Page 1


Table of Contents President’s Letter ...........................................Page 1 A Paradigm That Builds the 21st Century Schools We Need .............Pages 2-5 Book Review "Grit" by Angela Duckworth.......................Pages 6-7 A Novel Idea: Cultivating a Growth Mindset with Picture Books............Pages 8-9 What iGnites Us? Igniting the Middle: The Power of Educators AMLE National Conference......................Pages 10-11 DVR-PASCD Sponsors ............................Pages 12-16

To submit articles, information, or feedback, please contact: Monica Conlin Monica.Conlin@ssdcougars.org Editorial Team Monica Conlin & Christina Brennan


President's Letter December, 2016

Dear DVR­PASCD Members, We hope you had the opportunity to attend the November PASCD 2016 conference held in King of Prussia. It was a wonderful opportunity to have collaborative learning conversations with members of our organization in school districts across the state of Pennsylvania. I want to again thank the PASCD conference committee members for all their organizational efforts. Thank you also to the DVR executive board members for volunteering their time for registration and hosting rooms. It is a blessing to be part of an organization that continues to value professional growth opportunities for their members and provides the context for friendships to be created within the profession. Our region is a “hot bed” of innovative and progressive instructional practices. We welcome the voices and ideas of those in our region to join us at our next event, reach out to write an article, provide feedback on how we can improve our network, and best support our members. During the holiday season please take time to treasure the moments with those you love. Take time to reflect upon what matters most as we move into the New Year. Always remember the power of conversation and how we can create productive change one conversation at a time. It is a gift that costs us nothing, yet is of great value. Peace & Joy, Dorie Dorie Martin­Pitone, Ed. D President, Delaware Valley Region­PASCD Delawarevalleypascd@gmail.com Twitter: @dorie_martin Twitter: @DVR_PASCD

1


A Paradigm That Builds the 21st Century Schools We Need

Joel DiBartolomeo DVR-PASCD Board Member

Technological skills, intra­ and interpersonal awareness and abilities, and possessing an agile skill set merit space in the conversation about what should be driving school culture and instruction. Traditional models and systems have not been able to deliver these skills to all students and may not be able, as evidenced by their performance on international measures (OECD 2008 and 2015, Fullan 2016, Dintersmith 2015). These skills, nonetheless, continue to gain prominence in the work force and garner more and more support from research and society. Why are local leaders waiting to act? Michael Fullan identified his 21st Century competencies following his research of various education models in the OECD and their PISA results. In their book, Most Likely to Succeed, Wagner and Dintersmith suggest “Seven Survival Skills” as skills graduates must be able to “do” well in order to succeed in today’s workforce. Educators from across the country must create schools, classrooms, and activities that cultivate the types of 21st Century skills Fullan, Wagner, and Dintersmith identify in their respective research so they can create the types of engaging learning communities and opportunities for teachers and every student. Schools must take on the additional responsibility of educating families on how these skills will transfer and prepare graduates for tomorrow’s workforce. Change of this magnitude comes slow, and may require a bottom up movement, but local leaders can drive this change from where they are now. Many of the 21st Century skills are intangible, indiscrete, and complex to measure. Most traditional assessments used today are not dynamic enough and fall short in measuring the effect sizes these programs have on learning, cognitive development, and success in life. NYC schools are attempting to do so using surveys as part of the school assessment model, and the ESSA legislation is moving thinking in a similar direction, but systems, states, leaders, and schools will need time to adapt to these changes. Students in the system today need local leaders who are willing to take risks in an effort to implement change. Education leaders must find ways to include learning opportunities and build school programs that provide 21st Century skills, despite top­down accountability drivers and measures of achievement and growth. The traditional model must be reformed to reflect, as Dewey said, life itself. Students should, for example, participate in learning activities that reflect the types of problems and interactions students will experience when they leave school. 

2


A Paradigm That Builds the 21st Century Schools We Need

Joel DiBartolomeo DVR-PASCD Board Member

Schools, however, will need to change priorities and become more adaptable learning communities and for each learner before they can provide the type of culture and learning opportunities necessary to prepare students for the ambiguous and sometimes ill­structured problems they will in life.  One action local leaders can take is to create and nurture the conditions needed to build and sustain the type of learning culture and opportunities research suggests are needed to deliver 21st Century skills. Since the release of TIMSS 1992, investigations have shown with consistency that the likely inhibitor to improved performance for American students in our curriculum. A mile­ wide and inch deep does not cut it. This fact was pointed out nearly 35 years ago and yet we continue to been driven by “that state test.” Something different is needed and local leaders are the group who can make the types of changes outlined here happen. They can do this by formed a pedagogical paradigm and school model that takes elements common to Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and Problem Based Learning (PBL) and using them to nurture a learning culture and create authentic learning opportunities with a pointed focus on 21st Century skills. SEL and PBL have in common many characteristics that complement each other in ways that makes the whole greater than the sum of its parts. Both SEL and PBL correlate to improving student performance, motivating work environments, and closing the achievement gap for students at all levels (Fullan 2016, Albanese 2000, Allen 2011). Together, they cohere into a pedagogical paradigm that creates and nurtures the instructional conditions necessary to immerse students and the entire school community in a 21st Century learning culture and deep learning opportunities.  SEL and PBL programs embed students in activities that build the technical and foundation skills and teach students the 6 C’s synonymous with 21st Century skills (Fullan 2016). Whether a graduate elects to pursue college or employment after high school, he or she will have been taught and required to apply technological, fundamental, and social emotional skills necessary to participate in and contribute to their respective profession. These skills are better learned in school than on the job and professions would receive agile, technical, and knowledgeable candidates.

3


A Paradigm That Builds the 21st Century Schools We Need

Joel DiBartolomeo DVR-PASCD Board Member

Most educators agree, in principle at least, on the need to include 21st Century skills in our instruction, classrooms, and schools, yet many remain committed to top­down accountability models and leadership styles that encumber our teacher’s ability to do so. Why are so many local leaders unable to reconcile the paradoxical relationship between thinking and doing? It could fear of test results and top down accountability or even a lack of information. Whatever the reason, local leaders are the group who foster school culture and learning opportunities for students, and both must focus more on student learning and preparation for the workforce and less on test achievement and aligned practices that are measured by one test. Albanese, M. (2000), Problem­based learning: why curricula are likely to show little effect on knowledge and clinical skills. Medical Education, 34: 729–738. doi:10.1046/j.1365­ 2923.2000.00753.x Allen, D. E., Donham, R. S. and Bernhardt, S. A. (2011), Problem­based learning. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2011: 21–29. Filip Dochya, b, Mien Segersb, Piet Van den Bosscheb, David Gijbelsb; University of Leuven, Afdeling Didactiek, Vesaliusstraat 2, 3000 Leuven, Belgium; University of Maastricht, The Netherlands. February 2003. Fullan, M. (2011). Choosing the wrong drivers for whole system reform. Seminar Series. Centre for Strategic Education. Paper 204. East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Fullan, M (2016). Coherence. Corwin, A Sage Publication. Thousand Oaks, CA. USA Publication. Hess, Fredrick. (2013). Be a Cage­Buster. ASCD, Volume 70, Number 7, pp. 30 – 33. Kehaulani Goo, S. (2015). The skills American say kids need to survive in life. pewresearch.org/fact­tank/2015/02/19/skills­for­success. Fact Tank Pew Research Center. World Wide Web.

4


A Paradigm That Builds the 21st Century Schools We Need

Joel DiBartolomeo DVR-PASCD Board Member

OECD/CERI International Conference “Learning in the 21st Century: Research, Innovation and Policy.” May 16, 2008. Paris, France. OECD 2015 Results in Focus (2015). https://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisa­2015­results­in­focus.pdf. 2016 Schmoker, M. (2011). Focus, p55. ASCD. Alexandria, VA. 2016. Wagner, T., and Dintersmith, T. (2015). Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era. First Scribner. NY, NY. Wyman, N. (2016). 21st Century Education For A 21st Century Economy. forbes.com/sites.nicholaswyman. Forbes.com. World Wide Web.

5


Book Review

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

Rina Vassallo DVR-PASCD Board Member

“Wise teachers can make a huge difference in the lives of their student….wise teachers…..promote competence in addition to well­being, engagement and high hopes for the future.” ­Angela Duckworth

Grit, newly published in 2016, was written by local author Dr. Angela Duckworth, a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania and a protégé of Dr. Martin Seligman (Learned Optimism). Although an educator, Dr. Duckworth’s research spans examples from a wide range of people, including National Spelling Bee contestants, West Point cadets, New Yorker cartoonists, the Seattle Seahawks, KIPP Schools and Finland. The book is written in the style of Malcolm Gladwell, Adam Grant, and Daniel Pink, with interesting anecdotes from organizations and persons used to illustrate her points. Dr. Duckworth defines grit as perseverance and passion for long term goals. “Grit is having stamina ….. sticking with your future, day in, day out, not just for the week, not just for months, but for years and working really hard to make that a reality,” she states. She also discusses that gritty people know when to let go of interests to focus and refine a goal that they are passionate about and stay loyal to. She equates it to staying in love versus falling in love. As a result of her work, Dr. Duckworth has created a scale to evaluate grit which she developed for West Point. It is in the book but can also be found online http://angeladuckworth.com/grit­scale/

6


Book Review

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

Rina Vassallo DVR-PASCD Board Member One of the more interesting sections of the book is on how to grow grit. There she provides insights for parents and adults on fostering grit with youths­ they can accurately judge children’s psychological needs; they understand that children need love, limits and latitude to reach potential and they do not rely on power, but on wisdom and knowledge when making decisions. She also states that research indicates that “wise teachers can make a huge difference in the lives of their student….wise teachers…..promote competence in addition to well­being, engagement and high hopes for the future.” This author and book is not without its critics. Grit has been viewed by educators as a simplistic solution for complicated reasons that students fail to succeed. Dr. Duckworth, a researcher, admits that her research is continuing and has responded to her detractors thoughtfully.

Sketchnote via @christybrenn

Her book and TED talk are worth a look. She, in fact, uses her TED talk preparation as a case study on grit in her book. Whether you agree with her perspective, the book is a fascinating read on a subject that is gaining momentum and has implications for our students and our personal lives.

7


4


Growth Mindset

A Novel Idea…Cultivating a Growth Mindset with Picture Books

Cindy Kruse DVR-PASCD Board Member Picture books are frequently overlooked resources that can stimulate critical thinking and meaningful dialogue on just about any topic.  Picture Books are not just for children.  Although they are often used as read alouds in the elementary classroom, picture books can be effectively utilized in middle school and high school classrooms, as well as professional learning opportunities.   I have used picture books in many of my workshops, and even as part of my keynote speeches.  When you use children’s books intentionally, you model a research­based practice, as well as help teachers to build a repertoire of excellent children’s books and meaningful ways to use them within their own role in education. A children’s book can be especially effective when it is used to: *  Reinforce a topic *  Acknowledge challenges *  Support changes The key to using children’s books effectively is to use them with both purpose and intention.  When you do this, you exponentially increase the effectiveness of any learning experience.   Here are a few suggestions about how to use picture books as a professional learning tool: *  Project the illustrations on a white board as you read *  Have the audience engage with you while reading by: repeating reoccurring phrases, reading chorally as groups or individually. *  Give opportunities for small groups to reflect and discuss on the ideas presented *  If the story is too lengthy, simply read aloud an important portion of the that illustrates your main idea Picture books that you might use to cultivate a growth mindset during your next professional learning opportunity: *  The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires *  Beautiful Oops by Barney Saltzberg *  What do You Do With a Problem? by Kobi Yamada *  What Do You Do With an Idea? by Kobi Yamada *  The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds *  Ish by Peter H. Reynolds

8


Growth Mindset

A Novel Idea: Cultivating a Growth Mindset with Picture Books

Cindy Kruse DVR-PASCD Board Member Resources for selecting quality picture books: *  Each year the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) identifies the best of the best in children's books. *  International Literacy Association – Children’s Choice Book List *  More ideas for read alouds that promote a growth mindset can be found at: http://www.weareteachers.com/perfect­read­alouds­for­teaching­growth­mindset/ There is a magical power that occurs when a community of learners engage in a shared experience of language.  Releasing language into the air through reading aloud, no matter what age we are working with, cultivates a true sense of community.  Try reading a picture book in your next professional learning event …it can transform the learning by increasing engagement, retention, and application.   Cindy Kruse is a DVR­ASCD board member serving on the professional development committee.  As an independent educational consultant, Cindy partners with educators and organizations to develop and deliver professional learning through workshops and instructional coaching.  Her areas of expertise include literacy, gifted education, growth mindset, and effective classroom instruction. 

9


What iGnites Us? Igniting the Middle Level – The Power of Educators AMLE National Conference: Austin, Texas

Joy Rosser, DVR-PASCD Board Member

Joy Rosser is currently serving as secretary on the DVR­PASCD board, teaching sixth grade science at Kennett Middle School, serving on the Pennsylvania Don Eichhorn Schools: Schools to Watch State Evaluation Team and is president of the southeast regional PAMLE board.  Joy is expanding her research and writing; discovering ways people are being ignited within educational institutions, among student interactions, and within families affiliated with education.  Educators have the incumbent responsibility to help students achieve at a higher level, teach content standards, and make connections with all students — simultaneously! With a broad sphere of responsibilities, teacher retention diminishes. Educators need increased levels of confidence, engagement, focus, optimism, clarity and purpose to replenish and maintain teacher effectiveness.  Improving the profession as a whole begins with passionate educators who see the broad influence of their power. Both in the classroom and in the school, educators are catalysts; who we are and what we say has the potential to enhance middle level learning experiences.  Empowering educators with a greater sense of purpose and confidence for students’ benefit begins with igniting the core of who we are; acquiring the motivational and optimistic wisdom needed to implement our best educational practices every day. At the 2016 National AMLE (Association for Middle Level Education) Conference in Austin, Texas this past October, I encouraged educators to be introspective; a critical piece to being a better educator in the classroom and a better contributor in the community.  Recognizing the importance of believing in our personal purpose and embracing who we are enables us to light fires and be catalysts for others. Comically, I reminded attendees to “Be the person your dog thinks you are,” (J.W. Stephens).  Somewhere between that type of interaction and our classroom door, our enthusiasm and stamina can erode. Perhaps we need to pause, recalibrate and proceed with optimism, knowing our personal attitudes ignite our passions. Each of us has the power to create a climate and a culture of positivity through our own personal approach, but it begins at the front doors of our schools.  

10


What iGnites Us? Igniting the Middle Level – The Power of Educators AMLE National Conference: Austin, Texas

Joy Rosser, DVR-PASCD Board Member

Investing in ourselves initiates the spark to wholeheartedly invest in others.  We know that building relationships – with students, staff and families is the foundation upon which we create opportunities.  Opportunities for conversations enable us to come alongside our students and colleagues moment by moment, empowering them to become greater, to magnify their character.  Seeing the challenges and mistakes of students and colleagues needs to be redressed as an opportunity for engagement, not a time to create boundaries.  We can do all of this and more because when we first ignite our own personal core character within, it gives us the strength and passion to generously light the spirit of others.   The choices we make every day with our attitudes, our passions, and our determination to create a culture, not just of learning, but of opportunity and empowerment, is an investment that tells the story of our lives and the lives of those around us.  Igniting the middle level, through who we are and the relationships we build, begins with our ability to empower others. It’s a journey of choice that writes the story of who we are.  

SAVE THE DATE APRIL 20, 2017 DVR-PASCD @ Cabrini University Promoting Student Creativity and Engagement Through Design Thinking and Maker Education 11


Thank You to Our Sponsors


DVR-PASCD Newsletter Winter 2016  
DVR-PASCD Newsletter Winter 2016  
Advertisement