D-E today 2021-2022 Volume II

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Reimagining the Present and Past: The D-E History Department Fostering Innovation Within the Classroom & Beyond


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D-E today is published by Dwight-Englewood School Communications and Publications, in partnership with the Advancement Office. Our Mission As a community of learners, Dwight-Englewood School strives to foster in each student a passion for life-long learning. We seek excellence, honor integrity, and embrace diversity in order to develop the skills, values, and courage to meet the challenges of a changing world and make it better.

Contents Spotlight on the History Department ���������������������������������������������������������������������3 Activities & Clubs Highlights �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 10 Fostering Innovation Within the Classroom and Beyond ����������������������������� 17 Arts Highlights ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 24

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Editor: D-E today 315 East Palisade Ave. Englewood, NJ 07631 Phone: 201-227-3117 Fax: 201-567-1676 Email: tausne@d-e.org

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Editor: Director of Communications and Publications, Liz Tausner Contributors: Copyediting: Leslie Virostek Graphic Design: Bartosz Klemensowski Features: Joel Lee ’17 Photography: Joel Lee ’17; DaYoung Jung; Bartosz Klemensowski; John McCabe. Additional photography supplied by D-E student and parent, faculty/staff, and alumni submissions. Printing: Print Solutions, Englewood, NJ On the Front Cover: Innovation starts with the youngest minds and thinkers! Lower School students with teacher Julie Pugkhem explore new ways of learning scientific concepts such as how positive and negative charges repel each other. For more about Innovation @ D-E, see Page 17.

Much to the delight of our students, the wearing of masks became optional in early spring, which helped to add to the morale and overall energy of our on-campus environment.

Innovation is a daily experience at D-E. To learn more about how our students and faculty/staff are pushing the innovation envelope, please visit our special centerfold section starting on Page 17


HISTORY

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HISTORY

An Interview with

Dr. Ari Easley-Houser Before coming to D-E, History Department Chair, Arika “Ari” Easley-Houser taught at Rutgers Prep and several colleges and universities, including Montclair State University and New York University. A socio-cultural historian focused on United States history, she received her Ph.D. from Rutgers University and a certificate in school management from the Harvard Business School. She was recently selected for a National Association of Independent Schools Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads. Now in her third year of heading the department, Easley-Houser speaks to the importance of historical inquiry for students and how the history curriculum must reflect and respond to the diversity of students. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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HISTORY

What has been your primary focus as history department chair?

backgrounds, including a lawyer, a museum educator, training in medieval studies, European studies, etc. One of our newest teachers, DomiI would say ensuring that our curriculum is cutting edge and culturally nic Vendell, has training in Southeast Asian history and background in responsive is a big one. Looking at what’s going on at the university level colonization and imperialism with Indian relations with Great Britain. and our market of schools, it’s important to think about what our students are reading and writing about in history. Our curriculum needs Moving forward, I want to make sure that we continue to have great to reflect our students. For example, in my first year at D-E, I proposed teachers, particularly as we have a lot of veterans in the department. I also to teach African American history, which we added to our curriculum. want to make sure that our faculty reflect points of view that are diverse, Last year for 9th grade we switched the naming of the class. It used to to mirror the diversity of our students because I think that’s important. be Ancient Medieval World History, but now it’s Early World History. I like that because it de-centers “medieval time” because it is only a term You mentioned how you want the curriculum to be culturally used to describe Europe. [And] it didn’t represent actually what the cur- responsive. Can you elaborate on that? riculum covered. This year we switched one of our 10th grade options, AP Euro, for AP World, a course that was first administered in 2002. I think about the students in the room and their own personal histories, AP Euro is typically a course that 70% of high school students take as [including] many, especially in this area, many immigrant families, secseniors, and while our [sophomores] have performed well, it’s a big leap ond generation, sometimes first, third generation, but all from different to come from 9th grade to that course. The AP World course will be places around the world. So for me, I think culturally responsive teachmore aligned to the goal of the department to ensure that all students ing is about thinking about the changes in our demographics. You look are covering two years of world history, from Early World History as 9th at our recent census that we just had, and think about all the changes and graders to Modern World History as 10th graders with different levels how those demographics impact what we teach and what our curricu[including college placement, honors seminar and AP]. So each year, lum looks like. we are trying to slowly but surely evaluate our curriculum, tweak, and improve it. And the books that we assign have to reflect that. If [culturally responsive content] is not in a textbook, then you’re going to have to supplement it But I would say one thing that appealed to me, [and one reason] why I with other materials, other visual aids, current events going on, so that came to D-E is that I like the US history curriculum and how we have so students are aware of why history matters. If they don’t see a relevancy many lenses. I think it’s so unique; it’s kind of a thematic approach to US to today it just doesn’t make sense. You won’t understand the present. history. There are so many options, too: we have a History of New York City class, Hollywood History, the American Presidency etc. How does the department collectively address refining curriculum? The teachers who teach the different courses work together to discuss the curriculum and share resources. We also try to ensure that we are moving along towards similar end goals and themes that we cover. There are team meetings by grade, and we also have department meetings once a month. Each year if we are making any curricular changes, those changes get included in the course of study guide that students see when selecting courses for the following school year. As a department leader, I try to be collaborative, and I am lucky to work with such a talented and passionate group of teachers. They care about the kids, are super experienced, and they all come from such different 4


How do you bridge the past to the present?

Lee Selected for Special Professional Development Opportunity This spring Madie Lee, Upper School Equity & Diversity Engagement Coordinator and a history teacher, was selected as one of 120 teachers enrolled in a professional development course sponsored by National History Day, a nonprofit that seeks to improve the teaching and learning of history. Lee’s enrollment in the Historical Argumentation Webinar Series is funded by the Library of Congress. Featuring

So that’s where you have to be careful. I find many students and—many people just in general—are very “presentist.” As a historian, you don’t want to be “presentist,” as in you don’t want to just start in the present. Yes, we can see themes and continuity from the past to today’s events, but we don’t want to leap. You must understand the context of different moments, and how there have been some changes. And then sometimes regressions. It’s a process, [for example] when you study the Founding Fathers. They wrote things that they didn’t actually mean. And then they tried to hide and not mention slavery in the founding documents. I think we’re also at this moment where people are trying to deny history. Thinking about the present, we’re right now into such a tense time with our fractured country politically, that history is at the epicenter of so many of these debates, how it is taught the curriculum, people going into protests and going to school board meetings, and saying they don’t want to teach about. How do you handle the fact that history has become so politicized?

resources from the Library of Congress, the course is designed to give teachers strategies to help their students “think like a historian” and use evidence to develop a solid historical argument. Lee shares her thoughts about the course so far.

On what she’s taken away from the course: That I have so much more to work on in this field! I have enjoyed learning about historical argumentation, and the consistent work with reading and writing skills has improved my own understanding of how

We’ve done PD (professional development) workshops with our department called “Facing History and Ourselves.” One of the questions in a current events workshop that was posed was: “How do you address your politics?” Also: “How do you address politics in your class?” I stood on the side that you want students to see you as a mediator—that you’re someone who should be a facilitator of debate, and you should be respectful of both sides. But we don’t allow offensive statements. That’s where you have to draw a line.

to structure my writing, what feels important to highlight or prioritize, and important aspects to consider for truly persuasive writing. Contentwise, I have a newfound appreciation for primary sources and how to effectively use them, while considering their contextual information.

On what she is looking forward to bringing back to D-E: What’s been awesome about the course is that there are so many aspects that feel tangible to bring back and implement within the classroom. The Library of Congress provides an incredible depth of primary sources that can be evidence for historical writing, and the course has refined my understanding of not only what’s out there to use, but also how to use it. We have also been provided comprehensive

You can’t have anybody in the room feel that they don’t belong because of their identity. I don’t tolerate that. That’s where I feel like you have to assert yourself just as an educator, but also I attach it to the mission statement, the school, and to our code of conduct. So then how do you consider those perspectives and foster that discussion in the classroom? How do you navigate through it? I just try to be very sensitive, I try to call out statements. We’re in a classroom, there has to be dialogue. It’s called civics for a reason, right? It can be tense. [I’ve had to follow up with students after class to make sure they are OK.]

worksheets and tools for historical argumentation that can be immediately used to scaffold my own students and their writing, which was already my main motivation for applying for this course in the fall.

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HISTORY

What do you imagine for the future of the department? I’m excited about developing more partnerships with the Lower School because that was something in the [most recent] accreditation [renewal self-study] report; the report found that the scope and sequence was better for Middle and Upper [Schools] but then Lower School is kind of doing its own thing. And I know the former Lower School principal made some modifications, but there’s still some improvement; there’s still some things they can do.

really what the curriculum is about––that class I feel like really needs to be much more centered on identity, your family, really thinking about America, thinking about the voices, and the fabric of this country. The 8th grade is so diverse, and they did a project on Ellis Island last year, and you can feel that excitement when they’re proud of their identities. And I think you want to make sure that it just reflects, again, back to culturally responsive teaching and the curriculum. Instead of just focusing on revolutions, we want to think about: Who is an American? Who gets to decide who’s an American? Because, of course, over the course of American history, that has changed. I love that guiding question. They’re ready, and that age group is so hungry to learn more.

Seventh-grade teacher Matt Schade has developed a curriculum that has students researching world problems. What else is especially exciting in What do you want a student leave D-E with? What do you want in the Middle School these days? their toolkit? What they do is a lot of debate about world problems, and they’re doing it [in interesting ways]. I’m really impressed with it. What’s nice is now we’re looking at other resources. So this year, in fact, we purchased a resource from TCI. [The Teacher’s Curriculum Institute offers dynamic activities and adaptable lesson plans].These projects are like little opportunities that kids can do that can kind of make learning more engaging. So they’ve been using some of those this year. Eighth grade is the curriculum that’ll probably have more drastic changes, because the current name of the class is Revolutions. And that’s not

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By graduation, I hope they leave with a curiosity about how the world has come about, about how our nation has gotten to this point, and hopefully being thirsty to learn more and learn deeply. Also, knowing how to write a thesis and have a strong toolkit for writing. When our students come back from college, they tell me that they now help their friends who didn’t get the [skills development] support that we try to provide. Because whether you’re in STEM or history, you’re going to need writing and critical thinking skills.


Reimagining the Present and Past: The D-E History Department

Developing critical thinking and writing skills is fundamental to every history class. As students progress through D-E’s history curriculum, they also acquire new knowledge on the world they think they know. We spoke with a number of history faculty members to learn more about how they approach pedagogy and why historical inquiry is crucial in lifelong learning. Vena Reed, 6th Grade History Hailing from Yorktown, VA, Vena Reed arrived at D-E in 2020 to teach the 6th grade history class called “Creating Cultures.” The course ranges from the beginnings of human history to the rise of ancient civilizations like Greece and Egypt. Teaching a foundational skills course that is an important introduction to Middle School academics is a rewarding, yet challenging, process for Reed. “The biggest thing with sixth grade is modeling,” she said. “I will teach them a skill like annotating. However, if I’ve determined that they’re not where I thought they were, I go back and do more guiding. It’s about being patient, modeling for them to get to a place where they can do things independently.” 7


HISTORY

With a bachelor’s degree and a master’s in secondary education from Virginia Commonwealth University, Reed taught the humanities at Success Academy Charter Schools prior to coming to D-E. Having inherited the curriculum from Ben Fleisher, who now teaches in the Upper School, Reed collaborated with her colleagues to introduce resources from the Teachers’ Curriculum Institute to diversify the reading sources available. At the same time, she joined the departmental collaborative effort to continually improve vertical integration between all three divisions, with the “Profile of a D-E Graduate” as a guide. Reed believes that teaching ancient history requires making creative and accessible connections to the past. Thus, conversations about current events are opportunities to tackle often difficult questions related to the curriculum. “People get fearful when something is political,” Reed explained. “Politics can be defined as who gets what, when, where, how, and why they get it. If you look at politics through that framework, then sports could be defined as political. The other thing I emphasize is to not make assumptions. I think framing what politics could look like and having different lived experiences in the classroom is exciting and cool rather than scary.”

of community and its students. “When I tell people I’m a middle school teacher, I get this ‘oh boy’ reaction,” Matt explained. “But I really love middle school kids. To me, they’re young enough where they haven’t fully formulated their worldviews, yet they’re also old enough to really start digging into some complex ideas. I have the best of both worlds in a lot of ways.” When Schade first began teaching at D-E, he inherited the legacy of former history teacher Betsy Carson. “Creating Connections” centered around key civilizations like Ancient India, China, and West Africa. From that foundation Schade and fellow 7th grade history teacher Pooja Patel decided to shift towards more a nomadic and concept-based curriculum. Drawing upon global case studies, the curriculum centers around such questions as: What are the roots of conflict? How do we define oppression, and how do people resist it? Seventh graders tackle these complex issues over the course of the year through projectbased units. As a capstone learning experience, students learn about the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and choose a topic of individual interest to research and present to their classmates. A process of skill building and scaffolding enables students to conduct research on their own. Real examples help ground the concepts students are learning.

Reed positions herself as a facilitator of discussions, offering frameworks that enable students to dig into complex issues, ask thoughtful questions, and lead class discussions on their “So when we discuss exploitation, marginalization, and own terms. For students to feel comfortable sharing their cultural relativism, what’s key is really giving them those thoughts, Reed believes they must know that they are cared concrete examples to then tie back those ideas to,” Schade for. “One thing I learned in grad school is this great quote from explained. Nel Noddings, an educational philosopher, who said, ‘Students don’t care what you know until they know that you care.’” That “It’s also a matter of repetition because they often won’t digest philosophy grounds Reed’s pedagogy. During the onset of the it the first time, and that’s expected. Once you appropriately pandemic, Reed would begin class with a “Question of the Day” scaffold concepts for them, it’s incredible to see them learn.” to have students get to know one another before getting into class material. Small gestures like that, combined with the class preparation from Reed and other history faculty, create a strong learning community––one that is rooted in care.

Matthew Schade, 7th Grade History Matthew “Matt” Schade always knew that teaching was going to be a part of his life. He recently discovered that in his second grade time capsule he had written that he wanted to be a teacher when he grew up. Originally from Philadelphia, Schade had only imagined working in public school until a colleague pointed him toward independent school teaching. Now in his seventh year at D-E, Schade is grateful for the school’s sense 8


When the Syrian refugee crisis was ubiquitous in mainstream media from 2015 to 2017, Schade sought to seize the opportunity to connect history to current events, while also helping students develop leadership skills. Teaming up with 3rd grade teacher Michelle Sussman, the 7th grade history team created a children’s stories project centered around themes of migration and displacement. Students wrote original stories and shared them with Lower School students, embracing the experience of serving as role models to younger students.

for example, emphasize the figures having supposedly perfect and unattainable bodies.” Rather than judging good or bad, he said, we should be asking, “What is the purpose of this?”

Challenging cultural associations to different motifs and symbols is part of what makes art history exciting. Even better, in Russell-Walker’s view, is when students take ownership of their learning and bring in their own cultural background to conduct research. Russell-Walker always begins with the class examining a work of art together. Students immediately Schade is comfortable with the idea that learning at the react with different opinions on what a piece might mean, and middle school level is messy and can’t be scripted to the letter. Russell-Walker dives in with them to further investigate an Rather seeking to provide a “perfect” lesson plan, he strives to artwork’s context. He considers learning about history to be a leave students curious and eager to learn more. “I can nitpick collaborative process. about what didn’t go right here and there, but if I felt like the students were engaged and leave in a great place despite In 2016, Russell-Walker received a Sloan Grant, providing him the opportunity to travel to different elite art museums to challenging conversations, that is successful day.” further his own study and pedagogy. When the circumstances of the pandemic allow for it, Russell-Walker is eager to bring students to the art, Alexander “Alex” Russell-Walker’s journey to teaching began reintroducing museum trips into halfway across the world in Vietnam. It was after teaching the curriculum. English there that he decided to commit to teaching full-time. Receiving his master’s degree at Columbia University’s Teachers College, he has taught history at Yeshiva University and at the Bronx High School of Science. At D-E, he teaches students in every Upper School grade level. He has taught 9th and 10th grade history courses and electives such as Hollywood History and the Holocaust. He loves giving students new perspectives to understand the world, especially with AP Art History. “I like to think of it as one of those culminating courses that seniors can take,” Russell-Walker said.

Alex Russell-Walker, AP Art History

“Art history is beautiful because it is this coherent whole. It’s all the same subject matter of religion, death, sex, humans, bodies, and love. It’s like one of the most beautiful and easy ways of saying humanity has a lot of the same issues.” With such universal topics and complex concepts, RussellWalker realizes that it takes time for students to think like an art historian. While he has the responsibility of preparing students for the AP exam, he also seeks to give a broader educational experience. Rather than giving definitive answers to what an artwork means and how it relates to its time period, Russell-Walker implores his students to think critically about what’s being presented. “One of my favorite themes throughout our history is thinking about why we look at ‘good’ art as being representational of reality,” he said. “Greek sculptures of men, 9


Activities & Clubs Highlights

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D-E student activities like the ones highlighted here are just one of many programs supported by the D-E Annual Fund. To support the D-E Annual Fund 2021-2022, visit d-e.org/giving or scan the QR code.

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Did You Know?

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D-E Activities & Clubs have worked incredibly hard to bring fun and engaging programming to the student body, in many cases providing a welcome return to in-person initiatives. Take a look at some of the highlights. To learn more, visit d-e.org/clubs or scan the QR code below.


Asian Affinity Group Hosts Lunar New Year Assembly

V-Day Performance Raises Funds for Local Women’s Center

To celebrate the Lunar New Year, the Asian Affinity Group hosted a mini-fashion show and presentation on how different Asian cultures celebrate the holiday. Students also presented how each of their own families uniquely celebrate with food and cultural traditions. It was wonderful moment to celebrate diversity and culture at D-E! The annual benefit performance “V-Day” aims to end violence against women and girls under the global activist movement under the same name, and to empower women of all ages. Mary Heveran (Lower School Music Teacher) kicked-off D-E’s version of this annual event with her moving, personal account as an unexpectedly, suddenly-single mother of two children under the age of 5. Mary shared how she came to rely extensively upon the Englewood Women’s Rights Information Center; thanks to the Center’s extensive resources she learned how to manage her household, find and secure a job, become an advocate for herself and others, and eventually run for office - she was ultimately elected Mayor of Leonia. Money raised through D-E’s V-Day event ticket sales was contributed to the Englewood Women’s Rights Information Center. Students, faculty and staff alike showcased original art, music, and writing. D-E was happy to have had D-E V-Day in-person again this year, and the event raised over $1300 dollars.

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Black History Month is about recognizing and appreciating black culture and the significant role that Black /African Americans have provided in American History. D-E Black Affinity Group students presented a special Upper School Assembly designed to honor and highlight those who have made a difference and recognize the role those achievements have made in the modern world today. This month’s theme was on Black health and wellness and its importance, acknowledging black scholars and medical practitioners in western medicine. It was another insightful Black History Month for D-E!

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Black Affinity Presents Black History Month Assembly

Editor’s Note: Online Only Content: To experience D-E’s V-Day by way of a recorded video livestream, scan the QR Code!


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DEFAC’s March Madness Fundraiser Environmental Club D-EFAC (Dwight-Englewood Fights Against Cancer) hosted a — D-EcoNews

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Editor’s Note: Online Only Content: To listen-in on Mariam’s Zoom discussion with D-E faculty member Dr. Danny Carragher, please scan QR Code!

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D-Econews is a publication started by student Darby Lee-Stack ’23 to promote conversations on environmentalism, sustainability, and equity. Through the Environmental Club, members have been contributing written articles, reports, and art with every new issue. Scan the QR code to view the March edition of D-Econews.

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March Madness fundraiser for young alumna Mariam Abdelhaq ’17 who is fighting breast cancer. Students created teams and paid an entry ticket to enter the basketball tournament. The senior team “Mutant Ninja Turtles” won the final showcase game. D-EFAC raised $4,847.77 dollars for Mariam. D-EFAC is motivated and inspired to continue supporting research and efforts to fight cancer. Fight on, Bulldogs!

Editor’s Note: Online Only Content: To read the latest issue of D-EcoNews, please scan QR Code!

South Asian Affinity Assembly In March, the South Asian Affinity Group showcased an insightful presentation on South Asian cultures, figures, literature, and fashion. To top it all off, New York Times Senior Editor, Shashank Bengali, zoomed in to talk about his journey as a journalist and international correspondent. It was a special treat for the Upper School thanks to the South Asian Affinity club leaders and members. Go Bulldogs! 13


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Editor’s Note: Online only content! Take a look at MS Papercut Women’s History Month issue here by scanning the QR code.

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The Middle School is on the scene! Editors-in-chief Anna Ibarguen ’26 and Madigan Kacmar ’26 have led the charge for the Middle School’s official student newspaper, MS Papercut. The second year in production, the club has only grown with contributors, eager to share what’s happening at D-E and in the world today. The newspaper takes on timely editorial topics including climate change and Earth Day.

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MS Papercut: D-E’s Middle School Newspaper Makes the Cut!

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Club Être “Zoomed” in early March with Elizabeth “Beth” O’ Connell, proud ambassador and strategic advisor to Etregirls.com. O’Connell is a multi Emmy award recipient and she was one of the first female Executive Producers at NBC News. She helped lead the “Today Show” to number one in ratings success, launched NBC Mobile, and was interim President of MSNBC. In the words of Club Être co-leader Amber Carr ’22, Club Être is a girl/women empowerment group “that strives to support, mentor, and empower young women in their middle school, high school, and college journeys” and as such, meeting with O’Connell provided an inspiring and fitting launch to recognition of empowered (and empowering) women leaders.

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Debate Team has had a stellar track record this year. Throughout the school year, debate club team members have competed in events, showcasing their argumentative and orator skills against other regional debate teams. Congratulations to Aly Calmas ’24 and Sam Gilman ’24 for winning 18 out of 20 varsity debates and to Rohan Kannan ’24 and John Elish ’24 for 10-for-10 straight wins in the JV division. Kannan and Elish also won first place in the Bergen County Debate League. Cheers to the Debate Team and advisor Ms. Ewa Krupinska!

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D-Ebate Team

Club Être Celebrates Women’s History Month

Editor’s Note: Online only content! Watch Club Être’s Zoom with in recognition of Women’s History Month issue here by scanning the QR code.


EPIC REU NION 3X 2022

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Enjoy all the excitement of the Bulldog Bash 2022 featuring Freestyle Love Supreme in the Edison Ballroom, including our Sponsors eJournal and photos and video highlights!

Scan the QR code or visit DEBash2022.givesmart.com

EPIC Reunion 3X 2022 - June 10-11, 2022 Reunion 2022 will celebrate all 2020, 2021, and 2022 class milestone reunions, we will honor an unprecedented number of milestones in 2022! Class year reunions include: • 50-Year Club: all class years from 1969 and back • 50th: 1970, 1971, 1972 • 45th: 1975, 1976, 1977 • 40th: 1980, 1981, 1982 • 35th: 1985, 1986, 1987 • 30th: 1990, 1991, 1992 REGISTER TODAY! • 25th: 1995, 1996, 1997 • 20th: 2000, 2001, 2002 • 15th: 2005, 2006, 2007 • 10th: 2010, 2011, 2012 • 5th: 2015, 2016, 2017 Questions? Please contact: For Classes 1940 to 1989 Maria Sanchez Gardner ’78, Director of Alumni Relations (201) 277-3111 sanchm@d-e.org For Classes 1990 to 2021 Liz Iannaconi ’04, Assistant Director of Alumni Relations (201) 227-3114 iannae@d-e.org

Visit www.d-e.org/alumni for more information or Scan the QR Code above.



Fostering Innovation Within the Classroom and Beyond

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The following pages describe how new ways of learning and teaching are underway at D-E, in all three divisions. For more about Innovation @ D-E, please visit d-etoday.org/ blog/category/tech-innovation-highlights/ or scan the QR code below.


Lower School Science “Innovation must start with our youngest minds and thinkers.”

However, science can be frustrating, and preparing students for trial and error is part of the pedagogical process. During a buoyancy activity with tin foil boats, Julie had students make This philosophy drives Lower School Science teachers, Julie predictions whether the boat would sink or float. Although Pugkhem and Yi Li, who are tasked with fostering students’ students can expect their predictions to be incorrect, Julie curiosity and critical thinking skills. emphasizes to her students that: Now in her eighth year at D-E, Julie works with students from “Scientists have to go through trial and error. Otherwise, we’d Pre-K through first grade, providing the youngest of students know everything. It’s kind of like life. We have those situations their first opportunity in scientific inquiry. of a caterpillar that never turns into a butterfly, but what we can do is talk about what may have happened and what we can try “First and foremost, we build a love for all parts of science,” Julie next time.” explained, “we start off the year by asking: what is a scientist? What tools do they use, and how do they perform research? Teaching students about scientific inquiry requires modeling empathy for the challenges that they may face. I try to relate to them that they are, in fact, scientists, and everything that they do every day is basically science. For At the same time, Julie and Yi are learning right along with their example, I don’t necessarily talk about molecular structure, but students. Introducing new tools like TinkerCAD, a 3D-modeling I introduce the properties of matter, so they are familiarized with program, and Scratch Jr., an age-appropriate coding software, those ideas through their five senses.” comes with new learning curves. As Yi was test-piloting TinkerCAD, she initially encountered concerns with the software: As students move up in grade-level, project-based learning becomes an important part of the curriculum. In their first year “I thought, if I’m having trouble with this, then the students will too. teaching at D-E, Yi Li brings a wealth of knowledge of integrating When I brought it [TinkerCAD] to class, everyone was very patient. technology into the classroom. The long-running “House Project” The students worked really hard and helped each other. I think offers second graders an opportunity to learn about different they’re more comfortable with trial and error in the technology cultures and house construction. To build their models of houses world, and we’re the technology immigrants.” in the Antarctic, students determine the factors that keep a building insulated. Using bluetooth temperature probes, typically In our increasingly digital and globalized world, students can seen in Middle and Upper School classrooms, second graders demonstrate resilience for these kinds of familiar challenges. learn to test for humidity and acquire a new skill set along The task then becomes encouraging students to access that same resilience for new material and situations. Rather than framing the way.

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science as a discipline only concerned with facts, Yi and Julie teach science as a space for ongoing questions and experimentation. After all, the scientific method always begins with a question.

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As the weather becomes warmer, Yi and Julie are eager to bring the students outside for more hands-on learning. How a plant grows and how some insects undergo metamorphosis are just a few of the exciting topics that students can look forward to. No matter the unit, what Yi and Julie are always certain of is students’ enthusiasm to listen and take ownership of their learning.

For more about Innovation @ D-E, please visit d-etoday.org/blog/ category/tech-innovation-highlights/ or scan this QR code.

More to the Middle: Innovative Teaching in Middle School Middle School Principal Jonathan Davis understands that adolescence is hard. He noted that, “No one wrote a book called ‘Middle School: The Best Years of my Life,’ ” Our culture’s associations with middle school are often flooded by memories of embarrassment and awkwardness. However, what we tend to forget are the moments of exploration, connection, and risktaking that come with those memories.”

porch” on every floor for project-based learning, a maker space, and a teaching kitchen, Middle School faculty and students can look forward to utilizing the facility’s full potential. Already, Tasha Urbanowski, Grade 6 Dean, has leveraged the kitchen’s innovative set-up for D.I.G. (“D-E In the Garden”), her gardening and cooking elective. Grade 7 Dean James Aitken and Grade 8 Dean Junior De La Hoz Sr., teach “Cars, Trucks, & Things That Go”, integrating design, engineering, and woodworking to custom-build miniature At its core, Middle School is about planting seeds, and Davis, racecars. along with the MS faculty and staff, are building a different kind of garden. Since Davis’s arrival in 2018, he has yet to host a back-to-school night in the building due to the pandemic. Having seen what “I asked the teachers, what makes a D-E Middle School teacher? We community events can look like with the 6th grade’s “Egypt Day” came up with 25 traits and narrowed them down to four things. and the 8th grade’s “Rollercoaster Expo,” he is excited to bring First, we’re student-centered. Second, we’re about process over the community together. Students can look forward to many product. Finally, we are collaborative and engaging. Even when exciting projects as part of the curriculum. Project-based learning we do hiring, this is what we’re looking for. What I love about provides students the opportunity to collaborate with each middle school is the consequences are lower, but the opportunity other and across disciplines. Similarly, he encourages faculty to for growth is greater.” experiment and try new things. In his own words: Housed in the newest building on-campus by internationally- “My whole thought process is to have an innovation lab of ideas. renowned architecture firm Gensler, the Middle School’s golden We should all try things that don’t quite work out the way we rule of “form follows function” is apparent. With an ample “front want them to. Teachers are constantly revising questions like: Continued on next page

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Continued from prior page

“How can we integrate math and history? How do we incorporate data and graphs to look at the past? I’m constantly reminded by middle schoolers’ capacity to make connections.” Fostering confidence for big ideas and leadership during middle school promotes lifelong learning. In that lifelong journey, how their middle school education shapes their adult lives may not be apparent until after they graduate D-E. However, that is the pedagogical work—to provide opportunity and space to try on different hats and roles. At the same time, the love for learning can be crystal clear. Students who take Physical Computing as a discovery class in 8th grade often join the US Robotics teams or continue their interest in STEM. As students move up from middle school, Davis hopes that, “eighth graders would know themselves a little bit better and to be comfortable with not having a totally fleshed out plan. We’re a very product-driven country. When the Superbowl ends, we cut to the winners. We don’t focus on the second-place team and that valuable journey it takes to get there. I hope that middle school students internalize that process of growth.”

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Surrealism Exhibit explores new ways of thinking in Art & Design Inspired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Surrealism Beyond Borders” exhibit this past fall, D-E’s Promotional Arts Society (PAS) and the Visual Arts Department curated their own exhibit, “Surrealist Visions: A Collective Showing.” Gathering 41 participants from all three divisions, students and faculty brought their fantastical imaginations to life. Along with PAS Leaders Bodhi Mathur ’23, Emma Leifer ’23, & Taryn Silver ’23, Edalix Marin ’23, presented their own original works (including Edalix’s sculpture titled Capricho) and they also learned what goes into curating an exhibit. Edalix noted that, “when you go to a show, you don’t always think about how deliberate the placing of everything is. How will people view it? Is this piece too low? I think that was interesting to think about.” PAS Faculty Advisor, Rachel Brusky, who presented an oil painting titled, The Journey Within, reflected on how special a showcase like this one—an ode to Surrealism. Rachel said, “ I am very pleased with how the exhibition represents the evolution of a child’s mind and view of the world to the mind of a contemporary teenager and adult, all living in this unique moment in time.”

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PAS students with Art & Design faculty Paul Edwards (far left), Rachel Brusky

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Visual arts is a necessary medium for exploratory expression. Congratulations to all the artists on a wonderful show. To view highlights of the exhibition, scan the QR code.

Art work Shown: Alexandra “Alex” Mae Brown ’31

(second from right) and Cecil Jones (far right).

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Upper School Robotics Teams Push the Innovation Envelope In the past 10 years, Upper School Robotics has trailblazed its own thriving cultural scene at D-E. Now with three official teams, the extracurricular program only continues to grow. Coached by Chris Fleisch, the teams have been able to compete in state and regional competitions, including the World Championships in 2017. Before becoming the coach, Chris taught the Middle School Physical Computing course. He continues to coach on top of his role as the Systems Administrator. “I would compare our robotics competitions to track meets,” Chris explained, “It’s a whole convention experience. From September to November, the kids are designing and building their robots. We have one meet per month, and what we bring to our first meet is going to look almost nothing like the robot the kids bring to the state tournament in March.” Multiple iterations of a robot are encouraged, if not required in the robotics world. All competitions are hosted by FTC (First Tech Challenge), an organization that promotes robotics and STEM to students across the globe. Many D-E students start with little-to-no experience in making a robot, let alone participating in competitions. Nevertheless,

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students surprise themselves with their ability to grow and learn from their peers. Out of the three teams, Upper School students new to robotics join “Quantum Smashers” to begin their journey. As students acquire more experience, students can graduate to the junior varsity and varsity teams, “Absolute Zero” and “Critical Mass” respectively. Bodhi Mathur ’23 began robotics in the Middle School in their First Lego League, the robotics league for middle school students under FTC. Now a member of Absolute Zero, Bodhi reflects on how she’s grown since then, “I’m much more confident honestly. It’s that self advocacy that I don’t know where else it would have come from then being in a place like. [Robotics] has become a passion of mine. I was thinking, ‘ok, if you want a place here, and you want to know if you can do it, you have to advocate for yourself and for what you can do.’ ”

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Cheers to another season of designing, testing, failing, and trying again. Go, Bulldog ‘Bots!

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As another season comes to a close, the robotics teams can pat themselves on the back for their hard work. During the qualification rounds in March, all three teams ranked in the top five out of 23 teams in their league; Critical Mass placed first, Absolute Zero second, and Quantum Smashers came in fifth. Moreover, Critical Mass won the FTC Innovate Award and received 3rd place for the FTC Inspire Award, while Absolute Zero won the Think Award. (For descriptions about each of these awards, please visit: d-etoday.org/robo221/ or scan the QR below.) By the season’s end, Critical Mass and Absolute Zero had both qualified for the NJ State N A L CO N T E N TO TIO DI Championship meet, and Critical Mass ultimately made it to the semi-finals round.

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Arts Highlights N A L CO N T E N

Scholastic Arts Award Winners

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In the D-E Art & Design and Performing Arts Departments, students and their teachers and families by extension were able to explore and celebrate selfexpression in myriad ways. To experience more D-E arts programs, events, and initiatives, please visit d-e.org/arts or scan the QR code below.

In its 99th anniversary, the Scholastic Art Awards recognize and celebrate young student artists across the country. 12 Dwight-Englewood students won NJ Regional Art Awards from Honorable Mentions, Silver Keys, and Gold Keys. Congratulations to all the participants for the distinguished honor!

Scholastic Art Award Recipients: fDiane Cho ’23, Honorable Mention, Jewelry fHyeri Chun ’22, 3 Gold Keys, 2 Honorable Mentions fEllen Chung ’22, 7 Gold Keys, 5 Silver Keys, 6 Honorable Mentions fEmma Hsu ’25, Silver Key, Digital Art fAustin Kim ’26, Honorable Mention, Film fSamantha Lee ’23, Silver Key & Honorable Mentions, Drawing 24

fTessa Li ’24, Silver Key, Digital Art fBodhi Mathur ’23, Silver Key & Honorable Mention, Drawing fIsabella Morales ’26, Gold Key, Digital Art fJayla Willis ’24, Gold Key, Comic Art fMargaret Yan ’23, Honorable Mention, Drawing fZiyu “Judy” Zhang ’24, Gold Key, Photography


AP Gallery Wall 2022 D-E’s Visual Art Department presented the “AP Gallery Wall 2022”! This year’s cohort of AP Art students were excited to showcase select pieces from their ongoing visual portfolios. AP Art is a yearlong course typically taken by juniors and seniors interested in the rigorous process of portfolio creation. As part of the CollegeBoard’s AP exam, students submit up to 20 artworks that demonstrate their design thinking, unique style, and breadth of skill. Many students utilize the course to apply to top art schools across the country. This year’s cohort led by Art & Design chair, Marisol Diaz, displayed an incredible range of twodimensional, three-dimensional, and drawing pieces. Each work is expected to demonstrate skillful synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas. The “AP Gallery Wall” was an opportunity for AP Gallery Wall 2022 Artists: the community to appreciate the dedication and thoughtfulness of these students. Congratulations fLexi Altirs ’22 to all! fAmber Carr ’22 fHyeri Chun ’22 fNicole Hirsch ’22 fLiv Ilasz ’22 fSamantha Lee ’23 fEmma Leifer ’23 fHugo Louis ’23 fBodhi Mathur ’23 fOlivia Muttart ’22 fSophia Seriale ’22 fTaryn Silver ’23 fBen Tausner ’22

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Pippin The Upper School Winter Musical This past winter, D-E’s Performing Arts produced the critically acclaimed musical, Pippin. Created by Stephen Schwartz and directed by D-E’s Rober t Murphy, the cast and crew worked tirelessly to bring a fabulous show. Although based on two historical characters from the Middle Ages, Charlemagne (Charles the Great) and his son Pippin, the musical’s story is purely fictitious, albeit some might say a bit allegorical. However, it represents the historically existential theme of the young person seeking meaning in their life, examining Pippin’s need to “do 26

something truly fulfilling.” Using the brilliant storytelling mechanism of players in a magical acting troupe, the ensemble cast guides Pippin to an ultimate discovery. The musical raises questions both poignant and ironic, playful and parodic, as it moves through the realistic to the fantastical. As a metafictional story, Pippin was another wonderful way to bring audiences back into the live theater! Congratulations to the faculty, cast, and crew for a spectacular performance!


fJosie Blough ’23, Honorable Mention, Short Story fJoseph Chung ’22, Silver Key, Critical Essay fAidan Hunter ’23, Silver Key, Critical Essay fEmma Hsu ’25, Honorable Mention, Poetry fCasey Law ’25, Silver Key, Poetry fDarby Lee-Stack ’23, Silver Key, Poetry fTessa Li ’24, Silver Key, Gold Key, Science Fiction fSabrina Lu ’23, Gold Key, Poetry fSarah Ng ’24, Silver Key, Flash Fiction fSasha Rhee ’23, Honorable Mention, Poetry fZiyu “Judy” Zhang ’24, Silver Key, Memoir

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Enjoy these podcasts as D-E’s young writers read their award-winning stories:

The creatures first came from the smallest of candles. When lighting a flame at night, it was discovered that the small dancing sparks would form hundreds of tiny hands which reached out to grab at one’s fingers. They tore at weaker flesh, searing and bleaching bones underneath with their white hot flames.. Initially, they were easily avoided, as all it took was a small glass covering to stop their wrath. Time passed, and the glass melted away under the force of a candle’s rage. With time, the fireplace, a place of warmth and shelter, became cruel and unsafe, as the larger tendrils of fire morphed into gnarled arms. They twisted and writhed into columns of agonizing heat that reached out towards the unsuspecting, melting what they grabbed and charring what they merely grazed. Humanity was plunged into a daily darkness, forced to shy away from even the smallest of lights after the sun disappeared. As human nature goes, humanity sought to take advantage of a dark situation. The first to utilize the small, vicious creatures were rogues and power hungry traitors. They set ships and castles ablaze, allowing them to rob to their hearts’ content, becoming as rich as kings and queens through a deadly business. The kings and queens themselves harnessed the power of fire and fought many horrific and glorious battles by moonlight and under star-filled skies, leaving hills and villages scorched and barren in their wake. Their power grew, as the emberic warriors underneath their control amassed in numbers...

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Scan to listen to the full story of The World’s End Came in Flames by Tessa Li ’24

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Scholastic Writing Award Recipients:

This is not a story of hope. The world’s end came in flames. A planet previously holding life, bountiful and luscious, would be reduced to nothing but a scorched rock floating in uncaring space. There was nothing humanity could do about it, no possible way armageddon could have been prevented and no conceivable method of future survival. It was fire which had birthed humans, and it was fire that would now end them.

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Lower School Science teachers, Julie Pugkhem and Yi Li, are If the Scholastic Art Awards is one side of a coin, the Scholastic Writing Awards represents the flipside. Since 1923, the Scholastic Writing Awards has offered the opportunity for young writers, poets, and lyricists to express themselves. Both awards celebrate the importance of artmaking and craftsmanship. This year, 11 Dwight-Englewood students won awards ranging from Honorable Mentions, Silver Keys, & Gold Keys. Congratulations to all the participants.

Excerpt from The World’s End Came in Flames by Tessa Li ’24

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Athletics Highlights

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D-E Basketball Teams ended their seasons with the following records: Middle School (MS) Winter Season 2022 Basketball Teams • MS Boys Basketball Blue: 4-4 • MS Boys Basketball White: 11-2 • MS Girls Basketball: 14-1

Bulldogs had plenty to cheer about when winter sports teams returned for both the Middle School and Upper School!

Upper School (US) Winter Season 2022 Basketball Teams • Boys Freshman Basketball: 9-1 • Boys JV Basketball: 12-1 • Boys Varsity Basketball: 21-5 • Girls Varsity Basketball: 15-9 • During the Bergen County Relays, the Winter Track Team set a new D-E School record by the Boys 4x200M Relay team! Amari Boyd ’23, Oliver Fontaine ’22, Ryan Jaffri ’22 and Davis Lee’23 combined for a 1:38.94 time, beating the previous record of 1:39.2!

• Winter Track also earned many “Personal Gains” at the NJSIAA NPA (State Relays)! Highlights at NPA included the 4x200 Boys’ Fans remarked on the beautiful, recently-refurbished Myrna B. Team shaving 2 seconds off D-E’s School record; the 4x200 Girls’ Sherman Gymnasium and those unable to attend in-person were Team earning 9th Place; and our All-Distance Medley Relay Team able to enjoy games via D-E Athletics’ YouTube Livestream. featuring an all-Freshman team!

Highlights from the season included the following:

• D-E’s Ski Racing Varsity Girls finished 3rd in their Conference out of 10 teams! Equally impressive was D-E Ski Racing JV Girls’ Team: They finished in 1st place for their Conference! ALL our Ski JV Girls came in the Top 10 (Lily Kurtz ’25 , Sadie Berger ’25, • Boys & Girls’ Varsity Basketball players David Mager ’22, Philippine Pompidou ’25, Julia Litvin ’23! Vaughn Foster ’22, Karina Pink ’22, and Montana Nicks ’23 were • D-E’s Boys’ Ski Racing Varsity athletes Percy Bedell ’23 and Max recognized as ‘Players to Watch’ in the NJIC for 2021-22! Mayer ’23 both qualified for the ‘Race of Champions’ Winter 4 • David Mager ’22 scored his 1000th point (see Sidebar)! Kids Meet! • The Middle School Girls’ Basketball Team finished their season • To all our Winter Sports Teams athletes: thank you for a with an incredible 14-1 record, and the Middle School Boys’ wonderful season! Basketball “Blue” Team had a nailbiter, exciting 38-36 comeback victory over Gil St. Bernards!

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Congratulations to the following Upper School Winter Season 2022 athletes, recognized with All-League and AllCounty Honors! Winter Track Charlotte Stroff ’24 3rd Team All-County for the 1000M Event!

Girls Basketball • Karina Pink ’23 1st Team All- League and Honorable Mention All-County • Montana Nicks ’23 1st Team All- League and Honorable Mention All-County • Bella Levin ’22 2nd Team All-League • Alyson Yeshion ’24 2nd Team All-League • Sydney Adekanbi ’25 All-League Honorable Mention

Boys Basketball • Tyler Koutros ’22 1st Team AllLeague and Honorable Mention All-County)

David Mager ’22 made D-E School basketball history... . . .and joined an elite group of D-E athletes when he scored his 1000th point during the Bulldogs’ 88-75 win over Glen Rock “away” in January! David was later honored by the School and presented with an official “100th Point Club” ball in a Bulldogs’ home game at which he was joined by his family, Scott and Tammy Mager and Nora Mager ’24. During the 2021-2022 Winter season, David was also honored by being selected to the NJSCA / NJSIAA North-South All Star Team, and he was chosen for the Bergen County Jamboree - All Tournament Team. Congratulations David!

• Ajani Rasbury ’22 1st Team All- League and (3rd Team All-County) • David Mager ’22 1st Team All- League and (1st Team All-County) • Nick Balakian ’23 2nd Team All-League

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• Jack Sauma ’23 All-League Honorable Mention

Finally, you may already know about and ‘follow’ our weekly D-E DogPound Update social media posts, with games highlights and clips. If you’ve missed any of our D-E DogPound Updates, you can view the most recent and past editions online: click here or on the animated image at left.


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Parents’ Association Highlights / Parent Ed. Events At the collaborative invitation of D-E’s Parents’ Association and Office of Engagement, Marc Gladstone from D-E Student Support Services provided a fascinating discussion on the topic of “Neurodiversity and Creating a Culture of Belonging

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Neurodiversity is the basic yet important scientific fact that we are all different. We are different in the way we think, feel and learn because our brains process information differently. We take in information in different ways, and thus we behave and react differently to particular stimuli and environments. At its root, neurodiversity is as crucial for the entire human race as biodiversity is for life.

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When we think about diversity, we often consider this in regard to sexual, gender, cultural and/or race identity - and the challenges, prejudices and discrimination that it can bring. However, another important aspect that is highlighted in our Diversity Values Statement is we all “have different abilities, learning styles and types of intelligences”. These neurological differences are under the metaphorical umbrella of neurodiversity - and includes people who are neurotypical and neurodivergent*. Neurodiversity is a fully inclusive construct that brings together every human being.

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Below, Marc provides some highlights from his presentation.

For more information about Marc and for highlights from his parent ed. workshop, including his PowerPoint presentation slides, please scan this QR code.

An impor tant proper ty of neurodiversity is the fact that groups of people with different perspectives working together collaboratively can achieve extraordinary things. So, when we consider neurodiversity in terms of a positive facet - we are not just saying that individuals bring certain strengths - we are actually saying that the variety of perspectives that a neurodiverse group brings to a situation - or problem to solve - is in itself a strength! As a community, it is crucial that we provide each student (and each adult) an authentic sense of belonging in inclusive settings where difference is expected and valued. In addition to definitions and terminology, the talk included a brief introduction of types of neurodivergence, some common myths, and ways we can apply neurodiversity as a framework to further build a community of belonging. * Note: A person who is neurotypical does not display or be characterized by neurologically atypical patterns of thought or behavior, while a person who is neurodivergent can display and be characterized by atypical patterns.

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Big Feelings: Parenting for Emotional Health D-E Parents’ Association welcomes Psychologist Lisa Damour

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Recognized as a thought leader by the American Psychological Association, Dr. Damour has written numerous academic papers, chapters, and books related to education and child development. She is a Senior Advisor to the Schubert Center for Child Studies at Case Western Reserve University and is the Executive Director of Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls. She and her husband are the proud parents of two daughters.

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Lisa Damour is the author of two New York Times best selling books, Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood and Under Pressure: Confronting the Epidemic of Stress and Anxiety in Girls.

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It is easy to forget what a huge feat vocalizing our emotions are––to take an abstract feeling and find vocabulary for things that seem intangible. Kids can complain often. At the same time, kids can benefit from being given the space to unpack what’s on their mind. A stressful situation that happened at school may not need an immediate solution. Rather, guiding them through regulating their emotions can reap successful interactions and empower children to have agency in their lives. These were just some of kernels of lessons that Dr. Damour gifted D-E’s parents.

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D-E’s Parents’ Association welcomed back Dr. Lisa Damour virtually for a conversation with parents about supporting children through their emotions. Dr. Damour notes that oftentimes “mental health” is misinterpreted as striving to “feel good all the time”. On the contrary, mental health is about navigating the expression and containment of all emotions. If our feelings tell us anything, it is that they are informational. In moments of stress, what parents can do to support their children, whether they are six years old or eighteen, is to approach them with curiosity and empathy first.

To watch the recording of the event with Dr. Lisa Damour, please scan the QR code.


D-E’S Alumni & A Tradition of Excellence D-E Alumni Award Honorees 2022 We are excited to honor several alumni this year during the Epic Reunion 3X Reunion 2022 weekend. Alumni award ceremonies will be held Saturday, June 11, 2022 at 4:30 pm. For additional details please visit www.d-e.org/ alumni or scan the QR code.

The Distinguished Alumni Award The Distinguished Alumni Award was established in 1997 to pay special tribute to alumni of the Dwight School, the Englewood School for Boys, and the Dwight-Englewood School. The award is given for exemplary professional and/or volunteer work. This award honors alumni whose achievements deserve special recognition by the School and by fellow graduates.

2022 Distinguished Alumni Award Honorees Daniel Fish ’85 • Theater, Film, and Opera Director; 2019 Tony Award Recipient for Best Musical Revival Alicia Menendez ’01 • Television Commentator, Host, and Writer Karen Orzolek ’96 • Singer, Songwriter, Musician, and Record Producer; Lead Vocalist of Yeah Yeah Yeahs Robert Shafir ’76 • Chief Executive Officer of Sculptor Capital Mark Shafir ’74 • Global Co-Head, Mergers & Acquisitions at Citi Jeremiah “Jerry” Shafir ’ 70 • Entrepreneur, Founder of Kettle Cuisine

The Dwight-Englewood Athletic Hall of Fame D-E’s Athletic Hall of Fame was established in 1997 to honor those individuals who have achieved a high level of success during their careers as student-athletes, coaches, or through other significant contributions to the School’s athletic program. Its purpose is to perpetuate the memory of those who have brought distinction, honor, and excellence to Dwight-Englewood School, Dwight School, and Englewood School for Boys.

2022 Athletic Hall of Fame Honorees D-E 1984 and D-E 1985 Boys’ Lacrosse Teams Rose E. Byron McSween ’80 Luke Rigolosi ’91 Paul Vessa ’76

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Thanks to the support of hundreds of alumni from Dwight School, Englewood School for Boys, and Dwight-Englewood, the March Madness Alumni Challenge 2022 was a huge success! The campaign was promoted with help from dozens of D-Edicated alumni class representatives encouraging their fellow, former classmates to “join the madness!” Alumni were also treated to fun video reminder messages and social media posts featuring beloved D-E teachers and staff, including D-E Athletic Director Chris Schmid (aka “Schmiddy”) , as well as “Tough Cookies” Betsey Carson and Liz Traub. (See Editor’s Note).

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March Madness Alumni Challenge 2022 Makes Its Goal!

In the 10 Day Challenge that took place from March 25 - April 4 over 275 Alumni Donors raised more than $58,000, which unlocked $20,220 from an anonymous alumna for D-E’s Annual Fund! In the grateful words of Alumni Relations Director Maria Sanchez Gardner ’78, “Your ongoing generosity demonstrates your commitment to D-E’s ideals and mission to ‘meet the challenges of a changing world and make it better.’ We are proud to see the loyalty of our alumni donors, who strengthen the school for years to come. We are profoundly grateful for your enduring support and the positive impact of your gift -- all year long!” ` Editor’s Note: Thank you to all alumni who donated to the March Madness Alumni Challenge 2022! To enjoy the videos mentioned, and for more details about the Challenge, please scan the QR Code.

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D-E Kicks-Off Next Phase of Schmid Athletic Complex and Pavilion Campaign D-E Alumni Relations and alumni gathered in early April on Solomon Field to launch and announce the naming of the new Schmid Athletic Complex and Pavilion. The naming is in honor of Chris Schmid’s impending June 2022 retirement from Dwight-Englewood after 43 years and in recognition of his dedicated service as the Director of Athletics, Head Boys Soccer Coach, Lacrosse and more. This complex will include a pavilion as well as landscaping and beautification of the area surrounding Solomon Field, a fitting tribute to a man who has served D-E so well for so long. The plan is to officially name the new Schmid Athletics Complex (currently under construction) on Saturday, June 11, at 11:30 AM, in a special retirement celebration for Chris Schmid. Thanks to earlier support, the School has already raised $100,000 during the first phase of this campaign—over 12 years ago. Alumni, families and friends are encouraged to join in honoring Chris Schmid’s D-E legacy, and help raise an additional $100,000 by June 2022.

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Donors who give a total amount of $1,000 and above will receive special recognition in a dedicated area of the Schmid Athletic Complex and Pavilion. This amount includes gifts already made to the first phase of Schmid Pavilion campaign in 2012. To learn more please scan the QR code or email D-E Alumni Relations Director Maria Sanchez Gardner ’78 at: sanchm@d-e.org


Connecting Our Community:

Class Notes Are Now Online! Alumni from the Dwight School, Englewood School for Boys (ESB) and Dwight-Englewood School, families, faculty/staff and friends, all can look forward to our online-only Class Notes, featuring more photos, more frequent updates, alumni news. Alumni please share online your latest news! You can also send class notes directly to alumninews@d-e.org It’s easy: 1) Visit alumni.d-etoday.org 2) Enter the Password: connect

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Questions? Email alumninews@d-e.org

Alumni: Save the Dates! June 10-11, 2022: Reunion Epic 3X 2022 See inside for details, scan QR code or visit d-e.org/alumni!


Dwight-Englewood School 315 East Palisade Avenue Englewood, NJ 07631

US Robotics is just one of the many ways D-E students employ innovative and design thinking. To learn more about how each division promotes creativity and hands-on skills, take a look inside the Innovation Centerfold.