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M/T VESSEL A – IMO No. 1234567 COMPANY’S NAME STS PLAN


SAMPLE PLAN - MISSING PAGES

STS OPERATIONS

PLAN M/T  HANSA IMO 9178

According to IMO RESOLUTION MEPC 186(59) Prepared by ONLINESTS www.onlinests.net   2014


TABLE OF CONTENTS PREAMBLE 7 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................ 1 RECORD OF CHANGES .................................................................................................................................. 3 RESPONSIBLE PERSONS FOR STS OPERATIONS ............................................................................................. 5 VESSEL PARTICULARS ................................................................................................................................... 7 GLOSSARY ..................................................................................................................................................... 8 MARPOL ANNEX I AMENDMENTS .............................................................................................................. 16 A. B. C.

Regulation 40 Scope of application Regulation 41 General Rules on safety and environmental protection Regulation 42 Notification

16 16 17

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION - REFERENCES ........................................................................................ 18 PART A 1 1. GENERAL PRINCIPLES 1 1.1. SCOPE APPLICATION AND LIMITATIONS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE STS OPERATIONS PLAN ........... 1 1.2. THE STS OPERATION ...................................................................................................................... 2 1.3. TYPES OF STS OPERATION .............................................................................................................. 4 1.4. THE PARTICIPANT ELEMENTS IN STS OPERATIONS ........................................................................ 6 1.5. THE ROLE OF THE PERSON IN OVERALL ADVISORY CONTROL OF STS OPERATIONS - POAC ........... 8 1.6. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN. ............................................................................................ 10 1.7. TRAINING - FAMILIARISATION OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL ................................................................. 10 1.8. MANNING FOR SHIP TO SHIP OPERATIONS AND THE PREVENTION OF FATIGUE ......................... 11 1.9. ALLOCATION OF DUTIES. ............................................................................................................. 14 1.10. SECURITY ..................................................................................................................................... 16 A.

2.

SECURITY ON MULTIPLE VESSELS

16

STS EQUIPMENT 17 2.1. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ........................................................................................................ 17 2.2. AVAILABILITY AND INSPECTION. .................................................................................................. 17 2.3. FENDERS ...................................................................................................................................... 18 A. B. C. D. E. F.

2.4.

21 24 28 29 30 30

HOSES .......................................................................................................................................... 30 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L.

2.5.

FENDER SELECTION REFERENCE GUIDE FENDER REQUIREMENTS FENDERS USED FOR IN PORT TRANSFERS LOW PRESSURE FENDERS RIBBED FENDERS FOAM FILLED FENDERS HOSE STANDARDS STORAGE OF NEW HOSE ASSEMBLIES USE OF RACKS TEMPERATURE HUMIDITY LIGHT OXYGEN AND OZONE CONTACT WITH OTHER MATERIALS BRINGING HOSE ASSEMBLIES INTO USE HOSE SIZE AND LENGTH HOSE HANDLING HOSE CONNECTION

30 31 31 32 33 33 33 33 34 34 34 35

HOSE INSPECTION ........................................................................................................................ 35 A. B.

INSPECTION DURING SERVICE ELECTRICAL CONTINUITY AND DISCONTINUITY

36 37


C. D. E.

USE OF HOSE MARKING FLOW VELOCITIES

37 40 40

2.6. MOORING EQUIPMENT ............................................................................................................... 42 2.7. PERSONNEL TRANSFERS .............................................................................................................. 44 2.8. SUITABILITY OF LIFTING EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................... 45 2.9. PERSONNEL TRANSFERS - IN PORT OPERATIONS ......................................................................... 46 2.10. LIGHTING ..................................................................................................................................... 47 2.11. AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT ............................................................................................................... 47 2.12. EQUIPMENT NOISE LEVELS .......................................................................................................... 47 3. NOTIFICATION AND APPROVAL FROM COASTAL STATE AUTHORITIES 48 3.1. NOTIFICATION AND APPROVALS ................................................................................................. 48 4. HOW TO CONDUCT AN STS OPERATION 50 4.1. JOINT PLAN OF OPERATION ......................................................................................................... 50 4.2. PRELIMINARY PLANNING ............................................................................................................. 51 4.3. PREPARATION OF SHIPS ............................................................................................................... 53 4.4. LIGHTERING SUPPORT VESSELS ................................................................................................... 53 4.5. PROCEDURES AND POLICIES FOR STS OPERATIONS ..................................................................... 54 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J.

4.6. 4.7.

LANGUAGE PRE-ARRIVAL COMMUNICATIONS INITIAL COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN SHIPS NAVIGATIONAL WARNINGS COMMUNICATIONS DURING APPROACH, MOORING AND UNMOORING COMMUNICATIONS DURING CARGO TRANSFER OPERATIONS PROCEDURES FOR COMMUNICATION FAILURE

63 64 65 65 65 66 66

APPROACHING ............................................................................................................................. 67 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I.

4.9.

54 55 56 57 57 58 59 60 61 63

NAVIGATIONAL SIGNALS ............................................................................................................. 63 COMMUNICATIONS ..................................................................................................................... 63 A. B. C. D. E. F. G.

4.8.

SHIP COMPATIBILITY SHIP TO SHIP TRANSFER OPERATIONS INVOLVING VESSELS OF A SIMILAR LENGTH USE OF DUMB BARGES CARGO HANDLING COMPATIBILITY TRANSFER AREA ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS COLD WEATHER PRECAUTIONS SHIP TO SHIP OPERATIONS IN ICE CONDITIONS CARGO SLOSHING CONSIDERATIONS QUALITY ASSURANCE AND SCREENING PROCEDURES OF STS PROVIDER

BASIC BERTHING PRINCIPLES MANOEUVRING ALONGSIDE WITH TWO SHIPS UNDER POWER GENERAL ADVICE FOR CONTROLLING THE TWO SHIPS ADVICE FOR MANOEUVRING ALONGSIDE MANOEUVRING A COMBINED TWO-SHIP SYSTEM TO ANCHOR MANOEUVRING FOR IN PORT OPERATIONS MANOEUVRING WITH ONE SHIP ALONGSIDE A TERMINAL UNDERWAY TRANSFER MANOEUVRES WITH ONE SHIP AT ANCHOR

67 67 68 69 71 71 71 72 73

MOORING .................................................................................................................................... 74 A. B. C. D. E.

MOORING ARRANGEMENT MOORING CONSIDERATIONS TENSION IN MOORING LINES LEAD ANGLES ON HEAD AND STERN MOORING LINES WEATHER THRESHOLDS

77 78 78 78 78


F. G. H. I.

4.10. 4.11.

PRE-TRANSFER PROCEDURES RESPONSIBILITY FOR CARGO OPERATIONS PLANNING FOR CARGO TRANSFER CARGO TRANSFER - GENERAL GUIDANCE AND BALLAST OPERATIONS VAPOUR BALANCING - GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OPERATIONS AFTER COMPLETION OF CARGO TRANSFER BUNKERING AND STORING

80 80 80 82 83 84 85

UNMOORING ............................................................................................................................... 86 A. B. C. D. E. F. G.

4.13.

78 79 79 79

IN PORT MOORING OPERATIONS ................................................................................................ 79 ALONGSIDE PROCEDURES ........................................................................................................... 80 A. B. C. D. E. F. G.

4.12.

WAVE PERIOD DIRECTION OF WAVE ENCOUNTER ELASTICITY OF MOORING ARRANGEMENT CHAFING PROTECTION

PREPARATIONS FOR UNMOORING UNMOORING WHILE ONE SHIP IS AT ANCHOR UNMOORING AFTER UNDERWAY TRANSFER UNMOORING FROM A SHIP ALONGSIDE A TERMINAL UNMOORING CHECKS PROCEDURE FOR UNBERTHING UNMOORING USING QUICK RELEASE APPARATUS OR TOGGLE PINS

86 86 86 87 87 88 88

COMPLETION OF STS OPERATION-EVALUATION - NOTIFICATION ............................................... 89 A. B.

NOTIFICATION TO AUTHORITIES RECORD KEEPING OF STS OPERATIONS

89 90

4.14. NON CONFORMITY REPORTING................................................................................................... 90 5. DUE DILIGENCE, SAFETY AND EMERGENCIES 91 5.1. DUE DILIGENCE ............................................................................................................................ 91 A. B. C. D. E.

5.2.

VESSEL SCREENING VESSELS COMPATIBILITY FOR STS OPERATIONS STS SERVICE PROVIDERS SCREENING/ASSESSMENT PERSON OF OVERALL ADVISORY CONTROL SCREENING/ASSESSMENT STS EQUIPMENT ASSESSMENT

CONTINGENCY PLAN .................................................................................................................... 93 A. CONTINGENCY PLANNING AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES B. EMERGENCY SIGNAL C. EMERGENCY SITUATIONS D. EMERGENCY DUTIES E. EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS F. EXAMPLES OF POTENTIAL EMERGENCIES G. EMERGENCIES DURING MANOEUVRING H. PROCEDURES IN THE EVENT OF GAS ACCUMULATION ON DECK I. ACCIDENTAL CARGO RELEASE J. SHIPBOARD OIL POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (SOPEP), SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (SMPEP) AND VESSEL RESPONSE PLAN (VRP) K. STATE OF READINESS FOR AN EMERGENCY L. CESSATION OF TRANSFER OPERATIONS AS A PRECAUTIONARY MEASURE

5.3.

93 94 94 94 95 95 95 96 96 96 96 97

RISK MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................................... 97 A. B.

5.4. 5.5. 5.6. 5.7.

91 92 92 92 92

RISK ASSESSMENT OF TRANSFER LOCATION RISK ASSESSMENT OF SHIP TO SHIP OPERATION

97 98

USE OF CHECKLISTS/FORMS ...................................................................................................... 100 CONSIDERATION OF WEATHER CONDITION .............................................................................. 101 READINESS OF AVAILABLE FIRE-FIGHTING EQUIPMENT ............................................................ 101 ACCOMMODATION OPENINGS .................................................................................................. 102


5.8. 5.9.

GALLEY EQUIPMENT .................................................................................................................. 102 SAFETY DURING CARGO TRANSFER ........................................................................................... 102 A. B. C. D.

5.10.

THE ELIMINATION OF ELECTRICAL CURRENT AND ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE IN CARGO HOSES OTHER PLACES WHERE ELECTRICAL ARCING MAY OCCUR

103 104

THE USE OF RADIO AND SATELLITE COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT......................................... 104 A. B. C. D. E.

5.12.

102 102 102 102

SHIP-TO-SHIP ELECTRIC CURRENTS ............................................................................................ 103 A. B.

5.11.

SIMULTANEOUS OPERATIONS SMOKING AND NAKED LIGHTS EARTHS ON ELECTRICAL SWITCHBOARDS MACHINERY OPERATIONS

MAIN RADIO EQUIPMENT SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS VHF AND UHF RADIOS AUTOMATIC IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS (AIS) PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

104 104 104 105 105

RADAR USE ................................................................................................................................ 105 A. B.

GENERAL THE USE OF 3CM AND 10CM RADAR

105 105

5.13. GROWTH OF GAS ....................................................................................................................... 106 5.14. ELECTRICAL/ LIGHTING STORMS ................................................................................................ 106 5.15. UNAUTHORIZED BOATS OR CRAFTS........................................................................................... 106 5.16. HELICOPTER OPERATIONS ......................................................................................................... 106 5.17. DRILLS ........................................................................................................................................ 106 5.18. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT AND LIFE SAVING APPLIANCES........................................ 107 5.19. MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ............................................................................................... 107 5.20. GAS ACCUMULATION ON OPEN DECKS...................................................................................... 108 5.21. ACTION IN CASE OF INFRINGEMENT OF SAFETY ........................................................................ 108 5.22. ACTION IN CASE OF CARGO LEAKAGE ........................................................................................ 108 6. INFORMATION RESOURCES ON PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE TO OIL SPILLS 109 7. STS FORMS AND RECORDS 110 7.1. FORMS OF STS OPERATIONS ...................................................................................................... 110 7.2. RECORDS OF STS OPERATIONS .................................................................................................. 113 7.3. SHIP INTEREST CONTACTS ......................................................................................................... 113

PART B FORMS PART C ANNEXES ANNEX I – PLANS ANNEX II – LIST OF EMERGENCY CONTACTS FOR USA ANNEX III – EXAMPLE INSTRUCTIONS FOR CONNECTIONS OF STS HOSES


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INTRODUCTION The STS Transfer Operations Plan (STS Plan) has been developed in accordance with the standards describe in MARPOL Annex I, as amended by Resolution MEPC.186(59), Chapter 8: Prevention of Pollution during Transfer of Oil Cargo between Oil Tankers at Sea, Regulations 40, 41, 42. The STS Plan has been developed taking into account the information contained in the best practice guidelines for STS operations as identified by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) as shown in the reference list at page 11 of this PREAMBLE. The STS Plan is incorporated into the existing Safety Management System required by Chapter IX of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended. M/T ALGOMA HANSA engaged in STS operations shall comply with this STS Plan.

Reference to this STS Plan is made in SMS Part 4,5T - Car T OP 19 The Person in Overall Advisory Control (POAC) of STS operations shall be qualified to perform all relevant duties as mentioned at section 1.5, taking into account the qualifications contained in the best practice guidelines for STS operations identified by the Organization, as required by MARPOL Annex I, Chapter 8, Regulation 41.4 The purpose of the plan is to provide guidance to the Master and officers directly involved in Ship to Ship Transfer (STS) Operations with respect to the steps to be followed when this operation is likely to occur. Part A of this manual contains guidance on general conditions and operational requirements for vessel involved in Ship to Ship Transfer Operations. Records of STS operations shall be retained on board for three years and be readily available for inspection by a party to the MARPOL Convention, as required by MARPOL Annex I, Chapter 8, Regulation 41.5. Part B of this Plan includes the forms that should be completed and kept as records. In ship to ship transfers, both tankers should comply fully with the safety precautions required for normal cargo operations. As required by the Resolution MEPC 186 (59) regulation 42, M/T ALGOMA HANSA may participate in an STS operation with another tanker which also has an approved by the administration Plan. The Plan has been prepared by OnlineSTS.net on behalf of the managers and approved by the Classification Society on behalf of the Flag Administration or the Flag administration itself and, except as provided below, no alteration or revision shall be made to any part of it without the prior approval of the Classification Society or the Flag Administration. Changes to the Forms and Annexes will not be required to be approved by the Recognized Organization. The Forms and Annexes will be maintained and kept up to date by the vessel's managers. Any alterations are recorded in the RECORDS OF CHANGES as shown at page 3 of this PREAMBLE. Routine drills conducted on board will not only ensure that the ship’s staff are familiar with their duties but will assist in forming a proficient team to combat all pollution incidents in an efficient manner.

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RECORD OF CHANGES Please record all changes and amendments in this table Amendment #

Date

Made by

Amended Pages #

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RESPONSIBLE PERSONS FOR STS OPERATIONS Please circulate this table to all ship’s staff that will be involved in ship to ship transfer operations. Name

Rank

Date Joined

Signature & Date

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VESSEL PARTICULARS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

NAME: IMO: VESSEL TYPE: FLAG: DATE KEEL LAID BUILDER HULL NUMBER PORT OF REGISTRY CLASSIFICATION SOCIETY CALL SIGN: SHIPS’ EMAIL MMSI

M/T  HANSA 912 16 CHEMICAL TANKER BAHAMAS 17 JUL 1996 ALABAMA SHIPYARD, MOBILE, USA 46 NASSAU LLOYDS REGISTER C6 MASTER@AA.FLEET.COM 311010700

TONNAGES 13 14

GROSS TONNAGE: NET TONNAGE

11290 4891

DIMENSIONS 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

LOA [m]: EXTREME BREADTH [m]: DEPTH [m] KTM (KEEL TO MASTHEAD) [m]: BCM (BOW TO CENTER MANIFOLD) [m]: LIGHTSHIP PARALLEL BODY LENGTH[m]: NORMAL BALLAST PARALLEL BODY LENGTH[m]: PARALLEL BODY LENGTH AT SUMMER DWT[m]: MANIFOLD CARGO CONNECTION SIZE [mm] MAXIMUM MANIFOLD HEIGHT ABOVE WATERLINE [m]

144.05 23.3 12.4 43.19 75 61 73 82 152 9.18

LOAD LINE INFORMATION 25 26 27 28 29 30

LIGHT SHIP DISPLACEMENT [mt] SUMMER DEADWEIGHT [mt]: SUMMER DISPLACEMENT [mt]: SUMMER DRAFT [m]: NORMAL BALLAST DISPLACEMENT [mt]: NORMAL BALLAST MEAN DRAFT [m]

5202 16775 21977 8.7 13678 5.9

SPEED DATA 31 32

IS VESSEL CAPABLE OF MAINTAINING SPEED BELOW 5 KNOTS? OPERATIONAL SPEED AT SDWT [kn]:

YES 13.7

MANAGER DETAILS COMPANY NAME 33 COMPANY ADDRESS 34 35

COMPANY TEL/FAX COMPANY EMAIL

36

BERN SCHE SHT (CYPRUS) LTD HAN1, SZOU STREEYPRUS. + 3500 CYNGS@BSSHIPT.COM

OWNER DETAILS 37

COMPANY NAME

ALERNATIONAL

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M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN

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MOORING MASTER A person who is designated to assist a ship's Master in the mooring and/or unmooring of the ships. For some operations, the Mooring Master may be the STS Superintendent and, for transfers involving MARPOL Annex I cargoes, they may also fulfil the role of Person in overall advisory control (POAC). MOORING MASTER ASSISTANT A person who may be assigned to assist the Mooring Master in operational tasks such as rigging fenders, hose handling, mooring and unmooring, and surveillance and tending offenders, moorings and hoses during the STS operation. MOTHER SHIP Normally the larger of the vessels engaged in STS transfer operations. In conventional STS operations, the Mother ship is the Discharging ship. However, in a reverse lightering operation, the Mother ship may be a Receiving ship. MOORING ARRANGEMENT PLAN The plan that shows the Mooring details of the vessels. OCMI Officer in Charge of the Marine Inspection P.O.A.C - PERSON IN OVERALL ADVISORY CONTROL For transfers at sea involving MARPOL Annex I cargoes, the person agreed to be in overall advisory control of an STS operation. It may be one of the Masters (generally the Master of the Manoeuvring ship) or it may be an STS Superintendent. PRIMARY FENDERS Large fenders capable of absorbing the impact energy of berthing and wide enough to prevent contact between the ships should they roll while alongside one another. The Primary fenders are normally pneumatic and pressurised to either 50 kPa or 80 kPa gauge pressure. RECEIVING SHIP This is the ship receiving the cargo from the Discharging Ship. The Receiving Ship may also be known as the lightering ship. REVERSE LIGHTERING OPERATION An operation that involves discharge from one or more smaller ships into a larger ship. In this scenario the Receiving ship is actually the Mother ship. Primarily, this term is used to describe an STS operation that is being performed for the purpose of loading an exporting ship in deeper


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SAFE WORKING LOAD (SWL) Generally, a load less than the yield or failure load by a safety factor that has been defined by a code, standard or good engineering practice. SECONDARY FENDERS Secondary fenders are fenders used to prevent contact between the two ships, should they be rolling or not parallel to each other. They are especially effective when rigged towards the ends of a ship and are of most benefit during mooring and unmooring operations. SERVICE SHIP See receiving ship. SHIP Throughout this Plan the word “ship” refers to an oil tanker, chemical/product tanker, product tanker. SHIP BLACKOUT Operating in the event of loss of power. SHIP OPERATOR See Company. SHIP TO BE LIGHTERED (STBL) See discharging ship. SHIPBOARD FITTINGS Shipboard fittings mean bollards and bitts, fairleads, stand rollers and chocks used for the normal mooring of the ship and similar components used for the normal towing of the ship. Other components such as capstans, winches, etc. are not covered by this guidance. Any weld, bolt or other fastening connecting the shipboard fitting to the supporting hull structure is part of the shipboard fitting and subject to any industry standard applicable to such fitting. SHIPOWNER Shipowner is the owner, manager or operator that has the day-to-day commercial and/or operational control of the ship. SHIP-TO-SHIP (STS) TRANSFER OPERATION Where liquid or gaseous cargo is transferred between ships moored side-by-side. Such operations may take place when one ship is at anchor or alongside or when both are underway.

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water at a location where available loading berths do not have sufficient water alongside to safely handle the ship at her laden departure draught.


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In general, the expression includes the approach manoeuvre, mooring, hose connection, procedures for cargo transfer, hose disconnection, unmooring and departure manoeuvre. The operation may also be referred to as Transhipment. STANDOFF The horizontal distance, maintained between the parallel body lengths of both ships, which is provided by the primary fenders when conducting an STS transfer operation. STS EQUIPMENT Refers to the equipment utilized for the STS operation. STS OPERATIONS PLAN A ship-specific plan containing procedures for the safe conduct of STS transfer operations. STS ORGANIZERS An STS Organiser is a shore based operator responsible for arranging an STS transfer operation. The Organiser may be an STS Service Provider. STS SERVICE PROVIDER Companies sometimes employed to organise and assist with STS transfers. The services offered by these companies vary, but often include the provision of personnel and equipment to facilitate the STS transfer. The STS Service Provider may also supply the essential personnel and equipment needed, such as hoses, fenders and support craft. The STS Service Provider may also be referred to as an STS Contractor or STS Resource Provider. STS SUPERINTENDENT A person who may be designated to assist a ship's Master in the co-ordination and supervision of the STS operation. This may include mooring and unmooring of the ships and/or the cargo transfer operation. For transfers at sea involving MARPOL Annex I cargoes, the STS Superintendent may also fulfil the role of POAC. The STS Superintendent may also be known as Lightering Master, Mooring Master or Transfer Supervisor. STS TRANSFER AREA An area within which an STS transfer operation customarily takes place. Transfer areas should be selected in safe sea areas. In coastal areas they will be agreed with nearby coastal authorities and, as appropriate, in accordance with specific port or national regulations.


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SUPPORTING HULL STRUCTURE Supporting hull structure means that part of the ship structure on/in which the shipboard fitting is placed and which is directly submitted to the forces exerted on the shipboard fitting. The hull structure supporting capstans, winches, etc. used for the normal towing and mooring operations mentioned above should also be subject to this guidance. TRANSFER AT ANCHOR The expression “transfer at anchor" describes an operation where a cargo transfer is carried out between ships when they are moored alongside each other and one of the ships is at anchor. The operation is an alternative to underway transfer. TRANSFER SUPERVISOR See STS Superintendent. TRANSHIPMENT Generic term for any STS cargo transfer operation. TRANSHIPMENT AREA See STS transfer area. TVEL Tank Vessel Examination Letter. TVEL has been renamed to Certificate of Compliance (C.o.C.) UNDERWAY An STS operation that is conducted between two ships that are underway. A ship is underway when it is not at anchor, made fast to the shore or aground. The ships engaged in the transfer may be either steaming or drifting freely with current and weather. VAPOUR BALANCING May be used to avoid the release of cargo vapours to the atmosphere by interconnecting the vapour systems of the receiving and discharging ships. VESSEL Ship.

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May also be described as a Transhipment area.


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MARPOL ANNEX I AMENDMENTS Resolution MEPC.186(59) was adopted at MEPC 59 and contains a new Chapter 8 to MARPOL Annex I on the prevention of pollution during the transfer of oil cargo between oil tankers at sea. Find below Regulation 40, 41 & 42 from the new Chapter 8 to MARPOL Annex I. A. Regulation 40 Scope of application 1. The regulations contained in this chapter apply to oil tankers of 150 gross tonnage and above engaged in the transfer of oil cargo between oil tankers at sea (STS operations) and their STS operations conducted on or after 1 April 2012. However, STS operations conducted before that date but after the approval of the Administration of STS operations Plan required under regulation 41.1 shall be in accordance with the STS operations Plan as far as possible. 2. The regulations contained in this chapter shall not apply to oil transfer operations associated with fixed or floating platforms including drilling rigs; floating production, storage and offloading facilities (FPSOs) used for the offshore production and storage of oil; and floating storage units (FSUs) used for the offshore storage of produced oil 1. 3. The regulations contained in this chapter shall not apply to bunkering operations. 4. The regulations contained in this chapter shall not apply to STS operations necessary for the purpose of securing the safety of a ship or saving life at sea, or for combating specific pollution incidents in order to minimize the damage from pollution. 5. The regulations contained in this chapter shall not apply to STS operations where either of the ships involved is a warship, naval auxiliary or other ship owned or operated by a State and used, for the time being, only on government non-commercial service. However, each State shall ensure, by the adoption of appropriate measures not impairing operations or operational capabilities of such ships that the STS operations are conducted in a manner consistent, so far as is reasonable and practicable, with this chapter. B. Regulation 41 General Rules on safety and environmental protection 1. Any oil tanker involved in STS operations shall carry on board a Plan prescribing how to conduct STS operations (STS operations Plan) not later than the date of the first annual, intermediate or renewal survey of the ship to be carried out on or after 1 January 2011. Each oil tanker’s STS operations Plan shall be approved by the Administration. The STS operations Plan shall be written in the working language of the ship. 2. The STS operations Plan shall be developed taking into account the information contained in the best practice guidelines for STS operations identified by the Organization 2. The STS operations Plan may be incorporated into an existing Safety Management System required by

1

Revised Annex I of MARPOL, chapter 7 (resolution MEPC.117(52)) and UNCLOS article 56 are applicable and address these operations.

2

IMO’s “Manual on Oil Pollution, Section I, Prevention” as amended, and the ICS and OCIMF “Ship-to-ship Transfer Guide, Petroleum”, fourth edition, 2005.


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3. Any oil tanker subject to this chapter and engaged in STS operations shall comply with its STS operations Plan. 4. The person in overall advisory control of STS operations shall be qualified to perform all relevant duties, taking into account the qualifications contained in the best practice guidelines for STS operations identified by the Organization3. 5. Records4 of STS operations shall be retained on board for three years and be readily available for inspection by a Party to the present Convention. C. Regulation 42 Notification 1. Each oil tanker subject to this chapter that plans STS operations within the territorial sea, or the exclusive economic zone of a Party to the present Convention shall notify that Party not less than 48 hours in advance of the scheduled STS operations. Where, in an exceptional case, all of the information specified in paragraph 2 is not available not less than 48 hours in advance, the oil tanker discharging the oil cargo shall notify the Party to the present Convention, not less than 48 hours in advance that an STS operation will occur and the information specified in paragraph 2 shall be provided to the Party at the earliest opportunity. 2. The notification specified in paragraph 1 of this regulation 5 shall include at least the following: 1. name, flag, call sign, IMO Number and estimated time of arrival of the oil tankers involved in the STS operations; 2. date, time and geographical location at the commencement of the planned STS operations; 3. whether STS operations are to be conducted at anchor or underway; 4. oil type and quantity; 5. planned duration of the STS operations; 6. identification of STS operations service provider or person in overall advisory control and contact information; and 7. A confirmation that the oil tanker has on board an STS operations Plan meeting the requirements of regulation 41.

3. If the estimated time of arrival of an oil tanker at the location or area for the STS operations changes by more than six hours, the master, owner or agent of that oil tanker shall provide a revised estimated time of arrival to the Party to the present Convention specified in paragraph 1 of this regulation.”

3

IMO’s “Manual on Oil Pollution, Section I, Prevention” as amended, and the ICS and OCIMF “Ship-to-ship Transfer Guide, Petroleum”, fourth edition, 2005.

4

Revised Annex I of MARPOL chapters 3 and 4 (resolution MEPC.117(52)); requirements for recording bunkering and oil cargo transfer operations in the Oil Record Book, and any records required by the STS operations Plan.

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chapter IX of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended, if that requirement is applicable to the oil tanker in question.


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M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN

PREAMBLE

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION - REFERENCES The following Documentation supported the development of the STS Plan: 1. BRIDGE PROCEDURES GUIDE (ICS) 2. CODE ON NOISE LEVELS ON BOARD SHIPS (RESOLUTION A.468(XII)), IMO 3. FENDER SELECTION FOR STS OPERATIONS, Maurice Wan, Fumihiko Yazaki, Sigeki Sakakibara, The Yokohama Rubber Co., Ltd. Ref: SF06070 4. GUIDANCE ON SHIPBOARD TOWING AND MOORING EQUIPMENT, IMO MSC/Circ.1175 24 May 2005 5. GUIDELINES FOR THE HANDLING, STORAGE, INSPECTION AND TESTING OF HOSES IN THE FIELD, (OCIMF) 6. GUIDELINES ON THE USE OF HIGH-MODULUS SYNTHETIC FIBER ROPES AS MOORING LINES ON LARGE TANKERS (OCIMF) 7. INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON STANDARDS OF TRAINING, CERTIFICATION AND WATCH KEEPING AND STCW CODE, IMO 8. INTERNATIONAL REGULATIONS FOR PREVENTING COLLISIONS AT SEA (COLREGS) 9. INTERNATIONAL SHIP AND PORT FACILITY SECURITY CODE (ISPS) IMO 10. ISGOTT (INTERNATIONAL SAFETY GUIDE FOR OIL TANKERS AND TERMINALS) 5TH EDITION (ICS, OCIMF AND IAPH). 11. MOORING EQUIPMENT GUIDELINES (OCIMF) 12. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR OIL TANKER MANIFOLDS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT (OCIMF) 13. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SHIPS' FITTINGS FOR USE WITH TUGS (OCIMF) 14. RUBBER HOSE ASSEMBLIES FOR OIL SUCTION AND DISCHARGE SERVICES SPECIFICATION FOR THE ASSEMBLIES, BSI BS EN 1765 15. RUBBER HOSE ASSEMBLIES FOR OIL SUCTION AND DISCHARGE SERVICES. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STORAGE, TESTING AND USE, BS 1435-2:2005 16. SHIP TO SHIP TRANSFER GUIDE – PETROLEUM CHEMICALS AND LIQUEFIED GASES (OCIMF/ICS/SIGTTO) 2013 17. SHIPPING INDUSTRY GUIDANCE ON PILOT TRANSFER ARRANGEMENTS. ICS, IMPA 2012 18. SHIPS AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY -- HIGH-PRESSURE FLOATING PNEUMATIC RUBBER FENDERS, ISO 17357:2002 19. SOPEP MANUAL OF M/T ALGOMA HANSA 20. STANDARD MARINE COMMUNICATION PHRASES USING THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, IMO RESOLUTION A.918(22), 2001 21. THE USE OF LARGE TANKERS IN SEASONAL FIRST YEAR ICE AND SEVERE SUB ZERO CONDITIONS (OCIMF) 22. THERMOPLASTIC MULTI-LAYER (NON VULCANISED) HOSES AND HOSE ASSEMBLIES FOR THE TRANSFER OF HYDRO CARBONS SOLVENT AND CHEMICALS, EN13765, 2010 23. UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION ON THE LAW OF THE SEA (UNCLOS)


PART A DOCUMENTATION


M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN

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1. GENERAL PRINCIPLES

The idea of transferring crude oil or petroleum products between two vessels that are under way, anchored, or drifting on the open ocean may seem risky. And yet, according to shipping companies and maritime accident statistics, this common practice is safe, as long as certain conditions are met. This plan prescribes how to conduct STS operations and shall be carried on board whenever M/T ALGOMA HANSA is involved to STS operations (Regulation 41.1 of IMO MEPC Resolution 186(59)). According to Regulation 41.5 of same resolution, records of STS operations shall also be retained on board for the last three years. These records shall be readily available for inspection by Party to the present Convention. The objective of the STS operations plan is to describe the STS procedures along with the potential risks and ensure a safe operation as far as possible. Thus in companion with the main STS procedures the STS operations plan includes procedures for: x x x x x x x

Selection, storage and Inspection of STS equipment Performing a risk assessment for the STS Operation by utilizing the forms attached in this Plan. Reporting to Local Authorities Quality assurance of the STS service provider Emergency preparedness Crew training Retaining records for STS operations

When M/T ALGOMA HANSA engaged in STS operation shall comply with this STS operations Plan (regulation 41.3 of IMO MEPC Resolution 186(59)). Nevertheless the regulation prescribes certain cases where this plan does not apply. However, it may be of assistance to these cases, according to the circumstances. The STS operations plan does not apply: x x x

x

To bunkering operations (Regulation 40.3 of IMO MEPC Resolution 186(59)). STS plan applies only to cargo transhipments. To transfer operations associated with fixed or floating platforms including drilling rigs (Regulation 40.2 of IMO MEPC Resolution 186(59)) To transfer operations associated with floating production storage and offloading facilities (FPSOs) used for offshore production and storage of oil and floating storage units (FSUs) used for the offshore storage of produced oil (Regulation 40.2 of IMO MEPC Resolution 186(59)) To STS operations necessary for the purpose of securing the safety of a ship or saving life at sea, or for combating specific pollution incidents in order to minimize the damage from pollution (Regulation 40.4 of IMO MEPC Resolution 186(59))

PART A

1.1. SCOPE APPLICATION AND LIMITATIONS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE STS OPERATIONS PLAN


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To STS operations, where either of the involved ships is owned or operated by a State and used, for the time being, only on government non-commercial service (Regulation 40.5 of IMO MEPC Resolution 186(59))

This STS operations plan is developed whilst taking into account the information contained in the best practice guidelines for STS operations identified by the Organization (Regulation 41.2 of IMO MEPC Resolution 186(59)). It also takes into account international standards, national laws and good seaman’s practice as this is proposed by various guidelines issued by relevant International Organizations. A list of the supporting documents is listed in the Preamble of this document. The procedures contained in this plan present the actions and preparedness measures for STS operations. Any supplementary instructions from charterers, despondent owners or commercial managers may be supplemented to this plan without an overriding role. In certain Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) or Territorial Waters or Port Limits it may be found that national or local regulations apply and in this case those should be followed in addition. A copy of the STS Plan must be available in the x x x

Cargo Control Room (CCR), Bridge, Engine Room.

1.2. THE STS OPERATION The term “Ship to ship transfer operation” (STS), in this plan and in the regulation, denotes the transhipment of oil or oil petroleum products between seagoing tankers. This practice is common for a number of reasons and serves the optimization of the distribution process from the source to the end-consumers.

Figure 1.1 Underway STS operation Charterers and Cargo Owners usually decide to organize an STS in a specific location between two ships. At this point, all the parties (charterers, cargo owners, shipowners and masters)


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BIG SHIP - Ship A -

SMALL SHIP - Ship B -

(ORDINARY) LIGHTERING

DISCHARGING SHIP; (FULL)

RECEIVING SHIP; (BALLAST)

REVERSE LIGHTERING

RECEIVING SHIP; (BALLAST)

DISCHARGING SHIP; (FULL)

FULL COVERED TRANSFER

DISCHARGING SHIP; (FULL)

RECEIVING SHIP; (FULL)

Table 1.3.1 STS Types

Figure 1.3.1 Standard Lightering Most Mild Case. Ship A (Discharging Vessel) is fully loaded while Ship B is in Ballast Condition.

Figure 1.3.2 Standard Lightering Most Severe Case. Ship A (Discharging Vessel) is fully loaded while Ship B is almost Full.

Figure 1.3.3 Reverse Lightering Most Mild Case. Ship A (Receiving Vessel) is half loaded while Ship B (Discharging Vessel) is fully loaded.

Figure 1.3.4 Reverse Lightering Most Severe Case. Ship A (Receiving Vessel) is almost fully loaded while Ship B (Discharging Vessel) is fully loaded.

Figure 1.3.5 Full Covered Transfer. Ship A (Discharging/ Receiving Vessel) is almost loaded while Ship B (Discharging/ Receiving Vessel) is also almost loaded.

PART A

M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN


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M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

PART A

During the Full Covered type of STS operation, exchange or blending of cargo and/or Personnel transfer may take place. Ordinary lightering operations in the open ocean may span a geographical area of many miles and may take several hours to a week or more, depending on the number of discharges and the volume of cargo discharged. In lightering operations, the approach phase begins when the two vessels are approximately three miles apart. Once they are moored together and cargo transfer begins, one “lift” - the transhipment from a discharge vessel to a service vessel - can take 10 to 24 hours to complete depending on the transferred cargo quantity. Very large discharge vessels can require as many as eight lifts to transfer all cargo; thus, they may remain within a lightering area for a considerable time in order to discharge their cargo completely. The process proceeds more quickly when service vessels are dedicated lightering vessels, which are permanently outfitted with the required equipment. Simultaneously lightering with two lightering vessels is not recommended. Inshore lightering usually takes place at a dedicated, deepwater anchorage in a sheltered location. The discharge vessel is always at anchor, with the service vessel (usually a tug barge unit) manoeuvring alongside, resulting in a very limited geographical scope of operations. The process entails the same three phases as in offshore lightering, but the transfer often takes less time, usually 8 to 15 hours, depending on the size and configuration of the service vessel and the type of cargo. A typical inshore lightering operation entails no more than three lifts, which lightens the discharge vessel enough to allow it to continue to a terminal, where the remaining cargo can be offloaded.

1.4. THE PARTICIPANT ELEMENTS IN STS OPERATIONS An STS operation involves several parties depending on the availability of STS equipment from one of the participating vessels, the experience of the masters and the locations were the STS takes place. Below the role of each one of the possible parties is described. THE DISCHARGE SHIP and RECEIVING SHIP The participating vessels are the significant elements in the STS operation. Usually the discharge ship is also called Mother Vessel or STBL (Ship To Be Lightered). Each Vessel may perform STS operations either as a discharge or receiving vessel. The fundamental principle in the role of each vessel is to comply with the other vessel under certain parameters and also bare the appropriate certification for its classification and insurance. THE PARTICIPATING CREW The crews and officers aboard M/T ALGOMA HANSA should have previous experience about lightering in general and also be familiar with their vessel’s capabilities in particular. The officers and crews aboard vessels which are used only for an occasional STS operation may not have indepth knowledge of STS. These vessels can still conduct STS operations safely, as long as everyone involved is aware of the circumstances and procedures and plans accordingly. STS service provider usually supplements the crews by placing an experienced lightering master aboard the service vessel and, frequently, an assistant lightering master aboard the Discharge vessel. THE STS SERVICE PROVIDER


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In most cases the STS service provider has to be an approved firm by the Maritime Administration where the STS operation takes place. Approval shall be granted subject to the legislation of each administration and careful consideration has to be taken that the undertaking STS service provider is approved to function within each administration territorial or EEZ authority. For more administrations, the person guiding and supervising an STS operation (PERSON IN OVERALL ADVISORY CONTROL OF STS OPERATIONS ) must have been responsible for guidance and supervision of at least one independent STS operation within the past 6 months, either on his or her own or under the supervision of a trained STS service provider. THE MOORING MASTER The mooring master provides guidance and assistance to both Masters of the vessels. His participation does not substitute the Master’s authorities and responsibilities during the operation; he may also be the person in overall advisory control. Should a contracted mooring master be not involved in the operation then the Master of the manoeuvring vessel is denoted as the “Mooring Master”. THE STS EQUIPMENT The STS equipment is selected for each STS operation according to best practice guidelines and subject to vessels compatibility and characteristics. It is an essential issue that the STS equipment are certified and inspected at regular intervals as per manufacturer’s guidelines. Such records should be available for screening purposes as shown at section 5.1.a. For fender selection refer to section 2.3 and for hoses refer to section 2.4. THE MANAGER/ OWNER The role of the owner or Manager is to maintain that his vessel and crew is ready in all respect to perform STS operations and also to perform a screening analysis for the participating vessel as well as the STS service provider if one is involved in an operation as shown in section 4.5. Basic screening questions for a vessel are shown below: x x x x x x

Seek confirmation that the STS vessel has P&I cover in place via a recognized P&I Club. Check that the vessel is in class with a recognized classification society Request a completed Vessel Particular form (VPQ or Questionnaire 88). Request the date of latest SIRE inspection report. Check the vessel's historical Port State Control (PSC) records. Request confirmation that suitable security arrangements are in place on the STS vessel and the ship has an approved security plan onboard.

PART A

The STS service provider is a contracted company that is in charge of the STS operation and/ or (or not) the STS equipment. The selection of the service provider is subject to the STS location and also subject to a screening procedure as shown at section 5.1.c performed by the owners, charterers or operators of the vessels. The role of the service provider is to provide his services in the STS operation with respect to the necessary equipment and mooring master. The STS service provider bears a respected experience in STS operations and the selection of one mitigates the risk of encountering an incident during an operation.


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Ensure that a risk assessment has been undertaken prior to each occasion on which a vessel is used.

PART A

1.5. THE ROLE OF THE PERSON IN OVERALL ADVISORY CONTROL OF STS OPERATIONS - POAC The STS operation should always be under the control of a qualified and experienced individual, the STS Superintendent, who acts as the person in overall advisory control of the operation. This person might be either one of the Master of the participating vessels or a qualified individual proposed by an STS service provider or acting on behalf of such. Should Masters be unfamiliar with or inexperienced in STS transfer operations; it is strongly recommended that an STS Superintendent (Mooring Master) should be employed to advise them. There are companies offering specialized STS services. Before employing such assistance the Master, shipping company, or Charterer should ensure that the STS service provider will provide trained and experienced STS Superintendents.

Note: It is not the intention of this plan that the person in overall advisory control in any way relieves the ship's Master of any of his duties, requirements or responsibilities. In most cases persons approved as an STS service provider may not put other persons in charge of guidance and supervision of STS operations on their behalf. Usually enterprises approved as an STS service provider shall only allow personnel meeting the certain requirements to be responsible for guidance and supervision of STS operations. It has to be checked that approved STS service providers shall use a quality assurance system that ensures that their tasks are performed in accordance with this order. General principles for persons performing guidance and supervision of STS operations shall: x

x x x x x x

Holder of an appropriate management level deck licence or certificate meeting international certificate standards, with all STCW and dangerous cargo endorsements up to date and appropriate for the ships engaged in the STS operations. Attendance at recognised ship- handling course Conduct a sufficient number or mooring/unmooring operations in similar circumstances and with similar ships Experience in oil tanker cargo loading and unloading A thorough knowledge of the geographic transfer area and surrounding areas A knowledge of ship clean-up techniques, including familiarity with the equipment and resources available in the STS contingency plan; and Thorough knowledge of the STS Plan

In doing so the STS Service provider should provide evidence of the quality and competence of the intended STS Superintendents. This function is part of the Due diligence process which takes places prior to the commencement of the STS operation. The Company declares in writing that:


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The principles of "Bridge Team Management", Reference [1], should be observed if an outsourcing STS Superintendent is employed. The POAC duties shall include, but not be limited to: x x x

x

Reviews the location specific Risk Assessment. Reviews the JPO and associated Risk Assessment. Assess the co-ordination needs of each operation and review of all pre-operational documentation to ensure it is performed to OCIMF standards. This assessment includes the dimensional compatibility of the ships, assurance of the mobilized STS equipment and record this in OCIMF CHECK-LIST 1 included in Part B. Supervise and ensure that cargo transfer, mooring and unmooring operations are conducted in accordance with the STS operations plan, the content of chapter 6 of the Oil Pollution Manual, section I of IMO and the ICS/OCIMF guidelines Ref [16];

x

Oversees the correct placement of primary and secondary fenders.

x

Support the Master(s) in identifying of the critical phases of the operation and in ensuring the provisions of the contingency plan are carried out in the event of a spill; Assess weather forecasting and monitor prevailing weather conditions; Orchestrate fendering and unfendering operations with support craft; Ensure that approach and mooring operations are not attempted until proper effective communication has been confirmed between the two oil tankers and appropriate premooring checks have been completed and recorded in FORMS OCIMF CHECK LIST 2 AND CHECK LIST 3 Ensuring that all required reports are made to the appropriate authorities;

x x x

x x x x

Verifies that any emergency shutdown system (ESD) is properly connected and tested. Sights and reviews mooring equipment. Conducts a pre-operations discussion with the responsible persons of involved vessels, including lightering support vessel and tugs, as appropriate.

x

Ensure that proper effective communication has been confirmed through all critical stages of the operation; Ensure that crew members involved in each aspect of the operation are properly briefed and understand their responsibilities;

x x

Discusses current and forecasted environmental conditions and the need for their continuous monitoring throughout the operation(s).

x

Support to the master for any adjustment to the JPO for the particular operation

PART A

“The ship master has the overriding authority and responsibility to take decisions with regard to safety of human life, property and the environment. Any requirement, instruction or guidance imposed by shore management must not detract him from either his authority or responsibility when dealing with safety or pollution prevention. He ought to not wait for approval to act.” It is underlined that in case of an incident Master should follow the provisions of the approved SOPEP plan.


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x

For at sea transfers, discusses passage planning and agrees courses and speeds for manoeuvring and mooring operations. Verifies joint agreement of the mooring and unmooring plans.

x

Ensure the proper completion of safety forms in all stages of operation;

x x

Reviews and verifies that any site-specific risk mitigations are in place. Supervises vessel approach and manoeuvring alongside.

x

Ensure hoses are handled using the correct hose handling procedures;

x

Confirms the safe connection of transfer hoses/arms and any associated emergency release systems (ERS). Confirms that cargo transfer rates are being monitored together with associated vapour management procedures. Verifies that the integrity of the mooring arrangement is being continuously monitored. Ensures that contingency plans are activated in the event of an emergency. Verifies that cargo transfer lines are properly drained and, where required, purged. Confirms safe disconnection of hoses/arms. Supervises the unmooring and the separation of vessels. Where applicable, supervises the return of primary and secondary fenders and transfer equipment.

x x x x x x x

The STS Superintendent should advise the Master when to suspend or terminate the STS operation. In fulfilling the above role, in some locations the STS Superintendent may be supported by a Mooring Master Assistant.

1.6. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN. Although STS transfer operations can be carried out safely, the risk of accident and the potential scale of the consequences require that organizers develop contingency plans for dealing with emergencies. For STS operations, a risk assessment study should be carried out as set out in section 5.3 Risk mitigation and contingency plans, which are the products of the risk assessment, should then be drawn up covering all possible emergencies and provide for a comprehensive response. In addition, contingency plans should have relevance to: x x

The location of the operation and Take into account the resources available both at the transfer area and with regard to nearby back-up support.

1.7. TRAINING - FAMILIARISATION OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL It is likely that the pre-operation risk assessment will identify that many of the crew will be required to take on additional or different tasks, roles and responsibilities than they would when conducting a routine port and cargo operation. The risk assessment may also identify emergency scenarios that are not included in the vessel's regular exercise programme.


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may be more stresses on the fender towing wire(s). In addition, being generally the smaller ship, a less effective lee for rigging is available.

PART A

In certain circumstances, such as a lightering operation involving several transfers to multiple vessels, it may be preferable to rig the primary fenders on the discharging ship. This option, which may result in less handling of the fenders, should be evaluated during the risk assessment for the operation. Whichever ship the fenders are rigged on, limits should be imposed on the vessel's speed to prevent overstressing of the fender system. As part of the vessel compatibility study, particular attention should be given to the parallel mid-body length of both vessels. This is of particular importance for operations involving fine-lined vessels such as gas carriers. As the parallel midbody of larger liquefied natural gas (LNG) vessels tends to be much shorter than that of a conventional oil tanker of similar length overall (LOA), the correct placement of the fender string is critical to ensure adequate hull protection for both vessels. This may result in the need for the fender connection wires to be made to specific lengths for a particular operation. The fender pennants may be secured to a winch mounted wire, if available, or made fast to a mooring bitt. If the fender pennant is shackled onto a winch mounted mooring wire, the winch brake should be correctly applied so as to avoid rendering that may result in the fender string moving out of position. When fender pennants are secured on a split drum mooring winch, the proper number of turns should be taken on the tension side of the winch to ensure effective brake holding power. Bitts recessed in the shell plating should not be used for securing fenders due to access and safe working load (SWL) restrictions. Fenders should be kept clear of any recessed bitts (to prevent snagging) and from pilot doors located on either vessel's hull (where fitted).

Back up pennant

Primary pennant (towing line)

Back up pennant

Spacing line

Figure 2.3.2 Fenders Rigged in a Continuous String

Tail line


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When fenders are fitted to the manoeuvring ship, primary fenders should be positioned one at each end of the parallel body, with similar additional units fitted in between (see figure 2.3.2). The fender string may be made up to a prearranged length. Alternatively, in some operations where four fenders are used, it has been found beneficial to position them in two groups of two (see Figure 2.3.3). In this way, and with each group positioned well forward or well aft on the parallel body, better protection can be provided. Fender pennants should be monitored frequently and tended as necessary to ensure that they do not become too slack or too taut and that the fenders remain in position.

Back up pennant

Tail line Primary pennant (towing line)

Spacing line

Spacing line

Primary pennant (towing line)

Tail line

Figure 2.3.3 Fenders Rigged in Pairs. The length of the fender sting should be such that the fenders will be able to distribute the maximum anticipating impact load within the parallel body of both ships. A. FENDER SELECTION REFERENCE GUIDE There are mainly two types of fenders used during berthing at STS operations, the pneumatic rubber fenders and the foam fenders. Both of those may be used; however the selection is based on their energy absorption characteristics and size along with the size of vessel and the relative approaching speed as will be shown in the following sections.

PART A

The STS Superintendent should have advised the position and method of securing the fenders to the ships in advance of the operation. Fender pennants should be led through fairleads in such a manner as to prevent chafing. Particular care should be taken to ensure that there are no obstructions, such as fish plates, which could chafe against the pennants. While rigged, the condition of the pennants should be regularly monitored.


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Note: Each fender supplier provides data related to the Energy absorption and reaction force. Those data should be available from the STS service providers when they are providing the fenders. Otherwise, should one of the vessels already be equipped with fenders, those data should be supplied to the STS service provider and the participating vessel. It is strongly recommended that individual fender manufacturers or STS Resource providers are consulted prior to suggesting the number and sizes of fenders for a particular operation.

Figure 2.3.3 Typical Pneumatic Fender with chains in place The parameters incorporated in the calculation of fendering requirements are the following: x The displacement of the 2 participating vessel x The approaching speed and weather conditions x The type of available fenders The weather conditions should be accessed and accordingly the relative approaching speed at the time of vessel contact should be decided. According to Yokohama fender manufacturer, Reference [3], the following approaching speed recommendations are suggested:

Weather Condition Sea State Wave Height (m) DWT

PART A

STS service providers, and some ship operators, will be able to call upon experience when assessing fender requirements for a particular STS transfer operation. It is advisable, however, to determine the forces that will be generated between berthing ships to provide information relevant to the selection process.

Less than 10,000 10,000 – 50,000 50,000 – 100,000 Over 100,000

Maximum Permissible Contact Velocity in (m/s) CALM MODERATE ROUGH 0-3 4 5 0-1,25 1,25-2,5 2,5-4,0 0,30 0,25 0,20 0,15

0,40 0,325 0,25 0,20

0,50 0,40 0,30 0,25

Table 2.3.1 Berthing velocity based on approaching vessels’ DWT and weather conditions (reference 3)


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OCIMF at reference [18] provides a fender selection procedure on the basis of the equivalent displacement coefficient C for pneumatic fenders with initial pressure of 50 KPa. Table 1 at FENDER SELECTION PROCEDURES BOOKLET provides the coefficient C for M/T ALGOMA HANSA with respect to the displacement of a second participating ship B. Calm weather conditions and a safety factor equal to 1 have been utilized in order to obtain the values for “C”.

‫ܥ‬ൌ

ʹ ή ሺ‫ ܣݐ݈݊݁݉݁ܿܽ݌ݏ݅ܦ‬ή ‫ܤݐ݈݊݁݉݁ܿܽ݌ݏ݅ܦ‬ሻ ‫ ܣݐ݈݊݁݉݁ܿܽ݌ݏ݅ܦ‬൅ ‫ܤݐ݈݊݁݉݁ܿܽ݌ݏ݅ܦ‬

Where A is the displacement of M/T ALGOMA HANSA and B is the displacement of the 2nd vessel. Equivalent Displacement Coefficient (C) Tonnes 1000 3000 6000 10000 30000 50000 100000 150000 200000 330000 500000

Relative Velocity

Berthing Energy

m/s 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.25 0.25 0.20 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15

Tonnes x m 2.4 7.0 14.0 17.0 40.0 48.0 54.0 71.0 93.0 155.0 231.0

Suggested Fenders Diameter x Length 1.0 x 2.0 1.5 x 3.0 2.5 x 5.5 2.5 x 5.5 3.3 x 6.5 3.3 x 6.5 3.3 x 6.5 3.3 x 6.5 3.3 x 6.5 4.5 x 9.0 4.5 x 9.0

Quantity 3 or more 3 or more 3 or more 3 or more 4 or more 4 or more 4 or more 5 or more 5 or more 4 or more 4 or more

Table 2.3.2 Equivalent Displacement Coefficient “C” from OCIMF NOTE: Fender selection on the basis of coefficient C, according to OCIMF, applies to the approaching speed related to CALM WEATHER CONDITIONS and suggests pneumatic fenders of initial pressure of 50 KPa. If a different approaching speed is expected or a different type of fender is desired, then fender calculation should take place by calculating the vessel berthing energy. However the maximum of the calculated and the proposed by OCIMF (Table 2.3.2) berthing energy should be taken into account. Fendering selection process takes into account the equivalent displacement coefficient C as well as the berthing energy of the vessel subject to the weather conditions and the approaching speed. Fendering selection is based upon the estimated berthing energy of the participating vessels. An analysis of the possible berthing energy is parametric and should be examined prior each STS operation. In order to estimate the number and type of selected fenders, the data provided at tables 2-9 of the FENDER SELECTION PROCEDURES BOOKLET which is provided as a supplement to this STS PLAN, should be utilized. The approaching speed is of great importance since this alters the berthing energy hence the number and type of required fenders.

PART A

The equivalent displacement coefficient C is defined by the following formula:


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PART A

To interpret the data on tables the displacement of both vessels should be known. The methodology for calculating the type and number of required fenders has been developed on the basis of OCIMF STS guidelines and has been analytically adopted for M/T ALGOMA HANSA and a range of participating vessels up to 550000 mt displacement. Regardless if the STS operation is a reverse lightering, same steps have to be followed. Special care should be taken to the selection of fenders in this case. Some ship-owners and STS service operators will be able to call upon experience when assessing fender requirements for a particular STS transfer operation.

Figure 2.3.4 Typical Pneumatic Fenders being deployed from a support craft. The steps and examples of the fender selection calculation for M/T ALGOMA HANSA are shown on FENDER SELECTION PROCEDURES BOOKLET which is provided as a supplement to this STS PLAN. For the purpose of fender selection by Ship’s Crew STS 11 form will be utilized. For the purpose of fender selection by the STS service provider STS 12 form will be utilized.

B. FENDER REQUIREMENTS The fenders used should be suitable in terms of energy absorption and result in sufficient standoff distance such that the compressed' diameter of the fenders is always sufficient to ensure that there can be no contact between ships' structures through rolling during the period alongside. This is of particular importance when transfers are being made between vessels that have relatively high freeboards, such as gas carriers.


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It is recommended that the fender diameter is less than half the freeboard of the ship to prevent inadvertent boarding of the ship by a fender during inclement weather.

Consideration should be given to fixing retro-reflective tape on the fenders to improve their visibility during hours of darkness. Fenders should be subject to regular inspection for damage or deterioration. The pressure within pneumatic fenders should be regularly checked and the attached safety valves should be maintained in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations. A record of inspection and testing should be available. Prior commencement of an STS Operation it is highly suggested that relevant fender certificates are requested from individual providers in order to ascertain that proper maintenance has taken place according to manufacturer guidelines. The longevity of fenders will be determined by a number of factors including frequency of use, method of storage and standards of maintenance. As a guide, fenders should not be routinely used beyond the manufacturer's recommended service life, which will typically be 15 years. If fenders are provided by an STS service provider, the Master, shipping company or STS organiser should ascertain the age of the fenders to be used. It is recommended that all fender providers have detailed and accurate records regarding the history of the fenders. These records should include particulars of each job they were used for, inspection, testing, maintenance and casualty information. When selecting fenders for specific operations, reference should be made to individual fender manufacturers' specifications and these should be addressed in terms of combined berthing displacement, approach velocity and sea and swell conditions. It is the responsibility of the STS organiser to determine the fender requirements and to agree these with all other parties involved. Fender selection is particularly important when planning to undertake reverse lightering operations where consideration should be given to utilising fenders with higher energy absorption for the berthing phase than those recommended in table 2.3.2. In these situations the further guidance regarding approach velocity that is contained in the FENDER SELECTION PROCEDURES GUIDE should be taken into consideration. Special requirements of fenders should be taken into consideration when deciding same. The requirements are part of the Risk Assessment and Due Diligence process and should be taken into account prior fender selection. The requirements of fenders consist of the following:

PART A

To reduce abrasion damage to the outer rubber of the fender and to ensure that steel-to-steel contact does not occur between the fender cage and the ship's hull, fenders may be fitted with hard wearing tyres and cage components may be fitted with rubber sleeves.


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M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

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x MARKING Each ISO approved fender as per Reference [18] must have markings on the fender body to indicate the following information: ¾ International Standard number, and applicable year, i.e. ISO 17357:2002; ¾ Size (diameter and length); ¾ Initial internal pressure; ¾ Date of manufacture or its abbreviation; ¾ Full or abbreviated name of manufacturer; ¾ Individual serial number; ¾ Type of reinforcement layer. The markings of the manufacturer, for internal pressure rating and size, shall be of a suitable size and finish to enable clear identification. The letter heights shall be minimum for fenders whose diameters are and larger. On request, the fenders shall be equipped with an identification system, which is to be buried in the fender's body. The identification system shall work such that it can identify the fender's serial number. Therefore, in the event that markings disappear, information can still be retrieved from the serial number. The identification system shall be designed to last throughout the fender's life. x MINIMUM FENDER DIAMETER The fenders used should be suitable in terms of energy absorption and result in sufficient stand-off distance such that the compressed diameter of the fenders must always be sufficient to ensure that there can be no contact between ships' structures through rolling, during the period alongside. It is recommended that the fender diameter is less than half the freeboard of the ship, to prevent inadvertent boarding of the ship by a fender during inclement weather. x SIZE UP CONSIDERATION When fenders need to be upgraded, increasing the fender diameter is preferable. Increasing the length or initial internal pressure from pressure 50kPa to 80kPa is not recommended. If the length or internal pressure is increased, the reaction force and energy absorption are increased however the rate of increase of reaction force become steeper without providing any significant increase in allowable compression capacity as shown in Figure 2.3.5. On the other hand, in case of using a larger diameter fender, the allowable compression capacity and standoff can be increased with negligible increase in reaction curve gradient. Therefore the larger diameter fender is more suitable when additional energy performance or more stand-off distance between two ships is required during berthing and mooring.


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Figure 2.3.5 Consideration when sizing up pneumatic fenders, (reference 3) x PROTECTION OF FENDERS Individual fenders should be fitted with rubber sleeves and hard wearing tires in order to reduce the abrasion damage to the outer rubber of the fender and ensure steel to steel contact does not occur between fender cage and ship's hull. x FENDER TENSION LOAD Care should be taken with regard to the safe working load (SWL) of the end fitting of the fenders, and the expected tension load as shown at figure 2.3.6 at the end of the fenders should not exceed this limit.

Figure 2.3.6 Tension Load on Fender x FENDER AGEING The prolonged existence of fenders will be determined by a number of factors including: ¾ Frequency of use ¾ Method of storage and ¾ Standards of maintenance


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All valves should be checked before oil is admitted to the hose assembly, and care should be taken not to shut off any valve suddenly while the fluid is flowing. This will avoid unnecessary shock pressures on the hose assembly.

PART A

Every effort should be made to keep hose assemblies from chafing against the dock or any part of the ship. This is particularly important if reciprocating pumps are used. The hose assembly should not be allowed to touch any hot surface.

Figure 2.5.2. Hose assemblies during operation The hose assembly should be kept under close observation during use in order to detect any signs of failure. Personnel performing this duty should be able to take necessary action to prevent failure of the hose assembly and to quickly control any loss of its contents. PROCEDURE AFTER USE After use, hose assemblies may be left full or drained. Assemblies left in position and full should always be provided with means to allow for relief of the expansion of any trapped liquid. If such means are not available, the assembly should be drained. Assemblies drained and left in position might need to be protected against mechanical damage and, in particular, the end fittings might need to be capped or otherwise closed to prevent the ingress of foreign materials. For marine use, if hose assemblies are dismantled and stored on the dockside, they should be placed in an area designed for the purpose. Hose lengths should preferably be laid out straight with wide supports on level ground. Such supports will also allow for the easy insertion of suitable hose slings under and around the hose for lifting or transporting as shown in Figure 2.5.3.


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M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN

Figure 2.5.3. Lifting system When hose assemblies are out of use for prolonged periods, consideration should always be given to returning the hose to the storage area for new assemblies and protection from sunlight, mechanical damage and excessive temperatures should be part of any storage conditions. Before returning a hose assembly to storage, it should be drained completely. Hose assemblies which have been used in white oil or crude oil service should be flushed to remove any potentially explosive vapours and should be stored in such a way that air can circulate freely around them. Hose assemblies which have been used in black oil service should be flushed out with water if they are to be stored for more than two months. Cleaning of open ended hoses with lose steam or compressed air is permitted if carried out within hose temperature/pressure limitations. Cleaning with sea-water should be followed with flushing with fresh water to minimize corrosion of fittings. Hoses should be grounded (“earthed”) during cleaning operations. Mechanical methods of cleaning should not be used. Where hose assemblies have been used for white or crude oils, caps having a vent hole to relieve any vapour pressure build-up within the hose assembly should be provided to prevent air circulation through the hose. All hose assemblies, whether left in position full or drained, should be visually inspected for obvious mechanical damage before being brought back into use. If hoses are provided by an STS Service provider, the Master, shipping company or organizer should ascertain the age of the hoses to be used and should satisfy that reasonable measures have been taken to ensure that they continue to be fit for the intended service. The hose certificates should be made available to assist with this. This procedure is part of the quality assurance of the STS service provider as shown at FORM STS-9 ONLINESTS SP AND POAC.


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D. MARKING

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Each length of hose should be marked by the manufacturers with x x x x x x

The manufacturer's name or trademark. Identification of the standard specification for manufacture. Maximum allowable working pressure. Month and year of manufacture and manufacturer's serial number. Indication that the hose is electrically continuous or electrically discontinuous, semidiscontinuous or anti-static. The type of service for which it is intended e.g. oil or chemical.

Figure 2.5.4 — Marking of hoses E. FLOW VELOCITIES The maximum permissible flow velocity through a hose is limited by the construction of the hose. The hose manufacturer's recommendations and certification should give details as to recommended flow rates/velocities, which should not be exceeded. Hoses should be properly tested and certified and should therefore be capable of performing to their specification. Downgrading of hose flow rates or pressures due to age or condition is not allowed. Tables 2.5.1 -2.5.3 are indicative of flow rates for hoses supplied to BSI specification. Flow rates for different hose velocity ranges can be calculated using the following formula: ଷ

ߨ ή ‫ ݎ‬ଶ ή ܸ ή ͵͸ͲͲ ൌ ݉ ൗ݄‫ݎ‬ Where r2 is the internal radius in [m] V is flow velocity in [m/sec]


M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN

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6

152

788

4950

8

203

1400

8810

10

254

2180

13700

12

305

3150

19800

16

406

5600

35200

20

508

8750

55000

Table 2.5.1 Throughput vs. Inside Diameter at Velocity 12m/s

Velocity 15 meters/second Nominal Inside Diameter of Hose Throughput Cubic Meters Barrels Inches Millimetres Per Hour Per Hours

6

152

985

6190

8

203

1750

11000

10

254

2730

17200

12

305

3940

24700

16

406

7000

44000

20

508

10900

68000

Table 2.5.2 Throughput vs. Inside Diameter at Velocity 15m/s

Velocity 21 meters/second Nominal Inside Diameter of Hose Throughput Cubic Meters Barrels Inches Millimetres Per Hour Per Hours

6

152

1370

8600

8

203

2450

15400

10

254

3930

24000

12

305

5520

34500

16

406

9780

61500

20

508

15315

96300

Table 2.5.3 Throughput vs. Inside Diameter at Velocity 21m/s

PART A

Velocity 12 meters/second Nominal Inside Diameter of Hose Throughput Cubic Meters Barrels Inches Millimetres Per Hour Per Hours


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2.6. MOORING EQUIPMENT It is important that both ships are fitted with good quality mooring lines, efficient winches, well placed and sufficiently strong closed fairleads, bollards and other associated mooring equipment which are fit for purpose. Effective leads between fairleads and mooring bitts and mooring winches should be available for the handling of all mooring lines. Only fairleads of the enclosed type should be used, except on a ship that will always have a substantially greater freeboard than the other. This will ensure that the fairleads will remain effective in controlling mooring line leads as the freeboard difference between the two ships changes. Such fairleads should be strong enough to take the anticipated mooring loads and large enough to allow the mooring line (plus any soft rope tail and shackle) to pass through comfortably. Open fairleads, even those fitted with stopper bars, are not allowed for STS operations. A prime consideration in mooring during STS operations is to provide fairleads and bitts for all lines without the possibility of lines chafing against each other, the ships, or the fenders. This is critical in view of the large relative freeboard changes between the ships. Steel wire mooring lines should be fitted with synthetic fibber tails to provide the additional elasticity required for STS mooring arrangements. Lengths, connections and properties of such synthetic fibber tails should at least comply with the recommendation of the OCIMF Mooring Equipment Guidelines, Reference [11]. Some dedicated lightering ships may be equipped with special mooring line arrangements such that the synthetic fibber tail is of a different length to the Mooring Equipment Guidelines recommendations and is positioned outside the ship's fairleads with a further wire pendant attached to its end to reduce chafing damage.

Figure 2.6.2 Mooring Procedure High modulus synthetic fibber ropes, which are now increasingly being used as ship's moorings, should (depending on type) also be fitted with soft rope tails to provide additional elasticity and


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Strong rope messengers should be available on both ships. A rope messenger is a light rope that is used for hauling mooring lines between ships. A minimum of four messengers should be available, preferably made from a buoyant synthetic fibber material of 40mm diameter and at least 200m in length and fit for purpose. It is recommended that the guidance provided for sizing, marking and certifying fairleads and bollards should be applied to these fittings. Further guidance is provided in the OCIMF Mooring Equipment Guidelines, Reference [11], and Recommendations for Ships' Fittings for Use with Tugs, Reference [13]; in particular Section 4.7.c Recommendations for the Tanker Owner should be applied to such fittings used for STS moorings. In so doing, it is recognized that it may not always be practicable to apply all aspects of these recommendations to existing mooring equipment with the ship in active service and that changes may have to wait for a dry-docking or repair period. In the case of existing ships where deck fittings do not meet the above recommendations, the Master should be aware of any limitations and should advise the Master of the other ship, the STS Superintendent and person in overall control of this shortcoming so that they may take appropriate precautions. In practice it has been found that the smaller ship's standard mooring equipment is generally suitable for STS transfers. Larger ships may require additional fittings to allow a proper mooring pattern and it is therefore recommended that tankers over 160,000 dwt, used for STS operations, be fitted with closed fairleads within thirty five meters of the centre of the manifold, fore and aft, on the starboard side to take the spring lines from the smaller ship (see Mooring Equipment Guidelines, Reference [11]. It is also recommended that the larger ship does not utilize any fairleads located on a transom stern such that the mooring line will, due to its lead, chafe on the edge between the transom stern and the ship's side. The recommended minimum number of closed fairleads on the starboard side of the larger ship for STS operations is three aft and four forward. Typically a mooring pattern for exposed locations for lightering vessels not fitted with special mooring arrangements would consist of at least six headlines, two forward and two back springs, and four stern lines. Where specialized mooring equipment is fitted (e.g. on dedicated STS transfer ships) the number of headlines could be reduced to four where this has proven to be reliable for the local operating environment. The aft closed fairleads should be located as far aft as practicable and the forward closed fairleads should be located on, or to starboard of, the centre line and clear of any protruding anchor housings. In determining the location of closed fairleads consideration should be given to achieving a mooring arrangement that allows mooring lines of the same function (headlines, stern lines, breast lines or springs) to run as parallel as possible to each other in order most effectively to share the mooring load. It is desirable that each designated STS suitable closed

PART A

to reduce the susceptibility to fatigue failure. (See the OCIMF publication Guidelines on the Use of High-Modulus Synthetic Fibber Ropes as Mooring Lines on Large Tankers Reference [6] for further details.) Some high modulus synthetic fibber ropes are susceptible to axial compression fatigue due to tight radius bends and care should be taken to follow the manufacturer's recommendations when choosing the connection to the tail. Some types are more susceptible to chafing and may require greater protection in STS Service.


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M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

fairlead on the larger ship be accompanied by bitts capable of taking at least two mooring lines and rated to at least the same SWL as the fairlead. Each set of bitts should be sited or arranged for safe use of messengers and attendant winches. In addition it is recommended that provision be made for securing fender lines.

PART A

At ANNEX I the mooring arrangement of M/T ALGOMA HANSA illustrates the type, number and location of STS chocks/ fairleaders.

2.7. PERSONNEL TRANSFERS In general, it is recommended that the transfer of personnel between ships be kept to an absolute minimum. If the transfer of personnel is unavoidable, the safest means of transfer should be verified by risk assessment. This assessment should consider the prevailing circumstances and conditions at the time and place in question and should compare the risks associated with any alternative means of transfer that may be available. The following recommendations should be considered: x

x

x

Gangways should only be used in sheltered locations where there is little or no vessel movement. If used, gangways should be of a lightweight insulated type fitted with rails and complete with a safety net and should be tended to ensure they remain at all times within safe design operating parameters. Open rung ladders should not be used. Where workboat transfers take place using appropriate pilot ladder/accommodation ladder combinations, due account should be taken of the freeboard. Consideration should always be given to the sea conditions, the suitability of the workboat and the experience and fitness of transferring personnel. The pilot ladder/ accommodation ladder combination should be rigged in accordance with the Shipping Industry Guidance on Pilot Transfer Arrangements (reference 17). Prior to commencing personnel transfer using a personnel transfer basket (PTB), it should be ensured that the PTB is suitable for the task, certified, tested and inspected, the associated lifting equipment is suitable for personnel transfer and that adequate procedures are in place. An example checklist for use in the planning and execution of personnel transfers by basket is included as OCIMF CHECK-LIST PERSONNEL TRANSFER BY CRANE.


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STS OPERATION DUE DILIGENCE 1. SHIP COMPATIBILITY 2. CARGO HANDLING COMPATIBILITY 3. SELECTION OF EQUIPMENT 4. TRANSFER AREA

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5. APPROVAL FROM COASTAL AUTHORITIES 6. WEATHER CONDITIONS 7. QUALITY ASSURANCE OF STS PROVIDER

PREPARATION OF SHIPS 1. COMPLETION OF CHECKLISTS 2. NAVIGATIONAL SIGNALS 3. COMMUNICATIONS

APPROACHING 1. MANOUVERING ALONG SIDE WITH BOTH SHIPS UNDER POWER 2. MANOUEVERING A COMBINED TWO-SHIP AT ANCHOR 3. UNDERWAY TRANSFER 4. MANOUVERS WITH ONE SHIP AT ANCHOR

MOORING 1. MOORING ARRANGEMENT 2. MOORING CONSIDERATIONS - TENSION IN MOORING LINES - MOORING LINE LEAD ANGLES - WEATHER THESHOLDS - LONG PERIOD WAVES - DIRECTION OF WAVE ENCOUNTER

TRANFER PROCEDURE 1. PRETRANSFER PROCEDURES 2. CARGO TRANSFER 3. OPERATIONS AFTER COMPLETING CARGO TRANSFER

UNMOORING 1. UNMOORING WHILE ONE SHIP IS AT ANCHOR 2. UNMOORING AFTER UNDERWAY TRANSFER 3. UNMOORING CHECKLISTS

REPORTING 1. TO COASTAL STATE AUTHORITY

2. TO OWNER/ CHARTERER

Figure 4.5.2 The STS Operation Procedure’s


M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN QUALITY ASSURANCE AND SCREENING PROCEDURES OF STS PROVIDER

If an STS Service provider is employed, the quality of the services and equipment it can provide are paramount if operations are to be carried out safely, reliably and efficiently. There are currently no international standards for STS Service providers and while some form of ISO accreditation, if available, will provide an assurance that an STS Service provider has the necessary resources, afloat and ashore, to provide a quality service, this is by no means the only determinant of quality. Performance record, previous experience and reputation within the industry may be just as important when assessing an STS Service provider's ability to meet customer and regulatory requirements. In either case, it is recommended that the Master, shipping company or organizer take whatever measures are necessary to ensure that the STS Service provider can provide the level of service expected. STS Service providers should be aware by ship managers/ owners that they might be subject to assessment for their services. Self assessment can be used by service providers to verify that their safety management systems (SMS) are comprehensive and sufficiently robust to minimise all potential safety and environmental risks in the execution of their operations and to measure and continuously improve their management systems. Guidance on this process is also contained in Ship to Ship Service Provider Management. For this purpose prior contracting an STS service provider for each STS operation and for due diligence purposes ONLINE SP AND POAC FORM STS-9 should be completed by the STS service provider and returned to the managers/ owners/ charterers for evaluation. The evaluation process of ONLINE SP AND POAC FORM STS-9 is shown at section 5.1.c

4.6. NAVIGATIONAL SIGNALS The lights and shapes to be shown, and the sound signals made, during STS transfer operations are those required by the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS, reference [8]), and local regulations. These lights and shapes should be checked and rigged ready for display prior to the STS operation.

4.7. COMMUNICATIONS Good communications between the ships is an essential requirement for successful STS transfer operations. The chief recommendations covering this subject are addressed below. A. LANGUAGE To avoid any misunderstanding, a common language for communication should be agreed before operations commence. In this connection, attention is drawn to the Standard Marine Communication Phrases using the English language, Reference [20]. Should a serious language problem be detected, then action should be taken to resolve this by, for example, suspending operations until an experienced person fluent in both languages is made available before operations are resumed.

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J.

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M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

B. PRE-ARRIVAL COMMUNICATIONS The organizers generally provide STS instructions. This may be the operator of the ships if carrying out "in-house" operations or it may be an STS Service provider. Normally such providers send advance STS instructions to the ships concerned. Due to the different circumstances and individual requirements of various organizers, it is not practical to provide a generic STS information message. However, the following advice may be useful.

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INFORMATION REQUIRED FROM THE SHIPS The following information should be received from involved ships: x

Confirmation of the integrity of systems e.g. navigational, machinery, steering gear, cargo system, crude oil washing (COW), inert gas system (IGS), fire-fighting, mooring equipment, derrick or cranes, etc. x Confirmation of estimated time of arrival (ETA) at agreed intervals. x Confirmation that copies of the Ship to Ship Transfer Guide and appropriate accepted industry guides (see section 5) are on board and that ship's personnel are conversant with the procedures within them. x Cargo details, including copies of the material safety data sheets (MSDS). x Confirmation of arrival draught, freeboard and height of manifold above waterline, including anticipated changes during the transfer. x Confirmation that the ship complies with applicable local, national and international requirements, including those relating to hours of work/rest. In addition, the organiser should request an electronic copy of the ship's approved STS operations plan, if available (see section 1.1). The requirement for an STS operations plan is mandated for vessels undertaking STS transfers of MARPOL Annex I cargoes. It is also recommended that similar plans are available on vessels transferring other cargo types. ADVICE TO BE GIVEN TO THE SHIP BY THE ORGANIZERS THE following advice should be transmitted by the STS organiser prior commencement of the STS. x

The organizer’s full title, identification of person in overall advisory control and contact numbers. x A description of the planned STS operation including the location of the transfer area. x Details of equipment (including confirmation of fender integrity, hoses etc), logistical support and personnel to be provided x Requirements for the preparation of moorings, manifolds and lifting gear. x Local and national STS regulations, where applicable. x Identity of the STS Service provider and/or STS Superintendent. In adition to the previous advice, the STS organiser may consider sending electronics copies of the following to the ship:


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x

C. INITIAL COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN SHIPS The ships should establish initial communication as early as practicable to plan operations and to confirm the transfer area. The person in overall advisory control must be mutually agreed between the two ships and this should be clearly established by both Masters prior to the start of operations if not agreed earlier with the STS organizers (see Section 1.4). Logbook entries to the agreement should be made. D. NAVIGATIONAL WARNINGS Prior to commencing an STS transfer operation, and thereafter at intervals according to local requirements or more frequently if the situation warrants it, the person having overall advisory control or his designee (see Section 1.5) should broadcast navigational warnings to all ships advising: x Name and flag of the ships involved. x Geographical position of operations and general headings. x Nature of operations. x Time of starting operations and expected duration. x Request for wide berth. On completion of the transfer, the person having overall advisory control or his designee should cancel the navigational warning. For operations conducted in port, local requirements may address the need for navigational warnings, their content and responsibilities for their broadcast. The requirements may also include associated provisions for traffic control. E. COMMUNICATIONS DURING APPROACH, MOORING AND UNMOORING As the ships come into the transfer area, contact should be established on the appropriate VHF channel at the earliest opportunity, thereafter switching to a mutually agreed working channel. Approach, mooring and unmooring should not be attempted until proper effective communication has been confirmed between the two ships. At this time, in accordance with the information exchanged, OCIMF CHECK-LIST 2 and OCIMF CHECK-LIST 3 should be satisfactorily completed. Subject to the precautions in Section 5.11.c portable radios are invaluable for inter-ship communications during mooring and cargo transfer operations. Inter-ship confirmation should be sought that the portable radios on each ship are capable of working on the same frequencies.

PART A

A copy of risk assessment identifying appropriate mitigation measures to ensure the safe conduct of the STS at the scheduled transfer area. x If available, a copy of the joint plan of operation (JPO). In addition to the information included above, vessels should be advised of the identification of the POAC and should receive confirmation that the POAC is qualified in accordance with the guidance contained in the Manual of Oil Pollution.


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In the event that the same frequencies are not available, provision should be made to exchange compatible equipment between ships.

PART A

Ship's officers responsible for mooring stations should be provided with portable radios. Ship's emergency portable VHF radios should not be used for routine operations. It is recommended that the internal communications on each ship are maintained on separate frequencies to avoid misunderstandings when operations are being conducted on multiple vessels. In addition, all radio transmissions should be prefixed with the vessel’s name. When conducting operations in port, there may be a need to communicate with additional parties such as the port authority, a terminal, pilots, tugs and line handlers. F. COMMUNICATIONS DURING CARGO TRANSFER OPERATIONS During cargo operations, essential personnel on both ships should have a reliable, common means of communication at all times, including a back-up system. It is recommended that spare radios and batteries are available on both ships. When undertaking operations in port, frequencies should be assigned by the STS Superintendent, having due regard for the safety and working channels of the port. Communications between sh ips should be regularly tested. When conducting STS operations at sea, bridge watches should be maintained in accordance with recommendations contained in the Bridge Procedures Guide (reference 19). As appropriate, bridge watch keepers should maintain communication with: x x x x

The STS Superintendent. Deck officers on all involved ships . Harbour authorities to provide any required notifications of vessel movements and operations taking place. Lightering support craft and other vessels, such as tugs and port safety vessels.

G. PROCEDURES FOR COMMUNICATION FAILURE If communication breakdown occurs during an approach manoeuvres the manoeuvres should be aborted if appropriate and safe to do so and the subsequent actions taken by each ship should be indicated by the appropriate sound signals as prescribed in the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS), Reference [8]. During cargo operations, in the event of a breakdown of communications on either ship, the emergency signal (see Section 5.2-B) should be sounded and all operations in progress should be suspended immediately it is safe to do so. Operations should not be resumed until satisfactory communications have been re-established. If the primary communication system fails at any time during the STS operation, the agreed back–up systems should ne used.


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4.8. APPROACHING A. BASIC BERTHING PRINCIPLES

At some locations, particularly within port limits, manoeuvres may be subject to local requirements and may involve the use of pilots and tugs (see section 4.8 F). Berthing and unberthing operations should be conducted during daylight unless the personnel concerned are suitably experienced in night-time STS manoeuvring operations. At any case company’s policy requires that the Master request approval from the company in order to commence STS Operations during night hours. Having considered all the relevant aspects of the specific operation, including but not limited to the following: x Prevailing sea and weather condition x Navigation hazards in the area x Characteristics of the other vessel involved x Experience of the organizer x Tugboat(s) availability For some inshore areas the port authority may require a pilot to be taken. In such circumstances the pilot should advise on all aspects of navigation and piloting. but the Master remains in overall control and in command of his own ship. B. MANOEUVRING ALONGSIDE WITH TWO SHIPS UNDER POWER The berthing operation should take into account the manoeuvring characteristics of the ships. For example, if the manoeuvring ship is fitted with a right handed propeller, when going ahead the impact of transverse thrust will typically result in the manoeuvring ship approaching and berthing with her port side to the starboard side of the constant heading ship. One of the two ships normally the larger maintains steerage way at slow speed (preferably about 5 knots) keeping a steady course heading. Local conditions and knowledge will dictate the appropriate heading with due regard to sections 4.5.d and 4.5.e. The manoeuvring ship then manoeuvres alongside. It is recommended that the manoeuvring ship approaches and berths with the port side to the starboard side of the constant heading ship. Be aware that some local jurisdictions may have regulations specifying some aspects of manoeuvrings between the ships. A common method of berthing is for the manoeuvring ship to approach the constant heading ship from the quarter on the side of berthing. On closer approach the manoeuvring ship should

PART A

Manoeuvring, mooring and unmooring operations should take into account any local regulations and the output from risk assessments. Due consideration should be given to any restrictions that may be posed by factors that include restricted visibility or the adequacy of vessel lighting for operations during the hours of darkness.


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parallel the course of the constant heading ship at a safe distance appropriate to the prevailing conditions, then position itself relative to the constant heading ship with the manifolds on both ships being almost abreast of each other. The manoeuvring ship reduces the distance by appropriate rudder and engine movements, keeping the manifold stations on both ships abreast of each other until parallel contact is made with the fenders, at which point both ships are proceeding at the same speed through the water (see figure 4.9.2).

PART A

C. GENERAL ADVICE FOR CONTROLLING THE TWO SHIPS Each ship should take the following into account: x All navigation and communications equipment should be in full working order and proficient helmsmen should be used. x Engine movements and steering gear should be remotely controlled from the bridge. x Courses and speeds requested by the manoeuvring ship should be followed by the constant heading ship. A common system for assessing speed should be agreed, such as speed through the water or over the ground. x Where possible, the ship's speed should be controlled by adjusting engine revolutions or propeller pitch. This will facilitate fine adjustments, for example plus or minus 5 revolutions per minute (RPM), rather than the relatively coarse control possible using the engine room telegraph. In the absence of the ability to remotely adjust engine revolutions, the telegraph will need to be used and information concerning the engine revolutions for set telegraph positions should be communicated before commencing the approach. x On motor ships, the number of available air starts should be ascertained. x At night the deck should be adequately lit and, if possible, the ship's side and fenders should be illuminated. x The side for mooring should be clear of all overside obstructions. x There should be effective radio communications between the bridge and mooring personnel on each ship. Communications should be tested before commencing the approach and agreement reached on a back-up method in the event of a communication failure (See sections 4.7.B and 4.7.E). x There should be effective communications between the bridge teams of each ship. This should be maintained on a separate frequency to those being used for internal radio communications on each ship.


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Figure 4.8.1. Manoeuvring alongside with both vessels under power D. ADVICE FOR MANOEUVRING ALONGSIDE During lightering operations, the service vessel is usually moored to the starboard side of the discharge vessel. Before the vessels begin to manoeuvre to come alongside, a string of four or more fenders is rigged on either the starboard side of the Discharge vessel or on the service vessel (the industry-recommended approach). Although individual Masters will have their own preference for the method of manoeuvring their ship, the following points are emphasized for STS transfer operations: The following points should be considered when manoeuvring alongside: x x x

x x

x x

x

If either of the Masters of the ships or the STS Superintendent has the slightest doubt about the safety of the manoeuvre, the berthing operation should be aborted. At all times, each ship is responsible for maintaining a proper lookout. During manoeuvring, the manoeuvring characteristics of the involved ships together with local conditions and/or knowledge will indicate an optimum approach. Common approaches include: Keeping the wind and sea on the port bow of the constant heading ship. Keeping the wind and swell on the port or starboard quarter of the constant heading ship to reduce loads on the fender rigging and to reduce the relative wind across the deck. The angle of approach adopted by the manoeuvring ship should not be excessive. The RPM of the main engine(s) of the constant heading ship are normally set to provide a speed through the water as requested by the STS Superintendent or Master of the manoeuvring ship. No changes should be made without advising the STS Superintendent or Master of the manoeuvring ship. When manoeuvring at close quarters the effect of ship interaction should be anticipated. To ensure optimum helm response to counter the effects of interaction and to maintain effective heading control, the manoeuvring ship should keep her engines turning ahead or, if fitted with a controllable pitch propeller, maintain positive propeller pitch throughout.


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Ships that are nominated to conduct underway STS operations should be capable of manoeuvring at slow speeds of 5 knots or less. In situations where the manoeuvring ship has a relatively high minimum speed, the STS Superintendent may consider increasing the speed of the constant heading ship sufficiently to enable the manoeuvring ship to complete the berthing operation without the need to temporarily stop its engine to reduce speed though the water. In doing so, it must be borne in mind that the effects of interaction increase as the square of the ship's speed through the water. In addition, any limitations posed by loads on fender rigging should be considered.

PART A

x

M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

SHIP A CONSTANT HEADING SHIP CONSTANT SPEED (ABT 5kn) SHIP A

SHIP B MANEUVERING SHIP

SHIP B

Figure 4.8.2 A possible final approach Manoeuvre. When the vessels are approximately 25 to 30 feet apart, the crews begin passing mooring lines between them to make them fast to one another. As the two vessels come closer together, the mooring master must pay special attention to the hydrodynamic effects that tend to move the bow of the service vessel away from the discharge vessel; therefore, the first lines out are the forward spring lines. The headlines follow shortly thereafter. Once these critical lines are out, a full complement of after-spring lines and stern lines is put out. When the lines are almost fast, the mooring master begins to reduce the speed of both vessels simultaneously. If the lightering operation is to take place at anchor, then the service vessel’s


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speed is gradually reduced to zero, essentially making it a towed vessel. The discharge vessel proceeds slowly to the chosen anchorage, and the anchor is dropped. If the two vessels are to drift with the winds and currents, then the speed of both is reduced to zero. The third option is to lighter while the discharge vessel steams at a very slow speed and the service vessel is towed alongside. The selection of one of these three alternatives depends on several variables, such as water depth, weather conditions, sea states, the area available for steaming, and the draft of the discharge vessel. In all cases, the mooring master, or lightering master, and masters and crews of both vessels must maintain diligent navigational watches as long as the vessels are together to ensure the safety of the crews and vessels. Support vessels, such as workboats, may remain in the area to assist in the lightering operation or warn other vessels in the vicinity. E. MANOEUVRING A COMBINED TWO-SHIP SYSTEM TO ANCHOR On completion of mooring, the constant heading ship will usually power all future manoeuvres and, if a transfer at anchor is planned will proceed to the agreed anchoring position. During this time the (former) manoeuvring ship will have its engines stopped and rudder amidships. It should be emphasized that, for this period in order to avoid problems for the manoeuvring ship the constant heading ship should not use strong astern engine movements. Speeds through the water should be minimal. The constant heading ship should use the anchor on the side opposite to that on which the other ship is moored. Once at anchor each ship is responsible for watch keeping arrangements as required by STCW, Reference [7]. It is recommended that the anchored ship maintains an anchor watch. Nothing relieves a ship of the requirement to keep a navigational watch. F. MANOEUVRING FOR IN PORT OPERATIONS Many STS operations, particularly those associated with the transfer of chemical products, are undertaken within port limits. These operations may involve berthing alongside the discharging ship, which may be at anchor in sheltered waters or alongside a terminal (see section 4.8 G). Permission of the harbour authorities and, where required, the terminal should be obtained prior to commencing manoeuvres to berth alongside another vessel. The STS Superintendent should be aware of the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the vessels and should be notified when manoeuvres are about to commence. The manoeuvring vessel should advise the Master of the moored ship of the intended approach and the approach should not be commenced until the procedure has been jointly agreed. Within port limits, it will in most cases be a requirement to take a berthing pilot on board and, depending on the size of the vessel, regulations may require that tugs are used. G. MANOEUVRING WITH ONE SHIP ALONGSIDE A TERMINAL This operation, also known as double banking, involves one or more vessels mooring alongside a ship that is already moored to a jetty and is a relatively common practice in certain trades.

PART A

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For berths that have not traditionally been used for double banking operations, it is recommended that a formal engineering study and risk assessment is undertaken and a formal procedure and safety plan is produced prior to conducting such operations.

PART A

Before double banking operations are agreed, consideration and agreement should be reached by all parties concerned on issues that may include the following: x x x x x x

Safe arrival and departure procedures. Integrity of the berth, including fender panels and mooring fittings, with regard to the potential loads involved. Personnel access, including emergency escape provisions for personnel on all involved ships. Management of operational safety. Roles and responsibilities of involved parties. Contingency planning, fire-fighting and emergency unberthing.

The Master of the ship moored to the terminal should be aware of the total displacement of his ship and vessels berthing alongside. The mooring arrangements should be adequate for the anticipated loads. Consideration should be given to the availability and need for line handling support. The ship alongside the terminal may provide crew to receive and secure the line but this should not detract from the safety of any ongoing cargo operations. Local port regulations may require that licensed line handlers are used and these should be arranged prior to commencement of manoeuvring. H. UNDERWAY TRANSFER Local conditions such as those where water depths are too great for anchoring sometimes demand that cargo transfer be carried out with the two ship system under power and making way through the water. As long as adequate sea-room is available and traffic conditions weather sea conditions and forecasts are suitable, then transfers of this type can be carried out. It should be noted that speeds through the water should be minimal. The constant heading ship maintains steerage way at slow speed on a steady course and the (former) manoeuvring ship keeps its rudder amidships and remains (with engines stopped) as a towed ship. In order to minimize towing loads on the moorings, the constant heading ship should alter her engine revolutions sparingly, adjusting speed very gradually. The chosen course and speed should be agreed by the two Masters and the STS Superintendent and should result in minimum relative movement between the two ships and minimum turbulence in the gap between the hulls. Under such circumstances, while the ships are moored together as a unit, safe navigation and collision avoidance is usually the responsibility of the constant heading ship but may be under the direction of the person in overall advisory control aboard the lightering ship.


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As an alternative and provided that conditions are suitable and a transfer area of suitable size is available, it can be advantageous to carry out cargo transfer while the two ships are allowed to drift freely.

If deteriorating weather conditions cause the ships to roll unacceptably, engine and rudder movements can be used to bring the ships to a heading that results in minimum movement. I.

MANOEUVRES WITH ONE SHIP AT ANCHOR

STS transfer operations involving one ship already positioned at anchor are quite frequent. For such operations, one ship anchors in a pre-determined position using the anchor on the side opposite to that on which the other ship will moor. A berthing operation should only be carried out after the anchoring ship is brought up to her anchor and is lying on a steady heading with reference to prevailing current and wind conditions. In addition to the usual factors which have to be taken into account when deciding on the scope of cable (water depth, holding ground, winds, currents and under keel clearance), the Master of the ship which is to anchor should also allow for the fact that the single anchor will be required to hold both ships. When anchoring in deep water, and using an extended scope of cable, the Master of the ship that is to anchor should also ensure that the windlass is capable of recovering the cable and anchor once the operation is completed. The type of berthing operation then undertaken by the manoeuvring ship is similar to a normal approach to a jetty. A risk assessment should be undertaken by the organizers to evaluate the necessity of tug assistance for the manoeuvring ship. A careful watch should be kept on the heading of the anchored ship and the anchored ship should advise the manoeuvring ship immediately if she has any tendency to yaw. Where there is a tendency to yaw excessively, a tug should be employed to hold the anchored ship on a steady heading. If no tug is available, postponement of the operation should be considered. This manoeuvre can be preferred for more constrained transfer areas, especially when tug assistance is available, or if the manoeuvring ship is fitted with bow thrusters. Where current and wind are not from the same direction or the wind varies in speed, direction the anchored ship can yaw (or lie cross-current), making it difficult for the manoeuvrings ship to berth alongside. Also both ships could experience different effects due to their different freeboards and draughts. In these circumstances tug assistance may be advisable to hold the anchored ship on a steady heading during berthing. It is recommended that the services of an experienced STS Superintendent be utilized for this type of operation. However, berthing should not be attempted when the tidal stream is due to change. When approaching a ship at anchor some Masters recommend a wider angle of approach than that adopted for manoeuvres underway. A wider angle of approach, especially when tugs are not

PART A

The use of the underway transfer system requires a full navigational watch to be kept on the bridge of each ship.


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available, helps to avoid early ship-to-ship contact in cases where the anchored ship might yaw unexpectedly. It is usually recommended that the manoeuvring ship approaches and berths with her port side to the starboard side of the other ship. When mooring to an anchored ship, care should be taken not to pull the anchored ship quickly towards the manoeuvring ship.

PART A

4.9. MOORING Mooring operations should be managed to ensure effective mooring line handling. Moorings should be arranged and rigged to allow safe line tending when the ships are secured together. This is especially true on board the manoeuvring ship whose mooring lines will normally be used, but this should also be addressed on the constant heading ship where rope messengers have to be made ready between fairleads and deck winches. The mooring plan adopted will depend upon the following: x x x x x x

Size of each ship Difference between their sizes Expected difference in freeboards and displacement Anticipated sea and weather conditions Degree of shelter offered by the location Efficiency of mooring line leads available

If an STS provider is involved he will propose a mooring plan, suitable for the particular location. It is important to ensure moorings allow for ship movement and freeboard changes to avoid over stressing the lines throughout the operation, but that they are not so long that they allow unacceptable movement between the ships. Note: Mooring lines leading in the same direction should be of similar material. Lines should only be led through closed fairleads suitable for STS operations (see Section 2.6). The use of stopper bars to retrofit open fairleads is not recommended.


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PART A

M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN

Figure 4.9.1. Mooring Procedure on Stern lines at the receiving vessel. The order of passing mooring lines during mooring, and of releasing lines during unmooring, should be prior agreed with the STS Superintendent and both Masters. Where the STS Service providers utilize quick-release mooring hooks, their role and use should be prior discussed to ensure proper understanding. As a general guide, Figure 4.9.2 illustrates a typical and proven mooring plan for an STS transfer operation in offshore waters. Scope for additional head and stern lines is preferred, and at any time spare lines should be readily available to supplement moorings if necessary or in the event of a line failure. While analysis of mooring loads alone may indicate a lesser number of mooring lines would be sufficient, it is prudent to provide for some redundancy. However, where specialized mooring equipment is fitted (e.g. on a Dedicated Lightering Ship) the number of headlines could be reduced to four where this has proven to be reliable for the local operating environment. It is normal for the mooring lines to be deployed from the manoeuvring ship. However, when prevailing weather conditions or weather forecasts require it, sending lines from both ships can increase the number of mooring lines. Loads should not be concentrated by passing most of the mooring ropes through the same fairlead or onto the same mooring bitts. Use should be made of all available fairleads and bills.


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PART A

M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN

Figure 4.12.1. Unmooring using a “toggle” pin

4.13. COMPLETION OF STS OPERATION-EVALUATION - NOTIFICATION Upon completion of the STS operation a performance evaluation should be completed in order to access all the participants, their performance and efficiency. Special note should be given on the required corrections that should be taken into account for further Operations. ONLINE ASSESSMENT FORM of Part B should be completed at this stage.

A. NOTIFICATION TO AUTHORITIES Upon completion of each STS lightering operation, each ship or their ship agents should provide a STS completion notice to the appropriate coastal State authorities as per the local or national requirements. In general, the following information should be reported in the notification: x Time and date of completion of STS operation x Quantity and type of cargo transferred x Service vessel discharge port x ETA to pilot and discharge port


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B. RECORD KEEPING OF STS OPERATIONS

PART A

The requirements of recording the cargo transfer operation is to follow the guidance provisions outlined in IMO Resolution MEPC.117(52) with regard to completing the Oil Record Book for the STS transfer operations taking place on the Ship. All documents including logs, records and reports, in support of an STS transfer operation should be collected and maintained on board the Ship (see also Part A – 7.2).

4.14. NON CONFORMITY REPORTING In case an observation or Non Conformity occurs with respect to the adopted procedures and policies within this plan, a relevant report has to be filled and preventing actions should be addressed as per HSQE Management system. STS-10 FORM should be completed at this stage and must be added to a Statement (type NCO) issued in the Companies HSQE Management system.


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5. DUE DILIGENCE, SAFETY AND EMERGENCIES

5.1. DUE DILIGENCE The first step towards safety is to ensure, prior the initiation of any action, that all required and recommended safety rules are applied by all participating parties. Since the responsibility cannot be forwarded at any means to a subcontractor or other participants, the ship managers to the best of their knowledge must always perform a thorough check with respect to the qualification and credibility of the participants. This concept is known as due diligence. The Procedure prescribed below has been based on industry guidelines and provides a set of indicative provisions to assist the master/operator. Same are not to be considered as exhaustive. A. VESSEL SCREENING During an STS operation, M/T ALGOMA HANSA is moored alongside another vessel. This situation makes both ships performing as a combined operational scheme thus introducing parameters which in effect make both vessels vulnerable to each other. The prospective STS vessel should be screened in order to ensure that she is safe and suitable for an STS operation with M/T ALGOMA HANSA. The ship screening process should include the following actions/information: x

Confirmation that the prospective STS vessel has P&I cover in place via a recognized P&I Club. x Confirmation that the prospective STS vessel has a valid Civil Liability Convention Certificate (1992). x Confirmation that the prospective STS vessel is in class with a recognized classification society. x A completed list of the particulars of the prospective STS vessel should be available. x Latest SIRE inspection report date. x Vessel's historical Port State Control (PSC) records x Confirmation that suitable security arrangements are in place on the participating STS vessel and that she has an approved security plan onboard. x Declaration that a risk assessment has been undertaken prior to each STS operation. The screening process should be performed by the ship, or alternatively by the company or a specialized screening company. EQUASIS (http://www.equasis.org) is a recognized source for obtaining information with respect to the classification society and the Prot State Control (PSC) records. Finally, Vessel Particular form (VPQ or Questionnaire 88) form can be considered as a complete list bearing the necessary ships particulars.

PART A

For all STS transfer operations each Master remains at all times responsible for the safety of his own ship, its crew, cargo and equipment and should not permit safety to be prejudiced by the actions of others. Each Master should ensure that the procedures recommended by this guide are followed and, in addition, that internationally accepted safety standards are maintained. In this regard, the most prominent international safety manual in use for cargo handling advice is the International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals (ISGOTT), Reference [10].


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B. VESSELS COMPATIBILITY FOR STS OPERATIONS

PART A

After screening process, a vessel compatibility check should always be performed. The vessel which is going to have STS operation with M/T ALGOMA HANSA, should not have any part of the ship projected from the maximum breadth. Furthermore the following issues should also be examined for incompatibilities: x x x

Mooring arrangement, Manifold arrangement, Cargo Hoses Cranes

C. STS SERVICE PROVIDERS SCREENING/ASSESSMENT STS service providers are normally providing all the necessary equipment, and provide guidance in a number of critical decisions. Thus a screening process of the STS service provider is also required. This process always takes into account the experience of this STS service provider with former STS operations if any. The key points of the screening credibility of the STS service provider include the following: x x x x x x

Certificate of incorporation Certificate of insurance, Accreditation from local authorities, Quality management policy Environmental protection management policy The maintenance policy of the STS provided equipment

D. PERSON OF OVERALL ADVISORY CONTROL SCREENING/ASSESSMENT The person in overall advisory control of STS operations shall be qualified to perform all relevant duties, taking into account the qualifications contained in the best practice guidelines for STS operations identified by IMO’s “Manual on Oil Pollution, Section I, Prevention” as amended, and the latest edition of ICS and OCIMF “Ship-to-ship Transfer Guide, Petroleum”. The prior experience with this person should also be taken into account. E. STS EQUIPMENT ASSESSMENT All the required tests should be performed, according to a schedule maintenance policy and records should be maintained. Records of incidents and repairs should also be maintained for each individual equipment. If STS equipment is provided from the STS service provider, the operator shall confirm that a relevant policy is also performed. The construction date of the hoses and fenders should comply with associated ISO Standards.


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5.2. CONTINGENCY PLAN

Ship to ship (STS) transfer operations may be carried out safely through adherence to proper procedures and the use of suitable equipment. However, the risk of accident and the potential scale of the consequences require that organisers and vessel operators develop contingency plans for dealing with emergencies. Ship specific contingency plans covering the possible range of emergency scenarios should be considered as part of the ship's safety management system (SMS) and, where appropriate, it’s STS Plan. For STS operations, a risk assessment should be carried out as described in section 5.3-B . The risk assessments should be used to identify and document any potential emergency scenarios that are not already covered by the ships' emergency response plans. Risk mitigation and contingency plans should be drawn up to cover all possible emergencies and provide for a comprehensive response. In addition, contingency plans should have relevance to the location of the operation and take into account the resources available, both at the transfer area and with regard to nearby back-up support. Where appropriate, the contingency plan should be integrated with similar plans prepared by the responsible local authority. In some locations, approval of the plans may be required by the local authority. Consideration should be given to: x Procedures for raising the alarm. x Cessation of operations during emergencies. x Notification procedures. x Emergency stations and preparations to initiate emergency procedures. x Deployment of mooring gangs to stations. x Emergency disconnection of cargo transfer equipment. x Preparation of engines for manoeuvring. x Unmooring. The joint plan of operation (JPO), agreed by all involved vessels, should include the contingency plans for the operation. The information should include an emergency contact list that should be posted on board all vessels. Emergency procedures should cover the full scope of the operation and include, for example, scenarios such as: x Vessel collision during mooring/unmooring manoeuvres. x Cargo spill. x Toxic or flammable vapour release. x Fire/explosion. x Multiple mooring line failure. x Emergency unmooring. x Emergency on own vessel or other vessel involved in operation. In an emergency, both Masters should assess the situation and act accordingly and, if applicable, in consultation with the STS Superintendent. When considering emergency response options,

PART A

A. CONTINGENCY PLANNING AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES


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reference should be made to the information provided in the material safety data sheets (MSDS) of the products being handled.

PART A

Coastal States or other authorities may impose specific contingency and notification requirements. Emergency duties should be assigned to personnel. An appropriate drill should be held, where practicable, within 24-hours and in any case not more than 7 days before commencing STS transfer operations. Ships' crews should be made aware of emergency Signals, procedures and actions. For vessels carrying Annex I cargoes, reference should also be made to section 5.2 D and E. B. EMERGENCY SIGNAL An emergency on either ship should be indicated immediately by sounding the ship's internal alarm signal and by sounding five or more short blasts on the ship's whistle to warn the other ship. The emergency signal should be communicated to all personnel on both vessels and understanding confirmed. All personnel should then proceed as indicated by the contingency plan. It is emphasised that both ships should be in an advanced state of readiness at all times in order to be in a position to deal with emergencies. C. EMERGENCY SITUATIONS It is difficult to anticipate every emergency that could arise. However, the scenarios described below should be among those that organisers include in the contingency plan. In an emergency, the Masters involved should assess the situation and act accordingly. Masters should decide jointly, particularly in cases of fire, whether it is to their mutual advantage for the ships to remain alongside each other. D. EMERGENCY DUTIES Each oil tanker should assign emergency duties to deSignated members of the crew in case of accidents that may arise during the transfer of oil, particularly in the case of spillages, when the guidance included in the ship's Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan (SOPEP) shall be followed. A table similar to that shown below (table 5.2.1), containing emergency duties assigned to deSignated members of the crew, may be used as general gUidance: Title POAC Master

Location Bridge Bridge

Chief Officer

Cargo Control Room

2nd Officer 2nd – 3rd Officers

Bridge Manifold Area

Duties Provide advice to Masters of both vessels In overall charge of his vessel's operat ions. Arranges notifications as appropriate Stops cargo operations. Organises hose disconnection Prepares bridge for departure In charge of hose disconnection


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Chief Engineer

Engine Control Room

2nd Engineer 3rd – 4th Engineer Electrical Technical Officer Pumpman

Engine Control Room Engine Control Room As required

Prepares main engine for manoeuvres and auxiliary equipment required to respond to an emergency Secures cargo plant Under Chief Engineer or 2nd Engineer's orders Under Chief Engineer or 2nd Engineer's orders

As directed by Chief Officer Bridge/Main Deck as required Engine Room

Under direction of Chief Officer's. Provides support to respond to emergency Under Officer of the Watch (Deck) and Chief Officer orders Under Officer of the Watch (Engine) orders

Bosun and Deck Ratings Engine Room Ratings

Table (5.2.1) Example of emergency duties allocation The allocated duties are to be assigned by the ship management team based upon the anticipated manpower workload for the scheduled operations, having due regard to the provisions regarding prevention of fatigue referred to in accordance with requirements ofthe relevant ILO (regulation 2.3 Standard A2.3 of the Maritime Labour Convention 2006 (or equivalent)), International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) (reference 7) and national regulations. A copy of the allocated duties table should accompany the STS operations plan posted in the bridge, cargo control room and engine control room. E. EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS The STS operations plan should include details of the company specific contacts that requ ire notification in the event of any shipping emergency, plus guidance to notify the following parties: x x x

Notifiable parties referred to in the ship's current voyage orders. Port contacts as listed in the ship's copy of the SOPEP Responsible National Authorities as listed in Annex 2 of the SOPEP in accordance with the latest MSC-MEPC Circular.

F. EXAMPLES OF POTENTIAL EMERGENCIES Vessels involved in an STS operation should have procedures ready for immediate implementation in the event of an emergency. Personnel involved should be familiar with the procedures and should clearly understand the action they would be required to take when responding to the emergency. STS service providers should have anticipated and fully considered the implication of all types of emergency that might be encountered during an STS operation. G. EMERGENCIES DURING MANOEUVRING The Masters of both ships and the STS Superintendent should always be prepared to abort a berthing operation if necessary. The decision should be taken in ample time and while the

PART A

M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN


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RISK PARAMETERS

PART A

STS PREPARATION

SHIP OPERATION

STS OPERATOR

MANOUEVING

STS LOCATION

CARGO OPERATION

STS EQUIPMENT

TECHNICAL PROBLEMS

VESSEL COMPATIBILITY

WEATHER CONDITIONS

CREW PREPAREDENESS

TERMINATION OF OPERATION

RISK ASSOCIATION STS OPERATOR

STS LOCATION

STS EQUIPMENT

VESSEL COMPATIBILITY

MANOUEVING MANOUEVING CARGO OPERATION TECHNICAL PROBLEMS WEATHER CONDITIONS TERMINATION OF OPERATION

CARGO OPERATION TECHNICAL PROBLEMS WEATHER CONDITIONS TERMINATION OF OPERATION

CREW PREPAREDENESS MANOUEVING

MANOUEVING

MANOUEVING

CARGO OPERATION

CARGO OPERATION

CARGO OPERATION

TECHNICAL PROBLEMS

TECHNICAL PROBLEMS

WEATHER CONDITIONS

TECHNICAL PROBLEMS WEATHER CONDITIONS TERMINATION OF OPERATION

WEATHER CONDITIONS

TERMINATION OF OPERATION

TERMINATION OF OPERATION

RISK ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS EVALUATION Figure 5.3.1 Risk Parameters Matrix

5.4. USE OF CHECKLISTS/FORMS Checklists are an important risk management tool aimed at ensuring that operations are conducted in a safe manner. They are essential reminders of the principal safety factors to be


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considered, but they should be supplemented by continuous vigilance throughout the whole operation.

Before mooring operations commence, each ship should confirm with the other that all items on IMO NOTIFICATION and USCG DOI forms have been checked and found to be correct. OCIMF CHECK-LIST 2 should be completed before commencing the cargo transfer. FORM 5 should be completed before commencing unmooring and separation. It should be noted that the checklists have been developed to specifically address factors that are relevant to the STS operation and the questions are supplementary to those contained in standard pre-transfer FORMS, such as the International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals (lSGOTT) Ship/Shore Safety FORM (reference 10). It is, therefore, important that the ISGOTT checklist, or equivalent, is completed prior to the commencement of cargo transfer.

5.5. CONSIDERATION OF WEATHER CONDITION Once the vessels are safely moored together, the weather is continuously monitored to ensure that conditions do not deteriorate to the point where safety is compromised. Sea state, winds, and currents also affect the unmooring of the two vessels. If it appears that weather may become marginal, then the operators have several options. They may: x x x

Terminate cargo operations, drain the hoses, and keep the vessels together until the bad weather passes; Terminate cargo operations, drain the hoses, and separate the vessels with the intention of coming back together later to finish transferring the cargo; or Continue operations. Interrupting an operation and dismantling connections takes time, so the longer the lead time the lower the risk associated with unmooring.

When the weather is deteriorating, it is important to have accurate forecasts that give operators sufficient time to unmoor and move the vessels apart before the weather becomes too severe to accomplish this safely.

5.6. READINESS OF AVAILABLE FIRE-FIGHTING EQUIPMENT Fire-fighting equipment should be ready for immediate use on both ships. Foam monitors on each ship should be pointed towards the cargo manifold in use and left in a suitable condition for hands-off operation. Additional foam fire-fighting equipment should be immediately available for use on deck. All access doors to the accommodation should normally be kept closed during cargo transfer operations. The Master of each ship should designate those access doors that are to be used for personnel transit. Where possible, only doors remote from the main deck cargo area should be used. All doors opened for personnel transit should be closed immediately after use.

PART A

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 1 should be used when organisers are planning an operation, Checklists 2 to 5 apply to STS transfer operations undertaken at sea and FORMS 6 and 6a are provided as examples that may be used for STS operations in port. All of these checklists are included in PART B


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contained toxic vapours that could be displaced onto the deck of the discharging ship or returned to the ship's tanks through vapour balancing/ vapour return. Particular attention should be given to the potential of H2S and other toxic substances in the cargo vapours and all necessary personal safety precautions should be taken.

PART A

It is important that the MSDS is the one issued by the shipper of the product. Generic MSDS should not be used and transfer operations should not commence before it is verified that the MSDS is for the specific cargo, as issued by the shipper.

5.20. GAS ACCUMULATION ON OPEN DECKS An STS transfer operation should be suspended if cargo vapour accumulates around the decks or manifolds of either ship and should not be resumed until the vapour has dissipated and it is considered safe to do so. While it is normally anticipated that cargo vapours will be dissipated by environmental airflows across open decks, airflows around vessels engaged in STS transfers are prone to eddies that prevent normal dissipation. Surrounding structures, such as deck frames and deck houses, can impede air flows, creating hazardous spaces where cargo vapours can accumulate. Risk assessments should be conducted to determine control measures when working in these areas.

5.21. ACTION IN CASE OF INFRINGEMENT OF SAFETY If either ship fails to observe any of the safety requirements during the STS transfer operation, this should be brought to the attention of the Master of the ship concerned and the STS Superintendent. Operations should be suspended until the situation is rectified.

5.22. ACTION IN CASE OF CARGO LEAKAGE Cargo transfer should be stopped in the event of a cargo leak on either vessel and should not be resumed until the source of the leak is identified, repaired and/or the cause is isolated. Where appropriate, vessel operators and/or local authorities should be notified. Cargo operations should only resume, with the agreement of both Masters, once the spilled product has been cleaned up or contained, any vapour associated with the leak has dispersed and safe atmospheric conditions have been verified. Due account should be given to any hazardous properties of the cargo or vapour released and the potential dangers to responding personnel.


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6. INFORMATION RESOURCES ON PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE TO OIL SPILLS

PART A

Should an oil spill occur coastal state has to be notified as per approved SOPEP, reference [19]. The “list of National Operational Contact Points responsible for the receipt, transmission and processing of urgent reports on incidents involving harmful substances, including oil from ships to coastal states” (Msc-Mepc.6/circ.x) is available in the approved SOPEP, reference [19]. The list is electronically updated on a 3-monthly basis through the IMO web site.


PART A |110

M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

7. STS FORMS AND RECORDS According to IMO resolution MEPC 186(59) and the recommendations of INTERTANCO and OCIMF, records of the undertaken STS operations should be maintained. The STS operation should be recorded in the Oil Record Book Part II, as required for all oil cargo transfer and ballast operations. The FORMS contained in PART B on this plan, should be followed and filled out concurrently with the STS operation.

PART A

All records should be retained onboard for at least three years. NOTE: A Unique reference number should be assigned for each STS Operation. The reference may be arbitrary; however it is suggested to include the date of commencement of the operation along with an ascending reference number i.e. STS2010-03-23-001 or STS100323001.

7.1. FORMS OF STS OPERATIONS Below, a table of the required forms follows, associated with the relevant STS actions.

FORM

DESCRIPTION

ASSOCIATION

WHEN FILLED / BY WHOM Preliminary report is completed when planning the STS operation. This form is addressed in order to ascertain that both vessels are compliant and fit to perform the STS operation.

OCIMF CHECKLIST 1

PRE-FIXTURE INFORMATION

STS OPERATION § 1.5 ,4.5 ,5.4

This form is filled by the Ship Operator/Master/Officer in charge and emailed to the STS Service Provider Equivalent with Check List 1 of REF [16] Is completed before operations commence

OCIMF CHECKLIST 2

BEFORE OPERATIONS COMMENCE

STS OPERATION § 4.7

This form is filled by the Master/Officer in charge Equivalent with Check List 2 of REF [16] This form is completed before mooring.

OCIMF CHECKLIST 3

BEFORE RUN-IN AND MOORING

STS OPERATION § 4.7

Filled by the Master/Officer in charge Equivalent with Check List 3 of REF [16] This form is completed before cargo transfer

OCIMF CHECKLIST 4

BEFORE CARGO TRANSFER

STS OPERATION § 4.11

Filled by the Master/Officer in charge Equivalent with Check List 4 of REF [16] This form is completed before unmooring

OCIMF CHECKLIST 5

BEFORE UNMOORING

STS OPERATION §4.12

OCIMF CHECKLIST 6 OCIMF CHECKLIST 6A

PRE-TRANSFER CHECKLIST CHECKS DURING TRANSFER

STS OPERATION § 4.11 STS OPERATION § 4.11

Filled by the Master/Officer in charge Equivalent with Check List 5 of REF [16] PRE-TRANSFER CHECKLIST FOR IN PORT STS CARGO TRANSFER CHECKS DURING TRANSFER FOR IN PORT STS OPERATIONS


OCIMF CHECKLIST PERSONNEL TRANSFER BY CRANE OCIMF CHECKLIST FOR TRANSFERS INVOLVING VAPOUR BALANCING

IMO NOTIFICATION

PART A |111

PERSONNEL TRANSFER

STS OPERATION 2.7

CHECKLIST FOR PERSONNEL TRANFERS BY CRANE

TRANSFERS INVOLVING VAPOUR BALANCING

STS OPERATION 4.11E

CHECKLIST FOR TRANSFERS INVOLVING VAPOUR BALANCING

NOTIFICATION TO COASTAL AUTHORITY

PRIOR COMMENCEMENT OF STS OPERATION § 5.4

Notification to coastal authority is submitted and sent to the responsible coastal authority. When STS Operation takes place within the territorial waters (12 nautical miles) or within the EEZ (200 nautical miles) of a coastal state, then notification has to be sent at least 48 hours prior commencement of the STS Operation. Where, in an exceptional case, all of the information is not available not less than 48 hours in advance, the oil tanker discharging the oil cargo shall notify the coastal state, not less than 48 hours in advance that an STS operation will occur and the rest information specified in IMO NOTIFICATION form shall be provided to the Party at the earliest opportunity. This form is filled by the Master/Officer in charge and emailed to coastal authority.

USCG DOI

ONLINESTS ASSESSMENT

ONLINESTS SP AND POAC

DECLARATION OF INSPECTION FOR TANKER VESSELS

STS OPERATION PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

STS SERVICE PROVIDER AND POAC QUALITY ASSURANCE

PRIOR COMMENCEMENT OF STS OPERATION § 5.4

STS OPERATION § 4.13

STS SERVISE PROVIDERS § 5.1C

Is completed when the coastal state is the United States of America. In this case FORM IMO NOTIFICATION is also required. This form is filled by the Master/Officer in charge. This form is completed after completion of the STS-Operation. Filled by the Master/Officer in charge. Managers should occasionally assess STS Service Provider as part of their due diligence. ONLINESTS SP AND POAC form is completed prior assignment of the STS service provider. This form is transmitted to STS Service Organiser in order to be completed and returned to Managers/ Operators.

PART A

M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN


PART A |112

NON CONFORMITY REPORTS

STS OPERATION § 4.14

PART A

STS-10

M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

STS-11

FENDER SELECTION CALCULATION

STS EQUIPMENT § 2.3.a

When an incident occurs during the STS operation, this has to be recorded and remedial actions have to take place in order to avoid reoccurrence. For this purpose STS 10 form has to be filled. Also, in case of the issue a non conformity this will have to be also mentioned in the report of the STS Performance evaluation ONLINESTS ASSESSMENT form Filled by the Master/Officer in charge. Prior commencement of the STS Operation the fender selection procedure takes place in order to exercise due diligence Filled by the Master/Officer in charge. Vessel data are completed and this form is forwarded to the STS service provider

STS-12

ECQ-1

FENDER SELECTION ASSISTANCE REQUEST FORM

IDENTIFICATION OF STS EQUIPMENT

STS EQUIPMENT § 2.3.a

STS EQUIPMENT §2

Filled by the Master/Officer in charge. Equivalent with Fender selection assistance request form of REF [16] The crew should register the STS associated equipment utilized in STS operations. Each apparatus should bear a unique ID number. After replacement of the equipment the new one will obtain a new ID number. It is essential to complete the interval of scheduled inspection according to manufacturer’s guidelines or associated ISO standards. This Form will be used when your vessel will have its own STS Equipment onboard. Filled by the Master/Officer in charge.

ECQ-2

RECORDING HOSE ASSEMBLY SERVICE AND TESTS

STS EQUIPMENT § 2.4.c

Should be completed during hose inspections. When this form is completed also a note at FORM ECQ-5 should be made. This Form will be used when your vessel will have its own STS Equipment onboard. Filled by the Master/Officer in charge.

ECQ-3

RECORDING FENDER ASSEMBLY SERVICE AND TESTS

STS EQUIPMENT § 2.3

Should be completed during Fender inspections. When this form is completed also a note should be made at FORM ECQ-5. This Form will be used when your vessel will have its own STS Equipment onboard. Filled by the Master/Officer in charge.


M/T ALGOMA HANSA– STS PLAN

ECQ-4

PERSONNEL TRANSFER BASKET INSPECTION

PART A |113

STS EQUIPMENT § 2.6

Should be completed during personnel transfer basket inspections. When this form is completed also a note should be made at FORM ECQ-5. This Form will be used when your vessel will have its own STS Equipment onboard.

ECQ-5

Log book is completed whenever an inspection to the STS equipment takes place. The log is completed regardless if the STS equipment inspection is performed by the crew or a contractor.

LOG BOOK OF STS EQUIPMENT INSPECTION

Filled by the Master/Officer in charge.

ISGOTT

ISGOTT CHECK-LIST

ALONGSIDE PROCEDURE § 4.11 A

ISGOTT Ship/Shore Safety CHECK-LIST

7.2. RECORDS OF STS OPERATIONS Records of STS operations shall be retained on board for three years and be readily available for inspection by a party to the MARPOL Convention, as required by MARPOL Annex I, Chapter 8, Regulation 41.5. The records consist of all completed forms associated with an STS Operation. After completion of the STS operation all the associated Forms should be kept separately, in the STS RECORDS FOLDER, for future reference and inspection as per SMS procedures.

7.3. SHIP INTEREST CONTACTS For ship interest contacts refer to SOPEP [19] appendix B.

PART A

Filled by the Master/Officer in charge.


FORMS

PART B

PART B


M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

PART B |1

FORMS CONTENTS

FORM REF # -DESCRIPTION OCIMF CHECK-LIST 1 – PRE FIXTURE INFORMATION OCIMF CHECK-LIST 2 – BEFORE OPERATIONS COMMENCE OCIMF CHECK-LIST 3 – BEFORE RUN-IN AND MOORING OCIMF CHECK-LIST 4 – BEFORE CARGO TRANSFER

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 6 – PRE-TRANSFER CHECKLIST OCIMF CHECK-LIST 6A – CHECKS DURING TRANSFER OCIMF CHECK-LIST PERSONNEL TRANSFER BY CRANE – PERSONNEL TRANSFER OCIMF CHECK-LIST FOR TRANSFERS INVOLVING VAPOUR BALANCING – TRANSFERS INVOLVING VAPOUR BALANCING IMO NOTIFICATION – NOTIFICATION TO COASTAL AUTHORITIES STS-7 - USCG DOI – DECLARATION OF INSPECTION FOR TANKER VESSELS STS-8 ONLINESTS ASSESSMENT – STS OPERATION PERFORMANCE EVALUATION STS-9 ONLINESTS SP AND POAC – STS SERVICE PROVIDER AND POAC QUALITY ASSURANCE STS-10 – NON CONFORMITY REPORTS STS-11 – FENDER SELECTION CALCULATION STS-12 – FENDER SELECTION ASSISTANCE REQUEST FORM ECQ-1 IDENTIFICATION OF STS EQUIPMENT ECQ-2 RECORDING HOSE ASSEMBLY SERVICE AND TESTS ECQ-3 RECORDING FENDER ASSEMBLY SERVICE AND TESTS ECQ-4 PERSONNEL TRANSFER BASKET INSPECTION ECQ-5 LOG BOOK OF STS EQUIPMENT INSPECTION ISGOTT CHECKLIST - ISGOTT SHIP/SHORE SAFETY CHECK-LIST

PART B

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 5 – BEFORE UNMOORING


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 1

Sheet 1 of 2

PRE-FIXTURE INFORMATION Ship Name: IMO:

(check appropriate)

MMSI:

Discharging

Ship Operator:

Receiving

Ship Charterer: STS Organizer:

Constant Heading or At Anchor

Call Sign / INMARSAT No:

Manouvering

Proposed Date of transfer: Proposed Location: PART A (OCIMF 2005) 1 VPQ data Current vessel particulars questionnaire (VPQ) data has been exchanged 2 Anticipated State the anticipated maximum berthing Vessel Data displacement of the ship 3 Anticipated State the anticipated arrival draughts and Vessel Data freeboard 4 Compliance The ship is able to conduct operations in with latest accordance with the latest edition of the Ship Guidelines to Ship Transfer Guide 5 Sail @ 5 Kn If the berthing operation is to be conducted underway, confirm that the ship can maintain about five knots for a minimum of two hours 6 Manpower Sufficient manpower will be provided to ensure the safe conduct of operations while minimising the potential for fatigue 7 Working Key vessel personnel can communicate in Language English. If not, state working language used Manifold 8 The ship's manifold arrangement and lifting Arrang. & gear is in accordance with OCIMF or SIGDO Lifting recommendations for the ship type/size

Yes/No

Remarks

Equipment

9 Anticipated

State the maximum and minimum expected height of the cargo manifold from the waterline during the transfer 10 Lifting The SWL and outreach of the ship's lifting Equipmant equipment is sufficient for the intended 11 STS Plan Where applicable, a copy of the STS operations plan has been exchanged Mooring 12 If not included within the STS operations Arrang. Plan plan, a general arrangement plan or other similar mooring diagram has been exchanged Vessel Data

This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.

Cont.X


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 1 13

14 15 16

PART A (OCIMF 2005) The location and number of enclosed fairleads and mooring bitts fitted on the ship is in accordance with Mooring Equipment Guidelines (reference 2.6) Winch Drums The ship is able to deploy all lines on winch drums Messenger Messenger lines of suitable strength will be Lines available at each mooring location MSDS MSDS information has been exchanged for the cargo being transferred and, where applicable, the previous cargo of the receiving ship

Sheet 2 of 2 Yes/No

Remarks

Yes/No

Remarks

Enclosed Fairleads

17 Ships sides

Both sides of the ship are clear of any overhanging projections including bridge wings Available 18 Sufficient accommodation is available on board accommod. for STS personnel. 19 Vapour Confirm the vessel is equipped to conduct Balancing vapour balancing PART B (Due Diligence) 22 Part. Vessel Participating Vessel has been cleared from Operators, Managers and Owners. 23 STS S.P. STS service provider has been cleared from Operators, Managers and Owners. POAC 24 Master, Operators, Managers and Owners are aware of POAC qualifications and he fulfils requirements of IMO Manual on Oil Pollution, section 1, paragraph 6. 25 Last STS op. Date of last STS operation: 26 Fender Selection

Fender selection has been performed according to the latest edition of the ‘Ship to Ship Transfer Guide’ of ICS/OCIMF. Name: Rank: Date: Signature:

This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 5

Sheet 1 of 2

BEFORE UNMOORING Discharging Ship Name: Receiving Ship Name: Manouvering Ship Name: Name of POAC: Date and Location: PART A (OCIMF 2013) 1 Cargo hoses are properly drained prior to hose disconnection 2 Hose Cargo hoses or manifolds are securely blanked

Yes/No

Remarks

Cargo draining

blanking

3 Clear side

The transfer side of the ship is clear of obstructions (including hose lifting equipment) 4 Unbearthing The method of letting go moorings and method separation of ships has been agreed and crew have been briefed on procedures 5 Fenders Fenders, including fender rigging are in good order 6 Secondary Secondary fenders are correctly positioned and Fenders secured for departure Winches 7 Power is available for mooring winches 8 Mooring Equipment

9 Personnel

Rope messengers and rope stoppers are available at all mooring stations Crew are standing by at their mooring stations

10 Communic.

Communications are established with mooring personnel and with the other ship Traffic 11 Shipping traffic in the area is being monitored and a very high frequency (VHF) alert has been transmitted Equipment 12 Manoeuvring, mooring and navigational Condition equipment has been tested and is ready for departure Instructions 13 Mooring personnel have been instructed to let authority go only as directed by the Master Nav. 14 Agreement has been reached that navigational Warnings warnings will be cancelled and AIS status updated when clear of the other ship 15 End Notification

The other ship has been advised that Check-List 5 is satisfactorily completed

This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.

Cont.X


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 5

Sheet 2 of 2 Yes/No

16

Cargo hoses

Remarks

Cargo hoses are properly isolated, drained and purged with nitrogen prior to disconnection Name: Rank: Date: Signature:

This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 6

Sheet 1 of 2

AN EXAMPLE OF A PRE-TRANSFER CHECKLIST FOR IN PORT STS CARGO TRANSFER Discharging Ship Name: Receiving Ship Name: Manouvering Ship Name: Name of POAC: Date and Location: PART A (OCIMF 2013) Yes/No 1 A standard pre-transfer checklist, such as the ISGOTT ship/shore safety checklist or equivalent, has been satisfactorily completed and arrangements have been made for repetitive checks during the transfer 2 Regional Required regional checklists have been checklist completed 3 Written Written permissions for cargo operations to take permission place are available to all Responsible Persons

Remarks

Pre-transfer checklist

4 Risk assessment

5 Contingency plan

6 Security info.

7 Fenders 8 Cutting equip.

9 Weather forecastle

10 Safely transit 11 Cargo Specif.

12 Cargo transfer

13 Vapour control

The formal risk assessment has been communicated by the transfer organiser and reviewed by involved parties The general contingency plan for the cargo transfer operation has been communicated by the transfer organiser and reviewed by involved parties Security information has been exchanged and, if required, a declaration of security has been completed Suitable fenders are rigged correctly to prevent contact of the vessels Fire axes, or suitable cutting equipment, are in place at the fore and aft mooring stations Present and forecast weather and sea conditions have been considered A means of access is in place to allow personnel to safely transit between the vessels Cargo specifications and any requi rements for inerting, heating, reactivity and inhibitors have been exchanged The cargo transfer operation is to be completed under closed conditions Where applicable, procedures for vapour control/balancing have been agreed

This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.

Cont.X


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 6

Sheet 2 of 2 Yes/No

14

Cargo monitoring systems

Remarks

All cargo monitoring systems, including level gauges, high level alarms, pressure gauges and alarms, have been tested and are operational

15 Tank cleaning Where necessary, permissions for tank cleaning have been obtained and procedures are in place 16 Cargo deck Access to the cargo deck is restricted and access controlled during cargo transfer operations 17 PPE

All personnel engaged in the cargo operation are provided with appropriate PPE including, where necessary, personal gas detectors/monitors

18 Cargo hoses Cargo hoses have been pressure tested within the prescribed period and documentation is available on board 19 Cargo hoses The construction and material of the cargo hoses suitability is suitable for the temperature and nature of the product(s) 20 Electrically hoses

21 Cargo hose length

22 Cargo lines 23 Spill equip.

Where electrically continuous hoses are used, the hoses are connected to the vessel with the insulated flange before being passed to the other vessel for connection The cargo hose string is of adequate length and properly supported The cargo lines are lined up in accordance with the cargo operation plan Spill response equipment is on station and ready for immediate deployment

24 Fire fighting Where applicable, fire-fighting provision has provision been made for unmanned barges 25 Spaces Spaces to be routinely monitored for any buildmonitoring up of flammable and/or toxic vapour have been identified Name: Rank: Date: Signature: This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 6A

Sheet 1 of 2

AN EXAMPLE OF CHECKS DURING TRANSFER FOR IN PORT STS OPERATIONS Discharging Ship Name: Receiving Ship Name: Manouvering Ship Name: Name of POAC: Date and Location: PART A (OCIMF 2013) 1 Present weather and sea conditions are within the agreed limits

Yes/No

Remarks

Weather conditions

2 PPE 3 Check for leakage

Personnel engaged in the cargo transfer operation are wearing appropriate PPE Cargo hose strings, manifold connections and cargo systems are free of any leakage

4 Cargo hoses Cargo hoses are properly supported, taking into account changing freeboards and any movement between the vessels Cargo 5 All cargo monitoring systems, including level monitoring gauges, high level alarms, pressure gauges and systems alarms, are functioning correctly 6 Cargo transfer

7 Check for pollution

8 Spaces monitoring

9 Mooring lines

10 Emergency towing-off pennants

11 Securing of tank

The cargo transfer operation is continuing under closed conditions The sea surface around the vessels is periodically visually checked for any sign of pollution All identified spaces are being routinely monitored for any build-up of flammable and/or toxic vapour All mooring lines are correctly tensioned and managed during the cargo transfer operation Where rigged in accordance with local requirements, emergency towing-off pennants are adjusted throughout the cargo transfer operation On completion of cargo transfer to or from a tank, the tank is secured

12 Cargo tanks Levels in all cargo and ballast tanks, including monitoring those not being worked, are routinely monitored This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.

Cont.X


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

OCIMF CHECK-LIST 6A Name: Rank: Date: Signature: This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.

Sheet 2 of 2


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

USCG DOI u 1 2 v w

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

x

y z

ver. 3.0.0

Sheet 3 of 7

The personnel required, under the facility operations manual and the vessel transfer procedures, to conduct the transfer operation: Are on duty; and Conduct the transfer operation in accordance with the facility operations manual or vessel transfer procedures, as appropriate At least one person is at the site of the transfer operation who fluently speaks the language or languages spoken by both persons in charge The person in charge of the transfer on the transferring vessel or facility and the person in charge of it on the receiving vessel or facility have held a conference, to ensure that each person in charge understands The identity of the product to be transferred The sequence of transfer operations The transfer rate The name or title and location of each person participating in the transfer operation Details of the transferring and receiving systems including procedures to ensure that the transfer pressure does not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure (MAWP) for each hose assembly, loading arm and/or transfer pipe system Critical stages of the transfer operation Federal, state, and local rules that apply to the transfer of oil or hazardous material Emergency procedures Discharge containment procedures Discharge reporting procedures Watch or shift arrangement Transfer shutdown procedures; and, If the persons use radios, a predetermined frequency for communications during the transfer, agreed upon by both The person in charge of transfer operations on the transferring vessel or facility and the person in charge of transfer operations on the receiving vessel or facility agree to begin the transfer operation Between sunset and sunrise the lighting required by §§154.570 and 155.790 of this chapter is provided; and For transfer operations between tank barges from sunset to sunrise, lighting is provided as described in §155.790 of this chapter Cont.X


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

USCG DOI

ver. 3.0.0

Sheet 4 of 7

aa A transfer operation which includes collection of vapor emitted from a vessel's cargo tanks through a venting system not located on the vessel must have the following verified by the person in charge: 1 Each manual valve in the vapor collection system is correctly positioned to allow the collection of cargo vapor 2 A vapor collection hose or arm is connected to the vessel's vapor connection 3 The electrical insulating device required by §154.810(g) of this chapter or 46 CFR 39.40–3(c) is fitted between the facility vapor connection and the vessel vapor connection 4

The initial loading rate and the maximum transfer rate are determined

5 The maximum and minimum operating pressures at the facility vapor

connection are determined 6 The tank barge overfill control system, if installed, is connected to the facility, tested, and operating properly 7 The following have been performed not more than 24 hours prior to the start of the transfer operation: i

Each alarm and automatic shutdown system required by subpart E of part 154 of this chapter and 46 CFR part 39 has been tested and found to be operating properly, and

ii

Analyzers required by §154.820(a), §154.824 (d) and (e) of this chapter or 46 CFR 39.40–3(a) have been checked for calibration by use of a span gas

Each vapor recovery hose has no unrepaired loose covers, kinks, bulges, soft spots, or any other defect which would permit the discharge of 8 vapor through the hose material, and no external gouges, cuts, or slashes that penetrate the first layer of hose reinforcement; and The oxygen content of the vessel's cargo tanks, if inerted, is at or below 8 percent by volume If the transfer operation involves loading oil, as defined in §151.05 of bb this chapter, into a cargo tank, the overfill device required by §155.480 of this chapter is installed and operating properly Smoking is not permitted in the facilities marine transfer area except in cc designated smoking areas 9

Welding, hot work operations and smoking are prohibited on vessels during the transfer of flammable or combustible materials, except that dd smoking may be permitted in accommodation areas designated by the master Cont.X


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

USCG DOI

ver. 3.0.0

Sheet 5 of 7

The person in charge (PIC) of the transfer of liquid cargo in bulk about to begin, do certify that I have personally inspected this vessel with reference to the following requirements set forth in 46 CFR 35.35. 20, and that opposite each of the applicable items listed below I have indicated whether the vessel complies with all pertinent regulations. Yes/No Vessel

PIC

1 Are warnings displayed as required? Is there any repair work in way of cargo spaces being carried on for 2 which permission has not been given? Have cargo connections been made as described in 46 CFR 35.35.15 and 3 are cargo valves set? Have all cargo connections been made to the vessel's pipeline and not 4 through an open-end hose led through a hatch? Are there any fires or open flames present on the deck or in any compartment which is located on, open or adjacent to or facing the 5 main deck of the vessels on which the cargo connections have been made? Has the shore terminal or other tank vessel concerned reported itself in readiness for transfer of cargo? 7 Are sea valves connected to the cargo piping system closed? If Grades, A, B, or C cargoes are to be loaded and boiler fires are lighted, 8 has an inspection been made to determine whether these fires may be maintained with reasonable safety? 6

If Grades A, B, or C cargoes are to be loaded and galley fires are lighted, 9 has an inspection been made to determine whether the galley fires may be maintained with reasonable safety? 10

11 12

13

If Grades A, B, or C cargoes are to be loaded, has an inspection been made to determine whether smoking is to be permitted in areas not on the weather decks? If smoking is to be permitted in areas not on the weather decks, have those areas been designated? Is the inert gas system being operated as necessary to maintain an inert atmosphere in the cargo tanks in compliance with 46 CFR 32.535? Have the applicable sections of the vessel response plan been reviewed before commencing transfer, and arrangements or contingencies made for implementation of the Plan should the need arise? Cont.X


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

USCG DOI

ver. 3.0.0

Sheet 6 of 7

In addition to the requirements in paragraph (b) of this section, if a transfer operation includes the collection of cargo vapor from a vessel's cargo tanks through a vapor control system not located on the vessel, fill the following information Yes/No Vessel

1 2 3 4

5

PIC

Is each part of the vapor collection system aligned to allow vapor to flow to the facility vapor connection or, if lightering, to the other vessel? Are the vapor collection hoses or arms connected to the vessel's vapor collection connection? Are the vessel and facility vapor connections electrically isolated? Have the initial transfer rate and the maximum transfer rate been determined? Have the maximum and minimum operating pressures at the facility vapor connection, or the vessel vapor connection if lightering, been determined?

Have all alarms required by 39.207, 39.209 and 39.403(a) of this 6 subchapter been tested within 24 hours prior to the start of the transfer operation and found to be operating properly? Is each vapor recovery hose free of unrepaired loose covers, kinks, bulges, soft spots, or any other defect which would permit the discharge 7 of vapors through the hose material, and gouges, cuts, or slashes that penetrate the first layer of hose reinforcement? 8

Has the oxygen concentration of all inerted cargo tanks been verified to be 8 percent or less? I certify that I have read, understand and agree with the foregoing, as initialed and agree to begin transfer operations. PERSON IN CHARGE (VESSEL) Name/Rank Signature Date

PERSON IN CHARGE (SHORE/OPERATOR) Name/Rank Signature Date

Cont.X


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

USCG DOI

ver. 3.0.0

Sheet 7 of 7

33 CFR 156.150 DECLARATION OF INSPECTION - NOTES (a) No person may transfer oil or hazardous material to or from a vessel unless each person in charge, designated under §§154.710 and 155.700 of this chapter, has filled out and signed the declaration of inspection form described in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) No person in charge may sign the declaration of inspection unless he or she has determined by inspection, and indicated by initialling in the appropriate space on the declaration of inspection form, that the facility or vessel, as appropriate, meets §156.120. (c) The declaration of inspection may be in any form but must contain at least: The name or other identification of the transferring vessel or facility and the 1 receiving vessel or facility; The address of the facility or location of the transfer operation if not at a 2 facility; The date and time the transfer operation is started; 3 A list of the requirements in §156.120 with spaces on the form following each requirement for the person in charge of the vessel or facility to indicate by 4 initialling that the requirement is met for the transfer operation; and

5

6

A space for the date, time of signing, signature, and title of each person in charge during transfer operations on the transferring vessel or facility and a space for the date, time of signing, signature, and title of each person in charge during transfer operations on the receiving facility or vessel certifying that all tests and inspections have been completed and that they are both ready to begin transferring product; and The date and time the transfer operation is completed.

(d)

The form for the declaration of inspection may incorporate the declaration-of-inspection requirements under 46 CFR 35.35–30.

(e)

The vessel and facility persons in charge shall each have a signed copy of the declaration of inspection available for inspection by the COTP during the transfer operation.

The operators of each vessel and facility engaged in the transfer operation shall retain a (f) signed copy of the declaration of inspection on board the vessel or at the facility for at least 1 month from the date of signature.


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

ONLINESTS ASSESSMENT

Sheet 1 of 1

STS OPERATION PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Ship’s Name (Discharging)

Issued Date

Ship’s Name (Receiving)

Transfer Date

Yes / No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Remarks

Has the STS Operation been performed as per Ships’ STS PLAN? Have all Forms been satisfactorily completed? Has a non conformity report been raised during this STS Operation? The Fenders utilized remained in good order during the operation? The Hoses utilized remained in good order during the operation? The STS service provider performed his duties as expected? Did the STS Operation comply with OCIMF/ICS guidelines? Was the STS operation suspended for any reason? How long did the STS Operation last? (hours) What was the transferred quantity? Was the crew performance according to the required rules? Are there any suggestions for further improvement and with reference to this operation? Name: Rank: Date: Signature:

In case OSIS assessment service is utilized, this form can be substituted by OSIS assessment form.


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

ONLINESTS SP AND POAC

Sheet 1 of 1

STS SERVICE PROVIDER QUESTIONNAIRE & POAC QUESTIONNAIRE Full style of the STS Service Provider Emergency contact details

STS Service Provider

Yes

No

1 Is the certificate of incorporation available uppon request? 2 Is the certificate of liability insurance for oil pollution available upon request? 3 Is the certificate of liability insurance for third parties available upon request? 4

Is the STS service provider accredited from the local Authorities to perform STS to nominated location?

5 Do you have a Quality Management Policy (QMP)? 6

According to QMP, is the STS process documented in a way, equivalent to OCIMF guidelines?

7

According to QMP, is the STS process summarized with a final report available to the ship?

8 Is an Environmental Protection Management Policy (EPMP) available and certified by a recognized body?

9 10 11 12

Is a contingency plan available for this STS Operation? Is a Health and Safety Management Policy (HSMP) available? Does fender selection policy fulfill OCIMF/ICS guidelines? Are the test and maintenance records available for the supplied STS equipment?

13 Are logs kept for STS equipment break down incidents? 14 Are logs available for involved sea pollution incidents during the last 5 years? Poac 15 Does the POAC hold an appropriate management level deck license or certificate from a recognized jurisdiction, meeting international certification standards, with all STCW requirements and dangerous cargo endorsements up to date and appropriate for the above mentioned ships?

16 Has the POAC at least 12 months experience as a senior deck officer serving on board ships similar to those under consideration for the STS operation?

17 Has the POAC participated in a suitable number of STS operations in addition to the above noted onboard experience?

18 19 20 21

Has the POAC undergone a supervised STS apprentice or trainee program? Has the POAC been involved in STS operations within the last six months? If the answer in Q19 in NO, has the POAC received any training? Has the POAC been subject to performance assessment on an annual basis? Name: Rank: Date: Signature:

In case onlineSTS.net screening service is utilized, this form can be substituted by onlineSTS.net screening and Risk Assessment report.


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

FORM STS-10

Sheet 1 of 1

NON CONFORMITY REPORT

STS Operations reference

Non Conf. Number

Ship’s Name (Discharging)

Issued Date

Ship’s Name (Receiving)

Transfer Date Yes / No

Remarks

1 Crew Performance 2 STS Equipment 3 STS service provider 4 Cargo Transfer Procedure 5 Safety Procedures 6 Communication Equipment 7 Reporting 8 Other (Please mention)

Preventing actions

Has the person in overall advisory control been informed? Name: Rank: Date: Signature: This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

FORM STS-11

Sheet 1 of 1

FENDER SELECTION CALCULATION STS Operations reference Ship’s Name (Discharging)

Issued Date

Ship’s Name (Receiving)

Transfer Date

1 Displacement 2 Displacement of other vessel (mt) Equivalent coefficient C 3 (from Table 1 OF ANNEX I) 3A Proposed fender size (Table 1 ANNEX I) 3B Proposed number of fenders 3C 4 5

6

7 8 9 10

Energy absorption of fender of 3A (from Table 8 OF ANNEX I) Weather condition (indivate with an “X”) Approaching speed in [m/sec] (select the approaching speed subject to step 3 of Annex I) Berthing energy [tm] (select the berthing energy subject to step 4 of Annex I) Safety factor Normal coastal Operations SF=1 Normal Offshore Operations SF=2 Inverse lightering SF=2 Final berthing energy (berthing energy x safety factor) Maximum berthing energy (comparison of 3C and 8) Fender type (choose a fender scheme from tables 8,9,10, or 11 from Annex I)

Calm

Moderate

11 Fender size Number of required fenders (the larger from 12 comparison of 3B of table 8.1 from Annex I) Has the person in overall advisory control been informed? Name: Rank: Date: Signature: This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.

Rough


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

FORM STS-12

Sheet 1 of 1

FENDER SELECTION ASSISTANCE REQUEST STS Operations reference Ship’s Name (Discharging)

Issued Date

Ship’s Name (Receiving)

Transfer Date

SHIP A 1 Type of ship 2 Displacement Tonnage (at start of STS Ops.) 3 Gross Tonnage 4 Deadweight Tonnage 5 LOA 6 LBP 7 Loaded Draft 8 Beam 9 Freeboard when coming into contact 10 Relative approach velocity of ships 11 Other relevant information

Name: Rank: Date: Signature: This form should not be substituted for other required check-lists and should be used in its entirety.

SHIP B


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

ECQ-1

Sheet 1 of 1

IDENTIFICATION OF STS EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT CATEGORY

Equipment ID

Mooring Rope

Fender

Transfer Hose

Personnel Transfer Basket

INTERVAL OF SCHEDULE INSPECTION


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

ISGOTT 43. Electric cables to portable electrical equipment within the hazardous area are disconnected from power. 44. Window type air conditioning units are disconnected. 45. Positive pressure is being maintained inside the accommodation, and air conditioning intakes, which may permit the entry of cargo vapours, are closed. 46. Measures have been taken to ensure sufficient mechanical ventilation in the pump room. 47. There is provision for an emergency escape. 48. The maximum wind and swell criteria for operations have been agreed. 49. Security protocols have been agreed between the Ships Security Officer and the Port Facility Security Offiicer, if appropriate. 50. Where appropriate, procedures have been agreed for receiving nitrogen supplied from shore, either for inerting or purging ship's tanks, or for line clearing into the ship.

Sheet 4 of 5

R

A

Stop cargo at: Disconnect at: Unberth at:

A

A R

If the ship is fitted, or is required to be fitted, with an inert gas system (IGS), the following statements should be addressed: Remarks Code Inert Gas System Ship Terminal 51. The IGS is fully operational and in P good working order. 52. Deck seals, or equivalent, are in R good working order. 53. Liquid levels in pressure/vacuum R breakers are correct. 54. The fixed and portable oxygen R analysers have been calibrated and are working properly. All forms related to one STS Operation to be stapled together. To be filed in Chief Officer’s File CHO 02-C


BERNHARD SCHULTE MANAGEMENT (CYPRUS) LTD

STS OPERATION PLAN

M/T ALGOMA HANSA MMSI: 311010700

IMO: 9127186

ver. 3.0.0

ISGOTT

Sheet 5 of 5

55. All the individual tank IG valves (if fitted) are correctly set and locked. 56. All personnel in charge of cargo operations are aware that, in the case of failure of the inert gas plant, discharge operations should cease and the terminal be advised.

R

If the ship is fitted with a Crude Oil Washing (COW) system, and intends to crude oil wash, the following statements should be addressed: Remarks Code Crude Oil Washing Ship Terminal 57. The Pre-Arrival COW check-list, as contained in the approved COW manual, has been satisfactorily 58. The COW check-lists for use before, R during and after COW, as contained in the approved COW manual, are available and being used. If the ship is planning to tank clean alongside, the following statements should be addressed: Remarks Code Tank cleaning Ship Terminal 59. Tank cleaning operations are planned during the ship’s stay alongside the shore installation. 60. If ‘yes’, the procedures and approvals for tank cleaning have been agreed. 61. Permission has been granted for gas freeing operations.

FOR DISCHARGING [ ] / RECEIVING SHIP [

] Name: Rank: Date: Signature:

All forms related to one STS Operation to be stapled together. To be filed in Chief Officer’s File CHO 02-C


PART C ANNEXES


M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

ANNEX I |1

ANNEX I – PLANS In this Annex the following plans are included:

ANNEX I

1. MOORING ARRANGEMENT 2. GENERAL ARRANGEMENT 3. CAPACITY PLAN


M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

ANNEX II |1

ANNEX II – LIST OF EMERGENCY CONTACTS FOR USA EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS CONTRACTED COMPANY O'Brien's Oil Pollution Services 645 Cidifer Street, Slidell, Louisiana 70458-4094, USA. Tel: +1-985-781-0804 Fax: +1 985 781 0580 Email: oopsusa@oopsusa.com

ANNEX II

ON-WATER REMOVAL, SHORELINE CLEANUP AND REMEDIATION (OSRO) National Response Corporation (NRC) 3500 Sunrise Highway ,Ste.T103,Great River, NY 11739, USA 24 Hour Phone: +1 631 224 9141 Fax +1 631 224 -9082 / 90 Telex: 49617380 NRC UI Email: clientservices@nrcc.com


M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

ANNEX III |1

ANNEX III – EXAMPLE INSTRUCTIONS FOR CONNECTIONS OF STS HOSES The following instructions shall be followed by ship’s personnel to connect the STS Hoses supplied by the STS Service Provider. Ideally this operation should be supervised throughout by the attending STS Superintendent, and should only be performed by the ship’s staff when requested in writing to do so by the STS Service Provider. If it is possible to do so, ship’s staff should endeavour to complete stages 1 thru 5 of the tightening process, leaving the final stage to complete under the supervision of the attending STS Superintendent following his arrival on site. PREPARATION Prior to connection of the two hoses, the flange faces should be inspected and cleaned to ensure all residues and debris from previous gaskets or fixatives are removed completely. For best results, use a metal flange scraper and an aerosol gasket remover and inspect the flange for damage. Be sure surface finish and flatness are satisfactory. Avoid using a wire brush for cleaning flange surfaces as this could result in surface scoring. Only the joints, nuts, bolts and torque wrench supplied with these hose sections are to be used for the purpose of hose connection. Lubricate bolt and nut threads and nut bearing face (where it contacts the flange). Centre the gasket on the flange. Note: standard ANSI ring gaskets, when cut properly, should centre themselves with the bolts in place. Only use new gaskets/ packings.

ANNEX III

FLANGE DIAGRAM


ANNEX III |2

M/T ALGOMA HANSA – STS PLAN

TIGHTENING PROCESS After flange assembly and all nuts have been run down by hand with joint in place, start wrench tightening following the sequence of the numbers indicated on the flange diagram above (marking the number on the flange with a crayon aids in keeping track of the tightening process). During all of the following steps, keep any gap between flanges even all around the circumference, and nuts made up approximately the same amount on each end of the bolt. 1)

First time around just snug the nuts with a hand wrench.

2)

Second time around tighten the nuts firmly with the same wrench.

Use a torque wrench for the following steps: 3)

Third time around apply approximately 25% recommended torque**.

4)

Fourth time apply approximately 75% of recommended torque**.

5)

Fifth time around, apply 100% of recommended torque**.

6) Continue tightening nuts all around until nuts do not move under 100% recommended torque**. If possible, re-torque after completion of each transfer operation as most of the short term bolt preload loss occurs within 24 hours after initial tightening. ** The recommended torque value is dependent upon the gasket manufacturer's recommendation and for the gasket supplied is:

ANNEX III

/

ft lbs / Nm


Profile for DYNAMARINe

Ship to Ship transfer Plan  

STS plan according to latest CDI/ICS/OCIMF/SIGTTO guidelines, Edition 1 2013

Ship to Ship transfer Plan  

STS plan according to latest CDI/ICS/OCIMF/SIGTTO guidelines, Edition 1 2013

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