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THE BEAUT Y EXPERT

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Yes, Queen! Helen Mirren Is the Hero We Need

7 Things That Get Better With Age

Beautys Big Secret: What Are You Really Paying For?

the end of

anti-AGING OUR CALL TO THE INDUSTRY


SEPTEMBER IN THIS ISSUE BEAUTY REPORTER 49 Look We Love: Chrome Nails (Aka the Most Badass Mani Ever) 50 Editors’ Favorites 52 Chanel’s Next Scent Icon • Want to Play Perfumer? • Chic Body Sprays

54 Home Hairstyling Straight Out of The Jetsons • Serious Hydration for Seriously Fine Hair 58 Jessica Chastain on Fragrance, Trumpcare, and More • Brown Is the New Black—Especially on Your Lids and Lips 60 Victoria Beckham’s Newest Baby • Cool Finds From the London Beauty Scene

FASHION 63 Primary School. A classic bag in showstopping colors

64 You Say You Want a Revolution? Recycled clothing meets high fashion.

68 Flashes of Brilliance. Shani Crowe’s diamondstudded braids are nothing short of magic.

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SHARIF HAMZA

PUT A BOW ON IT

The evolution of the schoolgirl style. For fashion credits, see Shopping Guide.


SEPTEMBER

108 THE WILD WEST

Meet the modernday cowgirl. For fashion credits, see Shopping Guide.

73 Skin News. Heat of the Moment. Why we need to avoid more than just the sun. 76 The Fragrance Pro. Fashion Scents. Francis Kurkdjian on how the visions of four iconic designers translate into perfumes. 78 Perspective. The Good Life. Helena Christensen shares her beauty secrets (and they involve pasta and pole dancing). 82 Wellness Report. The Best Is Yet to Come. A celebration of sex, cheekbones, and everything else that only gets better with age.

86 The Green Movement. Earth Days. Eco-friendly fashion can be as luxurious as it is sustainable. 94 Phenomenon. Is Youth Wasted on Millennials? Molly Young explores the extreme beauty and wellness habits of her generation.

FEATURES 100 Yes, Queen. Helen Mirren is a self-professed procrastinator, feminist, and wannabe hairstylist. By Michelle Lee

108 Best Western. Fringe, patchwork, studs—welcome to fashion’s new frontier.

116 Catch a Fire. One kinetic color, five looks.

122 Beauty’s Placebo Effect. Just how powerful is a gilded jar and a fancy name? By Liana Schaffner 126 All Tied Up. A fresh new take on bows. By Liana Schaffner

REGULARS

NEWS & TRENDS 36 My Look. Talking Beauty With Kiersey Clemons. The singer, actress, and Justice League star shares her natural-hair journey.

44 Hair Inspiration. The Long Game. A case for skipping your next trim.

12 Allure.com 22 Contributors 24 Cover Look 30 Editor’s Letter 40 Beauty by Numbers 132 Shopping Guide 134 My Dream Kit. Rihanna’s makeup artist Lora Arellano

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QUENTIN DE BRIEY

ON THE COVER

Helen Mirren’s look can be re-created with the following: Infallible Pro-Glow Concealer in Creamy Natural, Infallible Pro-Glow Powder in Creamy Natural, Colour Riche Eye Shadow in Boudoir Charme, and Colour Riche lipstick in Matte-ly in Love by L’Oréal Paris. Viscose nylon dress by Carmen March. Silver earrings by Lady Grey. Ring by Robert Lee Morris. Details, see Shopping Guide. Photographed by Scott Trindle. Fashion stylist: Hannes Hetta. Hair: Luke Hersheson of Hershesons salon. Makeup: Charlotte Tilbury. Manicure: Marian Newman. Prop stylist: Sophie Durham. Production: Sarah Thompson for Creative Blood Agency.


ALLURE

when we grow up

Left: the Bellomo sisters in 1986. Right: Tish and Snooky today.

T

ish and Snooky Bellomo dyed their hair blue (and green, and also magenta) before you did. In fact, they embraced the rainbow-hair trend before you were probably even a zygote. The Manic Panic founders opened their first boutique in 1977 in New York City’s East Village. By then, they had already performed with Blondie and brushed elbows with David Bowie. After 40 years in business and countless dye jobs, they know beauty trends. So naturally we asked how to cover grays in the most badass way possible. To see what Tish and Snooky have to say about aging, head to allure.com/grown-woman.

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FROM LEFT: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; COURTESY OF MANIC PANIC; PAULA GATELY TILLMAN; COURTESY OF MANIC PANIC; PATRICK MCMULLAN

In our new column Grown Woman, models, stylists, and beauty pros sound off on wrinkles, aging, and why the world needs to stop telling them to look younger.


EDITOR IN CHIEF MICHELLE LEE MANAGING EDITOR AMANDA MEIGHER

B E AU T Y EXECUTIVE BEAUT Y DIRECTOR JENNY BAILLY DEPUT Y BEAUT Y DIRECTOR ELIZABETH SIEGEL

How will your style change in 10 years?

SENIOR BEAUT Y EDITOR JESSICA CHIA BEAUT Y ASSISTANT KATHLEEN SUICO

V I S UA LS VISUALS DIRECTOR RHIANNA RULE BOOKINGS DIRECTOR RO PENULIAR SENIOR VISUALS EDITOR JACQUELINE LADNER VISUALS EDITOR JAMES CLARIZIO

ASSOCIATE VISUALS EDITORS HANNAH CHOI, DANA DAVENPORT ASSISTANT VISUALS EDITOR PAIGE VITI

R E S E A RC H RESEARCH DIRECTOR LORI SEGAL

Let’s say I’ll be in Paris wearing silk Chloé dresses and red lipstick.

FAS H I O N FASHION DIRECTOR NICOLE CHAPOTEAU FASHION MARKET EDITOR JENNA WOJCIECHOWSKI

A RT I C L E S ASSOCIATE EDITOR LOREN SAVINI EDITORIAL ASSISTANT JESA MARIE CALAOR

A RT SENIOR ART DIRECTOR NICOLE ARGENTO

It can go two ways: Grey Gardens art teacher or mystical earthy coven.

P RO D U CT I O N DEPUT Y MANAGING EDITOR NICOLE STUART DEPUT Y PRODUCTION DIRECTOR MATT CARSON PRODUCTION MANAGER BRENT BURKET

C O PY COPY DIRECTOR CATHERINE GAMBRELL COPY MANAGERS AURA DAVIES, LESLIE LIPTON

A L LU R E .C O M DEPUT Y DIGITAL EDITOR SAM ESCOBAR DIGITAL DEPUT Y BEAUT Y DIRECTOR SOPHIA PANYCH DIGITAL BEAUT Y EDITOR SABLE YONG DIGITAL WELLNESS EDITOR HAYLEY M AC MILLEN DIGITAL EDITOR JIHAN FORBES DIGITAL PRODUCTION MANAGER MONICA PERRY SENIOR VIDEO PRODUCER MAYA MARGOLINA DIGITAL DESIGNER MARIA ASARE-BOADI ASSOCIATE DIGITAL BEAUT Y EDITOR SARAH KINONEN ASSOCIATE DIGITAL EDITOR DEVON ABELMAN

ASSOCIATE PREDITOR ANNA ST YPKO DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT SHAMMARA LAWRENCE

I’ll still be wearing the designer items I splurge on now, just with whatever’s in style then.

PRODUCT DIRECTOR RANDI EICHENBAUM ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT LINDSAY SANSONE ANALY TICS MANAGER TULIKA SINGH

RESEARCH MANAGERS AMBER ANGELLE, CRISTINA RIVERA

DIGITAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR PHILLIP PICARDI

EXECUTIVE EDITOR DANIELLE PERGAMENT

CREATIVE DIRECTOR MARIE SUTER

SOCIAL SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR TERRON MOORE SENIOR SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER RAWAN EEWSHAH SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER REBECCA SHINNERS ASSOCIATE SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER LARA ADEKOLA

CONTRIBUTING EDITORIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR PATRICIA ALFONSO TORTOLANI CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JILLIAN DEMPSEY, DAVID DENICOLO, MEIRAV DEVASH, JOLENE EDGAR, FRANCIS KURKDJIAN, BROOKE LE POER TRENCH, CHRIS McMILLAN, JANET MOCK, MISTRELLA MURPHY, LIANA SCHAFFNER

CONTRIBUTING ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR LAURA MORGAN SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR MEGAN SALERNO ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER TAYLOR SHEA

FO U N D I N G E D I TO R LINDA WELLS

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR ANNA WINTOUR

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CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER KIMBERLY KELLEHER VICE PRESIDENTS, REVENUE AMY OELKERS, HEDDY SAMS PIERSON, LAURA SEQUENZIA VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CHRISTINE DIPRESSO MORRA VICE PRESIDENTS, MARKETING JENNY BOWMAN, JILL STEINBACH FRIEDSON

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR– FASHION, JEWELRY & WATCH SARAH YORK RICHARDS

How will your style change in 10 years?

DIRECTOR CARLY GRESH MANAGER ALEXANDRIA HAUGHEY

EXECUTIVE SOUTHWEST DIRECTOR EZRA SEAN ALVAREZ 323-965-3564 EXECUTIVE MIDWEST DIRECTORS CHRISTINA KROLOPP 312-649-6731 ANGIE PACKARD PRENDERGAST 312-649-3509

NEW ENGLAND KRISTIN HAVENS 585-255-0207 DIRECT RESPONSE REBECCA VOLK 800-753-5370 EXT. 489

I’m hoping a lot less mom flats and more high heels in my wardrobe.

ITALY ELENA DE GIULI 011-39-02-655-84223 U.K./FRANCE SELIM MATARACI 011-33-1-44-78-00-62 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FINANCE JANICE TRICHON

CONTENT MARKETING & PA RT N E RS H I PS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CONTENT MARKETING ALEXIS WALL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, STRATEGIC SAMPLING & E-COMMERCE LEAH ASHLEY STRATEGIC SAMPLING MANAGER NICOLE SAFIR

I N T EG R AT E D M A R K E T I N G & C R E AT I V E S E RV I C E S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ERIN BRENNAN DESIGN DIRECTOR MARIS BODELL SENIOR DIRECTORS STEFENI BELLOCK, CHRIS MANCIVALANO SENIOR MANAGER MALLORY MILLER

M A R K E T I N G S E RV I C E S SENIOR DIRECTOR, MARKETING INTELLIGENCE JENNIFER FRIEDMAN PEREZ ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, EXPERIENCES SAMANTHA DANA

SENIOR BUSINESS DIRECTOR SHERRI GINSBERG BUSINESS ASSOCIATE CAROLINE GRANGER INTEGRATED ASSISTANTS ZUIE BILLINGS, CARA KURICA

P U B L I S H E D BY C O N D É N AST

If I’m being honest, I hope I look like my mom! She seriously had the best style.

CHAIRMAN EMERITUS S. I. NEWHOUSE , JR. PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER ROBERT A . SAUERBERG, JR. CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DAVID E . GEITHNER CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER & PRESIDENT OF REVENUE JAMES M. NORTON

A DV E RT I S I N G EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS KIM CONWAY HALEY, LAUREN DECKER LERMAN

EVP & CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER FRED SANTARPIA CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER JOANN MURRAY CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER CAMERON R. BLANCHARD CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER EDWARD CUDAHY EVP–CONSUMER MARKETING MONICA RAY CHIEF EXPERIENCE OFFICER JOSH STINCHCOMB CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER, INDUSTRY SALES, CONDÉ NAST LISA VALENTINO SVP–FINANCIAL PLANNING & ANALYSIS SUZANNE REINHARDT SVP–AD PRODUCTS & MONETIZATION DAVID ADAMS SVP–LICENSING CATHY HOFFMAN GLOSSER SVP–RESEARCH & ANALY TICS STEPHANIE FRIED SVP–DIGITAL OPERATIONS LARRY BAACH SVP–HUMAN RESOURCES NICOLE ZUSSMAN GENERAL MANAGER–DIGITAL MATTHEW STARKER HEAD CREATIVE DIRECTOR RAÚL MARTINEZ

C O N D É N AST E N T E RTA I N M E N T PRESIDENT DAWN OSTROFF EVP/GENERAL MANAGER, DIGITAL VIDEO JOY MARCUS EVP & CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER SAHAR ELHABASHI EVP–MOTION PICTURES JEREMY STECKLER EVP–ALTERNATIVE T V JOE LABRACIO EVP–CNÉ STUDIOS AL EDGINGTON SVP–MARKETING & PARTNER MANAGEMENT TEAL NEWLAND

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C O N D É N AST I N T E R N AT I O N A L CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE JONATHAN NEWHOUSE PRESIDENT WOLFGANG BLAU

Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets. CONDENAST.COM CONDENASTINTERNATIONAL .COM


CONTRIBUTORS Charlotte Tilbury Chic to Cheek blush in Love Is the Drug. Left: Tilbury painted perfect rosebud lips at the Dsquared2 fall 2017 show.

WONDER WOMAN

Want to know how to use makeup to telegraph glamour, sex, and power all at once? Ask Charlotte Tilbury.

i

t all started with a tube of mascara, but not quite like you’d expect. As a 13-year-old boarding school student, Charlotte Tilbury took the most standardissue makeup out there and discovered the thrill of beauty transformation. She swept mascara on her fair lashes right before bed and woke up feeling, for the first time, gorgeous. Friends took notice, “and from that day forward, I thought, I’m never, ever allowing anyone to see me without makeup again,” says Tilbury. A few years later, she went even further (a lot further) and set out to become one of the world’s most famous makeup artists. Now Tilbury makes thousands of other women feel glamorous every day. Some are laypeople, like the crowds who’ve camped outside Selfridges to scoop up her Magic Cream and will clamor for her new liquid matte lipstick before it sells out. And some are legends: Kate Moss, Penélope Cruz, and our cover star Helen Mirren, whom Tilbury describes as “witty, empowered, intelligent, hilarious, generous, iconic, hypnotic....” Right back at ya, Ms. Tilbury. —REPORTING BY JESA MARIE CALAOR

Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Lips Matte Contour Liquid Lipstick in Platinum Blonde. The first batches of Tilbury’s Magic Cream were created on set with models like Naomi Campbell (left, with Tilbury). Years later, the rich, coddling formula became the hallmark of her product line.

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FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

“One of my favorite shows that will stay with me forever,” says Tilbury of her fall 2007 collaboration with Alexander McQueen.

Kate Moss is a client, a muse, and a dance partner. “Our favorite song is ‘You Got the Love’ by Candi Staton,” says Tilbury.


COVER LOOK

HELEN MIRREN Behind the scenes at Allure’s cover shoot.

D

Top: Esteban Cortazar dress. Tod’s belt. Jennifer Fisher earrings. Far left: Aalto dress. Alaïa boots. Efva Attling ring. Left: Balenciaga shoes. Above: Haider Ackermann jacket. Wolford bodysuit. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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BRIAN DOHERTY

ame Helen Mirren knows how to command a room. (And yes, we realize that may be as obvious as telling you that she enjoys a strong cup of tea.) Her first cover shoot for Allure started off as most cover shoots do: a studio, a catering table (with a little more Earl Grey than usual), and a gaggle of photo assistants setting up cameras and lights. Mirren settled into Charlotte Tilbury’s chair for glam—and some chat. “We talked about both having curvaceous figures and making the most of our assets,” says the makeup artist. Once those very famous “assets” were draped in Esteban Cortazar and Haider Ackermann, the actress was off to photographer Scott Trindle’s set—and that’s when things got interesting. Mirren pointed at one of the photographer’s assistants and said, “Come here.” Fabian Nordstrom—a giddy and heavily tattooed Swede—obliged. And just like that, the Oscar-winning actress got some serious ink on the cover of Allure for the first time in our 27-year history.


Makeup Tilbury used an illuminating foundation on Mirren before sculpting her cheekbones with contouring powder and dusting on a pink blush. For Mirren’s eyes, Tilbury blended a shimmery champagne eye shadow across the lids and copper in the creases. The finale: matte ruby-red lipstick. “It’s a screen-siren red,” said Tilbury.

Carmen March dress. Lady Grey earrings. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Mirren’s look can be re-created with the following (clockwise from top): Colour Riche lipstick in Matte-ly in Love, Infallible Pro-Glow Powder in Creamy Natural, Infallible Pro-Glow Concealer in Creamy Natural, and Colour Riche Eye Shadow in Boudoir Charme by L’Oréal Paris.

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Hair “We wanted there to be a strength to the hair,” said hairstylist Luke Hersheson. How he got there: mixing Kiehl’s Creme With Silk Groom (for hold), Phyto Phytoplage oil (for slickness), and John Frieda Frizz Ease Original Serum (for shine) and spreading the cocktail through Mirren’s silver bob. After that, Hersheson used a comb to pull the sides of her hair back and create height at her roots.

FROM TOP: BRIAN DOHERTY; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

BEAUTY LESSON

COVER LOOK


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

This issue is the long-awaited, utterly necessary celebration of growing into your own skin—wrinkles and all. No one is suggesting giving up retinol. But changing the way we think about aging starts with changing the way we talk about aging. With that in mind, and starting with this issue, we are making a resolution to stop using the term “anti-aging.” Whether we know it or not, we’re subtly reinforcing the message that aging is a condition we need to battle— think antianxiety meds, antivirus software, or antifungal spray. If there’s one inevitability in life, it’s that we’re getting older. Every minute. Every second. We produced a video recently that featured 64-year-old grayhaired Jo Johnson, who made the poignant observation that aging should be appreciated because “some of us don’t get an opportunity to age.” Repeat after me: Growing older is a wonderful thing because it means that we get a chance, every day, to live a full, happy life. Language matters. When talking about a woman over, say, 40, people tend to add qualifiers: “She looks great...for her age” or “She’s beautiful...for an older woman.” Catch yourself next time and consider what would happen if you just said, “She looks great.” Yes, Americans put youth on a pedestal. But let’s agree that appreciating the dewy rosiness of youth doesn’t mean we become suddenly hideous as years go by. I’m not going to lie and say that everything about aging is great. We’re not the same at 18 as we are at 80. But we need to stop looking at our life as a hill that we start rolling uncontrollably down past 35. (And if it were, who determines the pinnacle? Is it our sexual prime? Is it the point at which most other people would consider us hot? Or is it utterly in our own heads?) I hope we can all get to a point where we recognize that beauty is not something just for the young. Look at our cover star Helen Mirren, who’s embodied sexiness for nearly four decades in Hollywood without desperately trying to deny her age. I came across this quote from actress Samantha Bond that nails why we need more role models like Mirren: “Helen doesn’t appear to be frightened of aging and taking her sexuality with her. And it kind of gives her female audience the right to say, ‘Well, I can do that.’ ” And we can do that, too. Major props to those who have already taken steps, and, to the rest of the beauty industry, we’re calling on you now: We know it’s not easy to change packaging and marketing overnight. But together we can start to change the conversation and celebrate the beauty in all ages.

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Michelle Lee, Editor in Chief @heymichellelee

FROM TOP: HANNAH CHOI; COURTESY OF MICHELLE LEE

THE END OF “ANTI-AGING”


talking beauty

MY LOOK

KIERSEY CLEMONS

WITH

Your hair can be a source of power—or heartache. The 23-year-old actress, star of Justice League, and singer explains. It’s a classic love story: me and my hair. I have loved my hair. I have betrayed my hair. My hair and I have gone through this long, gut-wrenching relationship. Growing up, I had really big hair. Giant hair. As I got older, the goal was to make it smaller—I wanted to look like everyone else. So I got a weave. I would manipulate my hair and try to make it straight. Wool-blend top and dress by No. 21. Earrings by Charlotte Chesnais and Eddie Borgo. Rings by Eddie Borgo and Arme de l’Amour. Makeup colors: Healthy Skin Blends Powder in Clean and Revitalizing Lip Balm in Fresh Plum by Neutrogena. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Sean Knight. Hair: Nikki Providence. Makeup: Samuel Paul. Manicure: Nettie Davis.

photographed by daria kobayashi ritch


i

MY LOOK Cotton top by Rejina Pyo. Cotton pants by Wanda Nylon. Earrings by Foundrae. Necklace by Alexis Bittar. Ring by Charlotte Chesnais. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Left: Shearling jacket and earrings by Coach 1941. Viscose dress by Acne Studios. Details, see Shopping Guide. Right: Clemons’s makeup-bag staples, Burt’s Bees Tinted Lip Balm in Hibiscus and L’Oréal Paris Voluminous Mascara (Clemons is a spokeswoman for L’Oréal Paris).

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“My hair is stubborn and rebellious like I am.” STILL LIFES: GRAHAM POLLACK (PROP STYLIST: JENNY WICHMAN)

moved around a lot. Where I lived determined how comfortable I felt with myself. It had to do with race sometimes—I mean, most of the time, actually. I went to high school in Redondo Beach, California. I think my beauty worries were different than everyone else’s beauty worries because Redondo Beach was predominantly white. My high school friends and I would go to the beach, and my issue was not my hair blowing in the wind or sand in my lipstick. It was my hair getting wet—and my wanting to keep it straight. You start to notice that boys like girls with that type of hair. And I will never have hair like that. I don’t think people realize why weaves and the cultural appropriation of black hairstyles are so sensitive. It’s deeprooted. For me, it goes back to high school: I wanted to have the long, flowing hair. So I got a weave. But then I didn’t want guys to put their fingers in it—you don’t want them to feel your weave. My insecurities were not the same as my white friends’ insecurities. At a certain point, I was like, I’m over this. And I shaved my hair off. It’s funny how we’re attached to things like that. We hide behind our hair. I didn’t really think about that until I cut it off, and it was like, Oh, fuck. So now I’m growing my hair back out. It’s in a little bun, but it’s thick, so it’s kind of coming out of the bun. Ten years ago, I would have never walked outside like this, but now I’m walking around with this little bun all day. My hair was my enemy at one point, and through trial and error I realized I should just leave it alone. Because my hair is stubborn and rebellious like I am. The more I try to get it to do something it doesn’t want to do, the more it’s going to blow up in my face, and then both of us are left heartbroken. I think I’m finally just letting her be. And the more I let her be, the more she works with me. Now I find myself playing with it and coming up with styles I really like. It’s beautiful when someone can carry her own hair and body and curves and bumps. That’s how I feel about my hair now: We’re friends. In fact, we can’t get enough of each other. —AS TOLD TO ELIZABETH SIEGEL


BEAUT Y BY NUMBERS

LIPS

CA. 3000 B.C.

There’s no glossing over the fact that fuller lips tend to be seen as more attractive. But is that the only reason we paint them, plump them, even coat them in jewels? A glimpse into our oral fixation. —JESA MARIE CALAOR

28,430

The number of people who received lipenhancement surgery in 2016 (an increase of more than 50 percent since 2000).

6.5

Approximate number of syringes of different fillers that you would need to inject over time to achieve lips similar to Kylie Jenner’s, according to her doctor Simon Ourian.

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Cost of one tube of F*ck Trump, a matte pink lipstick by Lipslut that went on sale after the 2016 election and was described as being “50% towards charity, 100% against tyranny, and, of course, 100% cruelty-free” on its website.

$1,250

Average cost of lip injections in the United States.

ANAIRAM/WALTER SCHUPFER MANAGEMENT

7

$20

Carats of diamonds (worth $26,500) used in a lip-art collaboration between makeup artist Vlada Haggerty and Smashbox Cosmetics.

2

Approximate number of syringes of the hyaluronic acid filler Juvéderm used for a natural-looking lip enhancement.

Earliest recorded use of lip adornment. Mesopotamian women are said to have covered their lips with crushed insects and gemstones.


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HAIR THAT VENTURES TO YOUR WAIST (OR BEYOND) FEELS FRESH AND STRIKING— AND A LITTLE SUBVERSIVE.

NICOLAS KANTOR

THE LONG GAME

H A I R I N S P I R AT I O N


S

H A I R I N S P I R AT I O N

hining, gleaming, streaming hair is the stuff fairy tales (and musicals) are written about. And there’s good reason for that: Long hair, especially really long hair, tells a story. It might be a story about romance. Or resistance. Or mysticism. Or Crystal Gayle. But whatever it’s saying, the point is that it’s saying something. Now, mind you, we’re not talking about the kind of long hair that swings between your shoulder blades, safe and uncontroversial. We’re talking about ends that graze your rib cage... your waist...your ass. That long hair is not just pretty; it’s powerful. And though it feels totally organic and untouched, it requires a little cultivating. Cut off a quarter inch every couple of months (your hair grows faster than that, so you won’t lose any real length). Invest in detangler. And if you’re in lob territory right now and unwilling to wait five years to get there, well, there’s a word for that: extensions. —LOREN SAVINI

For more extralong-hair inspo, head to allure .com/long-hair.

GREAT LENGTHS

KIM KARDASHIAN WEST

GILDA AMBROSIO

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

BLAKE LIVELY

NICKI MINAJ

THE PIONEER: CHER

NAOMI CAMPBELL HAILEY GATES JENNIFER LOPEZ


photographed by ward + kweskin

Cotton polyester dress by Adeam. Details, see Shopping Guide. Fashion stylist: Haley Loewenthal. Manicure: Madeline Poole. Hair: David Cruz. Makeup: Katie Mellinger. Model: Emma Surmon.

BEAUTY REPORTER

T H E B E AU T Y N E W S YO U N E E D T O K N O W N O W

Watch manicurist Madeline Poole’s chrome-nails step-by-step at allure.com/chrome-nails.

look we love

chrome nails Picture, for a second, the lining of an oyster shell—its opalescence, its sheen, its painterly swirl of blues and grays and...a bunch of shades you can’t totally identify. Up the concentration of rich navies and violets, render it near-reflective, and you get a stunning, kind-of-indescribable manicure. Shades from Sally Hansen’s Salon Chrome nail kit, available this month only, let you create the groovy, oil-slick finish that only professionals have had the tools to pull off until now, says manicurist Madeline Poole. To get the effect you see here, buff the purplish-blue Mermaid powder over an intensifying black polish. You can also top a paler polish with the silvery Holographic powder for a rainbow-beam pastel. These colors “just don’t exist in a polish bottle,” says Poole (without hyperbole).

SEPTEMBER 2017 ALLURE

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BE AUT Y REPORTER

AOA Wonder Jelly. Every decade or so a makeup-sponge innovation comes along that makes us excited about… makeup sponges. This squishy silicone pad has us (seamlessly) covered for the next 10 years. $1.

Kevyn Aucoin Exotique Diamond Eye Gloss in Galaxy. A few smudges of this goldflecked black gel gives lids a smoldering look worthy of a black-tie gala. Or karaokeand-trivia night at your local dive. $38.

RMS Beauty Wild With Desire lipstick in Unbridled Passion, Pretty Vacant, and Breathless. You will hoard these new additions to the RMS cult: for their rich finish, for their flattering colors, for how damn good the coconut oil–rich formula makes your lips feel. $28 each.

EDITORS’ FAVORITES

THE STUFF WE PLAN TO STEAL FROM THE BEAUTY CLOSET WHEN NO ONE’S LOOKING.

EOS Crystal Lip Balm in Hibiscus Peach and Vanilla Orchid. The trippy lava lamp vibe of these balms drew us in. But it’s their silky glycerin and sweet scents that keep us coming back. $4.99 each.

BareMinerals BarePro Performance Wear Liquid Foundation. This lightweight—but full-coverage—formula mattifies without looking mask-y. $34.

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Givenchy Noir Interdit Mascara. The hinged wand creates a 90-degree angle that lets you get every last inner and outer lash. $29.

Tiffany & Co. Eau de Parfum. The delicate iris, the whiff of musk— everything about this fragrance is soft and pretty and exactly what you’d expect from the temple of good taste, right down to the little blue box. $100 for 1.7 ounces.


BEAUT Y REPORTER

A FLORAL AFFAIR

When the latest Chanel perfume comes across our desks, it’s usually a classic reimagined (we love you, No. 5 L’Eau). But for the first time in 15 years, there’s a totally new Chanel fragrance to sniff (and dissect and, yes, obsess over). —ELIZABETH SIEGEL

The bottle. The glass is extremely thin and, to refract light, perfectly flat at the base (in case you’re not a glassblower: no easy feat).

The name. You know her as Coco Chanel. But before she reinvented herself, she was Gabrielle. Fittingly, this namesake fragrance is more youthful and less heady than the warm and spicy Coco, which debuted in 1984.

The scent. The mix of four white flowers— jasmine, tuberose, orange blossom, ylangylang—calls to mind a garden in full bloom. (And that gold tint? It’s perfectly matched to lamé from the Chanel archives.)

Secret Service Seventy offices in 35 countries, employing nearly 100 perfumers with access to thousands of notes: A company called International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF) has a lot of control over your sense of smell. It’s behind scents like Calvin Klein Euphoria, Viktor & Rolf Flowerbomb, and possibly Tide and Cool Ranch Doritos—though it can’t officially confirm or deny. Now it’s handing over the reins (or at least some of them). The digital service Waft gives you access to 40 notes from IFF’s legendary scents. For $99, you get to blend them any way you like. We clicked through the options (sage, leather, muguet), chose a name, and unboxed our perfume just three days later. Editor in chief Michelle Lee crafted a graceful citrus-and-green-tea blend. My roseand-vanilla try smelled a bit like...a mop. Democratic perfumery has its limits.

Splashing Out Something just happened, and it might take a second to compute: Body sprays got chic. Unlike their ’90s-era peach-champagne-star-fruit forebears, new spritzes such as Tom Ford’s All Over Body Sprays, Sol de Janeiro’s Brazilian Crush Body Fragrance Mist, and Clean’s body splashes have simple scents—fresh laundry, tropical jasmine, warm vanilla. They’re really soft, and they do this kind of magical thing where that jasmine or vanilla blends in with your skin, so you smell like yourself...only sexier and vacation-ier. —E. S.

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JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

—AMANDA BOHNSON


BE AUT Y REPORTER

PRODUCT REVIEW

Pantene Pro-V Daily Moisture Renewal Foam Conditioner

Clockwise from above: Dura Chi Handshot Hair Dryer, Revlon Salon 360 Surround AC Dryer, Drybar Wrap Party Wand, and Glossie Ceramic Styling Brush With Precision Press.

It looked—and felt—as frothy as Gillette shaving cream. Which explains two things: 1) how my boyfriend ended up smearing this conditioner all over his stubble and 2) why I was skeptical that it could do anything for my thick hair’s dry, fried-looking ends. I had to use a lot of it—multiple handfuls—to cover my hair from root to tip, as the can instructed. After it air-dried, my hair had a level of volume and bounce I never get with cream conditioners (awesome), and waves at the roots that I had to flatiron (less awesome). But it all made sense after I called cosmetic chemist Ni’Kita Wilson. In addition to propane and butane (gases that turn liquid conditioning ingredients panthenol and quaternium-80 into foam), the conditioner (available in October) also has polyvinylpyrrolidone, which smooths hair and helps define curls and waves. I will say this: My once-dry ends looked healthy and fantastic. —JESA MARIE CALAOR

DRY RUN Four new tools are turning (boring, biceps-burning) at-home styling on its head. 54

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Dura Chi Handshot Hair Dryer I’m a chronic air-dryer...mostly because I have wimpy arms. But with the handle-free Dura Chi (you grip the bulbous end of the dryer), I was able to rough-dry my hair without contorting into any weird angles—or getting any bicep cramps. Revlon Salon 360 Surround AC Dryer There was something counterintuitive (OK, terrifying) about sticking my hair inside this dryer to try its “360 Vertical Mode,” in which the nozzle twists to create a vertical tunnel of air jets. But once I did, I got my airiest, glossiest at-home blowout to date. It took a while, though—it can process only a small section of hair at a time. Drybar Wrap Party Wand This inverted curling wand looks odd, but after I flipped it upside down (as one does with a wand), it created the kind of cool S waves that usually require finagling with a flatiron. Glossie Ceramic Styling Brush With Precision Press The clamp-on styling arm smoothed down flyaways I didn’t even know I had and gave my hair a new level of shine. —LOREN SAVINI

HANNAH WHITAKER (PROP STYLIST: RACHEL HAAS)

TEST DRIVE


BEAUT Y REPORTER OUR GIRL CRUSH

ON FIRE

“My grandmother wore a scent that was very soft but also woodsy, which is what I like about Ralph Lauren Woman,” says Chastain. “The softness of the tuberose blends with the exoticness of the woods.”

—ELIZABETH SIEGEL

Jessica Chastain gets real about aging and more at allure.com/ jessica-chastain.

COLOR OF THE MOMENT

Brownie Points It’s a color that exists in nature and has never been preceded by the words “mermaid” or “unicorn.” This fall, brown feels groundbreaking. Melted-chocolate lipsticks are sophisticated and not remotely twee (try Nars Powermatte Lip Pigment in Done It Again or Estée Lauder Pure Color Envy Lipstick in Metal Cult), and cocoa powder shadows (right) give eyes natural-looking depth. —JESSICA CHIA

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From left: Dior 5 Couleurs Eyeshadow Palette in Hypnotize and Surratt Beauty Artistique Eyeshadow in Brunâtre.

FROM TOP: VAN MOSSEVELDE + N/AUGUST; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; HANNAH WHITAKER (PROP STYLIST: RACHEL HAAS)

M

y private life is so valuable—I don’t want to sell it,” says Jessica Chastain. We’re in a swanky hotel room in Manhattan, and Chastain, the screen siren–iest movie star you know and the face of Ralph Lauren’s new fragrance, isn’t saying she won’t open up. What she’s saying is: She won’t open up unless we were to ask her about, say... Trumpcare: “I grew up in a low-income family. I was raised by a single mother. My grandmother had a child when she was a teenager—she was taught abstinence, the least effective form of birth control. When you take away health care from women, you’re keeping women out of the workforce because you’re eliminating their choice of when to start a family. I’m the first person in my family to go to college and create a career for myself. Planned Parenthood is where I got my birth control pills.” Dirty secrets: “I love all the Housewives reality shows. It’s so against all the movies I do! Vanderpump Rules? Heaven. I used a lot of Teresa from The Real Housewives of New Jersey for A Most Violent Year. I need a character that’s Erika Jayne [from The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills]—I’ll be in some movie, and you’ll see that. She just looks like a Barbie doll.” Creating an image: “When I was a little girl, I would sneak into [my grandmother’s] room and smell her sweaters because they still had perfume on them. At a very young age, I knew I wanted people to be drawn to me in that way. Perfume says a lot about you before you say anything about yourself.... I have a different perfume for every character I play. Celia Foote in The Help was Chanel No. 5. Marilyn Monroe supposedly wore only Chanel No. 5 to bed, so I thought, Oh, this is perfect.” Her perfect-skin secret: “I have so many sunscreens. It has to be at least 50. Right now I’m wearing a La Mer one.”


CROWN VIC

Victoria Beckham is making it increasingly easy to be...Victoria Beckham. With her fashion line, we learned how to dress like her. With her makeup line, we learned how to smolder like her. And now, with her second collection for Estée Lauder, we have learned how to finetune her precise brand of sex appeal. Her next collection: How to Marry the Hottest Man of All Time.

Clockwise from left: Victoria Beckham Estée Lauder Makeup Collection Lip Pencil in Victoria is “the perfect not-too-mauvy, not-too-gray nude—and the most-used item in my makeup bag right now,” Beckham says. Morning Aura Illuminating Creme: “It moisturizes and tightens. I always apply it right before I get off a plane.” Eye Palette: “I especially love the gray—it’s so fresh. I used it in my fall show.” Cheek Creme in Blonde Mink: “It reminds me of when my mom would dab her lipstick on my cheeks because I looked a little ‘peaky.’” Eye Matte Duo in Saphir/Orange Vif: “The rich blue is inspired by the shadow I wore when I got my OBE.”

(More) British Are Coming

R

aucous color, lots of sparkle, boyishly handsome British musicians. No, this is not the scene at a Shoreditch nightclub. (Though, yes, it could be that, too.) We’re talking the high-street British makeup lines new to our shores. East London–based Sleek Makeup, long a favorite of insiders like makeup artist Lisa Eldridge and beauty vlogger Habiba Da Silva, specializes in highlighter palettes of the megashimmer, mega-statement variety. Models Own and Lottie London aren’t short on shock value either, with metallic lip colors, Crayola-box-bright palettes, and face-glitter kits. Oh, and the cute musicians? Lottie London’s Crush blushes are named after former members of the British boy band One Direction (Zayn, Harry). We predict they, too, could be transatlantic crossover hits. —JESSICA CHIA

Discover more of our favorite beauty brands from across the pond at allure.com/british-brands.

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From top: Models Own Celestial Chrome Lip Topper in Stardust, Lottie London Blush Crush in Harry, and Sleek Makeup Major Matte in Rioja Red.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: GRAHAM POLLACK (PROP STYLIST: RACHEL HAAS); COURTESY OF ESTÉE LAUDER; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; GRAHAM POLLACK (PROP STYLIST: RACHEL HAAS)

BE AUT Y REPORTER


primary school The only time we’d encourage—hell, applaud— touching a fresh coat of color? When it’s audacious, bright, and on a suede Chanel bucket bag.

PROP STYLIST: RACHEL HAAS

photographed by maxime poiblanc

FASHION NOTES

cult object

Chanel suede-and-leather bag, $3,200, at select Chanel stores.

SEPTEMBER 2017 ALLURE

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FA S H I O N N OT E S

you say you want a revolution? photographed by nicolas kantor

Clothing and accessories throughout by Jahnkoy. Makeup colors: EyeShadow in Shimmering Nudes and Brow Pencil in Brunette by Burt’s Bees. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Andrew Mukamal. Hair: Tina Outen. Makeup: Fara Homidi. Manicure: Rica Romain. Models: Londone Myers, Aiden Curtiss, and India Graham.


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FA S H I O N N OT E S

here are the clothes that you put on your body to stay warm, to not be naked, to maybe ward off a mosquito or two. And there are the clothes you wear to convey status or maybe look sparkly on a red carpet. But then there are the clothes of Maria Kazakova, a Siberia-raised, New York City–based artist whose medium just happens to be fashion. Her line is called Jahnkoy, a word that means “new spirit village” in Crimean Tatar. She uses recycled and found materials: used clothing, flags, beads, pigeon feathers, soda cans, or anything else Kazakova might find on the street or at her local bodega. Naturally, no two pieces are alike, and everything is made to order. This is design driven by

Rings, model’s own.

craft, not consumption. Consider it putting the brakes on fast fashion— and then spinning a complete 180. The clothes on these pages are from Jahnkoy’s latest collection, menswear, technically (we didn’t let that hold us back) that takes inspiration from traditional African, Indian, Native American, and Crimean designs. Classic American streetwear— part of the collection is a collaboration with Puma—has been fringed, beaded, layered. Each look is its own unique tapestry: bright, beautiful, and, in a world of what’s-next-buy-it-nowpay-less, revolutionary.

The artist wearing one of her designs

SESSE LIND/SHOTVIEW SYNDICATION (CREATIVE DIRECTION: DEBORAH FERGUSON)

no two pieces are alike, and everything is made to order.


flashes of brilliance

NOTES: EXTRAS

Take 66 carats of ethically sourced diamonds. Hand them over to braid artist Shani Crowe. Watch the magic happen.

Silk top by Ellery. Makeup colors: Diorshow Bold Brow Mascara in Dark and Dior Addict Lip Glow in Berry by Dior. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion editor, Nicole Chapoteau. Hair: Shani Crowe. Makeup: Erin Parsons. Manicure: Roseann Singleton. Model: Mical.

photographed by stas may

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NOTES: EXTRAS

CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM RIGHT: STAS MAY; COURTESY OF SHANI CROWE (3)

s

hani Crowe can braid. No, like, she can really braid. One look at the intricate and bejeweled styles on these pages and you can see that the 28-year-old Chicago native is more artist than hairstylist. “I look at what I do as working with a living, moving canvas,” says Crowe, who approaches her craft with a mix of improvisation, imagination, and, most of all, patience. Case in point: The crown braid you see to the right was a five-hour undertaking. For Crowe, braiding is a cultural tradition that she learned from her aunts and cousins as a child. “The way black women speak about braiding, the techniques—it’s our own language and a way of tying us to our African roots,” she says. That deep appreciation for the history of hair braiding inspired Crowe’s first Allure shoot. “I was given these ethically sourced diamonds, and I thought, How cool to incorporate those gems into the braids of an African model. It felt...important.” —AMBER ANGELLE

Above and right: images from “Braids,” Crowe’s 2016 exhibit at the Fountainhead Lofts in Chicago. “In African culture, there is this idea of looking out for one another whether or not you’re related by blood,” she says. “I wanted to connect women in different ways.”

Above: Crowe is wearing coils of wheatand gray-colored hair in her own design. Right: Crowe strung diamond rings onto a six-foot-long braid while wrapping it around the top of Mical’s head, then fastened the dangling earrings using earring backs. Earrings and rings by Bulgari, Cartier, Chanel Fine Jewelry, Chopard, and DeBeers. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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BJARNE JONASSON/TRUNK ARCHIVE

SKIN NEWS

heat of the moment

Can you guess what’s sneakily, quietly aging your skin? You’re getting warmer.... By Katie Becker SEPTEMBER 2017 ALLURE

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SKIN NEWS

S

omething very odd was going on. Women in Saudi Arabia were getting the kinds of dark spots on their cheeks that are normally caused by the sun—only that should have been impossible. “They were wearing niqabs, which are traditional Muslim face coverings, so their skin was hardly ever exposed,” says Zoe Diana Draelos, a consulting professor of dermatology at Duke University, who researches hyperpigmentation. “Discoloration never should have been an issue for them.” A world away, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, another bizarre phenomenon: “Spin instructors and women who were taking hot yoga upwards of five times a week were getting more discoloration and persistent redness than other patients,” says Doris Day, a clinical associate professor of dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. They were slathering on sunscreen religiously, but it wasn’t making as much of a difference as you’d expect. “We used to think that UV rays were the only external cause of skin damage, like age spots, but a growing body of research tells us that’s just not true,” says Day. “Some forms of heat are proving to be as damaging as UV.” One hot yoga class a month or the occasional cozy fireside scotch isn’t going to do enough damage to age your skin, but it may not take all that much more to effect the kind of change you really don’t want to see. “Chefs and bakers, who are exposed to heat daily, have significantly higher rates of hyperpigmentation than other patients,” says Whitney Bowe, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. And according to a study from Seoul National University College of Medicine, just 30 minutes of heat exposure three times a week can be enough to change your skin after six weeks—it causes protective antioxidant levels in the skin to drop and genes to create MMP proteins that break down collagen and cause wrinkles. And just like the sun’s UV rays, heat can penetrate skin down to its deepest layers. “We now know that heat triggers melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells within our skin, to create the pigment that causes age spots as a defense mechanism,” says Draelos, who is studying—and teaching other dermatologists about—the effects of heat on skin. “Melanocytes react when they’re injured, and heat is a form of injury.” You’re more likely to wind up with heat-induced dark spots if you’re Asian, African-American, or Latina, since susceptibility to hyperpigmentation is genetic. So all of that is the not-so-great news, but there’s an upside, too. Now that we know heat ages skin, we can do

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something about it. One of the best defenses we have is—get this—foundation. Look for ones that contain minerals like titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, iron oxides, or kaolin. “These ingredients can act as physical blockers against infrared heat,” says Draelos. (Infrared heat accounts for about 50 percent of radiation from the sun, so that’s a big deal.) The more minerals you slap on, the better, says Draelos, so full-coverage foundation is best. But let’s be honest: Wearing a full face of makeup on your morning run couldn’t be less appealing. So try pairing a lightweight foundation (like BareMinerals BareSkin) with antioxidant sunscreens and serums (like SkinMedica Total Defense + Repair). There’s also a marine extract called Venuceane “that’s one of the few ingredients that keeps skin cool for an extended period of time,” says Jordana Herschthal, a dermatologist in Boca Raton, Florida. We like Colorescience Even Up Clinical Pigment Perfector (studies suggest you have to apply it twice a day to get its skin-cooling benefits). Or you can go a little more old-school: Cooling overheated skin with an icy shower (ack) or a refrigerated mask (much better) brings down your skin’s temperature. And if you do it right after you get hot, it’ll be enough to lessen the damage, says Day. So try stashing a mask or a gel moisturizer, like Neutrogena Hydro Boost Water Gel, next to the sparkling lemonade—both are excellent ways to chill out. —WITH REPORTING BY LEXI NOVAK

BJARNE JONASSON/TRUNK ARCHIVE

“Spin instructors were getting more discoloration and persistent redness than other patients.”


THE FRAGRANCE PRO

FASHION SCENTS By Francis Kurkdjian

In 1921, Coco Chanel placed her name on a perfume bottle and transformed the world of fragrance. Chanel No. 5 was the first scent to bear the name of a fashion house, not a perfumery. And it introduced the concept that fragrance can represent a look or a style. (It also paved the way for dozens of other Chanel fragrances, including the brand-new Gabrielle Chanel.) Now, almost a century later, nearly every major designer aims to translate his or her aesthetic through fragrance. For a perfumer, it’s a creative process that can assume any shape. Some designers I’ve worked with want to capture a mood, while others offer specific direction. When I collaborated on Narciso Rodriguez For Her, the inspiration was a piece of pale-pink satin. But the goal is always the same: to extract a brand’s essence and define a moment in time—not just a trend.

Chloé A modern classic, this scent continues to be a reference point for both designers and perfumers. With powdery notes surrounding a rose core, it’s precisely layered—almost tailored.

Burberry My Burberry Blush When I worked with designer Christopher Bailey on the first My Burberry, his idea was to create a fragrance that suggested the cool quiet of a London garden. This scent continues that theme, but in a playful way. It’s dewy and sparkling. Gucci Bloom A soft and petal-y blend of tuberose and jasmine absolute, it’s the first scent developed for Gucci by designer Alessandro Michele.

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HANNAH WHITAKER (PROP STYLIST: RACHEL HAAS)

Calvin Klein Obsessed for Women The true boldness of this scent is that it totally reimagines the original, Obsession, over 30 years later. It has a quiet, sensual aura that feels very intimate. You can sense it developing on your skin.


PERSPECTIVE

Cotton dress by Ulla Johnson. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Solange Franklin. Hair: Caile Noble. Makeup: Courtney Perkins.

THE GOOD LIFE

We’ve found the fountain of youth and it’s a cabin in the Catskills, where model Helena Christensen is turning back the clock one bowl of pasta at a time. Photographed by Katie McCurdy

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PERSPECTIVE

W

atch the “Wicked Game” video on YouTube. No, seriously. Before you read another word on this page, pore over these photos, or scroll Instagram to see what @helenachristensen ate for breakfast today, please take four minutes and four seconds to…OK, you’re back. Thank you. It’s been nearly three decades since that Peruvian-Danish supermodel wrapped her tan, coltish limbs around Chris Isaak on that beach in Hawaii. Now look at her. Still hot as hell. It goes without saying that we all want to know exactly what she’s been up to for the last 28 years. Because it’s not a frozen-in-time face or a joyless chiseled body on display here. No, what Christensen has at 48 is far more beautiful. And far more covetable. A smile that beams true happiness, a body that is powerful yet feminine, and an outlook that has never seen the “anti” in aging. Best of all: She doesn’t keep secrets. —PATRICIA TORTOLANI

Silk top by Hellessy. Details, see Shopping Guide.

I feel her skin and think, How can you look like that at 100? My grandmother has the most beautiful, softest skin. And all she ever uses is water, soap, and Nivea. Over the years, I’ve used hundreds of different products, amazing-smelling oils, scrubs, and serums. In my head I think that if I mix them up in a magical way, something miraculous will happen. But every time I visit my grandma, I go back to the soap, the water, and the Nivea.

I’m completely frustrated, and that’s what keeps me going. I used to wake up in the morning and sprint, which is a great way to spark your metabolism and get your brain tuned up. And in my mid-30s, I started boxing. My newest exercise is pole dancing, and it’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done. The upper-body strength you need to carry out any of the moves is mind-blowing.

I eat what I desire... I’m not the kind of person who will limit myself to any kind of food. I could not live without bread and pasta. I eat real butter and drink whole milk. And I’m obsessed with Japanese food and Moroccan stews. So when I think about working out, yes, it’s good for the mind—but it’s also because I eat a hell of a lot of food. ...and I take a couple of pills every day. I was always the one carrying around the plastic pillbox with

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“POLE DANCING IS THE HARDEST EXERCISE I’VE EVER DONE.” the days of the week on it, spilling vitamins in my bag. When I was approached by Lumity, I tried [the supplements] for a few months and saw that I could eliminate a lot of the other pills I was taking. They all contain vitamin D, zinc, flaxseed oil. I’m taking care of my insides and my outsides, and that’s the best I can do.

We were obsessed with the sun. I remember being on a shoot in the middle of a desert with Peter Lindbergh and his team. We would slather ourselves in Eight Hour Cream from Elizabeth Arden to get a deep, dark tan. That’s basically how we took care of our skin in our 20s. So do I have regrets? Yes, a lot. If I could go back with the knowledge I have now, I would do so much differently. Now I use sun protection on my face and chest every day. I like the Nimue Sun-C line. And I don’t lie out in the sun. I prefer to be walking through the woods.

I really suck at meditation, but I know it’s important. I can’t just sit still and think of a mantra or repeat a thought or a word. But there are other ways of finding your stillness. Sometimes I do it by organizing or cleaning. I recently took up piano again, and that is a very good way of being in a calm zone by myself and using my mind differently. That’s my form of meditation. The key is to find what works for you.

Christensen and one of the loves of her life, her mini Australian shepherd, Kuma. Earrings by Altuzarra. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Want to know every single product in Helena Christensen’s beauty routine? Go to allure.com/ helena-christensen.


NEED MORE REASONS TO EMBRACE EVERY BIRTHDAY? WE CAN GIVE YOU SEVEN. BY JESSICA CHIA 82

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THE BEST IS YET TO COME

RICHARD BURBRIDGE/ART + COMMERCE

WELLNESS REPORT


WELLNESS REPORT

T

he ink that’s been spilled telling women how to look younger and defy aging could fill an Olympic-size pool. Or 20. But then you look at Diane Keaton. Or Angela Bassett. Or the gorgeous glittery-eyed model on that last page. And you have to ask yourself: Just what are we trying to “defy”? It’s impossible to quantify every great thing that comes with age—but here’s a solid start.

1. YOUR DOUBLE CHIN DISAPPEARS.

When twenty- and thirtysomethings say they want to get rid of fat under the chin, dermatologists may tell them to sleep on it...for a decade. The issue often has as much to do with youth as it does with diet and exercise or genetics—which means that some double chins correct themselves: “As we mature, the fat pads under our chin tend to get smaller,” says Whitney Bowe, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. So much so that she advises some young women to hold off on noninvasive (but pricey) procedures for removing fat under the chin (like CoolMini or Kybella) for a few years. At which point they might also be able to toss their contour palettes. “In your 30s and 40s, your face is not as round, and you tend to get more of that high-cheekbone effect,” says Jeannette Graf, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

2. YOU’RE A LOT HAPPIER.

Here’s a lovely little prediction that’s backed by science: You’re going to be happier in five years than you are right this second. A study in the Journal of Clinical Psychology found that people tended to get happier—and more adept at regulating their emotions—the older they got. And things only get better. “Happiness levels keep going up in a linear fashion from your 20s to your 90s,” says the study’s author, Dilip Jeste, the director of the Stein Institute for Research on Aging at the University of California, San Diego. At the same time, levels of anxiety, depression, and stress go down, often regardless of life circumstances. “We talk about the fountain of youth being in the 20s and 30s,” says Jeste. “But we found that was the period with the most stress, anxiety, and depression.”

3. THE BAGS UNDER YOUR EYES LET UP.

Take this, millennials: Research in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science found that eye bags’ appearance improved from morning to evening for women between 55 and 65 years old—but not for their younger counterparts. The likely explanation behind this unlikely phenomenon: Younger women’s eye bags are often fatty deposits, while older women’s tend to be caused by fluid retention, which increases at night but lessens, with gravity’s help, throughout the day.

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“HAPPINESS LEVELS KEEP GOING UP.” 4. SEX GETS HOTTER.

Your mom is probably getting off more than you. (Really sorry to go there, but we’re making an important point.) A study in The American Journal of Medicine found that 70 percent of women in their 40s and 50s said they had an orgasm the last time they had sex—nearly 10 percent more than 18- to 24-year-olds. There’s a good chance it’s because there’s more spontaneity later in life, says Mary Jane Minkin, a clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at Yale School of Medicine. Plus there’s this: The longer you’ve known your body, the better you know how—and where—to press its buttons.

5. YOUR SKIN LOOKS GLOWIER.

In middle age, you get the kind of glow that you just can’t fake with a highlighter (even a really good one). “You have this sweet spot from your 30s to your 50s when moisture levels in the skin are at their peak,” says Bowe. The less awesome news is that after your 50s, hydration levels start to dip. The best fix: “A moisturizer with vitamin E is great—we produce it in our sebaceous glands when we are young, and it diminishes when we get older,” Graf says. (We like Kiehl’s Ultra Facial Moisturizer and Fresh Seaberry Moisturizing Face Oil.)

6. YOU CAN SAVE A TON ON WAXING.

That is, if body-hair removal is your thing. (If not, move on to number 7: There’s no win for you here.) The hair on your arms, legs, and bikini line starts to get less obvious—meaning it grows in lighter and thinner—right around your 40th birthday, when testosterone levels start to dip, Graf says. And that’s pretty good timing, because you may want to start rethinking waxing altogether: As you lose collagen and your skin gets thinner, more aggressive forms of hair removal, like hot waxes, can cause irritation and potentially long-term discoloration. Graf recommends sugaring: “It uses a mixture of honey, lemon, glycerin, and sugar; it’s much gentler than wax.”

7. YOU’RE MORE OPEN-MINDED. A study at the University of Michigan found that women in their 50s were more empathetic than their younger counterparts. “Acceptance improves with age, especially in women. You may have strong views and opinions, but you can understand others,” Jeste says. And that’s a very beautiful thing.


EARTH DAYS

THE GREEN MOVEMENT

So you think eco-friendly fashion is synonymous with burlap, hemp, and joylessness? Some very savvy designers would beg to differ. By Loren Savini Photographed by Colin Leaman

Silk top and pants by Stella McCartney. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Coquito Cassibba. Hair: David Colvin. Makeup: Courtney Perkins. Manicure: Elina Ogawa. Model: Hanna Sorheim.

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THE GREEN MOVEMENT

SUSTAINABLE FASHION HAS MADE SAVING THE WORLD ONE THING IT NEVER WAS: GLAMOROUS. Cotton dress by Mara Hoffman. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Y

ou hail a green cab to Brooklyn. By sheer power of waste vegetable oil, you arrive at a warehouse— scratch that. You arrive at a reclaimed textile mill. The roof is tiled in solar panels. You’re greeted by the scent of biodynamic basil and aeroponic tomatoes. A waiter offers you a house-made kombucha in a martini glass. To your right: Leonardo DiCaprio cracking jokes with Elon Musk. Marion Cotillard floats by in a floral Reformation wrap gown that practically has a French accent all its own. Across the roof: Gisele in a ruffly

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Viktor & Rolf upcycled couture number, absorbed in conversation with Jane Goodall, who is gesticulating excitedly, vegan tempura in hand. Meanwhile, Emma Watson stands in the corner awkwardly tugging at her ethically sourced shift dress. Welcome to the totally made-up yet not totally implausible sustainablefashion party. (The only thing unlikely here is Emma Watson being awkward.) See, it turns out that fashion with a conscience is not comprised of sad burlap-sack dresses and miniskirts made from the naturally fallen eyelashes of rescued circus animals.

On a scale of chic, it’s more like the opposite. It’s H&M creating lines made with recycled materials, like shoreline waste. It’s Levi’s checking in on how much water a pair of 501s uses (1,000 gallons in a lifetime of being grown, worn, and washed). It’s non-awkward Emma Watson strolling the red carpet in a Calvin Klein pantsuit made almost entirely from recycled plastic bottles. Sustainable fashion today is considered and elevated—and elegant. If the fashion world is a reflection of where we are socially—flowers for the antiwar ’60s, shoulder pads for the opulent ’80s—it follows that 2017


THE GREEN MOVEMENT brings with it recycled fibers. Because this is where we are: with a White House that denies climate change at the same time that scientists (as opposed to “scientists”) are freaking the hell out that carbon dioxide, methane, and other greenhouse gases are choking the life out of planet Earth faster than anyone saw coming. So the people respond. We look at where our coffee comes from. We look at where our reclaimed wood comes from. And increasingly, we look at where our dresses are coming from. Responsibly made clothes are an emotional—and practical—response from an industry that has (if we’re being honest, and we’ve come this far) created a lot of the trouble. Aside from dyes running into our waterways, there’s overall water usage (you need about 713 gallons of water to make a single cotton T-shirt), pesticides used to grow cotton, petroleum used to make polyester, the deforestation behind rayon and viscose, and on and on. The fashion industry has been a major player in the slow, systemic destruction of the environment. But there’s a silver lining. A sexy, high-cut, stunning silver lining. We can thank Stella McCartney, who taught us that eco fashion was not a contradiction in terms, for that lining. Back in 2001, when the rest of us were trying to figure out what GMO stood for, McCartney showed her first vegan collection at Paris fashion week. Obviously you won’t find any real leather, skin, fur, or feathers on anything that bears her name, but—and this is her genius—you wouldn’t know the difference between her materials and those used by any other high-end label. She doesn’t sandblast denim in the name of distressed jeans (it’s been linked to lung disease in factory workers) and is a member of the Ethical Trading Initiative, an alliance promoting workers’ rights and equality. Stella McCartney is now committed to becoming a zero-deforestation company (nearly a third of rayon and viscose is made from dissolvable pulp from endangered forests). If McCartney is the matriarch of eco fashion, Reformation is the It girl. You’ve seen the cut-up-tohere dresses on the Taylor Swifts and Karlie Klosses of the world. The company’s “RefScale” lets you see the environmental footprint of every item. So you can feel better that the demure, off-the-shoulder dress saved 26 pounds of carbon dioxide, 664 gallons of water, and 3.2 pounds of waste (compared to similar dresses

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713: GALLONS

OF WATER USED TO MAKE A TYPICAL COTTON T-SHIRT from conventional lines). Add to the list Alabama Chanin for T-shirts and trench coats; Amour Vert for beachy, SoCal-cool sundresses; and Mara Hoffman for clothes that make you want to live in St.-Tropez, and you have the makings of a fashion trend that has nothing to do with hemlines. “When I started, I wasn’t concerned about where our wool was coming from,” says Julie Rubiner, the manager of sweater design at Eileen Fisher, a company that, while not on the cutting edge of high-end fashion, has quietly staked a claim as one of the most responsible, which may be more valuable to consumers in 2017. “But there comes a point at which you don’t want to be part of the typical supply chain. You want the next 30 years of the company to have a better footprint than the first 30.” These days, part of Rubiner’s job is to source responsibly made yarn from places like Italy and Peru. (Years ago, Eileen Fisher learned of the mistreatment of rabbits at angora farms in China and immediately stopped using it. To date, the company still doesn’t use angora.) Linda Balti, the founder of Amour Vert, has gotten creative with sustainability practices—the company has a resource-sharing agreement with another company that ensures trucks aren’t on the road empty. “The companies that articulate their sustainable policies and are honest about their challenges tend to be more sustainable,” says Jason Kibbey, the CEO of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition, a nonprofit company in San Francisco that helps fashion companies become more sustainable. For now, Stella McCartney, which says about 53 percent of its womenswear is sustainable, may not be the norm. The same goes for Patagonia, which donates 1 percent of sales to environmental groups. But then again, they’re no longer the outliers, either.

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PHENOMENON

ON MILLENNIALS? 94

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SØLVE SUNDSBØ/ART + COMMERCE

IS YOUTH WASTED

In a word: Hell, yeah! Never has there been a group of people so committed to eating healthier, working out harder, or looking better. Molly Young asks her generation: What’s so wrong with ordering that second margarita?


PHENOMENON

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SHAILENE WOODLEY

KARLIE KLOSS

GENERATION WELLNESS

Their mission: Always feel and look awesome.

GIGI HADID

JESSICA ALBA

HANNAH FALLIS BRONFMAN

agreement on what that word means, despite the fact that I, a confirmed millennial, have two meditation apps on my phone and consume more greenery than most herbivorous mammals and haven’t had a glass of cow-derived milk in half a decade. (I can’t prove that my generation is responsible for getting Starbucks to offer almond milk nationwide, but I have a strong suspicion about it.) Wellness, after all, meant something entirely different 40 years ago. Young people in the 1960s knew that cigarettes were bad, but they didn’t know how bad. Drugstore foundation did not come with SPF. You couldn’t buy tooth-whitening strips on Amazon. There weren’t thousands of YouTube tutorials on Pilates arms and barre butts available for free at the tap of a finger. People basted

AMANDA CHANTAL BACON

MIRANDA KERR

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

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uesday, 8 P.M., at a bar in SoHo on a warm presummer day. I had plans to meet a colleague for drinks after work. After-work drinks, in my experience, are a circumscribed ritual: Each person orders one cocktail over the course of a polite hour, or maybe two glasses of wine—just enough alcohol to make conversation slightly more fun but not enough for either party to say or do anything remotely compromising. The colleague, whom I’ll call Emma, arrived already sipping from a bottle of moss-colored celery-kale juice with the price sticker ($10.99) still attached. “Are you on a cleanse?” I asked, because the whole point of toting around a bottle of green juice is for people to ask whether you are on a cleanse and then for you to grimace and say, “Yes, and I’m dying.” “No,” she said. “I’m just trying to inject myself with as many nutrients as possible. I was thinking I’d just ask the bartender to pour a shot in here,” she said, jiggling the bottle. “Really?” “God, no,” Emma said, laughing. “I’m not drinking.” Of course. Emma is 29 and wears sunscreen every day. She is not gluten-intolerant but avoids it anyway, just to be safe. She cycles through a wardrobe of luxury athleisure gear that I would value at roughly $5,000 on the basis of the Instagram photos in which she wears these items to branded fitness classes. I’m certain she’s had preventive Botox. I’m pretty sure she’s had subtle lip injections. The idea that she would drink on a weeknight was, to her, literally laughable. Emma may be a particularly privileged case—Botox isn’t cheap— but she’s not unusual in her preference for juice and HIIT sessions over drinks and social cigarettes. Millennials are obsessed with “wellness”: We exercise more, smoke less, and eat healthier than previous generations. Companies like Twitter and Facebook attract young workers with perks like on-site acupuncture and farmers’ markets, and households headed by millennial parents are the top purchasers of organic groceries. We’re on track to be the glowiest cohort of all time. Still, I put “wellness” in quotes because I’m not entirely sure there’s


PHENOMENON

look at the 23- to 37-year-old set. Sounds good on the surface, right? But a total lack of irresponsibility may not be the straight path to success that it sounds like. For all of modern history, youth has been a time period designated specifically for screwing up. We have a whole vocabulary of phrases devoted to the concept: “youthful indiscretions,” “growing pains,” “sowing wild oats.” Today we’re more likely to soak our wild oats overnight and sprinkle them with goji berries than to sow them. (Tinder notwithstanding, a recent study suggested that millennials are actually having sex with fewer people than Gen Xers did at the same age.)

themselves in mineral oil–based solutions and laid out in the sun as a recreational activity, heedless of the (dermatologically catastrophic) consequences. These days, our knowledge base is immense, and our self-beautification possibilities are endless. “Young patients are very concerned with preventive methods,” says Melissa Doft, a plastic surgeon and clinical assistant professor of surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College, who treats some of New York City’s sparkliest specimens. “They always question what they can do to help delay aging and to protect themselves. My first recommendation is to always wear sun protection and to never start smoking.” As Doft’s

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advice suggests, it can be hard to tell the difference between our pursuit of health for its own sake and the pursuit of health for beautyenhancing purposes. “Stay out of the sun and don’t smoke” is irreproachable as medical advice, but it’s also the credo of every crow’s-feet-fearing woman I know. Our shopping habits bear this out—40 percent of millennials either currently use wrinkle creams or plan to start using them soon. “The millennial personality is centered around individualism, high expectations, self-confidence, burnishing an image,” says Jean M. Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University and the author of Generation Me, a scholarly

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hatever the underlying motivations, I can’t help but wonder whether this wellness obsession signals a shift in social values. In 10 or 20 years, will we look back on our youth with virtuous approval rather than rueful romance? Are we quicker to embrace health than fun these days? And if so, why? “I think that image preservation has a lot to do with millennials’ coming into the job market in the recession and being very concerned about presenting the right image to employers,” says Twenge. She also acknowledges that our obsession with exerting self-control could be a reaction to the economic and cultural instability simmering around us: “Millennials have very, very high expectations for jobs and education, yet reality has not really gotten any easier.” In response, we make decisions where we can, dutifully applying sunscreen and eating our vegetables. This risk aversion leads to unquestionably good behaviors, yes, but also to ones that older generations might see as oddly conservative or limiting. The point of making mistakes, after all, is that you learn from them. You become a more complicated and empathetic person, a person whose imperfections and blunders give way to a nuanced perspective on all the facets of living. I’m not sure it’s possible for anyone to choreograph her life to become that person; it either happens or it doesn’t. I’m equally certain that green juice doesn’t help.

SØLVE SUNDSBØ/ART + COMMERCE

THE POINT OF MAKING MISTAKES, AFTER ALL, IS THAT YOU LEARN FROM THEM.


Yes, Queen Finding Helen Mirren. By Michelle Lee

Photographed by Scott Trindle

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arrive 15 minutes early at the Standard Hotel, but there appears to be some confusion. A guy at the front desk, a lanky twentysomething who looks like his other business card says “Williamsburg barber,” is helping me track down the events staffer I’m supposed to meet. “What are you here for?” I look around and whisper, “I’m here to interview...Helen Mirren.” “Oh, my God,” he enunciates quietly. “You just made me so excited. She’s like the most beautiful woman...” he stutters, “...woman...woman of a certain age.” In just two minutes, the mere mention of Dame Helen Mirren, the 72-year-old badass and Oscar-winning feminist icon, has reduced this man to mush. After a few panicked text messages, I realize I’m at the wrong Standard and race across town in an Uber, making it, miraculously, only a few minutes late. I enter the correct Standard Hotel, in the East Village, and almost instantly spot Mirren’s silvery blonde hair at reception. She gives me a warm “Helloooo,” then walks with me while I apologetically recount my geographical screwup. We’re ushered to a comfortable private dining nook, and before we even sit, Mirren tells the waitress, “I’ll have scrambled eggs, please.” No need to look at a menu. Helen Mirren knows what she wants. Of course, anyone who writes about Mirren speaks of her fierce wit, incomparable talent, sailor’s affection for cursing, ageless sex appeal, and admirable DGAF candor. For a woman who has played a queen multiple times in her five-decade career, she possesses the unique quality of appearing both royal and edgy. At first glance, she looks surprisingly conservative, in an A-line dress and classic white cardigan. But then there are the shoes: a pair of strappy red cage heels that I imagine she pulled off a shelf labeled “Pure Sex.” Not only in her career but also in life, the woman’s got range. She’s the blueprint for every Jennifer Lawrence and Emma Stone who came after her, proving that you can be outspoken yet respected by so many disparate groups if you stay wholly true to yourself. In recent years, the term “authenticity” has been so maddeningly overused that it often fails to mean anything anymore. But Mirren has earned her reputation for authenticity, radiating a sense of humor and a passion for fun that’s often—unfairly—referred to as youthful (because, really, does fun die at 40?). She’s the rare A-list Dame who can pull off five-inch Lucite stripper heels on the red carpet and pink hair inspired by an episode of America’s Next Top Model at age 67. She can hang with Vin Diesel one minute and the freaking queen the next. It’s not that she transforms the lowbrow into highbrow—she just makes it her own. As her Collateral Beauty costar Kate Winslet put it: “She is everyone’s friend.”

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Black wool jacket by Haider Ackermann. Silver earrings by Jennifer Fisher. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Hannes Hetta. Hair: Luke Hersheson of Hershesons salon. Makeup: Charlotte Tilbury. Manicure: Marian Newman. Prop stylist: Sophie Durham. Production: Sarah Thompson for Creative Blood Agency.


Viscose nylon dress by Carmen March. Silver earrings by Lady Grey. Makeup colors: Infallible Total Cover Foundation in Creamy Natural, Brow Stylist Shape & Fill in Brunette, and Colour Riche Matte Sharpenable Lip Liner in Matte in Manhattan by L’OrÊal Paris. Details, see Shopping Guide.


In the play Troilus and Cressida, 1968 In The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover, 1990

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: EVERETT COLLECTION; COVENTRY TELEGRAPH ARCHIVE/MIRRORPIX VIA GETTY IMAGES; EVERETT COLLECTION (2); COURTESY OF SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

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In Age of Consent, 1969

uring our morning together, I learn that Mirren is a fan of condiments (her scrambled eggs get ketchup and Tabasco). She’s a self-professed terrible procrastinator. She loves to sleep late. She’s a generous conversationalist who asks copious questions. Her perfect day consists of a long family barbecue in New York, then England, then Los Angeles, and ideally she’d have a teleportation machine. A few days before we meet, Mirren made a rousing commencement speech at Tulane University that seamlessly covered the gamut from Mike Tyson face tattoos to the war in Syria. The clever, hopeful, and seriously funny remarks were packed with pearls of wisdom: “No good can ever come from tweeting at 3 A.M.” and “No matter what sex you are, or race, be a feminist.” When Mirren was a child, open political discussion was encouraged in her household. Her father, a Russianborn musician turned taxi driver, took part in demonstrations against fascists in 1936. Eighty-one years later, his daughter would join New York City’s Women’s March; she recalls that everyone there “had good reason to be angry,” but she marvels at how the event was “positive, funny...joyous.” Mirren has been a vocal detractor of the current administration. “[Trump] just said and did whatever it took to get what he desired,” she scoffs. “That is quite terrifying, because it means there’s a lack of morality there and a lack of conscientiousness.” But if there’s one bright spot, she supposes, she suspects he’s less of an extremist than he lets on. “That was the horror of the Republicans: They thought that he was actually a bit of a secret New York-y-type liberal who was quite cool with gays getting married, wasn’t he?” Staying actively engaged in helping to push forward change is one thing, but she cautions that we’ll all need to wean off the IV drip of constant rage eventually. “It’s a bit like watching a car crash. There is a sort of mesmerizing horror—it’s why we love horror films.”

In The Queen, 2006

In The Fate of the Furious, 2017

A champion for women’s rights, she admits she’s conflicted when I ask her about Melania and Ivanka. “You look at old Mel there, and she is one of the most powerful women in the world because she could take him down. She almost did that with the hand. [She puts on a Disney Evil Stepmother voice and mimics the hand brush-off seen round the world.] ‘Don’t touch me.’” “I’m Eastern European, you know; [we’ve] got these dark souls,” she quips. “That dark Slovakian soul is about to come out. She’s only got to do a nice interview with Allure,” she laughs, drawing out the “u,” making it sound entirely regal. All-yyooooorrr. “[Ivanka] talks a good game, but there’s no substance. Her book is so ignorant about how the majority of women live, talking about ‘Make time for yourself to have a massage.’ Puh-lease.” In her lifetime, Mirren has seen the lasting impact of women in positions

of authority. “Although I completely disagreed with her politics, Mrs. Thatcher was a great role model for women...a little four-year-old watching TV says, ‘Who’s this, Mommy or Daddy?’ ‘That’s the prime minister.’ Immediately, the girl thinks, Oh, I see; that’s possible.” She can’t fathom why others still don’t get the optics. “The idiocy of the Republican Party to have a room full of 25 old white men making decisions about the health of this country that is 50.8 percent women and 37 percent other races—I looked this up!” she says. She firmly believes that putting women on an equal playing field helps everyone. “If you go to a place where women are given advantages, life gets better, especially for children.” Mirren considers herself a proud feminist today but has had a complicated history with the label. “I wasn’t into the very didactic feminism of the ’60s and ’70s because I liked


Black-and-white angora elastane dress by Aalto. Black leather boots by AlaĂŻa. Silver earrings by Lady Grey. Silver ring by Efva Attling. Details, see Shopping Guide.


wearing makeup and high heels,” she recalls. “That was a no-no. It was sort of ‘That’s playing to the patriarchy.’ I was thinking, Well, I just really like it. Then as feminism developed, they realized you can like nice dresses, high-heeled shoes, and makeup. That’s not stopping you from being feminist.” orn Helen Lydia Mironoff (her parents Anglicized the family name to Mirren when she was around nine years old) to a Russian father and an English mother, the actress grew up in Southend-onSea outside of London. Her life’s highlight reel reads like a legend: In 2015, she became one of only 23 actors in the world to secure a triple crown of acting—Oscar, Emmy, and Tony. She needs only a Grammy for the coveted EGOT. She dated a Russian prince as well as her Excalibur costar Liam Neeson. When she was 38, she met director Taylor Hackford at her audition for 1985’s White Nights; they wed in 1997. For someone who’s spent a solid chunk of her life on movie sets, Mirren is still surprisingly and endearingly a fangirl. “Oh, I’m always starstruck any time I meet a movie star. I’m paralyzed,” she says. “I say, ‘Right,

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lands on Jessica Chastain, her costar in the 2010 thriller The Debt, whose sexiness, she says, lies somewhere in the mathematical equation of talent plus intelligence: “It’s not necessarily to do with confidence because I’m sure if [Jessica were] sitting here, she’d say, ‘Oh, God, I’m not confident at all.’ It’s an interior power that comes from her intelligence. When intelligence is combined with beauty, it’s extraordinary...[like] Natalie Portman.” That said, Mirren takes issue with the word “beauty.” “Maybe we’re attractive, interesting, or mesmerizing, but 90 percent of women are not what you’d call beautiful. Of course, beauty is inside, but still it’s a word. When it’s tied to pictures of people and amazing outfits on girls who can wear that stuff, it’s intimidating for the rest of us.” Our linguistic discussion leads to another term: I tell her that Allure is making a resolution to stop saying “anti-aging,” a move she firmly stands behind. In fact, she says that when L’Oréal approached her to work with the company, she made the same point, and luckily, the company was already on it. “I said, ‘This word “antiaging”—we know we’re getting older. You just want to look and feel as great as you can on a daily basis.’” It’s just that when people talk about any touchy subject—race, death, sex— they often lack the proper vocabulary to speak openly without devolving into

The truly ageless quality Mirren possesses is that she’s not trying to act like she’s 40. She’s actively shifting the paradigm of what it means to be in one’s 70s in Hollywood and society in general, but without a preachy agenda. She practices skin care but doesn’t worship at its altar. She reveals she’s a wannabe haircutter who’s been “chopping away” at her own hair for the past year, and she confesses she doesn’t have much of a beauty routine. “At least I clean my face now,” she says. Yet she’d never shame anyone for getting a nip or needle prick. “Anyone should be able to do what they want. If they look in the mirror and go, ‘I look good’ and go out in a positive way— I don’t want anyone to feel miserable.” Throughout her teens and 20s, Mirren was racked by physical insecurity. “It was the time of Twiggy, and I did not look like a twig,” she says. “My cheeks were too fat, legs were too short, breasts too big.” If there were advice for her younger self, it’d be to say “Fuck off” more and stop being so “bloody polite.” “In those days, you had to,” she says. “It’s hard to explain how difficult it is to overcome the culture. You become a voice in the wilderness. No one wants to listen.” I tell her I fully expect to live to 100 since times have changed and 40 is the new 20. She, for one, would like to live to be 150, mostly to witness

“If people treat me like the age I am, I get absolutely insulted, really cross.... No, no, no. I don’t want your seat.” Helen, just be natural; just be yourself. Don’t talk too much; don’t stare.’ I have to give myself all these instructions.” In nearly every profile written about her over the past four decades, the subject of her sexiness inevitably comes up. The self-effacing star humbly downplays it. “I could see why—when I got far enough back from my young self—they called me sexy in those days. I fell into the cliché of sexiness: blonde hair, tits, waist, which I hated at the time because it was not fashionable. You had to be thin and have a cigarette and only wear black. And I just never fit into that look.” Sexiness, however, is not easily defined. I offer my theory that it’s rooted in confidence—a glint in the eyes. She draws a blank for a few minutes to think of the particular human who embodies sexiness. She

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euphemisms. I tell her the story of the guy from the front desk fumbling to find the right words to describe her as “the most beautiful....” “He wanted to say ‘old lady,’ ” she howls. She admits she stumbles over social behavior around aging as well. “If people treat me like the age I am, I get absolutely insulted, really cross. I hate when people give up their seat for me. No, no, no. I don’t want your seat.” Helen Mirren, smasher of traditions, has also consciously selected roles that aren’t your typical over-50 parts, like her turns in action films such as The Fate of the Furious. “I’m so tired of movies about Alzheimer’s and cancer. And actually...” she catches herself, laughing, “I’ve just done a movie where I have cancer and he has Alzheimer’s. But that’s it—done and dusted.”

future mind-blowing advancements in technology. “I’m just amazed and awestruck by the development. It seems every day there’s a new thing that you go, Oh, my God, how does it do that?” she says. “I still haven’t quite gotten over GPS. What did we do before? I can’t get over seeing my little blue dot, especially when I’m walking.” Still, she’s happy to witness those breakthroughs with her feet planted firmly on the ground, should Elon Musk invite her to the moon. “I have a real terror of deep space...those huge, terrifying planets,” she shudders, admitting she even refused to see the movie Gravity in IMAX 3D. “No, I wouldn’t be going to the moon.” And then Helen Mirren at her absolute Helen Mirren–est: “There are too many places on the earth to explore first.”


Knit dress by Esteban Cortazar. Belt by Tod’s. Makeup colors: Infallible Pro-Glow Powder in Classic Ivory, Voluminous Lash Paradise mascara in Black, and Infallible Paints Matte lip color in Skinny Dip by L’Oréal Paris. Details, see Shopping Guide.


best

It’s that unique place where the metal studs meet the lace, where the past meets the present, and where the rubber meets the road. photographed by quentin de briey


western

easy rider On Katie Moore: silk dress and belt by Alexander McQueen. Leather boots from See by Chloé. Necklaces by Eli Halili. Rings by Ariana BoussardReifel and stylist’s own. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Zara Zachrisson. Hair: Tamas Tuzes. Makeup: Maud Laceppe. Manicure: Rica Romain. Set design: David de Quevedo. Production: The Production Factory NY.

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sundance kid Left: fur coat by Valentino. Right: lace dress by Gucci. Necklaces by Eli Halili. Details, see Shopping Guide.


on the fringe On Constance Jablonski: studded leather-andsuede jacket by Gucci. Cotton dress by Coach 1941. Necklace by Eli Halili. Details, see Shopping Guide.


outlaw angel Bikini top by Adriana Degreas. Makeup colors: Vitalist Healthy Elixir Foundation in Creamy Natural, TruNaked Eye Shadow Palette in Jewels, and Total Tease Mascara in Very Black by CoverGirl. Details, see Shopping Guide.


border town Left: viscose dress by Loewe. Leather-and-suede boots from See by ChloĂŠ. Silver bracelet by Child of Wild. Belt by Deborah Drattell. Right: wool-and-leather jacket by Prada. Silk dress from What Goes Around Comes Around. Necklace by Eli Halili. Details, see Shopping Guide.


frontier fantasy Green bikini top by Eberjey. Blue wool skirt by Miu Miu. White leather boots by Gucci. Belt, stylist’s own. Details, see Shopping Guide.


trail blazing Embroidered suede dress by Coach 1941. Silk dress by CĂŠline. Details, see Shopping Guide.


catch a fire Welcome to red at its most evocative, most shocking, most exciting. It woos you. It intoxicates you. It doesn’t make a statement—it makes an exclamation.

photographed by hans feurer

under cover Top (worn as hat) by Salvatore Ferragamo. Pearl earrings by Christopher Kane. Shine Shot Glassy Shine Lip Topcoat by Maybelline New York. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Laura Ferrara. Hair: Ward. Makeup: Wendy Rowe. Manicure: Donna D. Model: Riley Montana. Production: HG Producers.


seeing red Lace bodysuit by Givenchy. Sunglasses by Retrosuperfuture. Makeup colors: Le Prisme Blush in Passion and Le Rouge Lip Color in Fuchsia IrrĂŠsistible and Carmin Escarpin by Givenchy. Details, see Shopping Guide.


making a splash Cape, custom-made by stylist. Silk chiffon dress by Mikhael Kale. Matte Multiple in Siam by Nars. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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queen of hearts Sequined tulle dress by Dior. Nail polish in A List by Essie. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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flame throwers Silk cape and dress by Alberta Ferretti. Earrings by Oscar de la Renta. Eyeshadow in Spike and Relish and Naked Skin Shapeshifter contour palette in Medium Dark Shift by Urban Decay. Details, see Shopping Guide.


Think of your favorite lipstick or cream. Now take away the satisfying click of the pump or the weighty glass jar or the soothing orange blossom scent. Still enamored? Still think it’s working beautifully? A new wave of pared-down products banks on the answers being yes and definitely— but have they accounted for the power of beauty’s (rose-scented, goldflecked) sugar pills? By Liana Schaffner

S ’ Y T O U B A E E C B PLA T C E F F E PHO

HED P A R TO G

BY

A HOR

CIO

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magine walking into a beauty boutique and encountering a panorama of white walls. There are no glossy images of painted lips or feathery lashes on display, no models sniffing fragrance bottles with their necks arched, lost in an ecstasy of oud. The effect is so naked, it borders on chilly. Once you’ve adjusted to the empty glare, you approach a makeup counter and discover an equally stark presentation. Creams, lotions, and serums sit side by side in matching white jars. Sleek compacts and lipstick tubes form uniform rows across every shelf—a series of sameness, numbing rows of simplicity. In such an austere setting, with no stunning visuals, impressive packaging, or designer labels to flood the imagination, would beauty products still entice us? A few new companies say yes, insisting that luxury products don’t require bells or whistles or sculptural bottles to work their magic. “It’s about reinventing the dream,” says Marcia Kilgore, the entrepreneur behind such profoundly likable brands as Bliss and Soap & Glory. “So many products are presented as precious objects that we can aspire to, if not afford. I think the more compelling fantasy is to have access to all the products we want because there aren’t high price tags placing them out of reach.” Kilgore was so convinced of this concept’s broad appeal that she spent several years bringing it to life. She traveled to some of the world’s most trusted beauty labs in places that even sound reputable, like Switzerland and South Korea, meeting with the suppliers that develop cosmetics for both mass and luxury brands under one roof. “Most factories present a range of makeup in different tiers to a variety of brands,” says cosmetic chemist Ginger King. “Prestige brands typically select formulas from the top tier, which have the highest-quality ingredients, while a drugstore brand may pick from the second tier. Most brands add additional ingredients and pigments to make products unique to their lines.” After testing hundreds of cosmetics from suppliers, Kilgore picked products from the highest tiers. And then she did something unexpected. “I cut out the middleman,” she says. Her goal was to sell everything she purchased directly to consumers, avoiding distribution fees, warehousing costs, and retail markups. She could offer top-notch formulas at factory rates, charging around $2 for a lipstick or eye shadow that typically fetched $25 on the shelf. “In most cases, consumers aren’t paying for a beauty product alone, but for the retail space, marketing campaigns, and packaging that go into it,” she says. That’s no exaggeration. “Color

braced for impact. She anticipated a deluge of customers signing up en masse, crashing her server. Didn’t happen. “We had to work a little harder than I thought we’d have to,” she admits. “People could not believe that what we were offering was real. They were shocked by the actual price of a lipstick. They thought there must be a catch.” But it wasn’t only fear of a “catch” that had weakened the initial response; it was psychology. Kilgore had underestimated the deeply entrenched marketing cues that consumers are practically conditioned to obey— and deliberately seek out. “There are a ton of studies that indicate people look for ways to rationalize extreme differences in the price of products,” says Kit Yarrow, a consumer psychologist and the author of Decoding the New Consumer Mind: How and Why We Shop and Buy (Wiley). “A high price tag or gorgeous packaging allows us to believe that a product is going to work more effectively than a cheaper version, and then we can justify investing in it.” In other words, we’re more inclined to believe in a product that looks expensive and costs more precisely because it looks expensive and costs more. This may sound like circular logic—and it is. But it’s powerful enough to convince us that a product is yielding great results even when it isn’t. “It’s the placebo effect,” says Yarrow. “If we feel optimistic that a $30 lipstick is going to give us fuller lips, then there’s a good chance we’re going to notice fuller lips in the mirror. The power of persuasion is a proven concept in science, and it absolutely applies to beauty.” But it’s more than a simple mind trick: This phenomenon can still have real merit. “I may not necessarily agree with a product’s claims, but if a patient sings its praises and is happy with it, I’ll never take it away from her,” says Amy Wechsler, a New York City dermatologist who’s also a board-certified psychiatrist. “If a beauty product lifts someone’s mood and boosts her confidence, it has value.” There’s even a chance that emotionally investing in a product can produce more measurable results. “If you think a product is working well,” says Yarrow, “you’re more likely to apply it religiously and experience its benefits in full.” Just don’t think those “benefits in full” include Gisele-like cheekbones. “I used to work at a beauty counter, and there were always customers who believed a high-priced product would make them look like the girl in the ad,” says King. “At some level, we believe that the more we spend, the more we can transform.” This perception is so ingrained in our thinking that Kilgore had to write over it. She included a letter with each Beauty Pie product acknowledging that the lightweight feel of the packaging and recycled cartons might be surprising. “I wanted to say that we had made a decision to reduce expense, waste, and landfill while keeping the integrity of the product,” she says. Brands aren’t simply hoping to impress the idea that simple packaging can signal pure intent. Some have built an identity on this very theme. “Our logo is a white box,” says Tina Sharkey of the new e-commerce company Brandless, which she cofounded with Yes To (Carrots, Cucumbers, etc.) entrepreneur Ido Leffler. “Our message

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cosmetics don’t require expensive clinical trials [like skin-care products], so that money can go into creating an image— into advertising and packaging,” says King. To sidestep all that, Kilgore built a membershipbased online company called Beauty Pie—a tempting title that implies both indulgence and fairness. For $10 a month (with a three-month minimum), everyone, it seemed to proclaim, gets a piece of the action. Kilgore launched the site on December 6, 2016, in the U.K. and

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Even on a subliminal level, we’re drawn to the aura of innovation. “I know of one luxury brand that has a best-selling compact that opens up at an exact 60-degree angle,” says King. “Does that make it work any better? No. But it telegraphs precision.” While advanced ingredients and linear forms create confidence in a product, they do lack a certain sex appeal (no one ever coyly whispered “silicone polymers” when asked what lipstick they were wearing). Most of us still want to feel sexy or excited or something when we look at our beauty products, says Yarrow. And achieving that kind of a personal connection can require more than just filling up an online shopping cart. “I remember entering a Chanel boutique on my first visit to New York City,” says

” . M R O F S N A R T N CA E W

is we have nothing to hide.” Like Beauty Pie and the recently launched, humbly named skin-care company the Ordinary, Brandless is committed to transparency and providing high-quality consumer goods for negligible prices. The company offers around 200 all-natural and organic health, beauty, cleaning, food, and home essentials for exactly $3 a pop. That’s not a typo. But the fact that you probably thought it was for a moment just proves how low prices can still trigger doubt. Direct-to-consumer models aren’t simply trying to erase old assumptions. They’re attempting to earn trust—a much trickier proposition in this cynical age. “People are incredibly skeptical right now,” says Yarrow. On the upside, we’re also savvier and more informed. “Everyone is doing research, reading product reviews, and evaluating what they’re using more closely,” says Yarrow. “Shoppers aren’t willing to just take a brand’s word for it anymore. They want a more reliable source.” Make that an irrefutable source. Now more than ever (in an era that saw the birth of the term “fake news”), we’re finding comfort in the exactness of science. Companies like Brandless, Beauty Pie, and the Ordinary that are paring down the bells and whistles may well be tapping into the zeitgeist—we’re focused on technology, and for some of us the ingredient list is eclipsing the thrill of a heavy jar. “Brands used to brag about not changing their original formulas. That’s not a selling point anymore,” says Yarrow.

makeup artist Troy Surratt. “I splurged on a bottle of Chanel Égoïste. It was my only binge, and it felt so important. To this day, whenever I smell that scent, I’m reminded of how I felt as a slightly intimidated 19-year-old kid walking into an iconic store. There’s real power in that.” Surratt’s own beauty line has earned a global following by striking a balance between luxury and technology. His formulas are made in what he calls a “futuristic facility” in Japan. “Many Japanese manufacturers perform an auditory test on products,” says King. “They measure the loudness of the click that a lipstick tube or a compact makes, because a strong ‘snap’ indicates high quality. It’s like the motor of a luxury automobile; it has a very distinct sound.” The pleasant weight of a compact and a reassuring click have always appealed to our senses, but the idea that they determine a product’s value is no longer an openand-shut case. “What people care about is an experience,” says Sharkey. “We want products that unlock joy.” And as her company’s blank logo suggests, that fulfillment can take any shape. “Some women respond to luxury products because they love the way they look and feel so indulgent,” says Wechsler. “Other women get a thrill out of saving money or stocking up on inexpensive products—a product can mean anything to anyone.” While thinking about beauty’s placebo effect, I did some experimenting of my own. I used Beauty Pie staples in unassuming compacts, and powders that open at 60-degree angles from prestige brands (it’s a tough job, but...). Without exception, I weighed each new formula based on how it would suit my life—not how it would look sitting on my shelf. The sensible lengthening mascara in the plain black tube was just the thing to wake up my eyes in the morning, and the tomato-red lipstick in the pretty gold case made me long for a romantic night out. I chose the makeup and creams—not the packaging—that worked best. I identified with the products that identified with me. “Our personal brand has become more important to us than any other,” says Kilgore. Maybe our favorite beauty products no longer capture a dream; maybe they simply reflect our own reality.

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triple take The end of a braid is...exactly where you’d expect to find a ribbon. For a more creative take, McKnight added a trio of skinny bows to this twisty plait, knotting them along the top, middle, and bottom sections. On Lorena Maraschi: Cotton top by Jill Stuart. Bows, hairstylist’s own. Makeup colors: Brow Styler in Blond, Dual Finish Highlighter in Shimmering Buff, and Liquid Lipstick in Beige Vintage by Lancôme. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Elizabeth Fraser-Bell. Hair: Sam McKnight. Makeup: Polly Osmond. Manicure: Chisato Yamamoto. Production: Rosco Production.

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getting high “A punky, ’80s version of a ’60s beehive” is how McKnight describes this towering style, which he achieved with some energetic teasing and a blast of his brand-new line’s texturizing spray, Hair by Sam McKnight Cool Girl (it’s launching in the U.S. as we speak). A broad ribbon wrapped around the hairline and tied at the nape of the neck helps anchor all that height. Tulle top by Jill Stuart. Makeup colors: Les Beiges Healthy Glow Luminous Colour in Light, Stylo Yeux Waterproof Long-Lasting Eyeliner in Espresso, and Rouge Coco Gloss Moisturizing Glossimer in Subtil by Chanel. Details, see Shopping Guide.


spiky updo There has never been a swath of fabric as elegant as a black satin ribbon, which is why it’s the perfect foil to a faux-hawk. “It adds a touch of romance,” says McKnight. On Lily Stewart: Velvet dress by Gucci. Bows, hairstylist’s own. Makeup colors: Instroke Eyeliner in Shikkoku Black and Rouge Rouge lipstick in Dusky Honey by Shiseido. Details, see Shopping Guide.


seeing double A hair ribbon made of floppy pastel fibers is guaranteed to turn heads and start conversations. Not bad for a bow. Silkblend tops by Bally. Bows, hairstylist’s own. Details, see Shopping Guide.


front and center If Alice in Wonderland had a sister who lived in the East Village, this would be the iteration for her: girlie, audacious, and aggressively ironic. “A throwaway texture keeps the style from appearing too deliberate,� says McKnight. Lurex top by Gucci. Makeup colors: 4-Colour Allin-One Pen Eyes & Lips and Instant Light Lip Comfort Oil in Red Berry by Clarins. Details, see Shopping Guide.


SHOPPING GUIDE Cover: Carmen March viscose nylon dress, $680. Saks Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C. 212-753-4000. Lady Grey silver earrings, $180. Ladygreyjewelry.com. Robert Lee Morris ring, $250. Robert leemorris.com. Table of Contents, page 6: Rodarte tulle top, price available upon request. Rodarte.net. Page 10: JW Anderson shearling jacket, $3,465. Barneys New York, N.Y.C. 888-222-7639. Sonia Rykiel linen dress, $2,170, and belt, $310. Sonia Rykiel, N.Y.C. 212-396-3060. Cover Look, page 24: Esteban Cortazar knit dress, $1,387. Estebancortazar .com. Tod’s belt, price available upon request. Tods.com. Jennifer Fisher silver earrings, $145 each. Jenniferfisher jewelry.com. Aalto angora elastane dress, $1,175. Aalto international.com. Alaïa leather boots, $1,290. Barneys New York, N.Y.C. 888-222-7639. Efva Attling silver ring, $345. Efva attling.com. Balenciaga satin shoes, $665. Balenciaga.com. Haider Ackermann wool jacket, $1,988. Haiderackermann.com. Wolford nylon elastane bodysuit, $275. Wolford.com. Page 26: Carmen March viscose nylon dress, $680. Saks Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C. 212-7534000. Lady Grey silver earrings, $180. Ladygreyjewelry.com. Talking Beauty With Kiersey Clemons, page 36: No. 21 wool-blend dress, $1,000, and top, $788. Numeroventuno .com. Charlotte Chesnais silver earrings, $505. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Eddie Borgo earrings, $125, and ring, $125. Eddieborgo.com. Arme de l’Amour ring, $195. Armede lamour.com. Page 38: Rejina Pyo cotton top, $452. Mproject store.com. Wanda Nylon cotton pants, price available upon request. Email sales@wanda nylon.fr. Foundrae gold earrings, $1,295. Foundrae.com. Alexis Bittar necklace, $295. Alexisbittar.com. Charlotte Chesnais silver ring, $600. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Coach 1941 shearling jacket, $2,500, and earrings, $125. Coach.com. Acne Studios viscose dress, price available upon request for similar styles. Acnestudios .com. You Say You Want a Revolution?, page 64: Clothing and accessories, prices available upon request. By special order at Goodman’s Men’s Store at Bergdorf Goodman, N.Y.C. 212-753-7300. Flashes of Brilliance, page 68: Ellery silk top, $1,895. Ellery .com. Page 71: Bulgari diamond earrings, $23,400. Bulgari.com. Cartier diamond earrings and ring, prices available upon request.

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800-CARTIER. Chanel Fine Jewelry diamond earrings, $9,900 to $20,500. Chanel Fine Jewelry stores. Chopard diamond earrings and ring, prices available upon request. 800-CHOPARD. DeBeers diamond earrings and rings, prices available upon request. DeBeers, N.Y.C. 212-906-0001. The Good Life, page 78: Ulla Johnson cotton dress, $495. Ulla Johnson, N.Y.C. 212-9650144. Page 80: Hellessy silk top, $790. Modaoperandi.com. Altuzarra earrings, price available upon request. Altuzarra.com. Earth Days, page 86: Stella McCartney silk top, $1,265. Stella McCartney, Los Angeles. 310-273-7051. Stella McCartney silk pants, $1,075. Stella McCartney, Costa Mesa, California. 657-273-5727. Page 88: Mara Hoffman cotton dress, $395. Marahoffman.com. Yes, Queen, page 101: Haider Ackermann wool jacket, $1,988. Haiderackermann.com. Jennifer Fisher silver earrings, $145 each. Jenniferfisher jewelry.com. Page 102: Carmen March viscose nylon dress, $680. Saks Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C. 212-753-4000. Lady Grey silver earrings, $180. Ladygrey jewelry.com. Page 105: Aalto angora elastane dress, $1,175. Aaltointernational.com. Alaïa leather boots, $1,290. Barneys New York, N.Y.C. 888-222-7639. Lady Grey silver earrings, $180. Ladygreyjewelry.com. Efva Attling silver ring, $345. Efva attling.com. Page 107: Esteban Cortazar knit dress, $1,387. Estebancortazar.com. Tod’s belt, price available upon request. Tods.com. Best Western, page 109: Alexander McQueen silk dress, $4,450, and belt, $765. Alexander McQueen, N.Y.C. 212-645-1797. See by Chloé leather-andsuede boots, $545. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Eli Halili necklaces, $4,500 to $9,000. Elihalili.com. Ariana BoussardReifel ring, $185. Marteau.co. Page 110: Valentino fur coat, $59,000. Valentino stores. Gucci lace dress, $9,500. Select Gucci stores. Eli Halili necklaces, $2,800 to $4,500. Elihalili.com. Page 111: Gucci studded leather-and-suede jacket, $11,000. Select Gucci stores. Coach 1941 cotton dress, $995 for similar styles. Select Coach stores. Eli Halili necklace, $2,500. Elihalili.com. Page 112: Adriana Degreas bikini top, $104. Adriana Degreas, Miami. 305-363-8686. Page 113: Loewe viscose dress, $7,150 for similar styles. Loewe.com. See by Chloé leather-and-suede boots, $545. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Child of Wild silver

bracelet, $398. Childofwild .com. Deborah Drattell belt, $250. Deborahdrattell.com. Prada wool-and-leather jacket, $6,940. Select Prada stores. Silk dress, $1,250. Whatgoes aroundnyc.com. Eli Halili necklace, $5,000. Elihalili.com. Page 114: Eberjey bikini top, $92. Eberjey.com. Miu Miu wool skirt, $1,200. Select Miu Miu stores. Gucci leather boots, $2,390. Select Gucci stores. Page 115: Coach 1941 embroidered suede dress, $1,900. Select Coach stores. Céline silk dress, $2,600. Barneys New York, N.Y.C. 888-222-7639. Catch a Fire, page 117: Christopher Kane pearl earrings, price available upon request for similar styles. Christopherkane.com. Salvatore Ferragamo top (worn as hat), price available upon request. 866-337-7242. Page 118: Givenchy lace bodysuit, $1,495. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Retrosuperfuture sunglasses, $239. Retrosuperfuture, N.Y.C. 646-590-3929. Page 119: Mikhael Kale silk chiffon dress, $1,200. Mikhaelkale.com. Page 120: Dior sequined tulle dress, $15,000. Dior stores. Page 121: Alberta Ferretti silk cape, $8,160. Barneys New York, N.Y.C. 888-222-7639. Alberta Ferretti silk dress, $3,255. Alberta Ferretti, Los Angeles. 310-652-9000. Oscar de la Renta earrings, $425. Oscarde larenta.com. All Tied Up, page 126: Jill Stuart cotton top,

$495. Jillstuart.com. Page 128: Jill Stuart tulle top, $390. Jill stuart.com. Page 129: Gucci velvet dress, $3,980. Select Gucci stores. Page 130: Bally silk-blend tops, $995 each. Bally, N.Y.C. 212-751-9082. Page 131: Gucci Lurex top, $1,980. Select Gucci stores.

PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS Wonder Woman, page 22, clockwise from top: courtesy of Charlotte Tilbury; Cathy Crawford; courtesy of Charlotte Tilbury; Josephine Schiele; Dimitrios Kambouris/ Getty Images for Charlotte Tilbury; courtesy of Charlotte Tilbury; Mark Leibowitz. The Long Game, page 47: Clockwise from top: Nicolas Kantor/Chris Boals Artists; Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for L’Oréal; Swan Gallet/WWD/REX/Shutterstock; ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images; John Lamparski/ WireImage; Jackson Lee/ FilmMagic; Jamie McCarthy/ Getty Images for Marc Jacobs; Camera Press Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo; Wayne Tippetts/REX/ Shutterstock. Is Youth Wasted on Millennials?, page 96, clockwise from left: Tara Ziemba/WireImage; courtesy of Karlie Kloss; Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images; Matt Baron/BEI/Shutterstock; Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images for Girlboss; courtesy of HBFIT; Getty Images for Reebok.

ALLURE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2017 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 27, NO. 9. September 2017 ISSUE. ALLURE (ISSN 1054-7771) is published monthly by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; James M. Norton, Chief Business Officer & President of Revenue. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS (SEE DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to ALLURE, P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to ALLURE, P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617, call 800-678-1825, or email subscriptions @allure.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to ALLURE Magazine, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please email reprints@condenast.com or call 717-505-9701, ext 101. For reuse permissions, please email permissions@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at www.allure.com. To subscribe to other Condé Nast magazines on the World Wide Web, visit www.condenastdigital.com. Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that we believe would interest our readers. If you do not want to receive these offers and/or information, please advise us at P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 500370617 or call 800-678-1825. ALLURE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND TRANSPARENCIES), OR ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ARTWORK, OR OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY ALLURE IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE.


MY DREAM KIT

Lora Arellano— aka Rihanna’s makeup artist—curates her ultimate bag of tricks.

Top row, from left: Lit Cosmetics Glitters, Clearly Liquid Glitter Base, Water Resistant Clearly Liquid Glitter Base, Forever Wear Glitter Base, and Flat/Liner Duo 5" brush; Melt Cosmetics Highlight/Bronzer and Digital Dust Highlights; Bobbi Brown Buffing Grains for Face; Kat Von D Everlasting Lip Liners. Second row, from left: La Mer The Moisturizing Soft Lotion; Sugarpill Pressed Eyeshadows and Elektro Cute Sparkling Neon Pigments. Third row, from left: WolfeFX Makeup Sponge; Make Up For Ever Step 1 Skin Equalizer Mattifying Primer and Radiant Primer; WolfeFX Hydrocolor Rainbow Cake and Hydrocolor 6 Color Palette. Fourth row, from left: Urban Decay 24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencils; Sugarpill Pretty Poison Matte Lip Colors; Kat Von D Everlasting Liquid Lipsticks. Fifth row, from left: Sisley Black Rose Cream Mask; Chantecaille Liquid Lumière Anti-Aging Face and Cheek Illuminator; Sigma F10 Powder Blush and F88 Flat Angled Kabuki brush; Smith Cosmetics 232 Quill Crease Brushes; Make Up For Ever Ultra HD Skin Booster; Givenchy Poudre Première loose powder; WolfeFX Cosmetic Body Glitter; Melt Cosmetics Ultra-Matte lipsticks.

PROP STYLIST: SOPHIE LENG

photographed by stephanie dinkel


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