our collaborators. It’s an atmosphere where everyone has the possibility to express and include their passion; where they are allowed to pop, explode and do whatever they want and need. It can be a lonely discipline but there is always my imagination. I like to take away the holiness of a circus equipment and let it be there as an object and part of the scenography and the space. It’s a tool; it’s a rope, that’s it! Sometimes we want to break out and shock or surprise; other times we want to fit the atmosphere that already exists.

WITH

IN CONVERSATION

P H OTO S BY COS MI N CI RSTEA . TO M BR AN D P ERFORMI NG WI TH S VA L B A RD AT DYN A MO CI RCUS F ESTIVAL 2019

You mentioned a sort of “solitude” in the discipline. Is this felt also in the intensity of the public’s eye on your act? How do you engage with the audience, as you perform? I enjoy it. I miss it a lot when I can’t perform. I aim to be so present in the moment, and true to myself, that there is no time to judge or analyse this relation. It’s instinctual. There is something cathartic in performing and I believe catharsis on stage has the power to work as a mirror for the spectator; to look inwards and maybe understand one thing or another about ourselves. I like to see honesty and purity in performers regardless of skill and aesthetic choices. Do what you feel and what you believe in, rather than show off a recipe. We are energetic beings and I believe we can sense more than we think. How would you describe the storytelling capacity of aerial rope? I don’t really use the rope metaphorically. I see it more as telling a story about the performer using the rope. I get physically inspired by how the rope moves when I give it impulses and try to imitate it and incorporate that in my body’s movements. I think the story is told by the viewer’s own associations and that is the way I like to present art: not to tell people what to think, but to use strong images, sometimes without a clear idea of what they mean for myself. I like to trigger imagination, associations and the audience’s need to understand.

TOM BRAND


ISSUE 01 BALANCE

TOUR

ELENA STANCIU IN CONVERSATION WITH SADE KAMPPILA Eight performers. One stage. One tent. One circus – a utopia. This is Circus I Love You, a unique performance “standing for voluntary simplicity, sustainable development and culture for all.” Art stands on the shoulders of giants. This is also true of contemporary circus, an artform that pays homage to its ancestry, in a forward-looking way. Techniques and apparatuses from traditional circus are still used, in new creative formats and with new artistic plots. With premiere in 2018, the touring production Circus I Love You lands at the meeting of the two - a travelling show, a tent for 500 people, a group of artists whose lives are temporarily on the road. Acrobat, musician and one of the creators of the performance, Sade Kamppila, makes a note of this: “The engagement of the artists on tour with Circus I love You is a lot more similar to the acrobats working in traditional circuses than acrobats touring with contemporary circus projects. Generally we aim to tour six months a year, and then everyone is free to go for their other dreams in life for the remaining time.” This form of part-time nomadism is recognised by circus artists as a lifestyle unique to circus – a form of togetherness that breeds belonging, despite the lack of permanence. “There are of course free days, but everyone is considered to be at ‘home’ in their caravan when on tour. This merges personal and professional life in a way that most of Western society would consider as ‘bad’” Sade explains. The feeling of occupying an idea of home, if not an actual home, in a traditional way, generates, according to Sade, community and kinship: “This way of living creates quite a nicely balanced atmosphere for the micro-society of the tour.” She recalls get-togethers, karaoke nights, family visits, nature walks and barbeques - life as we know it! Sade goes on to speak of the performance itself: rooted in research on circus composition, they were “inspired by the similarities between music and circus, and the way they are composed; circus forms acrobatic actions using apparatuses, just as music forms notes using instruments.” Stage presence and the structure of the acts are a priority in the mind of the creators: “We pay close attention to what actions and acrobatic moves are on stage, and there is a very clear Why? for all of them. We want to show how support from others can make an individual reach something greater than what they would have managed alone. There’s a focus on actions where the support helps an individual overcome their fears to regain freedom. We do not apply character work or a specific movement style, and don’t have solo moments in the show. We are more like a group of workers with the perfect profile - being multi-talented in the acrobatics we do, having an interest in playing music and ready for the hard work of touring with a circus tent. We all gathered to work for the mission of Circus I Love you.” The balance between individual artistry and collective creativity strikes an almost perfect chord: “In the creation period, we all aimed to bring the parts of ourselves forward that were building towards the initial goal we had as a group, instead of prioritising our personal artistic preferences.” Support, trust, and presence define the performance. Artists lean on each other and catch one another, as apparatuses are partly replaced with their bodies. The height and the fall gain new meanings, when the body of someone you trust stands between you and the pull of gravity. Circus I Love You calls itself “utopian circus” - perhaps a balancing of utopia and reality, in a world that needs more of both.

PAGE 24

BALANCE

LIFE ON

LIFE IN


P H OTO BY M IN J A K A U KO N IE M I

PAGE 25


ISSUE 01 OBJECT

Is it

. . PHOTO BY MATTHEW K ALTENBORN. GIEDRE DEGU T Y TE P E R FO R M IN G DU R IN G BR IN K FE STIVAL 2018

or hula hoop n. (a proprietary name for) a tubular, plastic hoop used for spinning round the body [...]. (OED)

HULA

WHAT IS

.A POEM BY. GIEDRE DEGUTYTE

or Hula: A Hawaiian dance, with six basic steps [...]. (OED) Hoop: A circle of wood or iron (originally a barrel-hoop), which is trundled along as a plaything by children. (OED) ?

H O O P/I N G?

Is it possible to discuss circus without mentioning tricks? What about hula hooping? What does hula hooping represent besides tricks? What would hula hooping be like if tricks were non-existent? Would it still be hula hooping? Can a hula hoop become something else? Can a hula hoop be a window or a mirror, or simply a hole to jump through and turn around with? Can a hula hoop be an extension of my mind, while being a circular object made from plastic? If there are no tricks, why circus? Can it be a form of dance? Or theater? What could a trick represent in a dramaturgic play? What is a trick? What is not a trick? Is there such a thing as a not-a-trick? Can I cheat a trick? Can I lie about what is a trick and what is not? Is this a trick? This is a trick! While this one is not a trick... or is it? Some tricks make me laugh, what’s so funny? Can a trick be funny? What am I doing with the hula hoop? Do I have a choice? Who am I in relation to the hula hoop? Is there any relation/ship between us? Should there be one? Am I the one manipulating it or is the hula hoop manipulating me? What about the ones watching us? Us? Me and my hula hoop in relation to the other(s), how does that work? Does it work? Them as the audience; me as a hula hooper; a hula hoop as a hula hoop.

Giedrė Degutytė is a Lithuanian circus and clown performer/creator whose ongoing hula-clown performance practice questions the placement and function of circus tricks. With and without hula hoops, bored, troubled and full of doubt, Giedrė explores clown as a compositional and dramaturgical tool in search of the comic.

PAGE 26


ISSUE 01 GENRE, BODY, OBJECT, BALANCE DYNAMO Workspace Finlandkaj 6, 5000 Odense DK dynamoworkspace.dk All images © the image makers as listed. ©2020 DYNAMO Magazine all rights reserved. No parts of this publication may be reproduced, stored or transmitted through any means mechanical, electronic, photocopied or otherwise without the prior permission of the copyright owner. All releases are the responsibility of the contributors and DYNAMO Magazine is in no way responsible or liable for the accuracy of the information contained herein nor in any consequences arising from its interpretation. Managing editor: Elena Stanciu Art & Design: Mads Find Project Coordinator: Kasper Herschend Contributing writers: Lina B. Frank, Michael Eigtved, Iona Kewney, Giedre Degutyte, Guy Carrara, Sunniva Byvard and Right Way Down. Contributing photographers: Cosmin Cirstea, Einar Kling Odencrants, Matthew Kaltenborn, Minja Kaukoniemi, Alex Hinchcliffe, Per Morten Abrahamsen, Rico Feldfoss, Marta Garcia, Geert Roels. Artists interviewed: Kitt Johnson, Tom Brand, Jay Gilligan, Sade Kamppila, Rebecka Nord.

Dynamo Magazine is supported by : Danish Arts Foundation and The City of Odense

Dynamo is supported by : Danish Arts Foundation, The City of Odense, Spar Nord Foundation, Funch Fonden, Nordic Culture Point, Hartmann Fonden, Danish Artist Union , Royal Unibrew, Kultur Region Fyn, Region Syddanmarks Kulturpulje, The Finnish Cultural Institute in Denmark, The Nordic Culture Fund Printed by: KOPA Print ISBN 978-87-972250-0-4

P H OTO BY CO SM IN C IR STE A . K AR L STE TS P E R FO R M IN G C U E R D O AT DYN AM O C IRC U S FE STIVAL 2019

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