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DVC’s ace breaks records: Vikings starting pitcher signs with Kansas and leads the state in strikeouts. See Page 6.

Festival lineup disappoints:

Outside Lands’ re-run bands: meh. See Page 8

Equal pay for equal work:

The Inquirer’s editorial board talks about equality for working women. See Page 7.

The

INQUIRER S tudent V oi ce

of

D iablo Val le y C ol le g e

Volume 85 No. 4 Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014 www.TheInquirerOnline.com

Election yields low turnout

Success on the road ahead

COLLIN JAMES News editor

Results from the latest ASDVC election are in, though the candidates are not yet ready to take office. The low turnout at this year’s elections, highlight ASDVC’s problems in recruitment and getting students involved in student government. A grand total of 183 students voted in the election held on Wed. April 9, and Thurs. April 10, despite the promise of free food and the chance for students to voice themselves in regards to student representation. There was not much of a voice to be hear from students in this election. Each candidate ran unopposed, which brought up the concerns of lack of interest in the election process. This is hardly representative of the over 15,000 students enrolled at DVC. ELECTION, Page 2

Student meeting may have violated the Brown Act RACHEL ANN REYES Editor-in-chief

When a student commission met in closed session with a college employee, it violated state open meeting laws, a media law expert said. Jim Ewert, general counsel at the California Newspaper Publisher’s Association, believes the April 8 meeting violated the Brown Act in that there was no public notice and the majority of the committee met to conduct business, which includes to hear, discuss, or deliberate issues. The Commission of Judicial Review met with Associated Students of DVC President Sam Park and Student Life Office student activities assistant Amelia Fitzgerald. The commission was formed by BROWN ACT, Page 2

Insite/WebAdvisor brings new tool to transfer planning

A

TYLER ELMORE Staff member

new tool has been added to the Insite/WebAdvisor home screen, which aids in the quickest route for transfer for DVC students. “Roadmap Planning” is a tool available for students to help streamline their degree, certificate and transfer progress through Insite/WebAdvisor. It allows students to view all the sections of a selected class, and then compile them on a visible chart where you can register for the ideal classes. This is a new tool that is still being altered and developed, according to Beth Hauscarriague, the dean of Counseling and Enrollment Services. ROAD MAP, Page 2

BENJAMIN DAVIDSON / The Inquirer

• News 1,2,3 • Opinions 7,8,9 • Sports 4,5,6 • Editorial 7 • Arts & Features 10,11,12 • Campus Buzz 7 • Calendar 2 • Police Beat 2 • Staff Information 2 • Copyright © 2014 The Inquirer - Diablo Valley College


news 2

Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

ROADMAP

calendar Thursday, April 17 Baseball vs. San Joaquin Delta Baseball field, 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 17 to Saturday, April 19 Swimming and Diving - Big 8 Championship Away at Stockton, All day Tuesday, April 22 Baseball vs. American River Baseball field, 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, April 25 A Night at the Opera Music- 101, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Track and Field - Big 8 Conference Finals Away at San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, All day Tuesday, April 29 A Vocal Jazz Tribute Music-101, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. to 10 p.m.

From Page 1

“We partnered with the vendor from the beginning and have played a large role in the development of the product,” Hauscarriague said. “We have slowly released it with pilot testing to small groups of students for much of this last year but didn’t want to do broad advertising until we were confident in our delivery date to all students. During this last year, the tool has gone through four iterations and releases, so it’s continuously been evolving and improving.” The link to access this application is in the left hand corner of the screen when you first log into your Insite/WebAdvisor account. When you click through it will take to you the opening page where you can see all the tabs and locations that you can navigate to within the app. Haurscarriague explains that a tutorial on how to use the Roadmap is in development.

Dennis Franco, counselor and transfer services coordinator, said that the easy registration was his favorite feature. “My favorite feature is the ability to register from the student’s educational plan,” he said. “This feature greatly reduces the amount of time it takes for students to register and is a simpler, more streamlined process.” Franco believes that the fact that this application is user friendly and can guide students in the right direction when it comes to their educational plan may heighten the traffic in the counseling office. “The tool is really designed to be used in conjunction with, not independent from counselors,” he said. “We hope that students will continue to seek out guidance from counselors when developing their ed plans and see students checking in with counselors an important step in the educational

This screenshot of the Insite Portal illustrates where students can find the new Roadmap. planning process. We anticipate that it may, in fact, increase traffic but are currently developing educational planning workshops to accommodate that increase.” Alyssa Orlikoff, 20, says, “It seems cool, I like that you can see

all the classes you piked on an actual schedule, it makes it easier for me to plan classes around my work schedule.” Contact TYLER ELMORE at telmore@TheInquirerOnline.com

BROWN ACT From Page 1

police beat Saturday, April 5 DVC PAC Quad Between 8: 15 p.m. and 9 p.m., a subject was wandering around campus looking for his residence, but had a warrant and was arrested and taken to the Martinez Detention Facility. Tuesday, April 8 DVC Parking Lot 7 Between 1:19 p.m. and 1:30 p.m., a suspect was found in possession of two small bags of marijuana after a strong smell of marijuana came from the vehicle. The suspect was given a citation and a date to appear in court. Wednesday, April 9 San Ramon Campus Admissions Office Between 12:15 p.m. and 12:25 p.m., officers responded to a student that reported that she felt faint. She refused medical assistance. San Ramon Campus Unknown Location Between 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., a student lost his wallet at the SRC. When it was found, it was missing $200 in cash.

ASDVC to review complaints about club activities. Because ASDVC has to follow open meeting laws, its commissions do, too, according to Ewert. According to Park, the Student Life Office made a sudden request to speak to the Commission of Judicial Review to discuss studentsensitive issues, some of which arose from the purpose of the commission. He was called in at the last moment. However, according to the Ralph M. Brown Act, “where matters are not subject to a closed meeting exception, the Act has been interpreted to mean that all of the deliberative processes by legislative bodies, including discussion, debate and the acquisition of information, be open and available for public scrutiny.” Ewert believes this meeting violated the act, which was originally created in 1953 as a way

for the public to gain access to meetings of local government agencies. “This was a meeting established by the Student Life Office, so it wasn’t something that JRC (Commission of Judicial Review) or myself were planning to meet,” he said. “If (the commission) was planning to meet, then yes, we have to notify the public.” But student life coordinator Sara Larkin explained via email that the meeting was informational, to discusse leadership positions between a Student Life staff member and students. “It’s our understanding that this type of meeting is not subject to the Brown Act,” she said. Park interpreted the situation as meeting with students explained that the meeting dealt with student issues, which revolved around students’ rights to privacy. Commissioner Neema Monfared explained

that while he was fine with the press being at that meeting, he doesn’t feel closing it violated the Brown Act, as it was unofficial. “In regards to school policy, it was a private discussion between the Student Life Office and five individuals of the public,” he said. “So because there was no action taken... and no decision was made, to my understanding it was not a violation of the Brown Act because it was not an official meeting, it was similar to friends meeting to discuss a topic.” However according to Ewert, it is “legally irrelevant” that decisions were not made. If the majority of the commission discussed business, the meeting should have been open to public. Contact RACHEL ANN REYES at rreyes@TheInquirerOnline.com

ELECTION From Page 1

The board members were required to get a petition signed by at least 250 students before they could assume office. This is the process that they need to go through as per the ASDVC constitution. All members that are returning board members do not need to go through this process. According to ASDVC, this year’s turn out was the lowest in its history, but the student body is ready to fix this issue. The vice president of legislative

THE INQUIRER Diablo Valley College 321 Golf Club Road, H-102 Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 The Inquirer is published Thursdays during the school year by the Diablo Valley College journalism students. Unsigned articles appearing on the opinions page are editorials and reflect a two-thirds majority opinion of the editorial staff. Signed columns and cartoons are the opinions of the writer or artist and not necessarily those of The Inquirer, Diablo Valley College or Contra Costa Community College District.

affairs, Kevin Tian, was not surprised by the low turnout, saying, “not many students were aware of the election.” ASDVC is determined to reverse this trend. “We need to make more students know about the student government and join us,” said Tian. Newly elected president Keith Montes expressed his determination to actively increase the number of people on the board for the current and the following semester. Getting enough members on

the board is critical to the way that ASDVC functions, by bringing in a diverse selection of views to the college governing board, according to Montes. “We put a lot of emphasis for our board members to function during meetings, by encouraging people to speak up,” said Montes. Montes and the rest of ASDVC staff is preparing to immediately boost recruitment. ASDVC will host a recruitment session from April 28 to May 1, between the hours of 12 p.m and

Editorial Board EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR ONLINE EDITOR NEWS EDITOR OPINIONS EDITOR ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR PHOTO CHIEF COPY EDITOR

Rachel Ann Reyes Benjamin Davidson Tyler Elmore Collin James Sasan Kasravi Regina Ortanez Gustavo Vasquez Amrita Kaur

1 p.m. Montes hopes to “fill the [Student Union conference] room.” It is imperative that ASDVC gets enough members to handle the task of student governing. Its outreach program is a step in the right direction, but the student organization will face steeper challenges without enough members.

Contact COLLIN JAMES at cjames@TheInquirerOnline.com

Staff STAFF MEMBERS Andrew Barber, Josh Bradshaw, Aurora Byrne, Malachi Harris, Wesley Ihezue, Allan Kew, Keanda Lewis, Ayaka Matsuno, Vivian Natalia, Aliya Recania, Mister Simmons Jr., Tara Tashayod INSTRUCTIONAL LAB COORDINATOR Julius Rea ADVISER Mary Mazzocco

• Phone: 925.969.2543 • Email: inquirer@dvc.edu • Website: www.TheInquirerOnline.com • Printed six times per semester •


news 3

Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Clubs prep for Earth Day Elijah Zislein, 19, encourages students to sign a pledge to help the environment on April. 7. He looks on to this pledge tree, which is made out of recycled materials.

The DVC earth club is gearing up for the upcoming Earth Day, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, April 22. at the Student Union courtyard with this pledge tree, made out of recycled materials.

GUSTAVO VASQUEZ/ The Inquirer

Career fair benefits Bay Area veterans

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sports 5

Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

BENJAMIN DAVIDSON / The Inquirer

Sharks face off against the Dallas Stars in a home game on Dec. 21 2013. The Sharks won this game in overtime. Both teams will be in this year’s playoff games for the prize of winning this year’s Stanley Cup. Advertisement

Sharks bite their way into their 10th straight playoff The second round is where it can get a bit confusing. Unlike previous seasons, there is no re-seeding The San Jose Sharks are headed for round 2. The bracket is set, to the Stanley Cup playoffs for regardless of who wins in the first round. their 10th consecutive season. One thing that it does give us is a Their playoff spot was attained by their 72nd game of the regular nice, clean bracket for the playoffs season – in which, one goal was since the reseeding is no longer. The bracket is the bracket, and scored by the Sharks to increase their playoff points just above the you know in advance who the threshold, thus reserving their potential opponents are in each round. 10th straight opPostseason Pending who wins portunity to obtain Notable the match-up on a Stanley Cup title. Thursday, April 17, Highlights With a total rebetween the Los Ancord of 51 wins, geles Kings and the 22 losses and nine Sharks, the winner games that went Goaltending: In a seof this match-up will into overtime, the ries that was decided face-off the winner of Sharks sit in the sevby the slimmest of the division match-up, enth spot overall for margins last year, it’s in either the top-seedthe 2013-14 regular a fact that Jonathan ed Anaheim Ducks or season, with a total Quick got the better the Dallas Stars. of 111 total points. of Niemi so hopefully The Sharks are, Even though a the home ice advanhowever, sporting a couple of days still tage won’t play a role. bench that is chalk remain in the NHL full of raw talent – and regular season, all Injuries have sub- from starters to back16 playoff berths sided and the Sharks ups, the 2013-14 team have already been returners include a looks to be one of the secured. couple starters in main contenders for The only questhat of Jason Demers, the 2014 title. tion left to answer is Adam Burish, and Despite the loss how the match-ups Brad Stuart according against the Calgary will turn out for the to SportsIllustrated. Flames in the clinch first round under game, it didn’t seem the new post-season to undermine the acformat. Along with reThe Sharks have complishment of getalignment of the home-ice advantage, ting to compete in divisions and conwhich is not insignifi- the postseason for ferences this seacant given how well a 10th consecutive year – of which, is the son, the NHL they play at home. introduced a new The crowd may be a second-longest stretch structure for the deciding factor in the in NHL history, behind the Detroit Red post-season.Each division rivalry. Wings, with a 23 seaconference,now son playoff appearance omprised of two streak. divisions, still has Since the new millennium, the eight teams qualify for the postseason, but the potential match- Sharks have been to three Western Conference Finals, won the ups are significantly different. Under the new format, the first Presidents’ Trophy in 2008-09 and three teams in each division au- have captured six Pacific Division tomatically qualified for the post- Championships. In the team’s first 20 years, San Jose has attended 14 season. The final two teams to qualify, post-season games. Detroit is the only team ahead did so as wild cards based on their of the Sharks with 779 points to record, regardless of division. Those two teams will face the our 753 points. On April 17, the two division winners in round 1 of Sharks will face off against the Kings in the playoffs. the post-season. The second and third-place teams in each division then fightt Contact BENJAMIN DAVIDSON at bdavidson@TheInquirerOnline.com for the remaining spots. BENJAMIN DAVIDSON Managing editor


sports 6

Thursday, April 17, - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

ANDREW BARBER / The Inquirer

Ben Krauth pitched eight innings allowing one earned run in DVC’s win over Cosumnes River on Tuesday, April 8, 2014.

Kansas-bound, locally renowned DVC’s ace ties all-time school record of three shutouts in a season after besting Sac State GABRIEL AGURCIA Correspondent

DVC baseball is enjoying a renaissance season. Coming off of a 2013 campaign mired by a stagnant offense and inconsistent overall play, the Vikings have returned to competitive form, compiling a 19-11 (7-8) record, as of Monday, April 14. While the team has improved as a whole, they are led by their most outstanding player, pitcher Ben Krauth. Krauth pitched very well last season, but he has stepped up to an elite level this season. In all of California community college baseball, he ranks fifth in ERA (0.65), tied for fourth in with eight wins, tied for first in complete games, second in innings pitched at 83 and two-thirds and first in strikeouts with 96. What exactly sparked this vast improvement in his game? “Coach Ward called me into his office last year at the end of the season, and told me that I needed to gain some weight, needed to get stronger,” Krauth said. “He told me to try to gain 25 pounds. He hooked me up with a trainer at Forma Gym in Walnut Creek, named Kevin Art. He really helped me a lot. (The weight gain) helped velocity, my offspeed stuff got better, and everything fed off that.” Krauth has built a solid repertoire of pitches, consisting of a two-seam fastball, change-up, 12-6 curveball and slider. But his best pitch is by far his change-up. “I used to throw a circle change. Sometimes I go through phases where I can’t throw it, so I have to have a backup. Right now I’m throwing a split change-up. It has a little more movement, a little more deception to it. And I throw it

off the same grip as my two-seam fastball, so it does basically the same thing, just a little slower.” “For full count, two outs, I’ll go to my change-up. It’s my go-to pitch.” Close friend and teammate outfielder Davis Strong said of the pitch, “His change-up is the best pitch I have ever faced. It can get hitters to swing and miss on it even if they know it is coming.” The tangibles and stats are all quite astounding, but when speaking to fellow Viking players, it seemed to be a consensus that it’s what can’t be seen that separates Krauth.

“His confidence has given him the ability to command all four pitches” ~Ronnie Lacour Pitcher

“As a pitcher, confidence is a huge factor in being successful,” stated pitcher Ronnie Lacour. “His confidence has given him the ability to command all four pitches for strikes and get in a rhythm that hitters have a very hard time keeping up with.” Pitcher Nate Simmons said that his composure is very impressive. “He could walk the bases loaded and it wouldn’t phase him,” he said. “He’s a rock out there. He makes his pitches whether we are winning or losing, and whether he’s doing good or bad.” Strong added, “He’s improved the most in the way he mentally carries himself. He knows that every time he gets

up on the mound that he’s going to beat the other team, and it shows. He also now uses his mind to get batters out, and he prides himself on simply outsmarting the hitters he faces.” Krauth has merged his physical and mental abilities to create a dominating form. He is arguably the best starting pitcher throughout California community colleges. He has received and accepted a scholarship offer to Kansas University, where he will be this coming Fall. You may think that a player with a talent level such as his would talk himself up, but Krauth deflected all praise to his teammates, especially catcher Luke Van Holten. “He puts the sign down and I throw it,” Van Holten said. “I trust him, he trusts me. I always talk to him in between innings, what’s working, what’s not. We’re pretty much on the same page at all times. I love it. He’s probably the best catcher I’ve ever thrown to.” That team-first attitude has caused his teammates to put their complete faith in him when he toes the rubber. He leads more by example than by sound waves. “I like to think those guys look up to me on the field,” Krauth admitted. “I’m not much of a vocal guy. I’ll talk if I need to, but I feel like I’m more of a captain on the field than off the field. Guys look to me for how I play, not necessarily for how I act.” “He has a casual intensity,” said Simmons. “I think most of the team has a strong belief that when Ben pitches, we win. It’s as simple as that.” Contact GABRIEL AGURCIA at inquirer@dvc.edu


opinions 7

Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The

Buzz

“Do you expect that men and women will be paid equally in your future career?”

Editorial America’s forgotten war?

CHARNISE JONES, 21 Communications

“Depending on your skill level, I think women have the opportunity to get paid more than men.”

AKRAM AZALES, 23 Business administration

“In my field of work women will have to go through cultural barriers to get subcontracts and men will be more welcome in some cultures.”

WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

Senate Republicans are still the biggest obstacle to income equality

Anything men can do, women can do better? NETTIE WALTON, 25 “No you can’t,” say Republicans. Kinesiology The battle over equal pay for “No, in my chosen field of women rages on between Demosports medicine/athletic train- crats and Republicans, which in iting it is dominantly an all male self shows, that as a society we truindustry and the pay scale is ly have not yet advanced enough governed by men.” from our sexist past. On April 8, the President signed an executive order, which prohibits retaliation by federal contractors against workers who discuss their pay, lifting the restrictions that keep too many workers in the dark — preventing them from advocating for fair and equal pay. He also signed a presidential PRESCOTT EDMUNDS, 23 memorandum directing the DePsychology “No. Although I would love partment of Labor Secretary to that to be a reality, the facts issue new regulations collecting summary pay data from federal are out there that women’s salaries are lower than men’s contractors. Collectively, these two actions on average.” will enhance pay transparency and give workers and investigators the tools they need to identify and remedy discrimination. On April 9, Senate Republicans blocked legislation for the third time, saying that: given the existing anti-discrimination laws, the legislation is redundant and is a transTONYA WESSMAN, 10 parent attempt by Democrats to Sociology and anthropology distract from President Obama’s “I guess in today’s society, much-criticized health care law that men and women in and to press what they see as their their respective industries electoral advantage among women in the upcoming mid-term elecare paid similarly.” tions. Interviewed and Democrats fell short of the 60 photographed by: votes needed to prevent a filibuster JOSH BRADSHAW and advance the legislation.

According to The Huffington other derangements of the nerPost from April 9, Senator Harry vous system, such as infertility.” Reid of Nevada, the majority leadHe went on to explain that a er in the floor speech said, “Are woman’s system never does two (Republicans) so repulsed by equal things well at the same time. pay for hardworking women that How is this type of attitude tothey’ll obstruct equal pay for equal wards women relevant in our sociwork?” ety today? “I’m at a loss as to why anyone According to the Department would decline to debate this im- of Labor and the Bureau of Staportant issue,” tistics, women Reid said. “One of the biggest make up almost In 1963, Presi50 percent of all obstacles to dent John F. workers in the Kennedy signed United States, combating pay the Fair Pay Act yet they earn 23 discrimination is into Law, since cents less than women in that their male counthat so many year were earning terparts for the women do not only 59 cents to same work. the dollar comThis gap reknow they are pared to men. sults in hundreds being underpaid Half a century of thousands of later, that amount dollars in lost due to has risen to 77 wages over a cadiscrimination.” cents on the dolreer. lar — a mere 18 For Africancent increase. American womThe issue faced here is entirely en, Latina women and women with relevant to the current generation, disabilities, the pay gap is even but it is a struggle that started off greater. as a war against women thousands Women-owned businesses acof years ago. count for 30 percent of all busiOver time women everywhere, nesses in the U.S and contribute were ranked down to a level of 1.8 trillion dollars to the economy, lesser value and importance by an yet they are the most underrepreever increasingly patriarchal soci- sented group in today’s labor marety of men. ket. In 1873, Harvard gynecologist One of the biggest obstacles to and author of “Sex in Education,” combating pay discrimination is Edward H. Clarke wrote: “Women that so many women do not know who went to college risked neural- they are being underpaid due to gia, uterine disease, hysteria, and discrimination.

This is where Obama’s executive order would come in if it were allowed to be enforced. Republicans fail to understand that when every single one of their party members vote against equal pay for equal work, it not only hurts their chances in the midterm elections, but it hurts families and individuals all across the country as well. The recent economic downturn created an ideal atmosphere for women to step up and bring their families out of poverty, by making up the majority of households where the woman is the sole earner. However if she is earning less than her male counterpart for the same job, the cycle of poverty becomes almost impossible to break. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, women make up approximately 57 percent of all college enrollment in the country, which will also increase their presence in the labor market — bringing them in direct competition with men. As college students are getting ready to join the workforce after graduation, it is of the utmost importance to recognize the challenges women will face without the opportunity of equal pay for equal work. It is the responsibility of the current generation to help close the pay gap and allow for pay transparency by standing up for equal rights and voicing the demand of those rights to legislators.


opinions 8 Money talks louder after Supreme Court decision Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The world of political campaign financ- protects.” he said. “If the First Amending has changed with the striking of the US ment protects flag burning, funeral protests Supreme Court gavel. and Nazi parades — despite the profound In the recent ruling of McCutcheon v. offense such spectacles cause — it surely Federal Election Commission, the Supreme protects political campaign speech despite Court ruled that the regulation of individual popular opposition.” aggregate contribution to political parties Bradley A. Smith, an American legal and candidates in election cycles was uncon- scholar, argued in Time Magazine that the stitutional. ruling strengthens the first amendment. The court decided in a split 5-4 deci“If nothing else, the real takeaway from sion that the limits on campaign donations today’s opinion is that federal and state govby an individual impeded ernments are not permitted their ability to freely express to squelch First Amendment themselves politically under rights based on a fear that the First Amendment. monsters are under the bed,” Previously, the cap for inhe said. dividual contribution was at However, Justice Breyer, $123,200, with $2,600 being in the liberal and dissentthe maximum amount that ing opinion of the court, could be contributed directly maintained that the decision, to a limited 18 candidates per “fails to recognize the differcycle. ence between influence restLike Citizens United v. ing upon public opinion and FEC, this case breaks precinfluence bought by money edent from the ruling in the alone.” 1976 Buckley v. Valeo case, Ted Blair, a professor of which established limits on political science at DVC, ALLAN KEW the contribution powers by commented that the issue of Staff member individuals. governance in the country While the $2,600 individunow has the potential to be al candidate donation cap will continue, con- unfairly influenced. tributors are now free to donate to however “If you define governing as participation many candidates they wish, with no overall in politics, this works in the opposite direccap on their spending to each campaign they tion,” he said. “This is going to favor a very wish to contribute to. few people with great wealth, who will be The conservative bloc of the court, being able to influence the political process.” led by Chief Justice Roberts, contended that The results of the Supreme Court’s rulcontribution is a form of the first amend- ing will most likely be played out in the midment right to the freedom of speech. term election this November. “Money in politics may at times seem reWith the removal of aggregate caps, this pugnant to some, but so, too, does much election will most likely see record-breaking of what the First Amendment vigorously levels of contributions to candidates and

WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

parties. Money is the life blood of any political venture, for it allows for those candidates who wish to win to showcase their platforms and achievements. Yet when massive spending is allowed within the election cycle, candidates who might appeal to the people are forced out because they do not have the investors. Privatization of politics is a step in the wrong direction. If we allow our politicians to be bought and sold as commodities for special interests and the interests of the select few who can afford it, then therein lays a great problem.

Our representatives will no longer be accountable to the people, but to the few who bankroll campaigns. They can be hired and fired, and by those who have only their interests in mind, not the collective society. The idea that money is a form of speech is an ethical question that all people must address. But when you meet someone who is insistent on their point and will not allow others to contribute, does that not strike you as obnoxious and unfair to the conversation? Contact ALLAN KEW at akew@TheInquirerOnline.com

Americans dismiss big ideas over small disagreements A small blog dedicated to reviewing bands by whether time while fighting in the American Revolution. they are politically, racially and sexually insensitive, recently If the movie showed Mel Gibson on a farm that had reviewed my favorite band. slaves on it, it wouldn’t matter what his character did for the On a scale of “awful or not awful” their verdict was, fight for independence from the British, none of us would “NOT AWFUL/SORT OF GREY AREA,” because a sin- like his character. gle picture showed one of the musicians wearing a shirt of a Of course, there’s nothing wrong with films doing this, band known to have extreme political views. in itself. The Finnish musician in question, reIt’s a convenient tool for screenwriters and sponded to the blog clarifying that he doesn’t it acknowledges America’s ethical shortcomshare any extreme political views with the ings while encouraging us to keep fighting band whose shirt he wore, but more interestagainst things like racism today. ingly, he fired back for even having to defend But, though it feels movies are different his band against the political views of people from reality and American films tend to rewhose music he was musically influenced by. inforce the notion that either a person manIn his attack, he criticized the blog for beages to adhere to perfect ethical standards ing, “the epitome of American inquisition.” else they’re simply a villain. The more I thought about this national More realistically, almost all people imporjab, the more I’m led to believe it has a lot tant in our history fail in some way to adhere of truth to it. to our better modern ethical standards. Americans, more than any other people Thomas Jefferson fails that test for having that I am aware of, have a tendency to look owned hundreds of slaves, but his contribufor one negative trait in a person which they tions to democracy are nonetheless worth can use to dismiss the person’s actions and praising and studying. SASAN KASRAVI ideas entirely, especially if that negative trait Mother Teresa was known to have enOpinions editor is political. dorsed various fascist dictators. Movies are a good example of how pervaEven Gandhi once led a campaign to sive this trend is. Because it’s so important to the screenwrit- cleanse India of homosexuals. ers that everyone likes and cheers for their main character, Until we learn to separate people’s actions and beliefs characters have to adhere to modern ethical standards, re- into parts we won’t have very many people left to admire, gardless of where and when they are placed. whether that means listening to their music or learning from In “The Patriot” Mel Gibson’s South Carolinian farmer their politics. character, anachronistically frees a few slaves in his down A big part of the problem is that we naturally look for

role models who we can try to style ourselves by entirely, which I don’t think would be a good thing to do even if it were easier. But I think a major reason America is uniquely affected by this trait is of its relatively short and stable political history. As it stands, American political values are similar enough currently to when they were first founded to allow Democrats and Republicans alike have an easy time believing that the founding fathers shared their same values and principles. By contrast, most non-Americans have a harder time looking at their history and believing that the people in it were just like them. Many other nations were just recently monarchical, fascist or communist, or still observe traditions before they were Christianized, Islamicized or colonized. Even looking far back in European literature, Beowulf was written by Christians who at once condemn the characters for being pagan heathens yet admire their deeds nonetheless. Non-Americans are much better practiced in admiring some aspects of a person while condemning others, simply because they have to in order to maintain much of a cultural identity. We as Americans should challenge ourselves to be slower to dismiss art, political ideas and the like because of some irrelevant thing we dislike about the person putting them forward. It would only serve to better expand the range of good ideas we’re exposed to and sharpen our skills of directly refuting bad ideas. Contact SASAN KASRAVI at skasravi@TheInquirerOnline.com


opinions 9

Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Asking for Answers:

Student veteran feels like “used gear” Dear Answers, Nine months ago, I was getting up at 0600, showering fast, and dressing for work. I had a place to be and a reason to be there. Four years I spent in the Marine Corps, and when it was over, I came home but so many of my brothers haven’t. “Hurry up and wait” is something I’ve gotten used to while getting my benefits and G.I. Bill set up, but it’s worth it... or so I thought. I’m halfway through my second semester and I’m completely miserable. I feel completely alienated from other students, my grades are suffering and I drink myself to sleep most nights. I’m sinking to the bottom and can’t seem to motivate myself. I’m thinking about dropping out and giving it a go in the real world, but I’m trying to stick it out until the end of the semester. I’m afraid if I can’t get my head in the game, I’ll be stuck on the side lines. Is the struggle really worth it? -Feeling like Broken Gear WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

Dear Gear, You had to adjust and learn to be a soldier, now you have to adjust to being home and there is a learning process to becoming a veteran, just like there was to becoming a Marine. It sounds like you feel alone, and although your civilian peers may not be able to relate to you, there are people, such as other veterans, who understand exactly how you are feeling. Connecting with others and likeminded individuals and groups, is one of the most important coping mechanisms we have in life. Knowing that someone else has faced the same obstacles, can make all the difference. The Veterans Alliance, right here on campus, can be a great resource for you. They strive to help fellow veterans successfully adapt to academic life and the new

demands that accompany school. They provide camaraderie, as well as advice and support on practicalities, like completing forms and paperwork and help you find your way around. Many have seen the benefits of using the services and getting settled into their new lives and DVC. The Veterans Alliance meets every Tuesday from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Union, room 101. I recently attended a Veterans Alliance meeting, to better inform myself about their services. There, I had the opportunity to hear Maurice Delmer, Marine Corps veteran and an alumni of both DVC and Cal State University, speak about the challenges you and others are facing. Delmer now serves as the Outreach Specialist at the Concord Vet Center. He wants all veterans to be aware of the essential services that

are available through the Vet Centers, which include individual and group counseling, mental health and medical services, such as substance abuse help, sexual assault therapy and treatment for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. All of the services offered at Vet Centers are completely confidential, even from the greater Department of Veterans Affairs. The Vet Center hosts community events and get-togethers, which is another great way to connect with other vets. The Concord Vet Center also offers outdoor fitness facilities. Delmer says that his adjustment to home life wasn’t so different from most soldiers, and that one of the things that he has found most helpful for himself was getting back in shape. “Working out and getting strong again allowed me to regain

my physical identity as a soldier,” he said. “As a strong, able-bodied individual. That did a lot for my mind as well.” Exercise has many other benefits as well, such as relieving stress and depression, allowing you to sleep better, building confidence, and as Delmer mentioned, regaining your sense of identity and discipline. Chances are, if you’re feeling good and sleeping well, you are also less likely to drink. The last advice I have for you is to think of your education as a mission, your objective now is to get an education, and to make the most of it. It makes sense to take courses that interest you, as long as they still fit your educational plan. When you become interested and engaged in your studies and other activities within your college, it may make everything seem a lot

brighter. Even though many of your classmates have had different experiences than you, everyone is here to learn and at the end of the day, everyone is a student, so you are not as alone as you might think. School can be a very forgiving place to find yourself and learn to connect with people who really aren’t so different after all. Delmer offered another wise insight. “The transition home doesn’t actually end. You have to keep rediscovering yourself.” Here to answer your most pressing questions. Relationship issues? Family tension? Wondering how to get involved on campus? If you ask, I will do my best to answer. Please submit your questions to: abyrne@theinquireronline.com, with “Asking for Answers” in the subject line.

Outside Lands lineup fails to impress Outside Lands 2014 lineup is mediocre at best. lineup. Outside Lands is a music and food festival that takes place Amber Gregory of Spinning Platters says, “Every year every August in Golden Gate fields in San Francisco. the OSL lineup features 3-4 artists I absolutely LOVE. This Outside Lands is little different that other year is no exception — Arctic Monkeys, Chfestivals in the way that they typically don’t vrches, Chromeo, Holy Ghost! – but unforhave the same line up as Coachella every year. tunately it’s also no exception on the other With Coachella hosting an Outkast reside of things. union naturally people thought that they The rest of this lineup is disappointing, would headline Outside Lands as they are and that’s how I feel every. single. year.” doing for many other festivals. Jonathan Pirro, another writer from SpinOutside Lands is good at keeping you on ning Platers, says “Despite having The Flamyour toes and trying to spice up the festival ing Lips on the lineup, and a small handful circuit but this year it seems they are going a of a few other favorites, this year’s Outside little mainstream. Lands lineup seems lazy, dispirited, and In past years Outside Lands has been thrown together to fill the space. known to have classic acts in the headlinThe pop trifecta of Kanye, Tiësto and ing performers such as, Stevie Wonder, Neil Macklemore doesn’t help their case.” Young, Hall &Oates, John Fogerty and Paul I like some of Kanye’s music but to headMcCartney. line a more alternative festival, left me quite TYLER ELMORE Although they have brought back Tom surprised. Online editor Petty to headline, one of his co-headliners It seems like this year Outside Lands is rein particular was strange to me; Kanye West. ally trying to advertise for the younger genMany local Bay Area people have taken to the Internet on eration, people like Capital Cities, Grouplove and Macklsuch websites such as The Huffington Post and Spinning emore & Ryan Lewis, whom I cannot stand. Platters, a Bay Area review site to lend their opinion on the Don’t get me wrong there are people I am excited to see

such as, Jenny Lewis, Death Cab for Cutie, Disclosure and The Flaming Lips. I am just afraid of what might come of this festival. Having people like Kanye West will definitely sky rocket sales and bring in revenue but is it going to bring in the same music loving people as past dates. I am afraid that by getting people so mega-star popular for this concert can potentially change the whole dynamic of the festival. Outside Lands was always a cool place to try new food and discover new music. I am curious to see the kind of people that will be attending this year and if Outside Lands will continue to book acts that are so mega-star popular. Other than their scary choice in headliner and what I can only presume is the “opening act” for that headliner, there are some acts in which I am excited to see. Will I buy a 3-day pass? Probably not. Outside Lands will be August 8-10, 2014 you can get more information about tickets and see the full line up at sfoutsidelands.com. Contact TYLER ELMORE at telmore@TheInquirerOnline.com


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arts & features 11 Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

DVC instructor graces the film festival scene REGINA ORTANEZ Arts & features editor

World renowned San Francisco International Film Festival showcases a film by DVC film instructor Robert Richert. The Berkeley native was among the lucky few to have their films play at this year’s festival. He describes his film — “No One but Lydia” — as a “light, coming-of-age, stoner comedy with an abundance of fun, quick camera movements.” The local festival is currently celebrating it’s 57th year as being the longest-running film festival in the Americas, according to its website. T As the name claims, the festival features films from around the world. “I wrote it with the intention, of going as far, from my last film, as possible and found that, at the end of the day while both have very different tones, they have a lot in common in terms of theme,” said Richert. ”Both focused on teenage boys who become lovesick, and discover something about themselves through that process of getting over their obsessions.” In an interview, Richert spoke on the San Francisco International Film Festival, praising it for being the renowned festival that

it is. He said it was the first festival he ever attended and left a screening crying, before running into one of the filmmakers and shaking their hand. “That’s the kind of magic a festival can bring to a creator. Seeing exactly how your film connects to a complete stranger,” he said. “As long as I have been making films I have hoped to screen there.” When asked about her thoughts on Richert’s recent accomplishment, fellow filmmaking instructor, Kristy Guevara-Flanagan, who has also been featured in a film festival, said enthusiastically: “I think it’s great. Clearly, the students respond and are interested in the fact that we show our work professionally and that we are committed to our creative processes. Students are able to see how our relationships with the broader film community are and what the potentials are for their own selves.” Nick Jackson, a broadcasting communications major at DVC, shares similar sentiments about his teachers. “Rob’s really cool. He’s very enthusiastic. I love learning about making films from him,” he said. ”And because he’s had stuff Advertisement

Courtesy of DREW BECK

Robert Richert, directing his new short on location in Mendocino, CA early January 2014. in festivals, it’s like I know that he knows what he’s doing. Kristy, as well. They know what they’re doing.” Richert says, that his biggest influence are the people around him and that one of his many inspirations are his students. “I think that there is no better way to cement one’s knowledge of a subject than to teach it to another person,” said Richert in regard to how being a teacher at DVC has influenced his work. ”My students inspire me. They’re full of ideas and an enthusiasm that is a constant shot in the arm of creative energy.” When asked what he hopes to accomplish

with his work, as both a filmmaker and an instructor, Richert replied: “Empathy is what I hope to evoke in the hearts of my audience members. Empathy is also a tool we need to practice in writing our stories.” “We are forced to think about what adversities our characters need to face, that would challenge them most and what would allow them to grow and become more whole, as people.” The San Francisco International Film Festival runs from April 24, till May 8. Contact REGINA ORTANEZ at rortanez@TheInquirerOnline.com

‘Oculus’ is everything but an eye opener TYLER ELMORE Online editor

What seemed to be a promis- yet with the description, the whole ing “scary” movie ended up being movie was just a boring, repetitive like all of the rest; a bore. Oculus mess. opened on Friday April 11, 2014. You are constantly battling with The movie stars Karen Gillan what is real and what isn’t, and from Dr. Who and promising trying to figure out if any of the new-comer Brenton Thwaites, movie actually happened. Withwho will be staring in the mov- out a solid story line the whole ing adaptation of the best-selling movie gets lost in a jumble of novel The Giver coming out later flashbacks, false reality, and what this year. you think is actually the characThe movie starts out with the ter’s reality. main characters as children, hidThe scare factor of this movie ing in a closet away from their dad was also almost nonexistent. The who is carrying a gun. The kids ghosts were creepy but not somerun down the stairs where their thing you’re going to have nightdad finds them mares about. It and the dad “...the whole movie vaguely resemble morphs into the gets lost in a jumble 2010’s Insidious, son as an adult with it constant of flashbacks...” and shoots the dream-like state. little girl. ConThe movie fused? Well it doesn’t get anymore seemed promising with having a clearer than that. 92% on rottentomatoes.com on The basic synopsis of this Thursday evening, but by Sunday movie is, that a haunted mirror the rating had dropped to 71%. gets put into a home where it posFrom the beginning of the sesses the two main characters’ movie, you can guess the ending parents until they are dead. if you can manage to sit through The actual movie takes place the confusion. ten years later when the children The only thing that might keep are fully grown. The sister, Kaylie, you halfway interested in the played by Gillan, is obsessed with movie is the good-looking lead trying to find a way to destroy the actor. mirror. Tim the brother, played by I give this movie two thumbs Thwaites, had just been released down. from the state mental health facility because he killed their dad. Contact TYLER ELMORE If you are not confused enough telmore@TheInquirerOnline.com


arts & features 12 Thursday, April 17 - Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Battle of the bars

Editor’s guide to nightlife: Is BARTing worth the ride? BENJAMIN DAVIDSON Managing editor

F

or the price of a low-end Long Island iced tea, you can get a round-trip ride on BART from the Pleasant Hill station to the Embarcadero station in San Francisco. The question is — is it worth it? Whether you are a newbie or a guzzled veteran – there are some legitimate, local options near-by as well as some delicious concoctions made in the city, which may satisfy your nighttime thirst.

San Francisco Fiddler's Green Irish Pub

1333 Columbus Ave, San Francisco, CA 94133 Open from 9 a.m. – 2 a.m. every day of the week and weekend — this pub pours stiff drinks and stout ales. Roughly a 35 minute walk from the Embarcadero BART station, Fiddler's Green is in a more affluent part of the city, and in close proximity to Fisherman's Wharf, adding to the convenience of being able to call a cab for the way back. Kegs of Guinness, Smithwick's and Harp are readily available; combine that with a stiff Cosmopolitan or a Washington Apple and your night is set.

The Buena Vista

2765 Hyde St, San Francisco, CA 94109 Open from 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 a.m. every day of the week and weekend, this bar may be considered a preferred tourist spot at times, but is definitely worth a visit for their Irish coffee. According to an Examiner article from 2013, per the bar's lore, in the early 1950's the combined efforts of the former owner, a travel writer, a dairy owner and the mayor of San Francisco resulted in the successful re-creation of the drink first created by Irish chef Joe Sheridan in 1943. Since then the bar has fine-tuned its method for cranking out these whiskey pick-me-ups at a staggering pace. They are stiff, but if you enjoy them, the BART ticket is worth the 10 bucks. The bartender Larry Nolan, has worked at The Buena Vista for more than 40 years.

Concord Agave

1985 Willow Pass Rd. Concord, CA 94520 Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.; 5 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. and Sunday 12 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m., Closed on Mondays, Night Club 10 p.m. - 2 a.m. Functioning as a restaurant, nightclub and bar, this local option is your one-stop-shop in terms of nighttime entertainment. You walk right into a massive bar which T's off to the left and right. The club, on the left, is open only Friday and Saturdays, and the right side is the restaurant side. Their Mojitos are made right, with fresh mint, lime wedges and Havana Club white rum. The first room offers the best of Salsa, Merengue, Rock en Español and Latin House. In the second room, you can enjoy R&B, Club Hits, House Music and more EDM type songs. The club is 18 and over on Fridays, and 21 and over on Saturdays.

Diablo Valley Bowl- Strike Zone Bar 'N' Bowl

1500 Monument Blvd, Concord, CA 94520

Monday - Sunday 9 a.m. to close. A bar within a bowling alley doesn't always work, but after 10 p.m. — Diablo Valley Bowl's nightlife lights up, literally. The best time to go is during their cosmic bowling session at 9 p.m. until closing from Fridays to Sundays. Not only can you bring your drinks with you down to the lanes, but they are pretty reasonably priced, especially if you are with a large group. Also, a pitcher of beer for $6 and a full bar and billiards tables in the 21 and over area are at your disposal until closing.

So be it an Irish coffee or a margarita type of night, weigh your local nightlife options before buying a BART ticket. Contact BENJAMIN DAVIDSON at bdavidson@TheInquirerOnline.com Courtesy of ALLAN HUTCHISON-MAXWELL through the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License


Inside dancing at DVC:

Students hope to showcase work for community. See Page 6.

Swim team goes to State: Men’s and women’s team break records and brings home awards. See Page 12.

Editorial board weighs in: Student safety should be a

bigger priority on college campuses. See Page 7.

The

INQUIRER S tudent V oi ce

of

D iablo Val le y C ol le g e

Volume 85 No. 5 Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014 www.TheInquirerOnline.com

Gaining ground

Kill switch dies in Senate AMRITA KAUR Copy editor

Legislators failed to pass a cell phone kill switch legislation, by two votes. The bill was introduced by Sen. Mark Leno, Democrat of San Francisco, on Feb. 6, which would require all smart-phone manufacturers to equip their products with the ability for theft victims to disable the phone inoperable remotely. The hope is that the technology would deter robbers from stealing the electronic devices. On April 24, Senate Bill 962, couldn’t make it passed the State Senate, by a vote of 19-17 in the 40 member house. The bill needed 21 votes to pass. According to a report by the BENJAMIN DAVIDSON / The Inquirer

Pati MacDonald greets John Gibson, one of the new prospects for DVC’s Veteran’s Alliance club, in their newly announced meeting room, located in the lower room of the Student Union.

Veterans Alliance club finds solace in new Student Union space AMRITA KAUR Copy editor

a good fit to accommodate the growing club, which is the only source of assistance for veterans on campus. fter a long road of having to share “The room will be used mainly for peer-tospace and facilities peer assistance, as we are with other clubs, getting bigger,” Kelley the Veterans Alliance club said. “Its nice and quiet in “I am pleased, so can finally move into their there, we can hold presenown home in the Student pleased, as it will serve tations by outside speakUnion Building Room 202. ers and by clubs like the, the club’s needs” Ryan Kelley, mechani‘Blue Ribbon Mothers.’” cal engineering student and According to Brian Var~DAVID VELA president of the Veterans Algas, outreach coordinator Veteran’s Alliance club adviser liance club presented their and club treasurer, Kelley plight to ASDVC for a vote has been instrumental in and the verdict came quickly. getting the room allocaAll parties agreed that the quiet room in the tion and taking it upon himself to make sure Student Union Building’s basement would be he talked to the right people and making it

A

happen. Previously the club used to meet in SU 101, but it became a challenge to share the space with other clubs. David Vela, club adviser and English professor, expressed his joy for the allocated space. “I am pleased, so pleased, as it will serve the club’s needs,” he said. “It will be good to use for small presentations and brown-bags.” Kelly said, “Veterans needs are different from other students, so it’s nice to have a room where people can go. Who ever needs a moment, can have a moment in there.” The room will be available for veterans as of the first day of the fall 2014 semester. Contact AMRITA KAUR at akaur@TheInquirerOnline.com

SWITCH Page 9

Union workers protest BENJAMIN DAVIDSON Managing editor

With informational picket signs in hand, the Concord crowd looked on as the speakers expressed their emotions through personal work stories. The annual Worker’s Memorial Day gathering is a time for mourning, and yet, it was able to bring together all those who wanted to address something that would hopefully better the whole – a change in safety, health and justice UNION, Page 9

• News 1, 10, 11 • Opinions 7, 8 • Sports 12 • Editorial 7 • Arts & Features 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 • Campus Buzz 7 • Calendar 10 • Police Beat 10 • Staff Information 10 • Copyright © 2014 The Inquirer - Diablo Valley College


arts & features 2 Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Late-night Southern Hospitality

An editor’s guide to nightlife explores soulful food options after dark BENJAMIN DAVIDSON Managing editor

As the waiter welcomed the lips, really makes the best out of customers into the lit-up waiting his late night shifts, by giving eararea of Walnut Creek’s Home of nest advice, pouring stiff drinks, Chicken and Waffles, located at and jokingly assisting customers 1653 Mt Diablo Blvd in Walnut with his favorite menu options. Creek, the to-be diners carried Every dish is named after a with them a smile, a wandering member of the owner’s family, eye and a sense of satisfaction – who gaze down on patrons from and all at 1 a.m. vibrant portraits on the bright yelLegitimate food options tend to low back wall that lines the booths diminish as the night progresses on the right side of the restaurant. – but for this small As if a warm meal Need to know restaurant in Wallate at night wasn’t nut Creek, it is just enough, Motown the opposite. grooves and funky On Fridays and For a dining exSaturdays they are open beats fill the dining perience that leaves until 4 a.m., which room, and continue you fulfilled with gives all you night-owls to play into the even more than a a place to soak up the night. full stomach, this Couple that with sauce after all the bars comfort-food diner the home style sides close at 2 a.m. is the only one of it’s such as grits, greens, Parking is close, and caliber for it’s hours and mac ‘n’ cheese the diner is only a short of operation, or at and you have the walk from the strucleast out of those in perfect recipe to ture. Additional parkWalnut Creek, and complement the ing may be found on surrounding areas. tender and crispy the street as well, and It is the Roscoe’s chicken. there is no need to pay of northern CaliThe restaurant is after 9 p.m. fornia, if you will. now approaching Built to reminisce the third anniveran upscale ‘60s-themed diner, a sary of opening, and they are still full bar with specialty cocktails are going strong. Their sister location now available for patrons until 1 in Oakland in a literal sense, as a.m. on Friday and Saturday and the owners are from the same famtill closing during the rest of the ily – is approaching their 10th anweek. niversary of opening, which is a The bar, which compliments milestone in and of itself. the menu of hearty comfort fare, The owner had voiced while gets the diners closer to the cooks. sitting at the bar, that as long as The feel of Southern hospital- people are in by 4 a.m. they will ity is more than present – not just be served a hot meal. So if you are in the food, but in the service as looking for a warm meal late into well – making for a very comfort- the night, make the short jaunt to able dining experience, despite the Walnut Creek, because the drive is time of night. more than worth it for the quality Four TV’s are also available for of food, all options considered. diners to watch, spread out in front of the bar stools. Contact BENJAMIN DAVIDSON at One of the waiters, Josh Philbdavidson@TheInquirerOnline.com

AMRITA KAUR / The Inquirer

Waiter Josh Phillips is working double-duty, as the busser, pass check, and food server at 1 a.m. on Saturday April 26, at the Home of Chicken and Waffles in Walnut Creek. Josh is one of many servers who make the diners feel like part of the family right when they walk in the door. Advertisement


arts & features 3 Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

First arts festival aims to draw in community

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REGINA ORTANEZ Art and features editor

The DVC Applied and Fine The festival will have outdoor Arts division will be hosting the entertainment including contests first annual “Arts Alive Festival” with prizes, face painting for any with the intent to showcase all that children in attendance and costhe department has to offer in just tumes from the drama department one day. on display. The inaugural event will welThe main stage will be held on come all those wishing to attend the Pleasant Hill campus by Parkon May 10, as it aims to target the ing Lot 8, near the Art Building. DVC community, as well as local Lisa Drummond, professor and middle and high schools to show- marketing director for the DVC case options for future potential Drama department said, “It won’t art students at DVC. just be ‘come and see the perforAccording to the DVC web- mances.’ It’s going to be ‘come and site, the Applied and Fine Arts wander and see what everything is Division includes the music, per- all about it.’” forming arts, art and photography Construction is scheduled to be departments and accordingly, will completed for that part of camfeature music concerts, drama pus by the date of the festival, so performances and art exhibits, as the stairs will be open, and areas promised by the promotional flyer for people to sit and eat in shaded for the festival. areas to get out of the sun will It is the aim be provided, of the division to “We know we have according to come togethDrummond. a wonderful fine arts er and target a “We want larger audience. to definitely division here, we have reach out the Back-to-back lots of students that community to performances are planned show what we move on to great from 1 p.m. to have to offer” success from all the she said. “We 6 p.m., and will feature both stuknow we have departments. ” dents and facula wonderful ty members. fine arts divi~LISA DRUMMOND The event will sion here, we Marketing director for DVC Drama culminate in a have lots of wine and cheese students that reception in the Performing Arts move on to great success from all Center lobby, which will lead into the departments. We want to share either a music concert or the dra- that and celebrate that with the ma performance of “Six Degrees community and become more of of Separation” in the arena at the- a community voice.” ater at 8 p.m. The choice is left up “It is our very first, our inauto the attendee. gural event, but our plan is that it Owen Lee, director of the DVC becomes something we do every Philharmonic Orchestra spoke of year and that we can continue to the music that will be present at grow and prosper with it,” Drumthe festival. mond continued. “So that’s the “In celebration of the arts at goal, that’s the hope is that it beDVC, the DVC Philharmonic Or- comes a yearly event here at DVC chestra with the combined choirs to celebrate what we have to offer at DVC, the concert corral, and the and it culminates especially bechamber singers will be perform- cause we’re moving into the 65th ing, in it’s entirety, Beethoven’s year anniversary of DVC, so we’re ‘Symphony No. 9.’ the whole trying to lead into that 65 year thing,” he said. “It’s going to be a celebration that will start and conwonderful event and “Full of Joy” tinue on.” is the last movement, it is based on For more information, contact Schiller’s “Ode to Joy,” a very, very Lisa Drummond at ldrummond@ famous and popular tune.” dvc.edu. The free event will include festivities that will last all day and Contact REGINA ORTANEZ at have food available. rortanez@TheInquirerOnline.com

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Now enrolling for Fall 2014. Come hear about our academic and career placement opportunities. Join us at our next Transfer Information Session! RSVP at smcadmit.com *Honors at Entrance Scholarship requirements include a 3.5 academic semester GPA and 30 transferable semester units completed at the time of acceptance.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Angelica Moore Director of Transfer Recruitment 925.631.4533 anmoore@stmarys-ca.edu


arts & features 4 Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Set boundaries when jealousy rears its head

Asking for Answers

Dear Answers, I have been dating my girlfriend for a while now, and there are some things that are really starting to bother me. She always wants to come along when I hang out with my friends, and she gets upset if I can’t answer her calls. Last week I had to work late and I didn’t see she had texted me, when I explained she got all weird and suspicious. I love her and she has great qualities, but it’s driving me nuts that it seems like she doesn’t trust me. How do I get her to stop being jealous all the time? -Feeling torn Dear Torn, Your dilemma is a common Of course couples have shared one. social lives, but you also need to Jealousy rears its ugly head in be able to spend time with your many relationships and when it own friends as well. isn’t nipped in the bud early, it can No one should be expected be the beginning of the end. to be at beck and call 24 hours a It’s called the “Green Eyed day, and you should not feel guilty Monster” for a reason. when you’re unavailable, whether Normal jealousy is a reaction it be that you are with friends, to a real threat to a relationship family, working late or simply like cheating, obvious attraction stuck in traffic. to someone else, spending time Once you set these boundarwith an ex, or as a response to ies, it is essential that you stick to other difficulties that you are go- them. ing through in your relationship. If she is the right partner for What you you this can have described be an op“If she is the right sounds like portunity to partner for you this grow as a a whole different level of but can be an opportunity couple, jealousy, which if she cannot to grow as a couple, abide by your is much more possessive and boundaries or but if she cannot detrimental in if she continabide by your nature. ues to break With this jealthen boundaries or if she them, ousy, feelings you must accontinues to break and behaviors cept that your have nothing to is them, then you must relationship do with the cirnot headed in accept that your cumstances of a good directhe relationship, tion. relationship is not instead they are Relationheaded in a good created by inseships marked curities and low by jealousy direction.” self esteem. are sure to deMy advice is teriorate over to explain to her that you want time, often with lasting emotional to have a happy and healthy rela- damage. tionship and that means trusting Make your expectations clear. you to be the boyfriend she fell Things will either improve, in love with. or you will know that you must Let your girlfriend know you move on to allow yourself the love her and that you chose this opportunity to build a relationrelationship, and aren’t looking to ship based on trust and respect. be with anyone else. Other than reassuring her that she is the one you want, she must be the one to look within herself, Here to answer your pressing quesand work on her own issues. tions. Relationship issues? Family tenShe is responsible for her own sion? Wondering how to get involved on actions, just as you are respon- campus? If you ask, I will do my best sible for your’s, which means es- to answer. Submit questions to ABytablishing clear boundaries when rne@theinquireronline.com, with “Anit comes to jealous behaviors. swers” in the subject line.

WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

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arts & features 5 Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

‘Six Degrees’ is a surreal surprise ALLAN KEW Staff member

Contact ALLAN KEW at akew@TheInquirerOnline.com

Allen Miller dazzles in his role as Paul, the con artist. Also pictured are Cassandra Grove, Séan Seviér (back to camera), and Andrew Jamshidi. Advertisement

YOUR SUCCESS STARTS HERE

© 2014 National University NU14_240

What is it in an experience, that them with the hope that things will defines us? be alright. Such is the question in “Six DeSo striking are the roles played grees of Separation,” a play writ- that in some parts it is remarkably ten by John Guare and directed by difficult to know what is true and Will Springhorn. false. In this dramatic re-creation of a A choice must be made by the 1980’s piece, a posh group of ur- characters and the audience: how banites and New Yorkers are taken much of the story are we willing for a ride by an enchanting young to believe? con artist. The play’s direction is also At one point, claiming to be the strong. son of a famous actor and at anIt involved many notable ideas other, the illegitimate son of a pre- and concepts that highlight that vious victim, the young man, who time period’s lavish lifestyles, and may or may not other settings be named Paul, that blend “...in some parts maneuvers his to create the it is remarkably way from pershow’s set. son to person. is difficult to know what theNotset only The charexpanis true and false. acter of Paul, sive in its use porttrayed by of a “second A choice must the talented Alfloor,” but the be made by len Miller, plays nature of the off the desires set in itself also the characters and ideas of reflects the surand the audience: the other charreal living qualacters, which of the tale. how much of the story ityNot he has intia single are we willing mate knowlset change, not edge of and a single prop to believe?” ultimately uses addition, nor this knowledge the intermisfor disturbing reasons that are un- sion–included dead space. known. Each contains actors who progThe strongest suit in the play’s ress the tale with unwritten diaarsenal are the characters. logues and scenes, or with imagiIn that regard, it is the actors, native, moving set-actors who fill who successfully communicate to the stage with more scenery and each other their sheer lack of un- life at the same time. derstanding the experiences that It is a choice that successfully have transpired in each of their continues to add to the audience’s lives. experience. For some actors, the role they Indeed, by the end of this tale, play is too far out of reality for the you will question who you are sepaudience to fully connect to. arated from, and what those fleetThis allows for the play’s twists ing experiences you’ve shared with and turns to truly stun the audi- people, truly mean. ence when they react in unpredict“Six Degrees of Separation” able ways to the inflicting experi- runs from April 25 through May ences they share. 11. However, characters that do Tickets are available for purconnect to the audience face un- chase at the DVC ticket office at certain futures and even doom (925)969-2358. when encountering Tickets are also available to buy Paul, leaving the audience with in advance online at www.dvcdratragic foreknowledge and gripping ma.net.

Courtesy of TARA MAGINNIS/DVC DRAMA

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arts & features 6 Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Students to show off their moves

GUSTAVO VASQUEZ / The Inquirer

Top, DVC dance students Katarina Klass and Khalil Lamnaouar practice their dance routine for technical director Scott Heiden, in preparation for “Stories unraveled.� Bottom, Klass demonstrates her solo dance routine for light and sound design in the kinesiology building.

Dance class preps for end of semester success REGINA ORTANEZ AND GUSTAVO VASQUEZ Arts & features editor and Photo chief

More than 16 dances will be performed, including solos, duets, trios and more. All pieces are original student works featuring original concepts. Katarina Klass, a 22-year-old DVC student, will be presenting her own work in the show. "I'm currently choreographing one dance that has no music in it, which is very challenging for me right now," she said. "We're using a lot of percussive body movements, experimenting with that and also using sign language and hand shapes in the dance." Klass went on to say that she plans on having her own deaf dance company in the future, hoping to start programs that fuse sign language and dance together. The choreographers, dancers and DVC dance instructor Kimberly Valmore have been working on this production since the very start of the semester. The process, as explained by Valmore, is very similar to that of a professional dance company. Students who wished to have their work featured in the show had to present a proposal introducing their idea along with a storyline to back it up. Once a proposal is accepted, students had to begin the audition process for casting their piece and start choreographing almost immediately. "It's a very fast paced class," Valmore said. "It's really exhausting." Zack Ramicone, 20, has been dancing at DVC for three years now. "I'm really excited to be a part of a production that's putting so much out there and giving people a lot to think about," he said. "[We're] presenting a lot of variety onstage and kind of setting a good example for

future students and current students as to what junior college life can be." Ramicone, along with Klass, went on to say how promotion for the show has been both difficult and frustrating, citing the lack of advertisement for the production on the DVC website and overall, lack of support for the dance department within the art community. Sharing similar sentiments to her students, Valmore spoke on how hard she and her students have been working to put together this production and how she hopes people will come to show their support for the department. "Most dance companies take six months to do a piece of full evening work, we're doing this in less than four, so it's a huge undertaking," she said. "The students take it very seriously. They work exhausted, under a compressed amount of time to put on a two hour show." Valmore continued to express why the community should care about her students' work. "I would love for the DVC community and the community at large to be here because this is original art and these students are pursuing higher education with an art emphasis basis and this evolution is something they need to see." "Stories Unraveled" will be in the Performing Arts Center from May 2-3 at 8 p.m., with an additional performance on May 4 at 2 p.m. Tickets can be bought in advance online at the DVC website or at the box office on the day of the show. Contact REGINA ORTANEZ at rortanez@TheInquirerOnline.com or GUSTAVO VASQUEZ at gvasquez@TheInquirerOnline.com


opinions 7

Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

The

Buzz

To what degree do college rankings inform your transfer decisions?

Editorial

Student safety, not student ratios

CHRIS HARRIS, 27 Engineering

“It’s what led me to find colleges and then I’d go look into them in person.”

JESSICA BRADLEY, 24 Undeclared

“Not really. It’s more location for me.”

RONAL RIBERA, 23 Business economics

“It helped me choose what schools had the best reputations and where I see myself in the future.”

CHRISTINE HINSE, 26 Linguistics

“I have never heard of [college rankings].”

COOPER ETTUS, 19 Mechanical engineering

“It didn’t help me make a decision, but it helped me choose the aspects I wanted from a college before visiting them.” Interviewed and photographed by: Collin James

WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

Crime rate should be calculated into college rankings Let’s be honest, most of us at DVC are here to transfer. We want to move onto some great school, get a degree and eventually get a good job. When it comes to deciding which college we want to go to, we may look at factors such as campus’ location, the kind of program for our major and the university’s prestige. Of course all those factors are based on each individual’s perception. A way to determine a university’s prestige is by national ranking, where an independent body determines which factors would be important for an educational institution to be considered top-ranking. However, various lawmakers have recently added a new criteria to the determine ranking. Namely, the school’s response and handling of sexual assaults. Lawmakers are urging the U.S. News & World Report, a leader in publishing news and consumer guides for rankings, to consider campus safety as a factor in judging colleges. According to an SFGate article from April 12, a dozen members of the House Representatives sent a letter to the U.S. News & World Report. In the letter, lawmakers urged that “institutions that fail to adequately respond to sexual violence should not receive accolades from your publication.” They continued on, to say that “nearly 20 percent of women are victims of attempted or actual sexual assault, along with 6 percent of men.”

As it stands, colleges don’t seem from complaints filed this past to be making their students’ safety February, where 31 former and nearly as much a priority as they current students said that this nado their prestige in other factors. tionally top ranked school violated Lawmakers may have a point: Title IX, a gender equity law that if we want to get colleges to be mandates schools to report sexual more proactive about safety, the assault cases. compromising of their rankings is These are only a few of the nulikely the most effective strategy. merous incidents where colleges In recent cases, some universi- mishandled sexual assaults on ties were found to be entirely dis- campus, inadvertently letting their missive in reporting sexual assault students down. incidents on campus. Lawmakers seem to have noAn article by ticed that the MSNBC from mishandling of “Since colleges April 24, reportthese cases is beed that a group want to keep their coming a prevaof 23 students issue across precious rankings, lent from Columbia college campusUniversity filed a calculating campus es, and we conmore-than-100with their apsafety into rankings cur page complaint peal to U.S. News citing, the Ivy would force them & World Report League school to include camto step up and had allowed sexpus safety as a ual assault percategory to judge be honest with petrators to stay colleges. their reports.” on campus and These rankthat survivors of ings are currently such incidents based on unwere discouraged from reporting dergraduate academics, retention assaults. rates, graduation rates, class size, Also individuals who protested admissions selectivity, wealth and against the school’s response faced alumni donations. retaliation. Whether or not rankings are a A similar case was brought up at significant factor in your transUC Berkeley. fer decisions, some colleges have According to The Huffington gone to great lengths to boost Post on April 21, the U.S. De- their rank for U.S. News. partment of Education’s Office A New York Times article from for Civil Rights is investigating Jan. 31, 2012 reported several inUC Berkeley for failing to report stances where colleges and universexual assaults on campus, which sities lied about their statistics in also lead to offenders staying on order to gain ground in the U.S. campus. News rankings. This investigation stemmed In 2008, Baylor University in

Texas gave financial rewards to admitted students who would retake the SAT in an effort to raise their average score. Lastly, Iona College in New York admitted to lying about test scores, graduation rates, studentfaculty ratio, freshman retention, acceptance rates and alumni giving in 2011. The Times article goes on to say that U.S. News ranked the college 30th in “regional universities,” but with correct information, would have dropped to 50th. That is 20 places above their deserved rank; that is 20 colleges that earned better benefits from their rank than they received. So what does this all mean? Since colleges want to keep their precious rankings, calculating campus safety into rankings would force them to step up and be honest with their reports. Reports that could include sexual assaults on campus could be a bad reflection on them, but that should only motivate colleges to act appropriately and protect their students. Too often do students look at prestige and choose colleges for their namesake, something that goes hand in hand with rankings. It’s important that students recognize that campus safety is a serious issue that could affect their college experience, as well as the outcomes for the rest of their lives. Choosing a university to transfer to, can be a difficult decision. But demanding transparency from a prospective college shouldn’t be.


opinions 8

Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Syria’s problems are everyone’s problems Syria and the Middle East are two major Iraq, Turkey and even Iran. topics that have been scarcely discussed in The Director of National Intelligence, both the American media and the American James Clapper, informed the United States public. Congress that “roughly 7,000 foreign fightFrankly put, world issues usually take the ers from 50 countries are in Syria--most of back burner in the United States. them linked with extremist militias.” Why should we concern ourselves with Clapper also acknowledged the presence other nation’s problems? of al Qaeda, deeming this a viable threat to Would it not be easier to stay and fix our the United States. own problems here in the United States? Syria is reaching the verge of destruction Since globalization has connected all of with their civil war, and odds are the extremthe industrialized countries together, both ists will not stop even when the country is economically and sometimes politically, it is destroyed. impossible to ignore topics such as Syria. The violence will continue into other We are part of not only regions, causing even more the country of the United global unrest. States of America, but also This could have devastata part of a world that relies ing effects on the United on one another for politiStates, if this issue is left uncal, financial and sometimes attended. military support. Another article from CNN On its surface, global ison April 3, discussed potensues may not affect DVC tial problems that may arise, students or the American if Syria were to fall into expopulation instantaneously, tremist hands. but they may in the near fuThe author, Simon Tisdall, ture. points out that Syria is in Syria is currently fighting the process of “becoming a for freedom from an oppresbridgehead to Europe for al sive government and many Qaeda and like-minded faJOSH BRADSHAW terrorist groups and guerrilla natics.” Staff member fighters have taken up arms In other words, Europe in this struggle. will be the target of the IsAccording to a CNN arlamic fundamentalists, opticle from Feb. 20, authored by Nader Hash- posing western values and ideas. emi, director of Center for Middle Eastern The article references another article pubStudies, the U.S. should care about the Syr- lished on Feb. 16 from the website of the ian struggle. British based newspaper, The Telegraph.’ The conflict has poured over the Syrian This article discusses the fear many Euroborder into surrounding countries such as peans have as many British extremists and

WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

jihadists who went to fight in Syria are now returning home. “Britain is facing a ‘significant and growing’ threat from up to 250 British-based jihadists, who went to train and fight in Syria.” Besides the United States, some European nations are the largest targets for extremists. James Brokenshire, the British Minister of State for Security and Immigration, informs the public that “Syria has become the number one jihadist destination in the world.” There have not been any recent attacks on European countries yet, but they are under threat as long as the crisis in Syria continues. How does all of this affect us, the student body of DVC? Well it is quite simple. If terrorists attack European countries,

Education is the key to ending racism

why would we not be a target as well? We have been the target of previous terrorist attacks, such as the one on September 11, 2001. Sure, there have not been any attacks on that scale in the United States since then, but that does not mean it will not happen again. The threat from Syria is putting the countries, which share common western beliefs, at risk. Innocent civilians in American and European countries are at risk from terrorist attacks. All of these threat scenarios are a possibility if the Syrian conflict is not resolved. Contact JOSH BRADSHAW at jbradshaw@TheInquirerOnline.com

As the musical “Avenue Q” puts it: “Everyone’s a little According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, there are In this format, we change the earth beneath our feet racist.” 939 active hate groups inside the United States. by rototilling the seeds for growth and chance of change. On April 13, three individuals were murdered in a hate That is 939 more than we should have. Weeds grow when the garden is not managed. crime, which targeted a Jewish retirement community. But to wage a war against these groups of people is wrong. The government must also work to counter these ideas. These grievous and heinous acts commitAll people are entitled to A more moderated and active message ted ring true that extreme racism still exists their ideas, regardless of sent out often than the occasional butting “... schools should of heads between law enforcement and in our society. how much rational people Thus the question arises, how do we sift may disagree with the hatspend more time dangerously armed individuals is by far a through the complex levels of freedom of ers. more legitimate use of power. educating students speech, mental health, gun regulation and a What could be proposed Disregard the “That Government is best billion other problems that surround this latis gentle moderation. about the ideas of which governs least” pathology, and realest hate crime? Isolationist thinking is ize that even in the least capacity to which racism; not simply the people wish their government to have The answer is this: there is not a comprewhat abandons hope from hensive answer, no fill-in-the-bubble option action. power, civil governance needs to take first to hate it, but to that can reverse these actions and the trag“We are we, and they are place for the betterment of society. understand it, edies to come. they” is not an idea that We do not need a backed-up Congress to It is easy to call for restrictions on the should exist. and learn to know foul things up. freedom of speech, but it isn’t legal to sift Though a large number We need an active Congress that can enit is a wrong idea.” gage in discussion rather than rhetoric. through every spoken word to find malconof people may ignore the tent in its most malicious form. racist messages that breach This is only a single issue that has ALLAN KEW We can call for legal action against groups our safe perimeters from breached the public’s gaze once again. Staff member that actively integrate hate into their identime to time, we must remove that perimeter There will be others, likewise in tragedy. tities and lives, but we are all offenders of and enter into the world. However, change starts at home. some form of prejudice. Education is often talked about as the tool Write your congressmen; voice yourself electronically; do There is no clear cut answer to this occasional reminder for enlightenment, and this might be the perfect chance for something! that within our society, there still exist serious flaws. it to live up to that reputation. Don’t wait around for the T.V. to tell you about the latest Marcus Aurelius famously dictated that, “Everything that Curriculum in primary and secondary schools should flaming bag of dog poop on the American porch. exists is in a manner the seed of that which will be.” spend more time educating students about the ideas of racThe things we see in our society are what we allow to exist ism; not simply to hate it, but to understand it, and learn to Contact ALLAN KEW at akew@TheInquirerOnline.com in our society. know it is a wrong idea.


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news 10

Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

calendar Thursday, May 1 San Ramon graduation and transfer reception San Ramon Campus, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, May 1 to May 3 Swimming and DivingCCCAA State Championships Away, East Los Angeles Friday, May 2 Track and Field Nor-Cal Trials Away, De Anza College Wednesday, May 7 May Jazz Swing Performing Arts Center 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday, May 8 Advanced Piano/ Piano Ensemble Music 101, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Friday May 9 Horticulture plant sale DVC Greenhouse 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Live Bootleg: Into the Light Performing Arts Center, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday, May 11 Spring guitar ensemble Performing Arts Center 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

police beat Thursday, April 17 DVC campus At 9:29 a.m., an unknown person called the DVC operator and told her there was a bomb on campus. It was a false report. DVC Gym Between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., a suspicious male and female who were possibly under the influence of an unknown substance were contacted and found to be in possession of a controlled substance, drug paraphernalia, a folding knife and stolen property.

UNION From Page 1

for Union workers. With important attendees such as the vice mayor of Concord, Ron Leone and Sen. Mark DeSaulnier, the turnout was enough to grab the attention of anyone in the downtown Concord area on April 28. The gathering was put on by an advocacy organization titled Worksafe – who is pushing for some new bills that would make the state safer for workers, according to Valeria Velazquez, an attendee. “This is organized by Worksafe, which is an organization that advocates for responsible workplace health and safety legislation policy,” Velazquez said. “They talked about a few bills for example, that would make the state safer for workers.” As a worker for the labor, occupational and health program, which is part of UC Berkeley, Velazquez is conscious of the type of awareness that needs to be spread. The right to work in a safe and healthy place of employment and to return home uninjured at the end of each workday is what the main focus of the gathering was centered around. Yet, every year over 66,000 American workers are injured, or die from preventable workplace hazards or exposure to toxic chemicals, according to the Worksafe website. Dan Jameyson, a member of the Service Employees National Union (SEIU), explained that he was there to support not only himself, but all of his co-workers who are dealing with the limited coverage and high risk of union jobs. “Well both my own experience with occupational safety, and of course for my co-workers who I advocate for, who have disability, and just the day to day ability to do your job and come home to your family,” Jameyson said. “People take that for granted.” Jameyson and Velazquez tended to share the same views on the matter. “Some are responsible employers, there are others that are incredibly irresponsible and really, nearly 100 percent of all of these deaths are totally preventable. That’s the really disturbing thing,” Velazquez said.

BENJAMIN DAVIDSON / The Inquirer

Sen. Mark DeSaulier speaks out on the issues that Union workers face in Todos Santos Plaza in Concord on Workers Memorial day on April 28. The reason that the meeting was held publicly in Concord this year – complete with microphones and cameras – was that there was a want to get out of the niche area of people who have heard the same spiel several times already. Ron Leone, vice mayor of concord, said that the fact that Concord is central to Contra Costa County and is the largest city may be why they chose it as the location this year. He also mentioned that the death at the Concord BART as well as work related injuries was likely a contributing factor. “It’s good to see,” explained Leone as he was

talking about the Mt. Diablo Unified School District employees, city workers, and friends and family in attendance. “It’s bringing people together,” he said. “The labor is demonstrating the fact that there are safety concerns that they have in different organizations and different companies, and I think to dramatize that, it’s needed.”

Contact BENJAMIN DAVIDSON at bdavidson@ TheInquirerOnline.com

SWITCH From Page 1

Huffington Post on April 25, Sen. Jean Fuller, Republican from Bakersfield voted against the bill because she believed it would undermine consumer choice. She also questioned whether it could be a first step to mandating similar technology in other products, such as having, “a kill switch in your car.” Cody Soong, 20, questioned the failed proposal. “I don’t understand why any lawmaker would vote against this bill,” he said. “I think it would be great to have this technology on our phones. It’s better to have it, than to not have it, right?” Half of all robberies in committed in San Francisco involve smartphones — the number is one out of three nationwide. At a press conference on Feb. 7 Leno said, “this is a crime of convenience, if we remove the convenience, we remove the crime.” Leno highlighted at the press conference that 67 percent of all theft in San Francisco and 75 percent in Oakland involve smartphones. Eveline Mbugua, a public health major, “Lawmakers don’t realize how

THE INQUIRER Diablo Valley College 321 Golf Club Road, H-102 Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 The Inquirer is published Thursdays during the school year by the Diablo Valley College journalism students. Unsigned articles appearing on the opinions page are editorials and reflect a two-thirds majority opinion of the editorial staff. Signed columns and cartoons are the opinions of the writer or artist and not necessarily those of The Inquirer, Diablo Valley College or Contra Costa Community College District.

hard student life can be and that we have to worry about our safety. I want this law to pass so that it would prevent thieves from making us a target.” Students, like Kayla Rojas, 20, who have had their wallets stolen in the past, wish that a device like this would exist for their phones, to deter thefts of their smart-phones and electronic pads. Megan Boken, a 23 year-old St. Louis University student, was shot and killed in 2012 during a mobile phone robbery, while sitting in her car. Boken’s father Paul Boken, San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón and Leno are continuing their efforts to pass the bill.

Contact AMRITA KAUR at akaur@TheInquirerOnline.com

Editorial Board EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR ONLINE EDITOR NEWS EDITOR OPINIONS EDITOR ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR PHOTO CHIEF COPY EDITOR

Rachel Ann Reyes Benjamin Davidson Tyler Elmore Collin James Sasan Kasravi Regina Ortanez Gustavo Vasquez Amrita Kaur

Staff STAFF MEMBERS Andrew Barber, Josh Bradshaw, Aurora Byrne, Malachi Harris, Wesley Ihezue, Allan Kew, Ayaka Matsuno, Vivian Natalia, Tara Tashayod INSTRUCTIONAL LAB COORDINATOR Julius Rea ADVISER Mary Mazzocco

• Phone: 925.969.2543 • Email: inquirer@dvc.edu • Website: www.TheInquirerOnline.com • Printed six times per semester •


news 11

Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Ceramic students showcase their best art work in Davis TARA TASHAYOD Staff member

Diablo Valley College art students were successful in both showcasing and selling the best of their work at this year’s ceramic sculpture event in downtown Davis. Only ten of the most serious and talented students at DVC were invited to participate in this show. The California Conference for the Advancement of Ceramic Art (CCACA) was held from Friday, April 25 to Sunday, April 27. The event is held annually to show off high quality ceramic sculptures from colleges and universities all over the area. Demonstration, shows and lectures were all part of the event. This year, the work of over 40 different colleges, both universities and community colleges, were featured in shows as well as in local gallery exhibitions. Within a short distance of CCACA, the John Natsoulas Gallery’s Annual 30 Ceramic Sculptors, the Artery’s California Clay Competition, the Davis Art Center, and the Pence Gallery also displayed artwork. Other schools in attendance included UC

GUSTAVO VASQUEZ / The Inquirer

Set of handmade cups made by ceramics students to be given out to the forst 50 people who attended DVC’s showcase ar the Caifornia Conference for the advancement of ceramic art. Photographed on Wednesday, April. 23 prior to the CCACA conference in Davis, Calif. Davis, CSU Fullerton, UC Berkeley, Academy of Art University and San Francisco State University. CCACA provided many

an opportunity for aspiring artists to interact with top artists, display their work in a professional and realistic environment, and

prepare them for a future in art. DVC ceramics instructor Mark Messenger said, “CCACA is a great opportunity for dedicated students to use the skills they have learned, and apply them in real world art.” Messenger mentioned that DVC students had put in a collective group effort to revamp the run down room with only sixteen hours to spare. They repainted and redesigned the entire room as a team to display their masterpieces in a beautiful, presentable environment. Painting and drawing instructor Jane Fisher mentioned, “The importance of the show is to give exposure for the students in the art program, while being able to compare our work to other regional schools. It’s a great learning experience.” Featured DVC artist Mingjie Zhang was able to display her art work this year’ CCACA 2014. Zhang stated, “Today’s exhibition was very successful for DVC, those who were invited had very high quality work that represented DVC very well.” Contact TARA TASHAYOD ttashayod@TheInquirerOnline.com

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sports 12

Thursday, May 1 - Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Swim team torpedoes its way to state TYLER ELMORE Online editor

With a powerhouse team and great coaching staff, the DVC Vikings swam through Conference and are headed straight for State — making for one of the best seasons the school has ever had. The 2014 Big 8 Championships were held on April 17-20. The women did well but got second overall. “The women didn’t have any divers on their team so that definitely handicapped them,” said Rick Millington, head coach of the swim team. The men’s team clinched first place in the Big 8, having being seeded second in conference going into the competition. Steven Gordon, a political science major at DVC, set a couple personal records for himself at the meet. “I PR’d in my 50 meter freestyle and my 100 meter backstroke,” Gordon said. Aside from a multitude of personal records being set, a few DVC swimmers took some of the biggest awards home.

Kelsey Leonard and Allison Gargalikis both tied for most Outstanding Swimmer of the Conference. They also were in the 200-medley relay that won Outstanding Performance of the Meet which was also a state record. Both Leonard and Gargalikis tied for Female Swimmer of the Meet as well. Dominic Baldwin of the men’s team, earned Male Swimmer of the Meet helping to lead the men’s team to overall victory of the meet. Shaila Yoder, a past DVC swimmer and record holder, expressed her how well they’ve done. “We’ve got a lot of star swimmers, but not as much depth as we had last year,” she said. “It’s a tradeoff that we’ve been dealing with.” Overall, the team set four state records and five conference records along with winning both outstanding male and female athletes of the conference. Twelve men and nine women are moving on to the state competition in Los Angeles which will be taking place May 1-3. Millington says, “The women

will be battling for the team title, the top four teams are all within 11 points of the title.” “The men’s team will probably be battling for the second place spot since the team in first place right now has such a significant lead,” he said. The Vikings go into the competition and high hopes that they will perform as well as they have all season. A live broadcast of the meet can also be viewed by tuning into www. cccaasports.org.

Dominic Baldwin, top, won Male Swimmer of the Meet. Kelsey Leonard, above, and Allison Gargalikis, left, tied for Most Outstanding Swimmer of the Conference. The men’s team clinched first place in the Big 8.

Managing editor Benjamin Davidson contributed to this story. Contact TYLER ELMORE at telmore@TheInquirerOnline.com

Photos by

GUSTAVO VASQUEZ / The Inquirer


I

The

INQUIRER

No divers, no problem DVC’s swim team breaks records See Page 5.

Student Voice of Diablo Valley College

Volume 85 No. 6 Summer 2014 www.TheInquirerOnline.com

Wikipedia University

Teachers look to integrate site into classrooms. See Page 2.

Long distance love? See Page 9. Wearable technology on the fritz See Page 7.

GUSTAVO VASQUEZ/ The Inquirer

• News 2, 3, 4 • Opinions 7, 8, 9 • Sports 5, 6 • Editorial 7 • Arts & Features 10, 11, 12 • Campus Buzz 7 • Calendar 2 • Police Beat 2 • Staff Information 2 • Copyright © 2014 The Inquirer - Diablo Valley College


news 2 Summer 2014

calendar May 17 and every Saturday Off the Grid, 1 1 a.m. - 3 p.m., 1975 Diamond Blvd., Concord May 27- June 13 DVC’s early summer short-term classes June 6 (every first Friday of the month) First Friday Concert Series, The Uptown Night Club, 1928 Telegraph, Oakland (free) June 10 Oakland Active Music Series: Improv Jazz Concerts, The Uptown, 1928 Telegraph, Oakland (free) June 13 Free SF Giants Post-Game Fireworks Show, AT&T Park June 14: $1 Book Sale San Francisco Public Library, Mission District, 300 Bartlett St. June 16 DVC’s summer classes begin. Late enrollment- space available basis with instructor’s signature or late add code. June 21 New Wave Dance Party, The Cat Club, 1190 Folsom St., San Francisco ($7) July 4 Firecracker 5K Run, 8 a.m., check-in at clocktower on Crescent Drive, followed by a community parade from Cleveland to Boyd Avenue, Pleasant Hill Fireworks, College Park High School, Pleasant Hill. July 24 DVC’s deadline to file AA/AS degree or certificate August 15 First day of instruction for DVC fall semester

correction In the print edition of May 1, the Veteran’s Alliance story incorrectly identified a group and the location of the meeting room. Group’s name is Blue Star Moms and the correct club meeting room is SB - 202.

Instructors learn to like Wikipedia REGINA ORTANEZ Arts and features editor

In a workshop on how to properly integrate Wikipedia into the classroom, instructors were forced to ask themselves questions like “Who invented the 7-10 page research paper anyway and why do I adhere to it so adamantly?” The executive director for the Wikipedia Education Foundation, Frank Schulenburg, spoke at Diablo Valley College on May 6 about the benefits of using the online collaborative encyclopedia, which is often banned from classrooms, to the teacher’s advantage. The Wikipedia Education Foundation, a rather new addition to the Wikimedia Foundation, has been successful in integrating Wikipedia in 400-plus classrooms in the U.S. alone. Schulenburg cited schools such as Harvard, U.C. Berkeley and Virginia Tech as some of the many universities that have been receptive to this collective effort for media literacy. "I think for the teachers, you have students that are motivated as never before," he said. "For the students, while having fun because there is a fun aspect to it, but you learn a lot, you learn a lot about Wikipedia and if that's one of your main information sources on the web then its important thing to know more about it." English instructor Anne Kingsley has been a pioneer in implementing this. Kingsley helped guide students in her critical thinking class through editing existing and creating new articles in Wikipedia, to prove they are capable of being more than consumers of information, but producers, as well. Kingsley said that her thought process towards using Wikipedia in her own classroom began with a set of questions: "Can I make meaningful pathways between my students and the world beyond the classroom… Could I do something different, design a different concept

GUSTAVO VASQUEZ/ The Inquirer

Frank Schulenburg, executive director of Wiki Education Foundation, demonstrates ways to use Wikipedia in class to DVC instructors. of research in the classroom?” She was especially interested because the peer review system used by traditional academic journals "can also prevent histories from being told." Evan Smith, 21, was one of Kingsley’s students who was successful in not just composing edits on Wikipedia, but also in generating a new article on the Harlem Renaissance. "I felt like it put me into a bigger community outside of the classroom and that was sort of a big thing," Smith said. "Normally, you do classroom stuff and what happens in the classroom stays in the classroom."

One of the attendees, English instructor Erin Holzer, said she hoped to do something similar to Kingsley next fall: "I think it would be a really interesting aspect for my students to engage in that process of becoming one of the people who contributes to that source of information, so that they can have a better understanding of what it takes to become a credible source in a way, with the research that you have to do in order to be completely knowledgeable on a topic." Contact REGINA ORTANEZ at rortanez@TheInquirerOnline.com

Service matches students with odd jobs RACHEL ANN REYES Editor-in-chief

When 21-year-old DVC student Ryan Homer started to look for a few part-time, local job in the Bay Area, he stumbled upon an online job marketplace just for college students. Homer has found 10 to 20 short-term jobs since the start of the semester, from helping people move couches to bar-tending a wedding. Founded in San Francisco by Justin Ohanessian and Joey Toboni, College Labor helps connects college students, around the Bay Area, with jobs like moving, event work, gardening, errands, and courier services. According to Ohanessian, many of these jobs earn students $20 or more per hour.

THE INQUIRER Diablo Valley College 321 Golf Club Road, H-102 Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 The Inquirer is published Thursdays during the school year by the Diablo Valley College journalism students. Unsigned articles appearing on the opinions page are editorials and reflect a two-thirds majority opinion of the editorial staff. Signed columns and cartoons are the opinions of the writer or artist and not necessarily those of The Inquirer, Diablo Valley College or Contra Costa Community College District.

First launched in Sept. 2012, the platform was intended for students who needed help paying for college. High school friends, Ohanessian and Toboni found that it was hard for a couple of under qualified students to gain jobs. However, they found success after posting a few moving ads one summer. Ohanessian said that they made, “a bunch of money doing odd jobs.” They continued to work every summer, getting more jobs and earning more money doing small tasks. After graduating college, they decided to go back to this simple idea, especially after learning that people like hiring college kids. Using their experience working these jobs and this knowledge,

they created College Labor for this purpose. Ohanessian explained that to work for this online marketplace, students need to apply and get interviewed, like other jobs, before being accepted. Customers can then submit a job to the website and get a quoted rate for the task. Students will get a text and if they are interested in the job, they can claim it and pay a small finder’s fee. The customer pays the student when the job is finished. 23-year-old Phillip Welden has worked for College Labor since last winter and has had fun with the odd jobs he’s done. While these jobs typically pay well, the fact that most jobs are based out of San Francisco makes it harder for students to get jobs.

Editorial Board EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR ONLINE EDITOR NEWS EDITOR OPINIONS EDITORS ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR PHOTO CHIEF COPY EDITOR

Rachel Ann Reyes Benjamin Davidson Tyler Elmore Collin James Sasan Kasravi Regina Ortanez Gustavo Vasquez Amrita Kaur

Welden admits that some jobs are, “barely worth it,” when considering the time spent traveling to get there. While Ohanessian admits that their San Francisco business is more established, College Labor has already expanded to the East and South Bay to help with accessibility for a wide range of students. Homer thinks that it’s great that this marketplace is only for students, and that he can choose which job he wants to do, based on his own schedule. He also likes the independence, flexibility and receiving about $15 to $20 an hour. “You get paid really well for these jobs,” Homer said. Contact RACHEL ANN REYES at rreyes@TheInquirerOnline.com

Staff STAFF MEMBERS Andrew Barber, Josh Bradshaw, Aurora Byrne, Wesley Ihezue, Allan Kew, Ayaka Matsuno, Vivian Natalia, Tara Tashayod INSTRUCTIONAL LAB COORDINATOR Julius Rea ADVISER Mary Mazzocco

• Phone: 925.969.2543 • Email: inquirer@dvc.edu • Website: www.TheInquirerOnline.com • Printed six times per semester •


news 3 Summer 2014

End of construction is in sight

GUSTAVO VASQUEZ / The Inquirer

By July, students should be able to use the new cafeteria and food services building. The cafeteria is expected to be operational by the fall semester.

Access for students will still be an issue COLLIN JAMES News editor

DVC is ready to begin a new round of construction upon the completion of the new cafeteria building. But in the meantime, disabled students will get little relief while getting around campus. With the cafeteria on the verge of completion, DVC is preparing for a final phase of construction on campus that will include a massive landscaping project in the center of campus. Chrisanne Knox, the marketing and communications director of DVC discussed the upcoming construction plans, including some of the paths that disabled students would have to take. Knox acknowledged the troubles that Disability Support Services will face in getting students around campus. DSS runs carts across campus to assist disabled students in getting to their classes. “This is going to (be the) biggest challenge of the project,” Knox said. For all students, the routes between the upper and lower sides of the campus will be limited to the pathways between the Math Building and the Music Building. This area will also be the gateway for equipment and vehicles, which will pass through Lot 1. The Student Union Building, despite being adjacent to the construction site, will always be accessible. A path for disabled students has been ordered to be maintained at all times, according to Knox. "[Disabled] students will not

be cut from the Student Union Building.” Jensen David, 22, a student worker in the Student Union Building, had concerns about maintaining the building so close to construction. “We have a lot of people coming in, especially DSS students," David said. "Construction will be taking place right outside the main entrance to the Student Union Building, making foot traffic more difficult to navigate to this already busy building. It will take a lot of time getting used to finding an alternative path." As demolition and construction begins this summer, this will hinder many of the paths for students getting around near the parking lots where certain paths will be cut off. Parking Lot 7 will remain open with its numerous handicapped parking spots available next summer and fall. Construction of the new cafeteria building will be finished by this June. The cafeteria is expected to be fully operational by the fall semester. The current cafeteria is set for demolition and a landscaping project will begin this summer to finish off the larger commons project. The first part of the landscaping project, the new north entrance, has just been completed. The construction project is expected to continue at least until January 2015 with a new quad put in place for students to gather.

Contact COLLIN JAMES at cjames@TheInquirerOnline.com

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news 4 Summer 2014

Repeatability restrictions proves hard on arts classes where they need to be the best, now they’re going to have to go one, two, three, four in order,” DVC’s new policy on repeatabil- he said. "Everybody’s different. ity is causing frustration and con- Some people, that might be fine; fusion in the music, art and drama some are not going to be ready. departments. Basically, you’re cutting out the While the policy change was an- lifelong learners.” nounced in 2012, it took effect this Peppo also fears that the new past academic year. limit of taking four courses within Previously, many of the three a designated family will exclude departments' classes could be re- some students. peated by students who wanted to The course family system dicimprove their skills. tates related courses that are orThis year, the ganized into departments “Some people that groups of had to reorgafour. These nize their course might be fine, some are groups constructures into not going to be ready. tain entire families of sections of tiered courses Basically, you’re cutting departments, that can only be out the lifelong encouraging taken once. specialization learners.” While the and forced fosystem changes cus on specific ~BRET PEPPO were known to course direcMusic department chair administrators tions. and professors However, for at least an entire year, students when four courses within a sinhave been faced with challenges gle family are taken, the family is they did not fully expect. closed and the student may not Music department chair Bret register within any of the prePeppo noted that students in skill- scribed course family sections. building courses like piano, guitar That leads to a perception that and vocal are some of the most students have a lessened to diveraffected. sify their studies in a given field. “Instead of taking the time Art department chair Kristen ALLAN KEW Staff member

SWIPE TO INVADE

Graphic illustration by BENJAMIN DAVIDSON

Supreme Court may re-define privacy AMRITA KAUR Copy editor

Is digital technology subject to a warrantless search or is it protected under the fourth amendment? That is the question currently debated in the Supreme Court. The case that sparked the court conversation is that of the Riley v. California case, where a San Diego man was arrested during a traffic stop and his smartphone was searched without a warrant. The information found by the police on the smartphone was later used in court as evidence against the suspect. According to a detailed article published on April 29, in The New York Times, justices had varying points of view. “Smartphones do present difficult problems,” said Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., asking, “so how do we determine what the new expectation of privacy is now?” Several justices noted that modern smartphones contain troves of private material, including bank and medical records, personal emails and hundreds of personal pictures and private text messages. Jeffrey L. Fisher, one of Riley’s lawyers, warned the justices to think hard about a decision he said could fundamentally change, “the nature of privacy that Americans fought for at the founding of the Republic and that we’ve enjoyed ever since.” Much of the argument concerned whether or not immediate searches were required to keep police officers safe and to prevent the

destruction of evidence. The smartphone generation feels an uneasiness when presented with this debate. Belinda Novoa, a 21 year-old radiology major, said that there has to be a major probable cause, seeing something that would give the police reason to search a person’s phone. “They should have to go through a proper process and get a warrant before searching through someone’s phone,” she said. Some students like Robert Benson, a 25 year-old communications major view the warrantless phone search as an infringement of their privacy. “It’s personal. Who are they to be inside your lives? They are not supposed to control us, this is just an excuse for them to get into our lives. They can’t go into our Facebook and Snapchat,” said Benson. The Fourth Amendment prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures and requires any warrant to be judicially sanctioned and supported by probable cause. Sarah Hutchison, a 22 year-old civil engineering major, says the amendment is there to protect the average, innocent civilian from government overreach in privacy matters. “Later on other laws will be passed that would allow them to regulate the system and allow them more access to our private lives. Phones are a lot more personal.”

Contact AMRITA KAUR at akaur@TheInquirerOnline.com

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Koblik said the repeatability restriction "is really geared towards getting students in and out of community college." Students moving through the college on a rapid schedule may not suffer directly, she said. "But they are suffering indirectly because repeatability is cutting out a lot of the students who are doing this for the general love of art. … I think that impoverishes the atmosphere of classes." However, Beth McBrien, department chair for drama, emphasized that while the transition for older students would be difficult, new students would be faced with more opportunities in a newly organized system. McBrien believed that drama had not been negatively affected in a large degree, as the department’s students typically have a high transfer rate. She thinks that this is a transitional challenge, and will be something that would only be temporarily problematic. As Peppo declared, “you’re always learning something new, and you’re building on what you know.”

Contact ALLAN KEW at akew@TheInquirerOnline.com


Sports 5 Summer 2014

Records fall at State Championship BENJAMIN DAVIDSON AND RACHEL ANN REYES Managing editor and Editor-in-chief

The swim team’s season ended with broken records and a multitude of awards. DVC’s women left the California Community College Athletic Association Championship in early May as the number one team in the state. The men’s team finished fifth. State Swimmers of the Week were Allison Gargalikis and Kelsey Leonard. Coach Rick Millington won his own award, Coach of the Year. Millington said the women’s relay team set new state records for the 200 and 400-medley relay, smashing the 400-medley relay by an almost-unheard of 4.5 seconds. On the relay teams were Gargalikis, Leonard, Alexa Tchekmarev and Laura Woods. “Everybody who went scored, all our women scored,” he said. “So it was a great team effort and they did exactly what they needed to do.” After being second for the past three years, Millington finds “being first so much better.” “Three years ago we lost by two points, we were close, and that was a really hard thing to take but it all came together this year and it was one of those years where the right things happened for the team. Everything fell into place.” DVC athletic director Christine Worsley was astonished at how well the team did at the state championship. To win without any divers on the team is “unheard of,” she said. Some of the team’s motivation grew out of the death of former DVC student and swimmer Lauren McCullough. McCullough lost her battle to Ewing’s sarcoma in February. Emily Saccullo, the women’s team captain, said the team

“became a big family” after attending McCullough’s memorial service, with the motto for the whole season being “swim for Lauren.” “Her mom, dad and brother came to conference and watched us swim,” Saccullo said. “I think it was a reality check for a lot of kids on the team. ... Nobody expected it to happen” Millington agreed that the team embraced the idea of being “Lauren Strong” throughout the year. “At the State meet, before finals, they actually had a moment of silence… I know that it meant a lot to the coaches and the team,” he said. Worsley noted, “They were swimming, not for themselves, but for each other and they were swimming for Lauren.” Results released by Robert Lewis, meet information director: Women’s 400-yard Medley Relay Champion: Diablo Valley, 3:48.45—new state meet record Women’s 200-yard Medley Relay Champion: Diablo Valley, 1:45.09—new state meet record Women’s 50-yard Butterfly Champion: Allison Gargalikis, Diablo Valley, 24.67—new state meet record Women’s 50-yard Breaststroke Champion: Allison Gargalikis, Diablo Valley, 28.19—new state meet record

IT’S AN

ATTITUDE IT’S AN

ATTITUDE

Kelsey Leonard, above, and Allison Gargalikis broke records at the meet.

Contact BENJAMIN DAVIDSON at bdavidson@TheInquirerOnline.com Contact RACHEL ANN REYES at rreyes@TheInquirerOnline.com

IT’S AN

ATTITUDE

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Sports 6 Summer 2014

GUSTAVO VASQUEZ/ The Inquirer

Diablo Valley College track and field team members Emma Shoenstein, Scott Lindsay and Joel Timbrell, running cool down after training on at the DVC track.

Track athletes advance to NorCal finals crosse player during the spring time, so we were lucky to snatch him up.” Scott Lindsay, 19, chose to keep in shape This past season, the DVC track and field by running track. team has displayed some excellent abilities “I never had any expectations, so when I and determination. made it to finals I didn’t really know what DVC sent 15 athletes to the Northern to think," Lindsay said. “It was just pretty California trials and four moved on to finals cool.” to compete to go to the State ChampionShoenstein admits that motivation was the ship. hardest thing about training for the events. Joel Timbrell, 19, made first team All“Definitely keeping a positive mindset, NorCal but did not meet the minimum especially when you’re running something marks to move on to state championships. like the 5-kilometer it’s hard to keep pushing Florence Carroll, yourself because you 18, was the only pole- “...when I made it to finals are just running in cirvaulter competing for around the track” I didn’t really know what cles DVC in the finals. Shoenstein said. “I have been doing to think. ” Timbrell and Lindtrack since my junior say both find that the year in high school, so hardest part for him is ~SCOTT LINDSAY this would be my third DVC Student being consistent with year,” she said. training. Besides just pole"Making yourself go vaulting, Carroll threw both the javelin and and run every day is hard,” Timbrell said. the hammer this past season. “The pull-ups were really hard, it took The three others who moved on to the fi- a lot for me to get to do as many as I can nals are all distance runners. now,” Carroll said. Emma Shoenstein competed in both the All in all, this track season has gone very 1500-meter and the 5-kilometer races. well. “I have done basically the same events, When asked why there weren’t any home in high school I ran the 1600-meter and the meets, Pierson said, “We don’t have home 3200-meter which is the 1 mile and the 2 meets because we do not have a hammer famile,” she said. cility for that event, so we cannot host. This Timbrell has also always run distance. is a very sore subject as there has been little “I started running the 400-meter which is support to rectify this issue here at DVC.” one lap, in eighth grade," he said. "Then in high school, I started running the mile.” The last runner who was in the finals had Contact TYLER ELMORE at DVC track and field team pole vaulter Florence Carroll trains in preparanever run track before. telmore@TheInquirerOnline.com Coach Shelly Pierson said, “He was a lation for NorCal trials. TYLER ELMORE Online editor


opinions 7 Summer 2014

Editorial

The

Buzz

What advice would you give to students hoping to transfer?

Now you see me

YILANG LIN, 20 Spanish

“Make multiple appointments with the counselors and keep track of all your emails.”

ELIZABETH BOMAN, 36 Nursing

“Make school your priority. Get it done. Other things can wait, but this is your future.”

WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

CJ YUDELSON, 24 English

“Even if you get discouraged from school, keep at it if it’s what you want to do.”

WALTER MUNOZ, 26 Political economy

“Don’t get distracted by things other than education because it is going to be a key that is going to open a lot of doors.”

CAROLINA ROVERSO, 38 Psychology

“Learn how to manage your time, especially if you’re a returning student and you’re a parent.” Interviewed by: REGINA ORTANEZ Photographed by: RACHEL ANN REYES

Wearable tech costs us our privacy and the privacy of others Businesswire has surveyed the rate by which consumers are taking to wearable technology — the first such survey it has ever conducted — and they have come up with some notable findings. In a report issued late last month, the organization found that Americans are ready to share their personal health data and that interest around wearable technology is high, given the transition of tech culture out of the smartphone era. “81 percent of consumers would use a wearable health device,” Businesswire said. “90 percent of consumers would share health data in order to help researchers develop or better understand a disease, or improve treatment options.” The growth of wearable technology means that in the not-sodistant future, the concept of personal privacy will be re-assessed. Standard recording devices will become obsolete, information can be accessed in half the time that it takes currently, and keeping people from recording content will become harder or impossible to control. And though there are many

benefits to the recording of com- something that is of a rising conmunication, sleep patterns and cern, as Google Glass has already fitness routines, it is worth noting been seen on our campus. that there is a privacy trade-off “The main concern is about that comes with it. privacy use in the classroom, the Still, it is clear that major resis- glasses were being used by the tance to the devices have already student, and it just arose quesdeveloped, tions in terms predominateof how we use ly with the technology in buzz emanatclassrooms,” “The world is ing around Vazquez said. approaching a shift Google Glass. “We can’t be As Google in eras that will be out- recording in Glass begins classroom lining and defining the awithout to slowly make perits way out mission — in traditional view of Google’s the classroom of privacy and just top secret it is sort of like Research & how much the public that public/ Development private divide. values it as such.” labs and into The people are the hands of there for inconsumers, struction, not outside app to be there for developers, the press and even taping and release on YouTube some lucky members of the gen- the next day.” eral public, it is eliciting many Google Glass aside, wearables charged reactions. can also be sported on various Obed Vazquez, instructor and parts of the body. The head, updean of the social sciences di- per body, wrists and feet — all vision at Diablo Valley College of which entertain smartwatches, voiced that how people are using biometric monitoring devices and technology in the classrooms is wearable cameras. These are just a

small glimpse of the new wearable era that is fast approaching. All of these conjure up the concern of conflict and privacy. Yes, the technological industry needs to be encouraged to develop software that shares information, but to a point where ethics are involved. People should be well aware of their privacy, or lack thereof, that comes when purchasing wearable technology. The world is approaching a shift in eras that will be outlining and defining the traditional view of privacy and just how much the public values it as such. Tom Buehrer, senior vice president at TNS puts it well, “The main challenge lies in convincing people of its value and developing a device with mass appeal. The future of computing will be wearable, the question is, which kind of computers will people actually wear?” Technology has connected millions over the past several decades. Now, rampant growth with a lack of privacy awareness threatens to undermine the concept of privacy itself — and wearables may be the approach that re-defines it entirely.


opinions 8 Summer 2014

The prevalence of memes hurts our humor and our thinking Imagine that you’re at a party or any other for one heartbeat before they flatline. But large gathering of people and someone gets that by no means makes them uncommon. everyone’s attention because they have the What the popularity graphs measure is best idea. the interest in seeing these memes, not the They start to speak, then have to stop rate at which they’re still being produced. A themselves to get the giggles out, and they Youtube search for Harlem Shake filtered try again to announce their hilarious idea: by upload date brought up several pages of let’s make a Harlem Shake video. results just in the last 24 hours, almost all of If your imagination, and social circle, is them with no views. anything like mine, you’re imagining an awkEven the least funny, least relevant memes ward, drawn out silence. No one wants to like Arrow to the Knee are still being submake a Harlem Shake vidmitted to image boards in eo anymore. No one even droves. wants to watch a Harlem Looking at the massive Shake video. amount of recent submisThat’s what happens when sions of a long-unfunny a meme has run its course, meme as they keep comand memes are more and ing, joke after joke that was more often setting track reunfunny before it was even cords, going from hilarious said, reminded me the scene to awkward-if-mentioned in in the Disney “Hercules” less time than ever before. movie where the dead would In the case of the Harlem fall like rain into Hell. Shake it exploded in popuThe problem with memes larity, showing up in 100 isn’t primarily that they’re news headlines in March annoying or get played out 2013 and the plummeting quickly: more than anything, SASAN KASRAVI down to nothingness in just the problem with memes is Opinions editor over a month. This is by no that they make unfunny peomeans unique to the Harlem ple think they’re funny. Shake. While the memes that become popular KnowYourMemes, a catalog that fea- are most often thought up by clever, funny tures popular memes complete with simi- people, the function of a meme itself makes lar graphs of their popularity and most of it so that the average person can, without them, especially the newer ones, come with much effort, use the meme to get a laugh, or popularity graphs that look like a single at least a polite smile and half-chuckle. heartbeat on an EKG machine. How often do you hear people actually Memes like Arrow to the Knee and Sur- talk in memes? I’d venture to say that peoprised Patrick are hilarious to most people ple only use phrases like, “Dat [insert any-

WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

thing here];” “Do U even [insert anything here];” and “One does not simply [you get the idea]” in conversation as often as they do because of they like the small fragment of time where they feel funny or related to. The problem is that this kind of interaction deincentivizes most people from at least trying to be witty and it scripts our interactions so that we have the same conversations over and over. With that being said, it’s not even in the interest of those just trying to get a quick laugh here and there to rely on memes to help them. The popularity of memes rises and falls so quickly now that by the time most people are aware of any given meme, it’s already run its course and has stopped getting laughs. There’s few things less funny than someone enthusiastically telling a bad joke and waiting for laughter that never comes. Cliche is the mortal enemy of wit, of hu-

mor and of creativity. And that’s all memes really are: cliches. It used to be the standard part of the curriculum for writers to be taught to avoid cliches, to never write your ideas using someone else’s words, but that it seems like that lesson is slowly being forgotten. Only the most showy, inkhorn publications now even bother to try to avoid cliched metaphors and figures of speech. Most media is aimed towards young people, and as long as young people speak, joke and think in cliches, then everything aimed towards them will follow suit. I don’t look forward to a media where looking a year back to anything would feel as embarrassed for what I’m seeing as being asked to Harlem Shake. Contact SASAN KASRAVI at skasravi@TheInquirerOnline.com

Young first-generation Americans often struggle to find cultural identity

Growing up with my parents, I’ve often gone to many generation Asian Americans speak the language of their I think that it’s important for the children of these immiFilipino bakeries and restaurants. Familiar with the environ- country of origin very well, while 33 percent say they speak grants to understand that it will be a struggle to assimilate ment and food, I see no problem in making a quick stop a little of the language, and 26 percent say they don’t speak to a culture that isn’t completely their own. for lunch. the language at all. I think it’s imperative for change to happen if we want But something I notice that happens quite often is that Both my parents are fluent in different Filipino languages, to keep our native cultures alive, while remaining a diverse a Filipino cashier will speak to another Filipino in front but they didn’t think it was important to teach me or my country. of me in line in Tagalog, the main language spoken in the sister how to speak their native languages. So often I feel that parents who immigrated to the U.S. Philippines. When it’s my turn, I walk up and as soon as While I understand most of what my parents say to me encourage their kids to have a better life than their own; I say, “Hi,” the cashier’s tone and demeanor automatically when they speak in native tongue, I’m for them to excel in things that will only changes. not able to speak it back, further their success. They know. I don’t speak Tagalog, or any other than a few words. I’m grateful for the opportunities that other Filipino language for that matter. They thought it’d be eas“The role of language living in the U.S. has brought to me and And suddenly I feel like an outsider. ier to speak to us mostly my family. The stories of my mother plays in a person’s As a child of Filipino immigrants, I find in English, because it’s growing up in a poor life in the Philipthat it’s difficult for other second-generation the primary language in pines has humbled me in ways that I cultural identity is Americans to have a sense of cultural idenAmerica. don’t think most Americans—that have underestimated by tity because they don’t quite fit in as AmeriThe role language plays been here for many generations—would cans whose families have lived in the U.S. for in a person’s cultural understand. parents trying to generations. identity is underestimated However, if parents didn’t conform assimilate their kids to all societal norms and chose to teach Yet at the same time, those first generaby parents who are trying tion Americans don’t feel as attached to the to assimilate their kids into American culture” their kids native languages and tradiculture of their parents either. into American culture. tions, there might be a stronger sense of According a Pew Research study on By not learning to cultural identity for second generation second-generation Americans from Feb. speak my parent’s naAmericans. 7, 2013, 34 percent of second-generation tive Tagalog or Visayan, I’ve felt distant to One day I hope to walk into a Filipino store and not feel RACHEL ANN REYES Asian Americans think of themselves as the traditional aspects of my parents’ native different. Someday I want to have my own family and I want Editor-in-chief very different from a typical American. country. them to know their roots, rather than hearing faint stories It is an ongoing dilemma in finding a culDespite Filipino blood running thick of the past. tural middle-ground in identity. through my veins and possessing a deep sense of ethnic Future generations need to make an effort to preserve I agree with this wholeheartedly, as it is something that I roots, I feel like the American culture that I’ve been im- their culture before it’s gone. struggle with. I never quite feel 100 percent Filipino, nor do mersed in, has me viewed differently than others of the Contact RACHEL ANN REYES at I feel 100 percent American. same ethnic background. rreyes@TheInquirerOnline.com The Pew study also found that only 4-in-10 of secondAs more and more people are immigrating to the U.S.,


opinions 9 Summer 2014

Should we try a long distance relationship? Dear Answers, I have spent 3 glorious, yet difficult years here at DVC, but now I am about to open a new chapter in my life. I have been accepted to a high profile university back East, and as thrilling as that is, it means leaving my long-time boyfriend behind. He still has another year here at DVC and even then, who knows where he will end up transferring to. We have always imagined building a life together, but spending years apart will be really hard. I don’t know if I can handle the heartbreak of ending it, but I also don’t know if it is fair to expect us to be faithful, and withstand the temptations of being 3,000 miles away from each other. Should we stay together or break up? -On to 4-Year Dear 4-Year, The good news is that with today’s technological advancements, couples that are geographically far apart, can still stay emotionally close. Yet despite the advent of gadgets and video chat, you are right to be trepidatious about embarking on a long-distance relationship. Long-distance relationships require an immense amount of trust, honesty, and communication. My advice to you is, that if you truly love each other and you’re

both willing to give it a go, try it out. However, keep an open mind and recognize that things may change with the two of you being so far apart. You may decide that it’s just too hard to miss each other all the time, or one of you may indeed meet someone else. For that reason I think it is of the utmost importance that you both commit to being absolutely honest with one another, even if the truth is that a long-distance relationship isn’t making you happy. Now that we have the doom and gloom out of the way, many

WESLEY IHEZUE / The Inquirer

people have very satisfying and successful long-distance relationships. One couple I know plans a dinner date each week where they eat together over Skype. You can also share photos and details of your lives with one another, using mobile instant chat apps, Facebook and Instagram. Also try to plan occasional visits as often as you both can afford. Many couples even find their

relationships strengthened by the time they’ve spent apart, as distance can make the heart grow fonder! When you have to make the most of your interactions in the little time that you do get to spend together in person, it forces you to focus on what is really important to you both, and you are likely to really develop your “best self ” when it comes to your relationship.

I personally think there is no harm in starting out with the best intentions, but be sure to re-evaluate from time to time, and encourage your significant other to do the same. Thank you for sending in your questions. This is the last edition of Asking for Answers for Spring 2014. For further information on Asking for Answers email inquirer@dvc.edu

Capital punishment needs to halt for review

The latest debacle concerning the institu- on all national executions. tion of the death penalty requires a review This stay of all executions should remain of the processes of capital punishment. until the three-drug cocktail has been meOn April 29, Clayton Lockett was ex- thodically tested and its efficiency is proven, ecuted by the state of Oklahoma in what or until the discovery of a new source for has been described by many as a ‘botched’ acquiring the single-chemical drugs is found. procedure. President Obama has since called for a During the execution, Lockett’s vein in his review of the national system. However, groin collapsed, causing him to experience a this review will be limited as executions are heart attack during the execution. administered by state governments, not the Witnesses noted Lockett lifted his head federal government. several times and convulsed, eventually dyYet many experts are also calling for a reing 43 minutes after the beginning of the view of the state system as well. execution. According to Paul Lewis of the GuardControversy surrounds ian, the Constitution Projthis execution, not only for ect, a think-tank based out the manner in which the inof Washington D.C., has dividual was executed, but in published a 200-page report the procedure and compocalling for the re-institution nents that occurred before of single-chemical administhe execution. trations. Namely, this pertains to The moderate think-tank, the three-drug cocktail now comprised of opponents used in place of the singleand advocates of the death drug administration in the penalty, argued that the pospast. sibility for “inmate pain and This new method evolved suffering” is of a higher risk from the growing scarcity of when the three-drug cocktail single chemical drugs prois administered. duced by European comThis is evident from the panies, which are now colexecution of Lockett, and a ALLAN KEW Staff member lectively refusing to sell for string of executions before usage in executions. him, as listed by Guardian This poses a problem. writers Ed Pilkington and Single-chemical drugs have been tested, re- Alan Yuhas. peatedly, in executions for decades and have This list further includes other forms of stood the test as being a relatively non-cruel capital punishment from the past that “went method for capital punishment. wrong.” However, these new three-drug cocktails There needs to be a review of the system have not been thoroughly tested to prove of capital punishment, as the sentence altheir efficiency in completing the act. ready teeters on unconstitutional. More so, some states do not reveal the If the execution includes some form of drugs involved in their cocktails. “cruel or unusual punishment,” as quoted Regardless of the arguments for or against from the US Constitution, then the act is the institution of capital punishment, there explicitly unconstitutional. should, for the moment, exist a moratorium Disregarding value judgments on capi-

tal punishment again, the smoothness and humane quality of a single-chemical drug administration for capital punishment does not fall under unconstitutionality. The Supreme Court has demonstrated in its rulings in the past. According to the BBC, Charles Warner, the other inmate in Oklahoma who was to be executed the same night as Lockett, has

been given a six month stay of execution. Hopefully six months’ time will be enough for Oklahoma, and the other 23 states that use three-drug cocktails, to review their processes of capital punishment and come to a more efficient and humane system of administering executions.

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Contact ALLAN KEW at akew@TheInquirerOnline.com


arts & features 10 Summer 2014

DVC students ‘Inspire’ with Oakland art challenge

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A DEGREE OF POSSIBILITIES

REGINA ORTANEZ Arts & features editor

Two of DVC’s own digital me- pursue graphic design as a cadia students were winners in a reer,” Bratton said. design challenge presented by the "Overall, Inspire Oakland has non-profit Oakland Digital Arts been a great opportunity to start & Literacy Center, better known building a portfolio and to develas Oakland Digital. op as a designer,” she said. “My Inspire Oakland is in its fourth design is inspired by the unity of year of being Oakland Digital’s the people of Oakland, which “workforce development pro- I believe is the key to the city's gram that provides professional prosperity." development for community colFirst place winner Andrew lege and state-level students pur- Warren will also have his design suing a career in the competitive showcased on a billboard in Oakgraphic design job market,” as land, as well as being featured as cited by Oakland Digital’s official the current cover image of Oakwebsite. land Mayor Jean Quan’s FaceShaun Tai, founder and execu- book, having been hand-selected tive director of Oakland Digital, by the mayor beforehand. spoke on how this challenge is Warren, 21, says he is actively more than a in pursuit contest, “it's “...the huge opportunity of an AA in about proArt Digital of possibly having a fessional opMedia-Digibillboard of my design tal Imaging. portunities in the design Of his acmake thousands of world.” complishpositive impressions a ments with He said this program the Inspire day really drove my aimed to Oakland desire to be one of the challenge, supplement what DVC Inspire Oakland winning he spoke on graphic dewhat motidesigners.” sign instrucvated him to tors taught participate. ~ANDREW WARREN by, "bridging “My mothe opportu- First place winner of Inspire Oakland 2014 tivation nity divide." behind the Among the colleges in partici- contest started from when it was pation are Laney College, Cali- announced in class by Oakland fornia State University East Bay, Digital founder Shaun Tai," he McClymonds, and Berkeley City said. "His passion for the projCollege. ect and the huge opportunity of Each year, students are asked possibly having a billboard of my to create a billboard design that design make thousands of posirelays the question, “What about tive impressions a day really drove your city inspires you?” my desire to be one of the Inspire Alexis Bratton, 18, was a grand Oakland winning designers.” prize winner in Inspire Oakland, As a part of the Inspire Oakdescribed as, “a collaborative land program, Oakland digital billboard design program,” or- also brought several DVC stuganized by Oakland Digital who dents to a site visit of  the Clorox partnered with the City of Oak- Company to meet with the head land, Oakland Museum, Twitter creative director of their large and many more for this challenge. design department, as well as Her design will be featured on awarded paid internships to sevmultiple commercial billboards eral of these DVC graphic design throughout Oakland and East students. Bay, according to the press re"I'm excited and honored that lease. DVC has been a part of Inspire As a first time graphic design Oakland since the beginning," student in her first semester at said Tai. DVC, Bratton spoke on how her To view the winning designs recent achievements has helped and for more information about her in setting her career and aca- Oakland Digital, visit www.odalc. demic goals. org. “I was not sure what I wanted to major in beforehand, but the Inspire Oakland design challenge Contact REGINA ORTANEZ at rortanez@TheInquirerOnline.com has definitely encouraged me to

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arts & features 11 Summer 2014

Wildlife thrives on campus

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COLLIN JAMES News editor

DVC is more than a place of learning for people. It is its own micro ecosystem with the duck pond serving as a watering hole, hunting grounds and home for a wide variety of animals, from snails and crayfish at the bottom of the food chain to turtles, frogs, minnows, geese and the famously friendly mallards. Troy Ricard, the senior grounds worker gardener spoke about the wildlife that inhabits DVC. Ricard and four other grounds workers maintain the ponds as a healthy habitat and allow these animals to live a prosperous life despite being in the presence of thousands of students. Here are some of the fauna that make DVC’s ponds more than a relaxing spot to study and peaceful escape from the stresses of college life.

YOUR SUCCESS STARTS HERE

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Two geese rest near the edge of the pond. The Canadian geese are a nuisance during migratory seasons, and on occasion are territorial during mating season, according to Ricard. A small flock of them have taken permanent residence on campus and often socialize with ducks.

A mother duck watches over a nest of ducklings on the edge of the pond. A total of 11 ducklings were counted this season and the absence of predators will likely mean these ducklings will live a long and healthy life.

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Bullfrogs can be found in the three ponds near the ATC building. Ricard reported a large bullfrog out break a few years ago got out of control with dozens of frogs hoping across the upper campus.

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arts & features 12 Summer 2014

DVC after dark BENJAMIN DAVIDSON Managing editor

Scholastic thouroughfare by day, and peaceful haven by night, Diablo Valley College’s nightlife is a thing of beauty when the sun sets on campus. The planetarium is one of the college’s larger structures and is still used for classes, but is ideally used at night. It is pictured above, around seven o’clock at sunset. The bookstore, as pictured on the right is open later, from 7:45 a.m. – 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday. But be that as it may, the lights are kept on into the night – illuminating the walkways and other areas that students or staff may need to get to if they are on campus after nightfall. The bookstore is pictured on the right around nine o’clock p.m. Surprisingly there is a lot of low key activity into the night in terms of the groundskeepers and janitorial staff. The two gentlemen pictured below were covering the pool around 9:45 p.m. The pool deck,

which is just one of the many illuminated areas around campus, is not open, but still shines its lights onto the walkways around it brightening up the paths, and making for a nice landmark of lower campus. Night classes are not as popular as the day classes, but the people who do take night classes – especially in the Spring – have no issues with the weather into the night. “We’re just taking a break out here because it is a nice night out, and the weather is great right now,” said Mike Sevick a student who was enjoying the evening as he stood outside the Humanities building with two of his friends. “We have class from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. but we don’t mind,” Daniel Buera said, as they stood outside and enjoyed the sunset on a class break. Not only does DVC offer a wide variety of places to go on campus to relax, but the nighttime views are awesome to say the least. Contact BENJAMIN DAVIDSON at bdavidson@ TheInquirerOnline.com

Photos by BENJAMIN DAVIDSON / The Inquirer


NorCal 2014 General Excellence entry - Diablo Valley College