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PROJECTS | 2016 - 2018 URBAN ECOLOGIES? THE AQUEDUCT

HISTORICAL CONTEXT? LAURENTIA

ARTIFICIAL NATURE?

GALLERIES AT THE GROTTO

WORK SAMPLES PRACTICE

PERPETUAL MOTION? CONTINUOUS LOOPS

ARCHITECTURE OF OCCUPANCY? CUNEIFORM

INTEGRATED DESIGN? MIXED USED DEVELOPMENT

SUSTAINABILITY?

MAYO(U)R DAYLIGHT BE AUTONOMOUS

COMMUNITY CULTURE? CUMULONIMBUS

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AQUEDUCT | URBAN ECOLOGIES food-to-house distance diagram

THE AQUEDUCT ARCH 601 Urban Housing Studio Project “Frontline” Vertical Farming Housing, Fishtown, Philadelphia, PA visual studies critic: Miroslava Brooks studio critic: Brian Phillips

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PENNDESIGN | FALL 2017 section/plan perspective hybrid

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AQUEDUCT | URBAN ECOLOGIES interior render from lobby looking up

POLLUTION + LOCAL FOOD CULTURE The local context of the site is riddled with layers and layers of rich history. The neighborhood began mainly as a fishing settlement due to its proximity to the Delaware River, then it quickly became a hotspot for industry which was to later be abandoned to decay. Because of this heavily industrial history, the area is some of the ones that are most affected by lead poison and air pollution among the Greater Philadelphia area. In recent years, the neighborhoods are being revitalized ever since the 2008 recession, and the streets are littered with hip, youth culture. One of the biggest fads in the Fishtown -Kensington area is the local food hype. As progressive as the neighborhoods are, 99% of local restaurants and residents make it a goal to source their ingredients locally and support their regions farmers. Local newspapers frequently comment on the neighborhood’s enthusiasm for sustainable food sources, being the location for the headquarters of Greensgrow. In response to this context, as well as the studio prompt of urban housing, this project approaches the givens with the baggage that is the architectural discourse on the Anthropocene. The story of Fishtown/Kensington echoes that of the canon Anthropocentric narrative: human beings began to significantly affect the planet’s entropy ever since they grew their own food and settled around it. More and more rapidly, we deplete our own resources--including the land on which we farm (Fishtown included due to its industrial period)-meaning there is less and less land we are able to grow. This project envisions a future, enabled by design, which adapts to these anthropocentric changes by radically shifting the roles of food and dwelling in relation to one another.

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PENNDESIGN | FALL 2017 concept diagrams, research, mapping

LEAD-POISONED SOIL

AIR POLLUTION

PARENTS ARE ADVISED TO KEEP CHILDREN FROM PLAYING IN SOIL ABOVE 400 PPM.

FISHTOWN = FOODTOWN SITE

HIGHER RISKS TO HUMAN HEALTH

SITE

LEAD CONTENT IN SOIL /PPM (PARTS-PER-MILLION) 0

1

GROWTH AND DECLINE: ANTHROPOCENTRIC CONCERNS

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3

4

400

5

800

900 1000 2000

FORMER SMELTER

GROWTH AND DECLINE: ANTHROPOCENTRIC CONCERNS SOURCE: ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY DATABASES BY ELIZABETH LUCAS, CENTER FOR PUBLIC INTEGRITY AND ROBERT BENINCASA, NPR.

HUMAN POPULATION

ARABLE LANDSCAPES

OCEAN FISH POPULATION

HUMAN POPULATION

ARABLE LANDSCAPES

OCEAN FISH POPULATION

ATMOSPHERE COMMUNITY AQUAPONICS

COMMUNITY GARDENS

1760

2015

1760

2010

1760

2010

2015

HYDROPONICS

+

REACTIONS TO GROWING POPULATIONS 1760

SOURCES: ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS CONDUCTED BY CRITERION LABS; SAMPLES GATHERED BY CRITERION LABS AND PHILADELPHIA MEDIA NETWORK

ATMOSPHERE

URBAN AQUACULTURE

+

=

More than 35% arable land in 1964 More than 35% arable land in 2014

More than 35% arable land in 1964 More than 35% arable land in 2014

URBANIZATION

VERTICAL FARMING

COMMUNITY AQUAPONICS

AQUAFARMING

URBAN HOUSING

+

=

?

HABITAT SPATIALIZATION GARDENING

URBAN FARM

COMMUNITY KITCHEN

BUSINESS

NEIGHBORHOOD

GARDEN CENTER

FARMSTAND THE AQUEDUCT

Aquaculture tank area needed to sustain 900 sq ft of hydroponic produce: 60 sq ft

SNAP MOBILE MARKETS

CSA

Hydroponic farm area needed to sustain 1 person per year: 900 sq ft Typical Front Street Studio areaL 277 - 960 sq ft

FARMING

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AQUEDUCT | URBAN ECOLOGIES interior render of corridor

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PENNDESIGN | FALL 2017 section axonometric + plan hybrid

DISTANCE BETWEEN FOOD + DWELLING

As a cohabitat for people, plants and fish, the aqueduct seeks to radically reduce the distance between food and urban dwelling for a youthful population interested in a new micro-scaled farm to table relationship wrapped in an experientially novel architecture. The project hybridizes housing and aquaponics into a zerowaste, self-sufficient ecosystem centering around the recirculation of water. With Greensgrow (a local fresh produce and plant grower) as the hypothetical developer, Aqueduct is a new living model which collapses living and food production into a single lifestyle. In the center of the building is a volume filled with fish defining a central stalk of water infrastructure. Surrounding this core is a greenhouse framework to the south and living units to the north. All three habitats are designed such that all occupants sustain each other in a closed loop system, with leftover production to export to the surrounding neighborhood.

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AQUEDUCT | URBAN ECOLOGIES layout catalog

human (private) private private humanhuman human (public) public human public human plants plants plants fish fish

DEGREES OF ACCESS + COMMUNITY VALUE One of the challenges with proposing a whole new lifestyle is that of its administration and implementation. All of the units are designed and calibrated such that any number of residents within each unit type will be able to sustain themselves for life with what the architecture provides. As mentioned before, to some extent this food resource also has the opportunity to be shared with the local community. This is done through a gradient of unit types, where the most private units lie on the highest floors and the most public-accessible harvest spaces are found in lower stories. The ground floor is proposed to be a mostly public floor, dedicated to a Greensgrow satellite office, leasing office , and community gardens. Flexibility is the aim of this new paradigm, should residents choose not to consume their fishstock or all of their vegetation, the circulation is designed for Greensgrow management to be able to seamlessly weave in to sell resident crops. The architecture serves as a food production machine, with residences along for the ride.

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fish


PENNDESIGN | FALL 2017 residential + public floor plans

TENTH FLOOR | PRIVATE UNITS DN

UP

DN

UP

DN

UP

FIFTH FLOOR |COOP UNITS DN

UP

UP

UP

GROUND FLOOR |LOBBY, MARKET, OFFICES DN

UP

UP

DN

0

10’

25’

50’

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AQUEDUCT | URBAN ECOLOGIES architectural diagrams + elevations

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3

4

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OT CIRCULATION

DEGREES OF ACCESSIBILITY

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UNFOLDED ELEVATIONS: HABITATS

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resident/ tenant

people plants fish

total privacy / no public access cooperative / some public access communal / full public access

greensgrow/ community members

1 need chart for each habitant 2 system diagram for the operation and required labor for aquaponics 3 water recirculation diagram 4 axonometric view showing building core and water circulation systems 5 north + west elevations 6 south elevation 7 access, public vs private farm spaces and units 8 schematic unfolded elevation 9 unit organization

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front st

open lot

lee st

adjacent buildings

FINAL UNIT LAYOUT ORGANIZATION + OWNERSHIP OF FARM SPACES

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PENNDESIGN | FALL 2017 section perspective

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LAURENTIA | HISTORICAL CONTEXT form development catalog 2

SUGAR AND CREAM SET A

CURVE SHAPE

15 VERTICES

8 VERTICES

4 VERTICES

SUGAR AND CREAM SET B

CURVE SHAPE

12 VERTICES

6 VERTICES

4 VERTICES

DIVIDED BOWL

CURVE SHAPE

14 VERTICES

6 VERTICES

4 VERTICES

CREAMER

CURVE SHAPE

20 VERTICES

7 VERTICES

4 VERTICES

3

4

5

B. VOLUME REDUCTION

1

CELERY TRAY

1000 FACES

200 FACES

80 FACES

10 FACES

SUGAR AND CREAM SET A

1000 FACES

200 FACES

80 FACES

10 FACES

SUGAR AND CREAM SET B

1000 FACES

200 FACES

80 FACES

10 FACES

DIVIDED BOWL

1000 FACES

200 FACES

80 FACES

10 FACES

CREAMER

1000 FACES

200 FACES

80 FACES

10 FACES

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3

4

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L A U R E N T I A Russel Wright Design Center Pavilion Competition Monolithic Pavilion Proposal, Manitoga, Garrison, NY award: Honorable Mention - Best Presentation collaborators: Yanlong Huang, Yili Zha, Yi Zhu critic: Miroslava Brooks

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PENNDESIGN| FALL 2016 photo of half scale physical model

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LAURENTIA | HISTORICAL CONTEXT model assembly drawings

23F

A 22F

21F

F

F C

20F

11C 19F

B

10C 9C

14D

D 13D

8B

15D

12D 5B

7B

1A 2A 6B

B E

16E

17E

C

3A

A

E

18E 4A

D

REDUCTION + WRIGHT’S MANITOGA Before Russel and Mary Wright settled onto the site that is now Manitoga, it was an abandoned rock quarry. The rock found in this region of upper New York state is mainly from the Pre-Cambrian Era, and in that time period, what is now much of the East Coast of North America stretching to Greenland was the super continent of Laurentia. Just as this supercontinent was a part of the whole that was Pangea, we wanted to imply that our monolith could be the remains, one of the parts of an historical whole, and named it as such—Manitoga’s geological roots are applied to the studio’s overall part-to-whole discourse. In response to the topic of part-to-whole, our group focused on mimicking the monolith. We break down the monolith as an autonomous object. Our monolith reveals that it is actually a whole made up of many smaller parts, seen on the interior. The partto-whole relationship is the aggregation of smaller, “high-res” components on the inside, to make up the big “low-res” monolith seen on the exterior. The smaller components that make up the aggregations were originally our individual group members’ assigned Russel Wright artifacts from the American Modern collection. In direct correlation with the switching between resolutions, we go down in scale and the supposed high-res components are actually low-res reductions of the American Modern pieces. Russel Wright rejected the superfluous and aristocratic snobbery of the American home in his ‘Guide to Easier Living.’ His pursuit for a simpler yet more elegant modern American home led to a design ethos that was highly reduced from the popular culture of the 1950s. We took this ideology applied it onto our project in close ties with the part-to-whole studio discourse. Our project takes the site’s geological history, Russel Wright’s ideologies, and the Part-to-Whole discussionthe result is our monolith-pavilion, Laurentia, which could be placed in multiple locations around the quarry, guiding the visitors through the site - mysterious objects that would sometimes reveal their glowing interiors. Quoting philosopher Timothy Morton, “we can never see all the dimensions of a thing at once. Things are what they are independent of us, yet never as they appear. Things are tricky, playful.”

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PENNDESIGN| FALL 2016 elevations + section

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ARTIFICIAL NATURES | GROTTO GALLERIES Upper Basement Plan section perspective N

scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

A

UP

B

N

Lower Basement Plan scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

Site + Bldg Section B scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

GALLERIES AT THE GROTTO ARCH 501 IFoundation Studio, Individual Project Art Gallery at Manitoga, Garrison, New York critic: Miroslava Brooks

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PENNDESIGN| FALL 2016 birds eye view render

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ARTIFICIAL NATURES | GROTTO GALLERIES photos of conceptual models + 1/16” model

ARTIFICIAL NATURE + TOTAL DESIGN Russel Wright approached the design of Manitoga with a sensitivity to the existing conditions of the site—he desired to blend together the elements of the place, such as the rocks, boulders, and trees, saying, “this place has been here forever, will be here forever.” Wright designed the property top to bottom in a way that made it appear as though it had been that way since before he settled onto the site. Walking through Manitoga, around the quarry pond, through the trails and into the Dragon Rock, one can feel the sublime of such “untapped” nature, which then discreetly transitions into the elements that make up the studio. It seems like the entire place remain as is since the glaciers melted. However this is untrue. Before the Wrights settled onto Manitoga, it had been a site to quarry rocks, so the existing “nature” had already been heavily tampered with. When Wright locked in on the site, absolutely everything was planned and designed. Manitoga is a total design of the site, an artificial nature with the intention of making the illusion that “this place has been here forever.” With this in mind, the approach in which the design of the Grotto Galleries took is similar in that the area the galleries would inhabit will be totally designed from the ground up. The first big move made on the existing topography is the creation of a new pond, upstream above the waterfall that feeds into the current quarry pond. As of now, the pond has been the center of focus of Manitoga, and the creation of the new pond is essentially the creation of a new focus point; this focus point would orchestrate the design of the galleries. ’05

50’

’52

25’

’01

10’

0

0

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PENNDESIGN| FALL 2016 site plan + section

A

A

B 19


ARTIFICIAL NATURES | GROTTO GALLERIES floor plans

A DN

DN

DN

B DN

DN DN

DN

A DN

UP

UP

N

50’

50’

B DN UP

UP

25’

25’

10’

10’

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PENNDESIGN| FALL 2016 photos of 1/8” model

RIGID + LOOSE | POND + GROTTO By definition, a grotto is “any type of natural or artificial cave that is associated with modern, historic, or prehistoric use by humans. When it is not an artificial garden feature, a grotto is often a small cave near water and often flooded or liable to flood at high tide.” Therefore, the galleries are built upon the new pond like a grotto, making use of the boulders and rocks that characterize Manitoga as they also characterize traditional grottos. The cave-like qualities of grottos are highlighted in the form of the building complex, produced by an aggregation of the primitive geometries of cones, which also dictate the way in which the topography of the pond and site around it is shaped. An overall rectangular prism binds the cone aggregation to create the building’s whole, while the cone aggregations make up the parts. The combination of cones+prism was chosen to echo Russel Wright’s desire to juxtapose rigid flatness with loose curvatures in his designs of both Manitoga and some of his ceramic collections. Grottoes take natural elements such as rocks, vegetation and water and combine them in a composition of caves to be used by humans for various functions; Russel Wright took the elements of the site, the quarry rocks, trees, the stream and designed his own space using these elements.This project builds upon this even further. The Galleries at the Grotto build upon the “nature” design language of Russel Wright and constructs the program with the façade artificial nature of caves and grottoes

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PRACTICE | WORK SAMPLES church master plan

W O R K

S A M P L E S

Dangerous Architects, P.C. in Chelsea, MI various projects done during summer internship Principal + Supervisor: Scott McElrath

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DANGEROUS ARCHITECTS | SUMMER 2016 pages from sheet sets/presentations 1

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CHELSEA COMMUNITY CENTER

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AREA + COST ESTIMATE GROUND LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

program

area

cost per sq ft

cost

program

aquatics

12000 sq ft

$ 345

$ 4140000

fitness/dance/aerobics

gyms

20160 sq ft

$ 195

$ 3931200

racquetball

cardio/weight

4800 sq ft

$ 225

$ 1080000

track

lockers

3300 sq ft

$ 255

$ 841500

area

1188 sq ft

7

1600 sq ft

$ 195

$ 312000

12478 sq ft

$ 225

$ 2807550

study room

1900 sq ft

$ 205

$ 389500

6893 sq ft

$ 200

$ 1378600

flexible (meeting/classroom)

1429 sq ft

$ 230

$ 328670

1680 sq ft

$ 230

$ 386400

toilet room

700 sq ft

$ 305

$ 213500

art/maker space

2228 sq ft

$ 200

$ 445600

circulation

1425 sq ft

$ 185

$ 263625

storage

2144 sq ft

$ 154

$ 330176

storage

toilet room

909 sq ft

$ 305

$ 277245

mechanical

circulation

5768 sq ft

$ 185

$ 1067080

mechanical

1115 sq ft

$ 190

$ 211850

410 sq ft

$ 154

$ 63140

4800 sq ft

$ 190

$ 912000

25,930 sq ft

Demo Emergency Light Extg Emergency Light

New Bsbd. Radiator

BB

Demo Bsbd. Radiator

BB

Demo Wall Switch

Extg. Bsbd. Radiator

BB

Extg. Wall Switch

New Supply Diffuser Demo Supply Diffuser

SD

New Wall Switch

New 3-Way Switch

New 1x4' Flourescent Lt.

1x4'

Demo 1x4' Flourescent Lt.

1x4'

Extg. 1x4' Flourescent Lt.

1x4'

Demo Ceiling Fan

Extg. 3-Way Switch

Extg. Ceiling Fan New TV/Cable Jack

TV

RT

Demo Dimmer Switch

Demo TV/Cable Jack

TV

Demo 1x4' Chain-Hung Lt.

RT

Extg. Dimmer Switch

Extg. TV/Cable Jack

TV

Extg. 1x4' Chain-Hung Lt.

New 4-Plex Outlet

New Phone Jack

P

New Sfc-Mounted Clg. Light Demo Sfc-Mounted Clg. Light

New Acpnl. Ceiling Return Duct

Extg. Acpnl. Ceiling Return Duct

P

SM SM

New Wall-Mtd. Exit Sign Demo Wall-Mtd. Exit Sign Extg. Wall-Mtd. Exit Sign

Demo Exit/Emergency Sign

Extg. Ground Fault Interrupt

Extg. Exit/Emergency Sign New Hose Bib

Demo Water Proof Outlet

Demo Hose Bib

Extg.Water Proof Outlet

Extg. Hose Bib

New 220V Outlet Extg. Acpnl. Ceiling Supply Diffuser

New Junction Box

Demo 220V Outlet

Demo Junction Box

Extg. 220V Outlet

Extg. Junction Box

Extg. Fan/Light

New 1x4' Chain-Hung Lt.

2x4'

New 2x4' Lay-In Flourescent Lt.

Demo 2x4' Lay-In Flourescent Lt.

Extg. 2x4' Lay-In Flourescent Lt.

New Exit/Emergency Sign

Demo Ground Fault Interrupt

New Water Proof Outlet Demo Acpnl. Ceiling Supply Diffuser

Extg. Under Cabinet Light New Fan/Light Demo Fan/Light

P

SM

Demo Smoke Detector Extg. Smoke Detector

Demo Outlet 42" Above Flr. Extg. Outlet 42" Above Flr. New Ground Fault Interrupt

New Acpnl. Ceiling Supply Diffuser

New Under Cabinet Light

Demo Phone Jack Extg. Phone Jack New Smoke Detector

Demo Duplex Outlet New Outlet 42" Above Flr.

New Linear Fluorescent Lt. Demo Linear Fluorescent Lt. Extg. Linear Fluorescent Lt. New Track Lighting

Demo Under Cabinet Light

Extg. Duplex Outlet

New Duplex Outlet Demo Acpnl. Ceiling Return Duct

Demo Yard Light Extg.Yard Light

Demo Track Lighting

Demo 4-Plex Outlet Extg. 4-Plex Outlet

New Yard Light

Extg. Track Lighting

New Dimmer Switch

New 2x4' SurfaceMounted Flourescent Lt.

2x4'

2x4'

2x4'

2x4'

Demo 2x4' SurfaceMounted Flourescent Lt.

Extg. 2x4' SurfaceMounted Flourescent Lt.

2x4'

1x4'

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1x4'

1x4'

10

9

Demo 1x4' Sfc. Mounted Lt. Extg. 1x4' Sfc. Mounted Lt.

New Ceiling Fan

Demo 3-Way Switch

SD

RT

Demo Return Diffuser Extg. Return Diffuser

Extg Sfc-Mounted Clg. Light

$19,635,056

New1x4' Sfc. Mounted Lt.

New Single/Dbl Exit Sign Demo Single/Dbl Exit Sign Extg. Single/Dbl Exit Sign

SD

Extg. Supply Diffuser New Return Diffuser

Demo Wall-Mounted Light Extg. Wall-Mounted Light

New Wall-Mounted Light

$5,545,405

$14,089,651

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ELECTRICAL/HVAC SYMBOLS New Emergency Light

Extg. Recessed Light

$ 255420

office/lobby

TOTAL 86,927 sq ft

Demo Recessed Light

cost

$ 215

childcare/activity

60,997 sq ft

New Recessed Light

cost per sq ft

11 1 Lakehouse A - DD set - Ground Floorplan 2 Lakehouse A - DD set - Elevations 3 Lakehouse A - DD set - Sections 4 Community Center - Pre-SD Presentation - Programming 5 Community Center - Pre-SD Presentation - Cost Estimation 6 Community Center - Pre-SD Presentation - 3D View 7 Barn Renovation - CD set - Site Plan 8 Barn Renovation - CD set - Floorplans 9 Barn Renovation - CD set - Elevations 10 Lakehouse B - SD Set - Floorplans 11 Lakehouse B - SD Set - Sections

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CONTINUOUS LOOPS | PERPETUAL MOTION photo of analog model

CONTINUOUS LOOPS

ARCH 602 Comprehensive Studio: Perpetual Motion

Major Transportation Hub at Red Hook, Brooklyn collaborator: Bingyu Wang critic: Ben Krone

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2018 render from across the river

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CONTINUOUS LOOPS | PERPETUAL MOTION research drawings + process models

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case studies of existing transportation systems _ 1 map of potential city-to-city hyperloop routes _ 2 map of potential metro-NYC cable car routes _ 3 diagram of transit systems: cable propelled + hyperloop maglev _ 4 diagram of initial analog model concept _ 5 structural analysis of formal massing _ 6 study analog model 08 photo _ 7 study analog model 07 photo _ 8 study analog model 11 photo _ 9

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2018 longitudinal section

WORLD IN MOTION, WORLD IN TOUCH

Advancements in transportation technologies historically owe rediscoveries, or the return of some concept or idea from the past. Events such as international expositions, places such as theme parks, works such as movies envision what the world might look like in the distant future, and from these imaginations humanity is inspired; then in one way or another—usually by applying techniques that have already been in use for decades yet taken for granted—it is made into a reality. This project in particular recalls the 1986 Vancouver Transpo Expo, with the theme: “World in Motion, World in Touch.” It exhibited experimental modes of transit like the monorail, space crafts, water taxis, gondolas. Right now we are in the midst of experiencing a revolution in transportation technologies. It is getting easier and faster to get from places that are farther and farther away from each other thanks to emergent transit phenomenon such as autonomous vehicles, rideshare apps, maglev long-distance transportation. Issues we face today that are transit-related entail congestion and its symptoms— long wait times, long queues, traffic jams, accidents, short tempers. To combat congestion and other prevailing crises like exponential population increase and sea level rise, a return to old technology occurs to move towards a new way of moving: vector-based continuous transportation—cable propelled gondolas for inner-city travel, and vacuum propelled hyperloops for national and international travel.

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CONTINUOUS LOOPS | PERPETUAL MOTION relationship to site

TRANSPORTATION HUB AS POST OFFICE In dealing with point-to-point vector based transportation systems, we propose the transportation hub as a buffer zone for deliveries going to and from places near and far, and in speeds that range from fast and slow. The hyperloop, which can reach speeds up to 700 mph, implies a revolutionary shift in the way we think about transportation. Hypothetically, one would go from Washington D.C. to New York City in 30 minutes or less. Imagining the shear speeds in which the system delivers people or goods between long distances suggest the need for a sorting system that would just as quickly dispatch a multiplying amount of arrivals to their desired destinations. Thus, the transportation hub acts as a post office, treating people just as cargo to efficiently get them from point A to point B (from their hyperloop terminal coming from Los Angeles to the cable car terminal heading towards Manhattan) with the least amount of disruptions or congestion. Typologies of postal infrastructures and logistics centers are the driving force of the organization of space, more than that of traditional transportation typologies such as airports or rail stations. To relate back to the forces demonstrated by the transportation systems and the forces we initially explored with our analog models, the concept of continuous loops is present not just in the way the transportation systems work, but also how one (person or package) would circulate throughout the building. The chronology of a traveler into, through, and out of the hub is essentially the process of translating from one continuous loop to another. Circulation is in perpetual motion.

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2018 floor plans

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CUNEIFORM | OCCUPANCY ARCHITECTURE 1/8� inch section model

C U N E I F O R M ARCH 502 Ontological Formations Studio Parkside Community Library, Philadelphia, PA visual studies critic: Nate Hume studio critic: Danielle Willems

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017 abstract pattern overlays

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CUNEIFORM | OCCUPANCY ARCHITECTURE research + site mapping overlays

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017 formal abstracts catalog

AGENCIES OF OCCUPANCE | INSTITUIONS Mapping overlays were drawn for the project, of census data of greater Philadelphia over the past 8 decades. It illustrated the proficiency of education per neighborhood in Philadelphia. Some of the most immediate elements that could be picked from the visualization is the prominence of Center City and University City in consistently having high populations of residents that have a college degree or more. West Philadelphia tends to be on the lesser side during most decades. The park lot in Farimount Park was chosen over the plethora of vacant lots located in Parkside as the site mainly because of the opportunities it provides to connect the neighborhood to the park, but also because of a sensitivity to the situation of placing a monumental architecture in the midst of a mainly residential area. The approach in which program massing studies was taken stems from the chosen formal and relationship explorations. With the given amount of square footage allotted to each program/ function, there were subcategories of programs associated with each function. The strategy is to break apart the programs into seven main categories and totaling the square footage for the sub-programs, then rationalizing the dimensions of the main component to conform to a more or less modular volume and area, and aggregating according to the total square footage of each main category. These aggregations then form clusters and a combination of strategies (packing, interlocking, and subdividing) were utilized to produce more complex relationships between each cluster of program. The way in which this massing is laid out is having the public space and areas as more of a focal point. The remaining program would wrap around public spaces.

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CUNEIFORM | OCCUPANCY ARCHITECTURE activity view render on street level, daytime

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017 night view render from street level

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CUNEIFORM | OCCUPANCY ARCHITECTURE photograph of 1/16� site + whole building model

EXTENDING THE PUBLIC STREET The architectural polemic this project endeavors then is rather than being occupied, an active architecture more directly participates in such events by the spatial tactics employed by the design--such as the extension of the public street cutting through the library, and the delamination of built space such that the gaps interact with these public activities. The majority of the more public functions is located in the ground floor, such as open meeting spaces, cafeteria, public reading areas, open stacks, and open air reading space. The functions which tend to be more private, such as administration offices, storage facilities, closed/semi-closed stacks, and media centers would be located in the above floors, encircling the center of the entrances, as though viewing circulation activity is a main spectacle that occurs in this architecture. The section below exhibits the interior space juxtaposed to the open air circulation space which leads to the entrance center point. Mezzanine floors litter the southern portions of the building, to let in daylight for the more public subterranean spaces located below. Again, the skin is to be conceptualized as a transparent material, and in this section one can imagine looking down towards the entrance spaces from the stacks on the second or third floor.

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017 ground floor plan + longitudinal section

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CUNEIFORM | OCCUPANCY ARCHITECTURE partial section perspective chunk

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017 birds eye view render

THE DELAMINATION OF BUILT SPACE Cuneiform script is one of the earliest systems of writing, distinguished by its wedgeshaped marks on clay tablets. This project looks at written word and archived records as an historical root of the library typology. But as time progresses, and technology evolves, so too does the typology of the library corresponding in the ways records change--for instance, from tablets to scrolls to books to digital documents to blogs. Contemporary libraries are in a moment of evolution, giving less and less space to archives and more and more space for public gathering. This project looks at the typology of the library as more of a public forum, and challenges the notion of enclosure and privitization of civic institutions. Another large facet that drives this project that heavily relates to civic institutions and public spaces is the phenomenon of civil unrest and protest, which thanks to technology is becoming more and more common an occurence. Here we look at how events such as protests occupy architecture in the city as a gesture of empowerment and democracy: a resistance to higher power. It is also worth mentioning how dependent protests are to the written word, as seen in signage, propaganda and documents such as petitions. Cuneiform then takes this community at the mercy of higher institutions that are exploiting and depriving them of resources, which surrounding neighborhoods have access to, and posits as a platform to have their voices heard by way of assembly and protest. It seeks to be an active architecture, which participates in these events rather than just being occupied. This project proposes a sort of protest architecture, a stage for the performance of democracy.

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MIXED USE DEV | INTEGRATED DESIGN section perspective

MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT Building Information Modelling Beginner Course Midrise Office Building in Rittenhouse, Philadelphia lecturer: Franca Trubiano instructor: Patrick Morgan

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210 S 34th Street, Rm B13 Philadelphia, PA 19104

ARCH736-007 BIM STDUIO

dyancastro.co.vu

210 S 34th Street, Rm B13 Philadelphia, PA 19104

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Checker

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19 March 2018 Date

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UPENN

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Dyan Castro

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1 Exterior 3D View 2 Interior 3D View 3 Interior 3D View 4 Mezzanine Floor Plan 5 Typical Floor Plan 6 Reflected Ceiling Plan for Mezzanine 7 East Elevation 8 Longitudinal Section 9 Wall Sections 10 Exterior Callout Details 11 Exceptional Stair Details dyancastro.co.vu

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INSULATED GLAZING UNIT

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Project Number

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PRECAST CONCRETE PANEL MASONRY ANCHOR

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SSG MULLION SSG MULLION REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB

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AIR AND VAPOR BARRIER

Exterior Call Out Details

RIGID INSULATION PLYWOOD SHEATHING

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Soffit at Curtain Wall 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

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Floor Detail at Curtain Wall 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

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UPENN

Client

736.007

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Roof 150' - 0"

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210 S 34th Street, Rm B13 Philadelphia, PA 19104

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Interior View - Lobby + Mezzanine 2

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22' - 2 7/8"

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MAYOR DAYLIGHT | SUSTAINABILITY floor plan

MAYOR DAYLIGHT BE A U T O N O M O U S Daylight Analysis/Solution Report for Philly City Hall collaborator: Nikita Jathan instructor: Jessica Zofchak

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017 photo of case study room

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MAYOR DAYLIGHT | SUSTAINABILITY point in time measurements of base case

DIGITAL MODEL + MATERIALITY PHIA CITY HALL GOLD TRIM

GOLD TRIM

COFFER WITH GOLD TRIM

DARK CARPET

CURTAIN

GLAZING

TRANSLUCENT GLAZING

BRIGHT, VISUALLY UNCOMFORTABLE NORTH END»»»»»»»»

DARK CARPET CURTAIN BASELINE MEASUREMENTS

COFFER WITH GOLD TRIM

GLAZING

TRANSLUCENT GLAZING

EGY TO IMPROVE DAYLIGHT

COFFER TRIM IN COFFER ocused on a popular and wellused room locatedGOLD in TRIM INGOLD City Hall building, and it explores how priorities and REFLECTIVE WHITE COFFER REFLECTIVE WHITE COFFER aylighting design can change when considering a POINT IN TIME. Measurements gages historic preservation concerns, public funding, populations for usage (both public and private).

reflect the same, uniform lux range.

BASELINE MEASUREMENTS (P.I.T.)

OUTH END DEC 21 ty Hall is amajor cultural landmark for the city, as well 9 AM

BRIGHT, VISUALLY UNCOMFORTABLE NORTH END MAR 21 JUN 21 9 AM

ding. It is the site of major events inside and outside its paces, as well as daily use by government employees LIGHT COLORED WALL LIGHT COLORED WALL ants. A building so visible and important to the city means al reasons to make sure this space is a well designed one. STUDY EXISTING CURTAIN EXISTING CURTAIN he building has stood the test of time. While it is no d’s tallest habitable building, it is still the world’s TRANSLUCENT tallest GLAZING TRANSLUCENT GLAZING ng, with fully load bearing walls that go up 22 feet thick. DOUBLE PANEDOUBLE GLAZING PANE GLAZING

2274 lux

MAYOR’S RECEPTION ROOM

4 lux

DEC MAR 21 e site on March 28, 2017 around 2:00 PM, the room was 21 12 PM MARBLE FLOOR 12 PM MARBLE FLOOR n this day, skies were for the most part overcast. Despite brightness of the diffuse daylight outside, the reception DARK CARPET FLOOR DARK CARPET FLOOR eived any of it. Most of the lighting came from the large 4001 lux VIEW OF SOUTHWEST al lighting on the ceiling. These images help to understand he building, its rooms, and the openings at entrances CORNER OF at were designed in order to bring light into the space. DARK COLORED WALL DARK COLORED WALL

TAKING DAYLIGHT READINGS AT TYPICAL OCCUPANT SPACES

8 lux CITY HALL

DEC 21 3 PM

MAR 21 3 PM

MAYOR’S RECEPTION ROOM RENOVATION STUDY

9 AM

2182 lux

d by architect John McArthur, Jr. 4 lux orld’s tallest habitable building, masonry building -- walls are fully bearing, k.

4662 lux MAYOR’S

6665 lux

RECEPTION ROOM

ARCH 632 DAYLIGHTING / SPRING 2017 / CASTRO + JATHAN 8 lux

12 lux JUN 21 12 PM

6703 lux

8426 lux

14 lux

16 lux 43

JUN 21 3 PM

ARCH 632 DAYLIGHTING / SPRING 2017 / CASTRO + JATHAN

4957 lux

10 lux

6669 lux

13 lux

STRATEGY TO IMPROVE DAYLIGHT STRATEGY TO IMPROVE DAYLIGHT This project focused on a popular and wellused room located in Philadelphia’s City MAYOR’S RECEPTION ROOM RENOVATION STUDY

ARCH 632 DAYLIGHTING / SPRING 2017 / CASTRO + JATHAN

This project focused on a popular and well used room located in Philadelphia’s City Hall building, and it explores how priorities and workflow in daylighting design can change when considering a space that engages historic preservation concerns, public funding, and multiple Hall building, explores howandpriorities workflow in daylighting design can populations for and usageit (both public private).and Upon visiting the site on March 28, 2017 ING / SPRING 2017 / CASTROaround +change JATHAN2 PM, the room was notably dark, skies were for the mostpreservation part overcast. Despite when considering a space that engages historic concerns, the apparent brightness of the diffuse daylight for outside, the reception room barely received public funding, and multiple populations usage (both / public STUDY ARCH 632 DAYLIGHTING SPRING 2017and / CASTROprivate). + JATHAN any of it. Most of the lighting came from the large amount of artifical lighting on the ceiling.

Philadelphia City Hall is amajor cultural landmark for the city, as well as a public building. It

We developed a hypothesis based in three areas in which we feel design change could translate to is the site of major outsidewe itsidentified. constructed spaces, as well where as daily by positive changes that events respondinside to theand incentives These areas guided weuse placed government employees and public servants. A building so visible and important to the city means our methodological efforts: (1) placement of interior shading devices. (2) materiality and reflectivities of there are(3)several reasons to make thisconstruction. space is a wellWe designed one. Builtuseful in 1901, the building surfaces massivity and glazing ofsure historic found this study in understanding has stood the oftest of time.daylighting While it design, is no longer the world’s tallest habitable building, it is different degrees impacting and of feasibility of options in a building with many coinciding responsibilities. This could present goodload model for cost-benefit analysis a situation still the world’s tallest masonry building, witha fully bearing walls that go up 22in feet thick. where budgets and degrees of intervention can guide education options on how to use public funds. forward, stronger case could be2:00 made forthe these interventions exploring UponLooking visiting the site on aMarch 28, 2017 around PM, room was notablyby dark. On thisusage day, of event types and hours dedicated to each, as well as a cost analysis of construction, materials, skies were for the most part overcast. Despite the apparent brightness of the diffuse daylight fixtures, etc. We are excited by the possibilities this study gleaned for better daylighting design.

outside, the reception oom barely received any of it. Most of the lighting came from the large amount of artifical lighting on the ceiling. These photos help to understand the scale of the building, its rooms, and the openings at entrances and glazing that were designed in order to bring light into the space.

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METHODOLOGY: METRICS We began by calibrating our understanding of the space. To do this, we surveyed point in time measurements of illuminance at specific times over the year. It became clear that not only did the space suffer from low levels of daylight, but that there was a large inconsistency in lighting as well. At the glazed areas, very high light levels existed, extreme to a level of potential low visual comfort. Away from these areas, the room was extremely dark. The hot spots or extreme areas are noted on the maps of illuminance.


PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017

intervention options + annual daylight autonomy simulation 1

2

3

5

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8

9

shading moved to bottom half

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white plaster flooring

white plaster walls

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walls replaced with curtain wall assembly

light shelves retrofitted within existing glazing

light shelves installed along curtain wall

HYPOTHESIS MINOR DESIGN INTERVENTIONS 1 existing curtain 2 altered curtain 3 removed curtain

HIGH PROFILE EVENTS

PUBLIC LANDMARK + SYMBOL

LOWER ELEC + ENERGY USAGE

INCENTIVES FOR A BETTER DAYLIGHTING DESIGN

MEDIUM DESIGN INTERVENTIONS 4 new floors 5 new walls 6 new floors and walls MAJOR DESIGN INTERVENTIONS 7 curtain wall system 8 light shelves addition 9 curtain wall + light shelves addition

AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT

MAYOR’S RECEPTION ROOM RENOVATION STUDY

PLACEMENT OF INTERIOR SHADING DEVICES

MATERIALITY REFLECTIVITIES

MASSIVITY + GLAZING OF HISTORIC CONSTRUCTION

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ARCH 632 DAYLIGHTING / SPRING 2017 / CASTRO + JATHAN


CUMULONIMBUS| COMMUNITY CULTURE photo of analog model

CUMULONIMBUS

Hybrid Train Station in Parkside, Philadelphia, PA Schenk-Woodman 2017 Scholarship Competition collaborators: Andrew Homick, Yili Zha, Xieyang Zhou

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017 render from across the river

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CONTINUOUS LOOPS | PERPETUAL MOTION relationship to site

CULTURAL FLOATER SPACE Cumulonimbus is designed to be a floater space, not only to cater to the given program of market and train stop hybrid, but to also cater to the communities that directly are directly involved at this location on 41st Street: Belmont and Parkside. Both Belmont and Parkside are rumored to be the less safe parts of town, sprinkled with crime and poverty; it is directly correlated to the demographics of the area—these neighborhoods are underprivileged. Household income is generally lower, transportation and resource accessibility is limited and the amount of residents with higher levels of education are lower compared to other neighborhoods. Despite the negative qualities depicted by demography and data, both of these neighborhoods have flourishing communities such as church groups, charter school organizations, cultural associations. The intention for such a massive molding of space that Cumulonimbus does is largely for the sake of these community groups—more than just a train stop and a marketplace, it aspires to be a space for culture to take place. Most of the spaces are semi-enclosed and open for various types of events to take place: performances, gatherings, festivals and the like. For instance, parts of the overall form of the cloud collides with the ground and courtyards are surrounded by loops of wall to be covered by murals of local artists. The proposal is to make this space a destination rather than a passing point, a landmark that might expose the issues the premise initially pose. Cumulonimbus seeks to be a vessel of culture for the local communities and directs attention to the existing and obvious lack of accessibility these residents experience.

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PENNDESIGN | SPRING 2017 render from across the river

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Profile for Dyan Castro

2018 Graduate Porfolio  

2018 Graduate Porfolio  

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