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TheLifestylesCarolinas Today of the South Introducing...

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JUNE/JULY 2014

Southern Recipes + Peanut Butter Banana Fritters Sticky Toffee Pudding Kentucky Hot Brown Creole Chicken Drizzled with Chocolate Sauce

Amazing! Quite Boozy!

The Kentucky Sandwich

with Coconut Plantation Rice

P opular V acation D estinations

Willie Robertson The Duck Commander CEO and Duck Dynasty Reality TV Star on A&E Page 47

ď ľ Click here to watch video


Douglas Diamond Jewelers “Where the Brunswick Beaches get engaged”

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Click here to watch Virtual Tour

ď ľ T

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Click here to watch video

ď ľ Douglas Diamond Jewelers "Where the Brunswick Beaches get engaged"

4700 Main Street • Shallotte, North Carolina 28470

910-755-5546


The Carolinas Today Lifestyles of the South

Introducing...

Features 12 Buffalo River

A canoe trip in Arkansas

19 In a Sky Near You One Woman’s Story

47 Willie Robertson

The A&E TV Reality star stops by Myrtle Beach

73 Wilmington, NC

From Hustle and Bustle to Picturesque

90 Kentucky Horse Park Dedicated to “mans relationship with the horse”

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Rain or shine, good is always there. I don’t wait for something bad to happen to do something good. That’s why I offer things like free coverage checkups and rewards for safe driving. I’m here to help you live the good life every single day.

WILLIAM RUSS JR 910-754-6596 4746 MAIN STREET SHALLOTTE rustyruss@allstate.com

Subject to terms, conditions and availability. Allstate Indemnity Company, Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Company © 2013 Allstate Insurance Co.

61101

Call or stop by to see how much you can save.


TheLifestyles Carolinas Today of the South

Introducing...

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The Carolinas Today Model - Tina Culp

63

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Focus on the Club to Fix Your Body

DEPART MENTS 10

Letter from the Editor

52

Creole Chicken

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Annie the Mule

54

Peanut Butter Banana Fritters

29

Wendy Mogul Photography

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Kentucky Hot Brown

Talladega Superspeedway

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Sticky Toffee Pudding

36

The Carolinas Today expansion

Children’s Book Preview by Cheryl Brown-Avery

From Defunct Air Force Base to Fastest NASCAR Track

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with Coconut Plantation Rice by Andrew Zimmern

Drizzled with Chocolate Sauce by Nadia G

by Bobby Flay

Introducing Anne Burrell

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CONSIGNMENT

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Editor’s Note Hello and welcome to the June/July 2014 issue of The Carolinas Today. As you can see, our format is changing. We are also introducing…Lifestyles of the South. In conjunction with The Carolinas Today, we are now providing you, the reader, with interesting content from Popular Vacation Destinations, various NASCAR tracks, recipes from chefs Bobby Flay, Andrew Zimmern, Anne Burrell, Nadia G and Curtis Stone (Curtis is currently on location and unable to provide a recipe for this issue). And of course, we have a celebrity for our main feature. We were able to catch up with Willie Robertson from the A&E TV reality series, Duck Dynasty, while he Golfed at the 2014 Monday After the Masters tournament, which was started in 1994 by Hootie & the Blowfish and celebrated its 20th Anniversary this year. "Brands mature over time, like a marriage. The bond you feel with your spouse is different than when you first met each other. Exciting and discovery are replaced by comfort and depth" - Gary Vaynerchuk This is true with The Carolinas Today as well. Our focus has always been local. With the advent of Social Media, we have seen a need for a change. "Social media requires that business leaders start thinking like smalltown shop owners. This means taking the long view and avoiding short-term benchmarks to gauge progress. It means allowing the personality, heart and soul of the people who run all levels of the business to show." - Gary Vaynerchuk As you read through this and future issues, look for the video links. The videos will expand on the content in the article or offer a message from the advertiser. An added feature, videos open in a new window so you can keep your place in the magazine while watching. Be sure to share content from the magazine with your friends via the share button at the top of the reader. You can also visit our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter using the links below or on our web site, thecarolinastoday.com. I hope you enjoy the changes we've made thus far and find them as fulfilling as we do. Patrick Fairbrother Editor

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THE CAROLINAS TODAY

The Carolinas Today Lifestyles of the South

Introducing...

Publisher

Margie Fairbrother

Editor

Patrick Fairbrother

Marketing / Advertising 855-896-6601

Golf Instruction Editor Brad Redding

Contributing Writers Debra Madaris Efird J.D. Jones Barbara Loesch Weber Karen Joseph Grant Turner

Contributing Photographers Gene Ho Photography Bill Russ Wendy Mogul Photography NC Tourism New Hanover County Public Library Library of Congress Mike Culp

Graphic Design

DVD Photo Services

The staff of THE CAROLINAS TODAY welcomes your comments and feedback. Tell us what you would like to read about. What stories would be entertaining, informative, and identify with you? Email your comments to: info@thecarolinastoday.com.

The Carolinas Today

P.O. Box 6232 Ocean Isle Beach, NC 28469 855-896-6601 www.thecarolinastoday.com

THE CAROLINAS TODAY (Vol. 6, No. 2)(ONLINE ISSN 21551057) is published 6 times per year by DVD Photo Services, Inc., P.O. Box 6232, Ocean Isle Beach, NC 28469. All advertising is subject to approval before acceptance. DVD Photo Services, Inc. reserves the right to refuse any ad, editorial, for any reason whatsoever. Copyright © 2014 DVD Photo Services, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any content in whole or in part without written permission from the Publisher is prohibited. Not responsible for printed errors. JUNE/JULY 2014


FREE "Chef's Choice" appetizer with mention of this ad and purchase of entree!

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The Buffalo River, Northern Arkansas CLICK HERE TO WATCH VIDEO

ď ľ The Buffalo River, located in northern Arkansas, was the first National River to be designated in the United States. The Buffalo River is slightly more than 150 miles long. The lower 135 miles flow within the boundaries of an area managed by the National Park Service, where the stream is designated the Buffalo National River.

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The river flows through Newton, Searcy, Marion, and Baxter Counties, from

west to east. The river originates in the highest part of Boston Mountains of the Ozarks, flows out onto the Springfield Plateau near the historic community of Erbie, and finally crosses the Salem Plateau just before joining the White River. The Park is home to the state’s only elk herd. The upper section of the river in the Ozark National Forest is managed by the U.S. Forest Service and is designated as a National Scenic River and a National Wild River; that section is not part of the area managed as a park by the Park Service, but is managed as a part of the Ozark National Forest. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Cedar Falls 14

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The Buffalo National River was established by an Act of Congress on March 1, 1972, ending the recurring plans of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to construct one or more dams on the river. The National River designation protects natural rivers from industrial uses, impoundments and other obstructions that may change the natural character of the river or disrupt the natural habitat for the flora and fauna that live in or near the river. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Along the upper river, the gradient is steep and the water is fast, leveling and slowing as the river runs its course. The upper section has most of the whitewater rapids to be found along the river, and features dramatic topography including sink holes and caves, springs, and waterfalls, over 500-foot tall sandstone and limestone bluffs, and many rock formations. At one point, a 0.65-mile hike from the river up a narrow, boxed canyon leads to a 209-foot (1) 64 waterfall, (2) Hemmed-In-Hollow Falls, the highest of its kind between the Southern Appalachians and the Rockies. The river’s ancient current also gives life to well over 300 species of fish, insects, freshwater mussels, and aquatic plants. The Buffalo National River is a popular camping, canoeing, and fishing destination. Visitors may bring their own canoes or rent from several independent concessioners. Camping is generally allowed throughout the park with the following exceptions: the Hemmed-in-Hollow area, on Big Bluff, in historical structures, on private property within the park, or within 100 feet of any trail or watercourse. Camping is, however, permitted on gravel bars and sand bars along the river. In addition, the National Park Service has a number of “developed� campgrounds along the river. The National Park Service headquarters for the Buffalo National River is located in Harrison, Arkansas.


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In a Sky Near You: One Woman’s Story By Debra Madaris Efird

Click here to watch video

www.thecarolinastoday.com

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From ancient history all the way through the 21st century, we have been made aware that man has gazed thoughtfully at birds

winging their way through the sky and experienced the wish to fly. But have you ever thought about a woman possessing that same desire? Chances are, you have not. Many little boys have grown up to fulfill their life dream of becoming pilots, but the numbers are extremely low for the opposite gender. You may have never even encountered a woman pilot. But there

is at least one, a resident of Brunswick County, who may be up there flying over your house right now! It’s time for you to meet Barb Olsen-Gwin.

Barb grew up in St. Louis, MO. At age 19,

Barb felt the urge to fly – wanting to experience

those feelings of freedom, adventure, and exhilaration. But the obvious pathway for a

young woman during the 1970’s was to become a flight attendant, not a pilot. She applied for the

position only to learn that she had to be at least 21 to become a flight attendant. Ozark Air Lines did, however, hire her to work in the office. She

stayed with them for twelve years, performing a variety of tasks involving accounting, payroll,

finance, and maintenance. In 1986, when TWA (Trans World Airlines) bought out Ozark, the

maintenance staff invited her to work with TWA.

She felt lucky that she still had a job, as many others did not. She eventually moved from maintenance into marketing and worked with the Frequent Flyer program as well as special projects. She describes: “Got to do some really interesting things

like help put together a charter flight for Pope John Paul II…flew into and out of the United States… in 1995.” Another

intriguing task she shares: “I was also part of a team that started a new first class product and had to do some undercover flying to test it, which was really fun. Flew to Lisbon, Portugal, and turned around and flew right back. I think we were on the ground for four hours.” She spent her last year at TWA doing in-house advertising in the creative services department.

Final approach Runway 5, Cape Fear Regional Jetport (KSUT)


During her years at TWA, Barb met her husband Rich Gwin. She followed him to several locations when his job changed:

Michigan, Maryland Eastern Shore, Virginia, and then to Charlotte. They eventually moved to the Southport area in 2007, where her husband –though retired – continued his work in the aviation maintenance field, opening a small shop out of one

hangar. Eventually they bought out their partners so that they were the sole owners. In 2009, they decided to buy their own plane.

So how did Barb make the switch from office work to piloting? While in her early 30’s, she had gone through a divorce and

was raising three young children. She was dating a pilot and he took her out on small plane adventures. Like many others,

she fell in love with flying. She proclaims simply: “I got hooked!” She started taking lessons from a female flight instructor

who also had young children, and this proved to be someone who could relate to her and encourage her. When she had completed about twenty hours, she performed a solo flight, of which she notes: “I think soloing an airplane, looking back

now, is such a monumental confidence builder. For someone who’s not mechanical, the fact that I mastered this machine and I could take it around and land it three times and take off, it was such a confidence builder.” But she had to quit due to

all the busy times that come with raising a family, as well as the expense factor. Throughout those years, she put her dream of piloting on hold.

But once she and her husband owned a plane – a Cessna 152 – the time was ripe. She and Rich hired a local instructor to

teach them in their own plane, which they named “757 Delta Hotel.” Barb passed the solo qualifying test 22 years after her original foray into flying. Hers is truly a tale of patience and perseverance. But that’s not the end of the story.

Flying my Long Cross Country to Florence, SC www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Caswell Beach shoreline


She and Rich purchased a

second plane and began a Part

61 flight school in Oak Island with the name Brunswick Air

Inc. In August, it will have been

in operation for three years. Part 61 means their training is less

structured and better suited for pleasure pilots, who tend to be on

a more relaxed training schedule than those seeking a career in

the aviation industry. Brunswick Air provides a wide range of

training and refresher courses and is TSA-approved.

They

have installed a simulator which pilots can use to log hours of training at the instrument rating level. They also continue to do

maintenance service on planes. They rent planes, too, though

Barb laments that there are only

a handful of females borrowing their planes. She would like to

see more women following in her

footsteps, as she states: “I think for me there’s such uniqueness to

being a pilot, and I’ve had the bug for so long. And when you hear

about and read about the statistics of women that are in aviation, it’s

pretty mind-boggling. So of all

the pilots that are in the United States…less than 1% of pilots are women.” Barb loves everything about flying; in particular, she

enjoys doing aerial photography

of the Cape Fear River area and all beaches (as can be seen from pictures article).

accompanying

www.thecarolinastoday.com

this

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Photo & Inset courtesy Howie Franklin

Do you have what it takes to fly a plane? It involves many hours of both studying and in-the-sky training. You can obtain

a private pilot’s license while still a teenager – or you can be a grandmother like Barb. The first stage involves learning the basics of aviation to prepare you for your first solo flight. The second stage or phase involves cross-country travel, which means solo flights of gradually increasing mileage. During phase three you take more solo flights and then prep with an FAA (Federal Aviation Agency) examiner. To get a license, you must learn to communicate with Air Traffic Control, which

means you must fly into a towered airport, such as Myrtle Beach International (MYR) or Wilmington (ILM). The airport

serving the Oak Island-Southport-Bald Head Island area, the Cape Fear Regional Jetport (KSUT), is an un-towered airport, as is the Grand Strand (KCRE), north of Myrtle Beach. Coincidentally, Barb ended up with a woman administering her

examination. She had to go through one hour of oral questioning and fly for one hour, demonstrating specific maneuvers. She received her private pilot’s license in March 2012. She stated that once you have passed the third stage, your license never expires. However, you do have to do a flight review every few years to demonstrate safety. Barb describes the need

for keeping current with your flying skills: “They do call it a perishable skill. If you don’t use it, it very quickly gets rusty.”

She went on to note that pilots who want to fly through clouds must take another step and seek an instrument rating license instead of flying by only visual flight rules.

The Cape Fear Regional Jetport is in a period of high growth. There is a lot of interest in viewing the shorelines and ocean

from on high, and air traffic in the area has picked up. The airport has lengthened the runway to accommodate larger jets, and recently it added a parallel taxi-way, which contributes to greater safety. A ramp was built on the west side to park

jets. Also, there is a new multipurpose building on the west side. It will serve as a lounge and a place for meetings and conferences. Soon the airport will be adding a corporate hangar to the west side. Barb thinks that they might be able to move their maintenance shop to that site. There is also hope that the airport will build a new terminal someday.

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The most famous woman pilot, Amelia Earhart, still rocks headlines today with controversy over the recovery of her plane,

which went missing along with its noted pilot in July 1937 in an attempt to fly around the world. Whether or not the actual

wreckage site has been found, Amelia Earhart will always be remembered as a woman way ahead of her time, a fine role model for any aspiring aviators of the female gender. Which brings us back to Barb…

When asked if there is something Barb would like for you to know about flying in general, she answers: “The aviation

community as a whole…it’s like we’re all students. We’re all in learning mode at all times. I don’t care if you’ve got a hundred hours or 10,000 hours – there’s always something that you can learn. And because of that, it’s a bit of a community that you don’t see in a lot of other vocations, avocations, or hobbies.” She also shared that she likes the way many older

pilots want to pass on their excitement to children, possibly kindling that timeless dream to fly. From this, we should take heart and be inspired. If flying is one of your goals, work through the obstacles and never give up. Moving forward – and upward – is something you will never regret!

www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Annie the Mule Goes To The State Fair

The North Carolina State Fair will never be the same. Just how dangerous can one mule be?

Tenacious, persistent, smart, resourceful, and definitely faster than any racehorse competing in the Kentucky Derby, is Annie the Mule.

As Denise, Karen, Cindy, Susan and their family were preparing for a fun-filled day at the

North Carolina State Fair, they did not suspect that Annie the Mule was patiently listening at the window planning to escape from the farm in hopes of chasing and capturing Denise. Annie was not an ordinary mule. Annie was excited about the trip but what follows you won’t believe. Brown-Avery spent many years on her grandparent’s farm in rural North Carolina. In Cherheryl Annie the Mule Children’s books she recounts vividly her wonder years growing up on the

farm with her sisters, James Lee, mother, grandparent’s, and of course a fast mule named Annie. You’ll laugh until it hurts as Annie the Mule brings it wearing her PF Flyers sneakers, and sunshades.

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About the Author Cheryl Brown-Avery

Author/Motivational Speaker, Cheryl Brown-Avery was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1959. She is the daughter of Anita W. Brown, Kittrell, North Carolina, and the late Harry H. Brown, Jr., Wilmington, North Carolina. She is the sister of Harriet Thomas and Reverend Angela Brown. She has one Brother-in-law, Gregory Thomas, and two Nephews, Allan and Elliott Thomas. She is the mother of Cyndel Avery and grandmother of Matthew Alexander Avery. Brown-Avery is a graduate of New Hanover High School, Wilmington, North Carolina. Brown-Avery attended Sacred Heart College, Belmont. She furthered her education at Louisburg College, Louisburg, North Carolina. There she received Honors of Dean’s List and Phi Theta Kappa. In 1997, Brown-Avery’s poem entitled “Memories of Innocent Children,” written in memory of ten Plymouth High School Band students who were killed in a tragic automobile accident was televised throughout the United States by Channel 5 News personality, Betsy Sikes as well as the CBS Evening News. Brown-Avery received high recognition around the world for writing an inspiring poem honoring the memories of the decreased students. Brown-Avery later wrote a poem for President Bill Clinton entitled “Pray as You Go,” and she receiving a letter of thanks from President Bill Clinton. Brown-Avery is the current author of Annie the Mule goes to the US Olympics, Annie the Mule goes to Washington DC, Annie the Mule goes to Hollywood, Annie the Mule goes to the State Fair and Annie the Mule goes to London, currently being republished by Tate Publishing, Mustang, Oklahoma. Annie the Mule goes to the State Fair will be released August 5, 2014. BrownAvery received a card of Thanks from President Barack Obama and the First Lady, Michele Obama for her book Annie the Mule goes to Washington DC. She is a Motivational Speaker who donates her life to traveling to schools across the United States speaking to the youth on the dangers of drugs, gangs, etc., hoping to empower the youth to stay in school. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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The Works of Wendy Mogul Photography

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I am the owner/operator of Wendy Mogul Photography specializing in freelance contract photography. I have been published in several local publications. I was the chief Photographer for MUSC medical university working closely with the IT department taking photos of their buildings and outreach facilities, traveling all over South Carolina. I was the photographer for the city of Sullivan's Island taking photos of the Island, the town staff and administrators for web based advertising. I am officially endorsed by SEALINK Global for my photos of sea life taken at the South Carolina Aquarium. I work closely with several local real estate firms taking photos of properties for sale entering into the MLS (multiple listing system) as well as working closely with architects taking photos of recent projects for web based advertising I have been taking photos for as long as I can remember. It all started in my early twenties with my first Minolta film camera in Florida taking photos of people, places and anything that caught my eye. I have finally upgraded to my very first NIKON camera and have discovered a brilliant marriage between myself and my abilities as a serious photographer. I do believe it is what I was born to do. If you would like to see more of my work, follow this link to my business site and let me know what you think! www.wendymogulphotography.com www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Talladega Super Speedway Click here to watch video

ď ľ

From defunct Air Force Base to Fastest NASCAR Track (pre-2000) Anniston Air Force Base is a former United States Air Force airfield located approximately 10 miles north-northeast of Talladega, Alabama. It was active from 1942 to 1945 and 1949 to 1952. It is currently the site of the Talladega Superspeedway. Anniston was opened in 19 October 1942 as a flying school as part of Army Air Forces Training Command (AAFTC). The field was built with three hard-surfaced concrete runways. The main runway was 5,300 feet long. The base also featured a parking ramp and one hangar, constructed of wood and metal. The ground station consisted of many uniform buildings constructed of wood, tar paper, and non-masonry siding. The use of concrete and steel was limited because of the critical need elsewhere. Most buildings were hot and dusty in the summer and very cold in the winter. Besides offices, barracks and training classrooms, there was a library, a social club for officers, and enlisted men, and a store to buy living necessities. The airfield was initially assigned as an auxiliary to Courtland Army Airfield, Alabama and was assigned to the Southeast Training Center of the Army Air Force Training Command. It was used as a Basic Flying school, and was equipped with Vultee BT-13 Valiants for the cadets assigned to the base. AAFTC also located a transition school at Anniston in early 1945 for pilot upgrade training from B-17/B-24 heavy bombers to B-29 Superfortress very heavy bombers. The 36

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airfield was also used by the Army Airways Communication System with a detachment of the 108th AACS Squadron being assigned to the airfield. The control tower closed and the field became inactive on 16 August 1945 and placed on standby status. It was reassigned to Craig Field, Alabama in September 1945, then to Maxwell Field, Alabama as Auxiliary Field #3. It was reopened by the United States Air Force Air Training Command on 1 July 1949 as Anniston Air Force Base and conducted contract flying training until 1 August 1950 when it was transferred to Air Materiel Command as a support airfield to support the Anniston Army Depot. On 30 June 1952, Anniston AFB was closed for the final time, with the land being sold to the city of Talladega. The facility was vacant for little over a decade when Anniston insurance executive Bill Ward assisted NASCAR and International Speedway Corporation founder William H.G. (Bill) France acquire the land to develop what would become Alabama International Motor Speedway, which opened in 1969. Today the hangar on the former AFB still exists and is in use by the speedway, along with the aircraft parking ramp. The foundations of some of the station buildings northeast of the hangar can still be seen. The area has numerous taxiways and parts of former runways in various states of deterioration that are being used as access roads, one of which connects to the adjacent Talladega Municipal Airport. Talladega Municipal Airport next to the former AFB. It does not utilize any of the runways or taxiways of the former military airfield, and there is no shared history between the two facilities. Talladega Superspeedway (formerly Alabama International Motor Speedway) is a motorsports complex located north of Talladega, Alabama, United States. It is located on the former Anniston Air Force Base in the small city of Lincoln. The track is a Tri-oval and was constructed by International Speedway Corporation, a business controlled by the France Family, in the 1960s. Talladega is most known for its steep banking and the unique location of the start/finish line which is closer to turn one than at Daytona. The track currently hosts the NASCAR series such as the Sprint Cup Series, Nationwide Series, and the Camping World Truck Series. Talladega Superspeedway is the longest NASCAR oval with a length of 2.66 miles, and the track at its peak had a seating capacity of 175,000 spectators, although the current capacity is 80,000 seats. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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During the 1960s Bill France was wanting to build a track faster and longer than Daytona International Speedway. He would end up breaking ground on an old airfield on May 23, 1968. The track would be named Alabama International Motor Speedway (AIMS), but the name would not carry on and was later changed to Talladega Superspeedway. The track opened on September 13, 1969 costing $4 million. The first race at the new track was unlike any other; all the original drivers abandoned the track because of tire problems which caused Bill France to hire substitute drivers. The first finish was amazing with three cars side by side with the winner being Richard Brickhouse. After the first race, Talladega would host two Sprint Cup Series races a year, one of which would become part of the 10-race Chase for the Sprint Cup. Since the opening year Talladega has hosted many races and has been repaved four times. Talladega would also have many first time winners such as Larry Schild Sr, Richard Brickhouse, Brian Vickers, and Brad Keselowski. A 4-mile infield road course was in operation from the track’s founding until 1983. Six IMSA GT Championship races were held in the 1970s, including a six-hour race in 1978. During May 2006 Talladega Superspeedway started to re-surface the track and the apron. Construction started on May 1, 2006 and lasted until September 18, 2006. The first race on the resurfaced race track was the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series on October 7, 2006. Speeds in excess of 200 mph are commonplace at Talladega. Talladega Superspeedway has the record for the fastest recorded time by a NASCAR stock car in a closed oval course, with the record of 216.309 mph set by Rusty Wallace on June 9, 2004. Wallace circled the 2.66-mile tri-oval in 44.270 seconds, which surpassed the previous record held by Bill Elliott (212.809 mph) set in 1987, but doesn’t replace the record due to the fact it was a radio test and not a NASCAR sanctioned event. Buddy Baker was the first driver to test at a speed over 200 mph, with a 200.447 mph lap during testing on March 24, 1970. Baker’s record was set while driving the #88 Chrysler Engineering Charger Daytona, which is currently undergoing restoration in Detroit, after being found in the late 1990s in Iowa. The late Benny Parsons was the first driver to qualify at over 200 mph, doing so in 1982 with a speed of 200.176 mph. In May 1987, Bobby Allison, after a blown engine, cut his right-rear tire from the debris while going through the tri-oval portion of the track. The car was vaulted airborne. His car damaged a portion of the frontstretch catch fence, but did not enter the spectator area. NASCAR imposed rule changes to slow the cars after the incident, with a 1988 rule requiring cars running there and at Daytona to use restrictor plates. The most often cited reason is a fear that the increasing speeds were exceeding the capabilities of the tires available at the time, as high-speed tire failure had led to some gruesome crashes at slightly lower speeds. The plates limit the amount of air and fuel entering the intake manifolds of the engine, greatly reducing the power of the cars and hence their speed. This has led to an extremely competitive style of racing at Talladega and Daytona. The reduced power affects not only the maximum speed reached by the cars but the time it takes them to achieve their full 40

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Joe Nemechek (top) Images on the Army Web site are cleared for release and are considered in the public domain. Vehicles of NASCAR drivers Kurt Busch and Joe Nemechek at Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega, Alabama (bottom)

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speed as well, which can be nearly one full circuit of the track. The racing seen at Talladega today is extremely tight; often in rows of three or four cars, and sometimes even five lanes wide on the straightaways throughout most of the field, as the track is wide enough to permit such racing. Breaking away from the pack is very difficult as well. Such close quarters, however, makes it extremely difficult for a driver to avoid an incident as it is unfolding in front of them, and the slightest mistake can lead to a multi-car accident – dubbed “the Big One” by fans and drivers. It is uncommon, but possible, to see 20 or more cars collected in the crashes. Occasionally, cars go airborne. NASCAR has made several advances in safety over the years to lessen the chance of a car going airborne. Numerous strange occurrences at the track have led to rumors of Talladega Superspeedway being cursed. Stories of the origin of the curse vary. Some claim that a local Native American tribe held horse races in the valley where the track currently resides where a chief was killed when he was thrown from his horse. Others say that the site of the superspeedway was once an Indian burial ground. Still another version says that after the local tribe was driven out by the Creek nation for their collaborating with the forces of Andrew Jackson, a shaman put a curse on the valley. Since the construction of the track, many strange happenings and untimely deaths have fueled the rumors of a curse. In 1973, Bobby Isaac left his car during the race on lap 90 because of voices he claimed to have heard which told him to park his car and get out. Earlier on lap 14 in the same race, young driver Larry Smith died in a seemingly minor wreck. In 1974, the morning before the Winston 500, drivers and crews alike found multiple cars sabotaged by cut brake lines and sand in the gas tank. During the 1975 Winston 500, Randy Owens, a crew member for Petty Enterprises, was killed by an air tank that exploded in the pits. To some, Bobby Allison’s 1987 wreck described above was yet another reminder of the curse. In 1993, Bobby’s son, Davey Allison, died in a helicopter crash in the infield of Talladega. In 1996, Automobile Racing Club of America president Bob Loga died after a traffic accident in a parking area.

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Photo credits: Aerial of Talladega SuperSpeedway, aerial of Anniston A.F.B., multiple tri-oval images, racers, before the race: Wikipedia Joe Nemechek, 01 & 97 side by side: U.S. ARMY Special Thanks to Chase Austin for the following images: Chase Austin, Chase Austin signing autograph, 42 Chase Austin MotorSports

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9970-9 Beach Drive Calabash, NC 28467 46

(910) 575-7667

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Willie Robertson Photos by Gene Ho Photography

Look for Willie’s videos on page 51


You’ve all seen him on Duck Dynasty or CNN, he’s Willie Robertson. TV personality, businessman, outdoorsman, hunter, author, CEO and resident prankster of Duck Commander, the reality TV series on A&E. Robertson lives in West Monroe, Louisiana with his wife: Korie (m. 1990); and children: John Luke, Sadie, Willie “Lil Will”, and Bella. Willie and Korie also foster a child from Taiwan named Rebecca. Robertson was born on April 22, 1972, at Tri-Ward General Hospital in Bernice, Louisiana, to Phil Robertson and Marsha Kay Robertson. He has two older brothers, Alan and Jase and one younger brother, Jep. As a child, Willie grew up around hunting and the outdoors, as well as a small business run by his father, Duck Commander. As a boy, Willie handled myriad tasks at the company, including building duck calls and even handling business calls.

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Photo Courtesy: Art Striebler JUNE/JULY 2014


Ever since childhood, Willie Robertson and his brothers have been interested in the duck call business started by their father, Phil Robertson. Willie used his business degree from Harding University to take Duck Commander from a living room operation down by the river to a multi-million dollar empire. Duck Commander is the company that generated a great portion of the wealth that he has acquired and also generated the interest to start the TV show Duck Dynasty. In

Photos from Monday After the Master in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

2006, Robertson started another pursuit, the company Buck Commander. This company has also created the Buckmen series of DVDs and the television show Buck Commander Protected by Under Armour on the Outdoor Channel. Along with Si, he appeared on an episode of Last Man Standing and makes a cameo in the Christian film, God’s Not Dead, with his wife.


Willie Robertson with Darius Rucker

In recent news, Duck Commander, a premiere destination for all-things outdoors, entered multi-year agreement with Mossberg that focuses on the family’s passion of waterfowl hunting, promotion of the shooting sports and family values as well as a series of Mossberg “Duck Commander” firearms. Willie says he honed his skills as a salesman by selling his freshly caught fish at the market with his mom as a young boy. Even then, he always worked to negotiate the best price. While he says “being a redneck millionaire has its perks” – including buying new trucks, gadgets, and swanky suits – he also admits that working with kin can be a headache. Robertson is known for his Christian faith and often strives to preach and bring people to Christ. He is a member of the Church of Christ. He is also almost always seen wearing a bandana in the pattern of an American Flag on his head, and he often wears a white suit jacket to look more professional. He is estimated to be worth approximately $20 million. Robertson, like many of his family members featured on Duck Dynasty, is known for his ZZ Top-style beard.

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If you ask someone what they were doing last night, chances are the answer is: “watching Duck Dynasty.” Because based on the astounding ratings it drew, everyone was tuning in to catch up with the Robertson family. JUNE/JULY 2014


Robertson, as seen in these pictures and video is also an avid golfer. He played the Monday After the Masters tournament in Myrtle Beach, helping them celebrate their 20th Anniversary.

In June 2014, Duck Dynasty will enter in to its 6th Season on A&E.

When he is not working, you will catch him on his tractor bush-hogging a field – earphones blaring, thinking of the next idea that will keep his companies at the top of the heap. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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This chicken and andouille dish is chock full of bold Creole flavors. Served with sweet-and-spicy plantation rice that’s loaded with coconut, jalapeños, pistachios and raisins, the rich Southern stew is perfect for a Mardi Gras celebration.

Photograph by Madeleine Hill.

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Recipe courtesy Andrew Zimmern Reprinted from the book Bobby Flay’s Bar Americain Cookbook by Bobby Flay with Stephanie Banyas and Sally Jackson. Copyright © 2011 by Boy Meets Grill, Inc. Photographs copyright © 2011 by Ben Fink. James Published Beard Award-winning TV personality, food writer by Clarkson Potter, a division chef, of Random House,and Inc.teacher

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Ingredient List

Creole Chicken with Coconut Plantation Rice

Creole Chicken 5 pounds boneless skinless chicken thighs 1/2 cup olive oil 1 tablespoon dry oregano 2 large pinches saffron 2 minced onions 1 green bell pepper, minced 3 ribs minced celery 5 garlic cloves, sliced 2 fresh bay leaves 8 anchovies 3 tablespoons capers 16 ounces canned crushed tomatoes 1 pound Andouille sausage 8 ounces chicken stock 1/2 cup white wine 1/3 cup minced cilantro 1/3 cup minced parsley Juice of 1 lime and its zest Seasoned flour

Plantation Rice 3 cups Basmati rice 2 cups shredded unsweetened coconut 3 jalapenos, minced 2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoon sugar 6 tablespoons raisins 6 tablespoons crushed pistachios 2 bay leaves 1 cinnamon stick 6 cardamom pods 6 tablespoons clarified butter 4 cups milk 2 cups water

Creole Chicken 1. Trim and cube the chicken into one-inch chunks. Dust with the seasoned flour. Set aside. 2. Place the olive oil into a large pan with high sides. Brown the chicken in the pan over high heat. 3. Remove and reserve the chicken. 4. Add the sausage to the pan and brown. Remove sausage, slice and reserve. 5. Next, add the oregano, saffron, onion, pepper, garlic, bay leaves, anchovies, capers, and reserved sausage slices. 6. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, and add the wine and tomato. Reduce liquids by half and add the chicken stock. 7. Reduce liquids by half again. Add the chicken pieces and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally until cooked through. 8. Season with the cilantro, parsley, lime juice and lime zest. Finish with salt and pepper. 9. Serve with plantation rice. Plantation Rice 1. Mix the rice, coconut, chilies, salt, sugar, raisins, pistachios, bay leaf, cinnamon stick and cardamom pods. SautÊ for 5 minutes in the clarified butter over medium heat. 2. Add the milk and water. Increase the heat to high and bring mixture to a boil. Once it’s boiling, lower heat. Cover and cook for 20 minutes over extremely low heat. 3. Remove pot from heat and let stand for 15 minutes. Fluff and serve. Yields 10-12 servings www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Peanut Butter Banana Fritters Coutesy of Nadia G Host of Nadia G’s Bitchin’ Kitchen on the Cooking Channel 54

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Peanut Butter Banana Fritters

Ingredients

Fritters 2 cups flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar 1 pinch sea salt small pinch of baking soda 3 ripe bananas, mashed 1/2 cup smooth organic peanut butter 2/3 cup milk 1 egg 1 litre peanut oil (for deep frying)

Drizzled with Chocolate Sauce

Chocolate Sauce 1 cup dark chocolate 1/2 cup whipping cream 1 cup water (for double boiler)

Directions Fritters 1.Combine dry ingredients is a bowl and mix. 2.Add bananas, peanut butter, milk, egg and whisk until consistency is such that it can be balled up in a spoon. 3.In a medium sauce pan, heat peanut oil to 375 degrees F. 4.Using a teaspoon, delicately spoon the peanut-butter-banana batter into the oil, a few balls at a time and deep fry for 5 minutes until they fluff up and become crispy and golden brown. Drain on wire rack. Chocolate Sauce 1.In a pot, bring a cup of water to a simmer. 2.Add a large metal bowl over top of the pot. In the metal bowl add the chocolate and whipping cream then whisk until it melts together. 3.Drizzle generously over fritters.

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The Kentucky sandwich. Built on a base of savory French toast, this open-faced sandwich needs no doubling up. Thick slices of turkey breast and juicy tomatoes are topped with a decadent cheese sauce, broiled until bubbly and golden brown, then crowned with crisp slices of bacon. It’s no surprise that this dish, named for its birthplace at the Brown Hotel in Louisville, has become Kentucky Derby lore.

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Reprinted from the book Bobby Flay’s Bar Americain Cookbook by Bobby Flay with Stephanie Banyas and Sally Jackson. Copyright © 2011 by Boy Meets Grill, Inc. Photographs copyright © 2011 by Ben Fink. Published by Clarkson Potter, a division of Random House, Inc.

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Ingredients

Kentucky Hot Brown

Roast Turkey Sauce 1 boneless turkey breast, about 3 pounds 6 tablespoons (¾ stick) unsalted butter, softened Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 cups whole milk, plus more if needed 2 tablespoons all purpose flour ½ pound sharp white cheddar cheese, grated (2 cups) ¼ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

Sandwiches 4 large eggs 1½ cups whole milk, or more if needed 8 (½-inch-thick) sliced day-old Pullman or other good-quality white sandwich bread 4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter 6 tablespoons canola oil 3 ripe beefsteak tomatoes, sliced ½ inch thick 6 ounces sharp white cheddar cheese, grated (1½ cups) ½ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 16 (¼-inch-thick) slices bacon, cooked until crisp Fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves, for garnish

Directions 1. To roast the turkey, preheat the oven to 425°F. 2. Rub the entire breast with 4 tablespoons butter and season with salt and pepper. Place in a small roasting pan and roast for 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350°F and continue roasting the turkey until a thermometer inserted into the center registers 155°F, 1 to 1½ hours. Remove from the oven, ten loosely with foil, and let rest for 10 minutes before slicing. 3. To make the sauce, put the milk in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over low heat. Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter over medium-high heat in a medium saucepan. Whisk in the flour and cook for 1 minute. Gradually whisk in the hot milk. Bring to a boil and cook, whisking constantly, until thickened and the raw flour haste has cooked out, 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in more milk if the sauce is too thick to pour. 4. Remove from the heat and whisk in the cheddar and Parmesan cheeses, whisking until the cheddar has melted. Season with the nutmeg and salt and pepper to taste. Keep warm. 5. To make the sandwiches, whisk together the eggs and milk in a medium baking dish. Season with salt and pepper. Dip each slice of bread in the mixture and let sit until completely soaked through, about 10 seconds per side. 6. Heat 1 tablespoon of the butter and 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large nonstick sauté pan over medium-high heat. Working in batches, cook 2 slices of the bread at a time until golden brown on both sides, about 2 minutes per side. Repeat with the remaining butter, 3 tablespoons oil, and bread. 7. Preheat the broiler. 8. Put the tomatoes on a rimmed baking sheet, brush with the remaining 2 tablespoons oil, and season with salt and pepper. Broil until slightly charred and just cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. 9. Place 4 slices of the egg bread on a baking sheet, slide under the broiler, and heat just to warm through, 20 seconds on each side. Repeat with the remaining bread. 10. Top each slice of bread with 2 to 3 slices turkey. Ladle sauce over the top and divide the cheddar and Parmesan over the top of each slice. Place under the broiler and cook until bubbly and the tops are golden brown, about 2 minutes. Remove from the oven, top each slice with 2 slices of bacon and a tomato slice, and sprinkle with parsley. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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ANNE BURRELL Chef/TV Personality/Author

With her trademark spiky blond hair and pumped-up personality, Anne Burrell has worked at some of the top

restaurants in New York, studied the culinary landscape and traditions of Italy, battled alongside Mario Batali as his sous chef on Food Network’s Iron Chef America and wrote a New York Times best-selling cookbook.

Anne co-hosts Worst Cooks in America, a prime-time reality show where she leads a team of hopeless home cooks from

around the country through culinary boot camp. The fifth season premiered in February 2014. Chef Wanted’s third season premiered in August 2013 where Anne put top-notch chefs through the ultimate job interview as they strived to land the Executive Chef position in restaurants around the country. In her Food Network series, Secrets of a Restaurant Chef, she eliminates the intimidation of restaurant dishes and reveals concise, easy-to-master techniques for the at-home cook. She starred in her own right on Next Iron Chef: Super Chefs in fall 2011.

Anne published her first cookbook, “Cook Like a Rock Star,” in 2011 which gives home cooks the confidence and

support to be rock stars in their own kitchens. Her cookbook earned a place on the New York Times Bestseller List. Anne’s second book, “Own Your Kitchen: Recipes to Inspire and Empower” was released in October 2013.

Growing up in upstate New York, Anne’s passion for food and cooking began at an early age. After obtaining an

English and communication degree from Canisius College in Buffalo, she pursued her interest in the restaurant business by enrolling in the Culinary Institute of America. Following graduation, she spent a year in Italy attending the Italian Culinary Institute for Foreigners while working at La Taverna del Lupo in Umbria and La Bottega del' 30, a 30-seat restaurant that offers only one seating a night in Tuscany. During this year, Anne grew to truly appreciate and understand the philosophy of Italian cuisine and culture, which left a lasting impact on her culinary point of view.

Upon her arrival in New York City, Anne was hired as a sous chef at Felidia Restaurant, working with Lidia Bastianich.

She then served as a chef at Savoy where she cooked over an open wood fire and created flavorful Mediterranean-inspired menus. Here Anne developed her personal culinary style: a real love of rustic food made with pure and simple ingredients with intense flavors.

Anne took the opportunity to spread her culinary knowledge and passion as a teacher at the Institute of Culinary

Education. Shortly after, she joined the Batali-Bastianich empire by accepting a job at Italian Wine Merchants. The job also included salumi production and traveling to off-site events with Mario Batali. When Mario became one of Food Network’s esteemed Iron Chefs, he knew exactly who to enlist as his sous chef: the talented and dynamic Anne Burrell.

As the executive chef at New York hot spot Centro Vinoteca from its opening in July 2007 through September 2008,

Anne served up her “creative-authentic” Italian menu of small plates (piccolini), antipasti, pastas and main courses accented by her trademark bold, pure flavors.

Burrell feels fortunate to have found a field that satisfies her so completely. “I feel so lucky that I have found my true

passion in life.”

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Recipe courtesy Anne Burrell Chef - TV Personality - Author 60

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Mise en Place

Sticky Toffee Pudding

Ingredient List Pudding 2 1/4 cups pitted dates 3/4 cup dark spiced rum 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon Pinch of salt 1 tablespoon baking powder 2 cups packed light or dark brown sugar 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for the baking dish 3 large eggs

Toffee Sauce 1 1/2 pounds (6 sticks) unsalted butter 3 cups packed dark or light brown sugar 1 cup brandy Whipped cream (optional)

For the Cake 1. Preheat the oven to 350째F. and butter a 9 x 13-inch baking dish. 2. In a small saucepan, combine the dates, rum, and 3/4 cup water. Bring the liquid to a boil, reduce to a simmer (BTB, RTS ), and cook for 5 to 7 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, add the vanilla, and let the liquid cool. Puree the mixture in a food processor until smooth, and reserve. 3. Sift the flour, cinnamon, salt, and baking powder into a medium bowl. 4. Combine the brown sugar and butter in a large mixing bowl and beat until homogeneous. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Gently stir the flour mixture into the butter-sugar in thirds. Stir in the reserved date puree. 5. Transfer the batter to the prepared baking dish and bake for 35 minutes or until set in the middle. Let cool for about 10 minutes. For the Toffee Sauce While the pudding is baking, combine the butter, brown sugar, brandy, and 1/2 cup water in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer (BTB, RTS ), whisking frequently. Cook over medium heat until the mixture thickens to a sauce consistency, about 15 minutes. Serves 6 to 8; Time about 1 1/2 hours To finish the Pudding 1. Using a skewer or chopstick, poke holes in the pudding every inch or so. 2. Pour half the toffee sauce over the cake and let it soak in for at least 20 minutes. 3. Serve the pudding in a warm pool of the remaining sauce. Garnish with whipped cream if desired.

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New Location 2770 Hwy 17

THE FANCY FLEA ANTIQUE MALL

Shallotte, NC 910-755-6665

More than just antiques! Furniture • Primitives • Pottery • Stoneware • Old Toys Sporting Goods • Glass & China • Marbles • Militaria • Jewelry Coins • Vintage Bottles Check out our new website! www.FancyFleaAntique.com

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Look for Brad’s video on page 71 Brad Redding

PGA Master Professional The Members Club at Grande Dunes Golf Instruction Editor BradReddingGolf.com

“Focus on the Club to Fix Your Body”

In my 20 plus years of working with golfers to improve their game I have found that most golfers work on trying to get their body to do something versus working on what the club does. Now I agree that your body does move the club but you need to understand what the club is doing and then what it should be doing. I will take an issue that many golfers have and then show you that by fixing what the club does and changing what it should be doing can fix how your body moves. Reverse pivot is a move where you body moves or sways to the left (for a right handed golfer) in the backswing and then sways to the right in the down swing. The problem here is that the club is moving in such a way that your body is forced to move in this fashion.

1

2

In figures (1) and (2) you see a golfer in a good address position. The green noodle, Figure (1) represents the golfers swing plane which is the angle of the clubshaft at address. The purple noodle is on the golfer’s right ear and represents where the head should be during most of the swing until the follow through. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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3

In the back swing the golfer swings the golf club too low and inside their swing plane. Figure (3) 64

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4

As a result the body needs to get out of the way of the club and he sways to his left. Figure (4) You see the golfer was forced to move this way because the club was moving too low to the ground and inside. The body simply accommodated what the club did. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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5

With this inside move the golfer will now lift the club to the top of his backswing. He cannot turn he must lift it. As a result he must swing outside the plane on the downswing just to find the golf ball. Figure (5) 66

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6

Again the body will need to back up to get out of the way of the club. Figure (6) www.thecarolinastoday.com

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7

To fix how your body works we need to focus on how the club travels. We go back to Figures (1) and (2) which is an excellent address position. On the backswing keep the clubhead outside your hands and along the swingplane. Figure (7) 68

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8

As your keep your head up against the noodle. Figure (8) This will allow you to turn you back, chest and shoulders to the top of your back swing. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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9

There is no need to lift the club to the top as the club didn’t move so low to the ground. From this position at the top of your backswing you then can then swing the club back down on the same angle as the noodle. Figure (9) 70

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10

Click here to watch video

 As a result your lower body can shift forward and pivot onto your left side as you head stays on the noodle. Figure (10) Again this body moment is possible because the club is now coming back down on plane and not “over the top.” What we have actually done is reverse the “loop” in the golf swing. The reverse pivot is due to the club swinging “in” on the back swing, then “lifting” it up to the top of the backswing, then “over” the swing plane on the downswing. Simply said in, up, and over. Now the club is swinging more “up” and along the swing plane which is represented again by the green noodle. The club can now go “in” to the top of the backswing as the shoulder now can turn. I stress the word “CAN,” as a result of what the club did in the beginning of the backswing. Now the club can come from “under” or along the swing plane into the back of the ball. Simply said up, in, and under. You can use the noodles as simple aids it helping you fix what the club does to fix what your body does. Remember, a lot of the times your body basically accommodates the club. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Carolina Shores

“Selling Real Estate At The Beach, One Yard At A Time”

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Real Estate Broker Licensed in both NC / SC

10187 Beach Drive SW, Calabash, NC 28467 Office (910) 579-3685, Toll Free (800) 756-9635 Fax (910) 579-7497, Cell (910) 209-1172 Email mcleary@century21carolina.com

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4924 Main Street, Suite 4 4924 Main Street, Suite 7 4924 Main Street, 4924 Hispanic Main Street, Suite 7 English OfficeSuite 4 Office EnglishNC Office HispanicNC Office Shallotte, 28470 Shallotte, 28470 English Office Hispanic Office Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 Phone: 910-754-6068 Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-6068 Mon-Fri Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-6068 Mon-Fri 9:00 am to Suite 9:00 pm 9:00 am to Suite 7:00 pm 4924 Main Street, 4 4924 Main Street, 7 Mon-Fri 9:00Street, am to Suite 9:00 pm Mon-Fri 9:00Street, am to Suite 7:00 pm 4924 Main 4 Mon-Fri 4924 Main 7Mon-Fri 9:00 am to 9:00 pm 9:00 am to 7:00 pm Sat 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Sat 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Hispanic Office English Office 4924 Main Street, Suite 7 4924 Main Street, Suite 4 Sat 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Sat 9:00 to 5:00 pm Street, Suite 74924 Main Street, English Office Hispanic Office Main Street, Suite 4 am4924 Suite 4924 Street, Suite 44924 4924 Main MainMain Street, Suite 4 am Main Street, Suiteam 7NC Sat 9:00 to 5:00 pmMain Sat 9:00 toOffice 5:00 pm Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, 28470 4924 Main Street, Suite 44924 4924 Street, Suite 7NC English Office Hispanic Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, 28470 4924 Main Street, Suite 7 4924 Main Street, Suite 4 4924 Main Street, Suite 4 4924 Main Street, Suite English Office Hispanic Office 4924 Main Street, Suite 4 4924 Main Street, Suite 7 English Office Hispanic Office 4924 Main Street, Suite 4NC 28470 Main Street, Suite 7NC 28470 Hispanic Office English Office THE CAROLINAS TODAY JUNE/JULY 2014 Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-6068 Office Office 4924Hispanic Main Street, Suite 7 4924 4924 English Main Street, Suite 4 Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-6068 Shallotte, Shallotte, 4924 Main Street, Suite 4 4924 Main Street, Suite 7 Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 English Office Hispanic Office Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 English Office Hispanic Office Mon-Fri 9:00 am to 9:00 pm Mon-Fri 9:00 am to 7:00 pm Office Hispanic Mon-Fri 9:00 pm 9:00 pm Shallotte, 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 English Office Hispanic Office Hispanic Office EnglishNC Office Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 4924 MainEnglish Street, Suite 4am to 9:00 4924 Main Mon-Fri Street, Suite 7am to 7:00Office Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-6068 Sat 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Sat 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-6068 Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-6068 Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 Sat 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Sat 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Phone: 910-754-6067 Phone: 910-754-606 Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470 English Office Hispanic Office Mon-Fri 9:00 am to 9:00 pm Mon-Fri 9:00 am to 7:00 pm Shallotte, NC910-754-6068 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470Phone: Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NCOffice 28470 910-754-6067 Phone: English Office Hispanic Shallotte, NC 28470 Shallotte, NC 28470


Wilmington/Cape Fear Coast CVB

Wilmington, North Carolina

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From Hustle and Bustle to Picturesque Wilmington, NC

Photo by Peter Doran

Wilmington, located in New Hanover County, is a coastal town situated in southeastern North Carolina. The city is bordered by the Cape Fear River to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the east. Incorporated in 1739, Wilmington became a city in 1866. In 1840 it was the largest town in the state and remained so through the early 1900s, thanks to the thriving ports along the Cape Fear River and the arrival of the Wilmington & Raleigh Railroad (renamed the Wilmington & Weldon Railroad in 1854). When the railroad was completed in 1840, it was the largest continuous railroad track in the world. The Port City is the childhood home of basketball great Michael Jordan and journalist David Brinkley. Other famous Wilmington natives include Kevin Beasley, Sonny Jurgenson, Sugar Ray Leonard, Charles Kuralt, Charlie Daniels, Roman Gabriel, Meadowlark Lemon, Trot Nixon and Alge Crumpler. As the second smallest of the state’s 100 counties, New Hanover County encompasses only 199 square miles, most of which is the City of Wilmington. The county’s 2007 population of 188,000 reflected a growth of 33 percent since 1990. Wilmington alone saw its population increase to nearly 100,000 in 2007, making it the larger of the two major Wilmingtons (the other one is in Delaware). The University of North Carolina Wilmington has been ranked as one of the 10 best public master’s universities in the

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Photo by NC Div. of Tourism / Bill Russ

South by U.S. News & World Report for the past 10 years, and is ranked sixth for 2008. The 661-acre campus is among the fastest-growing universities in the 16-campus UNC system. Previously called New Liverpool, New Carthage, New Town and Newton, Wilmington was settled in 1729. That same year, St James Parish was founded and still exists today as St. James Episcopal Church at the corner of Third and Market streets. The name of the city was finally decided when Governor Gabriel Johnston took office. He was so excited and thankful for the prestigious appointment that he named the city after the man who gave him the job — Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington. In keeping with its English heritage, many streets in Wilmington, such as Red Cross, Castle, Walnut, Chestnut, Princess, Market, Dock, Orange, Ann, Nunn, Queen and Church streets, are named after streets in Liverpool, England. Wilmington flourished as a major port, shipbuilding center and producer of pine forest products. Tar, turpentine and pitch were central to the economy, and lumber from the pine forests was a lucrative economic resource. At one time, Wilmington was the site of the largest cotton exchange in the world. The waterfront bustled with steam ships crowding together to pick up or unload precious cargo. Downtown Wilmington remains the historical core of the community and is still in many ways the neighborhood that defines the region. Suburbs may flourish, but there is something fascinating about the historic homes and buildings downtown, with their intimate proximity to the river. Both visitors and residents are affected by a sense of lingering ghosts. Important events happened here, in places that are still standing — places that have not been obscured by modern architecture or lost in the trends of a constantly changing American culture. Over the last few years, the city of Wilmington and New Hanover County have experienced a tremendous building boom that has affected all aspects of life and culture throughout the area. However, with excellent shopping, outstanding restaurants, antiques to be discovered and a view of the river wherever you go, downtown Wilmington’s booming tourist industry vies for visitor attention with the nearby beaches, and remains the focal point of the county. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Perhaps the best thing about downtown Wilmington — and something that separates it from the rest of the city and nearby communities — is its pleasant walkability. Streets lined with shops and restaurants are easily traversed, and the Riverwalk is a great place to stroll, grab a hot dog from a street vendor, listen to free music and watch the river traffic. Nearly a mile long, the Riverwalk stretches from the Greater Wilmington Chamber of Commerce building just north of the Coast Line Convention Center to south of Chandlers Wharf. Complete with wide, patio-style areas and pocket parks with benches, the Riverwalk offers spectacular views of the river, especially at night. During the day, downtown Wilmington is quaint and charming, but at night it comes alive in a whole new way. Dance clubs, jazz bars, local and touring musicals, venues for rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm and blues and more can be found in the 55-block area of the downtown commercial district. With all this new growth and the continuing popularity of the area, real estate is a lively business. “Plantations,” the new name for gated communities and neighborhoods, are developed so quickly that natives have been heard to say they occasionally get lost on once-familiar streets because of the changing landscape. Housing choices are as diverse as a golf course condo to a house on the Intracoastal Waterway to Wilmington’s extensive Historic District, which is made up of approximately 230 city blocks and has many full-time residents. A stroll through the Historic District, by the way, reveals beautifully restored homes and commercial buildings, many of them antebellum, lining the shaded streets. A number of buildings bear plaques indicating their age: red for 75 to 100 years and black if the structure is more than 100 years old. As more of the city’s older homes are restored, and condominiums and townhouses are added, both the Historic District and the downtown population will continue to grow. www.thecarolinastoday.com

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The city also holds the distinction of being the cultural center for the whole southeast coast. Performances by touring and home-based theater, dance and music companies enliven the local stages of Thalian Hall Center for the Performing Arts, the oldest community theater tradition in the United States, and Kenan Auditorium, the Cultural Arts Building and Trask Coliseum on the campus of UNCW. Writers, artists and musicians are evident in abundance. Private galleries abound and in addition, the Louise Wells Cameron Museum of Art offers a showcase of regional and international artists. The Community Arts Center is constantly enhancing the arts scene by offering classes and sponsoring productions for adults and children, and numerous theater groups are active throughout the year. Museums, such as the Cape Fear Museum and the Children’s Museum add to the mix. The film industry lends an exciting opportunity for spotting the occasional celebrity or just watching the process of making movies. For many years, filmmaking accounted for a significant portion of the local economy and it still has the potential for growth because of Wilmington’s well-established film industry infrastructure. The cornerstone of the local film industry, EUE/Screen Gems Studios, is complemented by a seasoned crew base, an active regional film commission and a large talent pool. Since the first movie filmed here in 1983 (Dino DeLaurentiis’ Firestarter), Wilmington has been home to more than 300 movies and seven television series, including Matlock, Dawson’s Creek and One Tree Hill. Stars spotted over the years have included, among others, Bruce Willis, Richard Gere, Katherine Hepburn, Alec Baldwin, Kim Basinger, Patrick Swayze, Julie Harris, John Travolta and Anthony Hopkins. Linda Lavin, Broadway star and a woman known affectionately as “Alice” from the ‘70s TV series, lives downtown and works closely with the Community Arts Center. Pat Hingle, a Hollywood character actor for many years, lived in Carolina Beach until his passing in early 2009, and had been very active in the film scene. Another major economic influence lies just south of the city on the river. It is North Carolina’s principal deep-water port, the North Carolina State Port at Wilmington. The port and some of the industrial complexes north of downtown host hundreds of ships and barges from many nations every year. The river recently has been dredged and deepened so that larger cargo ships and some of the cruise ships can now dock in Wilmington.

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475 Kristen Lane Minutes to Holden Beach .37 acre 1900+ sq ft 3 BD 2 BA w/ Carolina Room, Double Sided Fireplace $259,900 484 Kristen Lane Lakefront Home 3 BD 3 BA w/ Bonus Rm Den, Carolina Room and Formal Dining Room Minutes to the Beach $338,000 www.thecarolinastoday.com

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910-575-7567 On the island of Sunset Beach overlooking the salt marsh and Intracoastal Waterway 9 North Shore Dr. • Sunset Beach, NC • 1.888.575.1001

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6810 Beach Drive SW, Ocean Isle Beach, NC www.aframeortwo.com


Tina Louise Culp

Career Women, Wife, And Mother Model: The Carolinas Today Sales Representative: The Home Shopping Network

Tina resides with her husband Mike, son Bradley and we can’t leave out Maggie Hope, the families beloved canine, in beautiful Tarpon Springs, Florida. Tina loves riding her bicycle and walking on the beach when her busy schedule permits. She is an active member of her church where she and Mike volunteer in helping their community. This will be her son’s senior year in high school and the family is looking forward to a busy, exciting and life changing year. Look for Tina in upcoming issues of The Carolinas Today.

www.thecarolinastoday.com

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TheLifestylesCarolinas Today of the South Introducing...

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entucky Horse Park is a working horse farm and an educational theme park opened in 1978 in Lexington, Kentucky. It is located off Kentucky State Highway 1973 (Iron Works Pike) and Interstate 75 in northern Fayette County in the United States. The equestrian facility is a 1,224-acre park dedicated to "man's relationship with the horse." Open to the public, the Park has a twice daily Parade of Breeds, showcasing both common and rare horses from across the globe. The horses are ridden in authentic costume. Each year the park is host to a number of special events and horse shows. Additionally, the park contains the International Museum of the Horse, which has a permanent collection of horse history and memorabilia, along with a rotating historical collection focused on a particular theme. Past themes include A Gift from the Desert (Arabia), Imperial China, and All the Queen's Horses (Britain). Beginning with the 1979 arrival of Forego, one of the leading handicap horses of the 1970s, the Kentucky Horse Park has been a retirement home for some of the world's greatest competition horses. The status of the park as a retirement center was further established with the 1985 arrival of John Henry, Horse of the Decade for the 1980s and the top money-winning thoroughbred gelding in racing history. With the exception of a few months in 1986, John Henry lived at the park until his death in 2007, alongside other racing greats such as Forego and his fellow 1970s champion Bold Forbes, and current residents Cigar, voted Horse of the Decade for the 1990s, and Da Hoss, the first of only two thoroughbreds to win Breeders' Cup races in non-consecutive years. In late 2008, the champions Alysheba and Funny Cide became residents, but Alysheba died at the park in March 2009.

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Cigar, voted Horse of the Decade for the 1990s, www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Besides Thoroughbred horses, Standardbred greats such as Western

Dreamer, Cam Fella and Rambling Willie have made the Kentucky Horse Park their home, as well as 5-gaited Saddlebred gelding CH Gypsy Supreme and late champions CH Imperator and CH Sky Watch. A number of horse sculptures stand in the Kentucky Horse Park, including a Man o' War statue on a pedestal near the entrance. There is also a life-size statue of the 1973 U.S. Triple Crown winner Secretariat with jockey Ron Turcotte aboard being led by groom Eddie Sweat. From harness racing, there is a statue of Bret Hanover.

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Rolex Stadium is the primary outdoor event venue in the complex.

The stadium seats 7,338 in its main grandstand but can accommodate up to 37,338 total capacity when bleachers seating up to 30,000 are used, primarily for larger outdoor horse shows, concerts, and other sporting events. Its show ring measures 306 feet by 406 feet, with the flooring made of sand and fiber; however, artificial turf has been brought into the Stadium for soccer and football games on occasion, among other events. It is the largest outdoor concert venue in Central Kentucky with a capacity of up to nearly 52,000. There are only six concession stands at the stadium and six restrooms, meaning that concession and restroom facilities may be limited for events that require larger capacity; however Rolex Stadium features an 18-by-33-foot Daktronics ProStar LED videoscreen.

Alltech Arena

Alltech Arena is Kentucky Horse Park's 5,520-seat indoor arena, expandable to 8,500 for concerts. The arena floor and championship ring measures 135 feet by 300 feet; in addition in indoor horse shows, Alltech Arena can also be used for indoor football, ice hockey, basketball, circuses, boxing, wrestling, concerts, and other special events. The arena contains nine luxury suites, 222 VIP box seats and a 4,000-square-foot club lounge seating up to 80 patrons. The arena floor is below street level; the arena concurse, with 50,000 square feet of space, overlooks the arena floor and contains six concession stands. There are also two box offices at the arena. In 2014, the Bluegrass Warhorses, a Continental Indoor Football League team, made their home field at Alltech Arena.

The Kentucky Horse Park also contains the National Horse Center, headquarters for several organizations including: American Association of Equine Practitioners American Farrier's Association American Hackney Horse Society American Hanoverian Society American Saddlebred Horse Association Carriage Association of America Kentucky Horse Racing Authority Equestrian Events, Inc. United States Hunter/Jumper Association United States Dressage Federation United States Equestrian Federation United States Pony Clubs, Inc.

www.thecarolinastoday.com

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Black Arabian

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Photo by Heather Abourader Photography

ELLIS PARK RACETRACK, HENDERSON, KENTUCKY

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The Carolinas Today June/July 2014