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“Provide comprehensive after-school programs that keep children safe and help them succeed in school and in life.” The organization’s Career Exploration Opportunities (CEO) initiative, for example, fosters financial literacy and other skills while helping students discover and plan for their future careers. Another initiative, Sports as a Hook, is a sports-based youth development program that promotes leadership and teaches a variety of skills.

“I would go to all these gyms and leagues and I’d see hundreds of great guys, all of whom I thought could be great mentors.” Dworkin has been with ASAS since 2007 and has been instrumental in establishing the national model and growing the organization, which now has chapters in 20 major cities. He spends his time managing the local affiliates and overseeing strategic planning, program, evaluation, advocacy, expansion, partnerships, and leadership training efforts. There have been many highlights along the way. For example, at the age of 36, he went “back to college,” sleeping in a dorm, eating in the cafeteria, and taking classes—alongside a group of teenagers who had just finished 8th grade. It was part of CampUs, a weeklong program that brings to college campuses students at risk for dropping out of school, helping them understand why graduating is important and how college leads to fulfilling careers. The overnight experience is part of ASAS’s We Are Ready initiative, which was developed based on research showing that the best time to intervene to prevent kids from dropping out of high school is actually before they even enter high school. Another highlight for Dworkin came in 2016 at a gala in Washington, DC, when on behalf of his organization he accepted an Impact Award from Partnership for a Healthier America, the national nonprofit whose honorary chair is Michelle Obama. The award recognizes the group that demonstrates a measurable impact at the community level in building a healthier future for America’s children. Dworkin’s career in battling such big national issues as the youth obesity epidemic, the high dropout rate, and the lack of college and career counseling for underprivileged kids began with the simple desire to give back. He started volunteering for Big Brothers Big Sisters. And then, as he explained in his remarks at Dwight-Englewood’s commencement for the Class of 2018, he had an epiphany about how to connect kids with mentors. “I would go to all these gyms and leagues and I’d see hundreds of great guys, all of whom I thought could be great mentors

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D-E TODAY 2018 - 2019 | VOLUME II

Profile for Dwight-Englewood School

D-E Today: 2018-2019: Volume II  

D-E Today is published by Dwight-Englewood School Communications and Publications, in partnership with the Advancement Office.

D-E Today: 2018-2019: Volume II  

D-E Today is published by Dwight-Englewood School Communications and Publications, in partnership with the Advancement Office.