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FE AT U R I N G E L E A N O R FR I E D B E R G E R DAV I D C R OS S H O L L I E W I TC H E Y K I M B E R LY VO N KO O N T Z ES C A P E B R O O K LY N AND NORTH

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(ALL SUMMER IN A DAY) Etel Adnan Ida Barbarigo Brian Belott Kim Beom Daniel Boyd Poul Gernes Udomsak Krisanamis Ben Morea (Blinky Palermo)

Open weekends for breakfast, lunch and dinner Memorial Day through Labor Day Unclebrother 250 E. Front Street, Hancock, NY uncle@unclebrother.org


Inspiration for your quiet place somewhere. Available now.

WWW.CABINPORN.COM


MONTESSORI SCHOOL SERVING STUDENTS PRE-K TO GRADE 8 Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life exists. —Rachel Carson Located in the hills of the Upper Delaware River Valley, our fields, woods, marshes, ponds and streams provide opportunities for hikes, year-round plant and animal research, as well as time for exploratory free play and quiet reflection in nature. Gardening, care of the school’s flock of sheep, dairy goats, and chickens, as well as large agricultural projects are a part of daily life at the Homestead School. Student interest and class studies spark day trips to natural, historical and scientific sites. At the elementary level, overnight, multi-day trips expand upon yearlong studies in literature, history, science and art with visits to places such as Newport, Portsmouth and Cape May. 428 HOLLOW RD, GLEN SPEY, NY 12737 | (845) 856-6359 WWW.HOMESTEADSCHOOL.COM


BORE GAAR D JE W EL ER HIGH END DESIGNER JEWELRY STACK RINGS In five different profiles and in several different widths made in platinum, 18K yellow, white and pink gold and set with white and cognac colored diamonds, rubies and orange and yellow sapphires.

101 MAIN ST, NARROWSBURG, NY 12764 | (845) 252-3833 WWW.BOREGAARD.COM | PBOREGAARD@BOREGAARD.COM | WWW.FACEBOOK .COM/BOREGAARD


A carefully curated wine and spirit shoppe by Ron and Joan Santo. Helping to make memories and solve world problems... One sip at a time. Find us on FB for hours and events. Open seven days a week.

44 MAIN STREET, NARROWSBURG, NEW YORK 12764 | (845) 252-3242 WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/NARROWSBURGFINEWINESANDSPIRITS


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Would you believe that one of biggest yoga websites in the world is based in Honesdale, PA? This summer, YogaInternational.com went even more local by opening a café, boutique, and yoga studio below their Main Street office. The renovated space is both rustic and modern, an ode to Honesdale history blended with urban elegance. Surrounded by glass vessels and copper canisters, the café serves signature chai, exquisite loose leaf teas, locally-made organic treats, and fresh pour-over coffee to enjoy amidst cozy seating. The boutique is curated with yoga products, artisanal jewelry, and other handmade gifts. Open Thursdays and Fridays from 12-7pm & Saturdays and Sundays from 9am-4pm. CAFE ∙ BOUTIQUE ∙ STUDIO | 630 MAIN STREET, HONESDALE, PA 18431 | WWW.YOGAINTERNATIONAL.COM/STUDIO

$10 SINGLE DROP-IN CLASS, $49/MONTH FOR UNLIMITED CLASSES AND ONLINE ACCESS MONDAY Power Lunch 12:00-12:50 (all levels); Heated Vinyasa 5:15-6:15pm (all levels) TUESDAY no classes WEDNESDAY Gentle Yoga 10:00-11:00 (gentle); Simply Yoga 5:15-6:15pm (all levels); Vinyasa Flow 6:30-7:30 (level 2) THURSDAY Mid-day Distress 12:10-12:50 (gentle); Ashtanga Immersion Series I 5:15-6:15 (all levels); Evening Flow 6:30-7:30 (all levels) FRIDAY Simply Yoga 9:00-10:00; Kids Yoga I 10:30-11:15 (4-7 years); Power Lunch 12:10-12:50; Kids Yoga II 4:00-5:00 (8-12 years); Level II Yoga 5:15-6:15; Restorative Yoga 6:30-7:30 SATURDAY Hatha Yoga 9:00-10:15 (all levels); Awakening the Radiant Body 11:00-12:15 (all levels) SUNDAY Vinyasa II 9:00-10:00 (level 2) CAFE ∙ BOUTIQUE ∙ STUDIO | 630 MAIN STREET, HONESDALE, PA 18431 | WWW.YOGAINTERNATIONAL.COM/STUDIO


MASTHEAD

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CONTRIBUTORS

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MATTHEW SCRIVENS PHOTOGRAPHER Matthew Scrivens was born and raised in Toronto, Canada and went to McGill University, in Montreal. He is based in New York City, with Milan, his blue nose pittbull but travels extensively, shooting for clients around the globe. He is represented by André Werther. www.matthewscrivens.com @matthewscrivens

D E L AWA R E VA L L E Y E I G H T ISSUE NO 4

Publisher & Creative Director N H I M U N DY Editorial Director M I C H A E L M U N DY Editor at Large L A U R A S I LV E R M A N

DORIS CHEVRON FEATURE WRITER Doris Chevron grew up in Hamburg and Arosa, Switzerland and is now based in New York. This year will mark her 20-year career at Condé Nast International, where she is currently Editorat-Large. Some of her favorite stories that she has covered include profiles on Billy Wilder, Alexander Girard, Robert Wilson, Frank Gehry and fashion greats Donna Karen and Calvin Klein. Doris Chevron is also the co-founder of a strategic communications company called SMARTLUXURY.co. @dchevdesign

JOHN PAUL TRAN CREATIVE DIRECTOR A Texas native, John Paul Tran is now based in New York and divides his time between Manhattan and the Catskills. He is the Executive Creative Director of TRIPTENT in New York City and is a continuing contributor to publications such as VOGUE Mexico & Latin America, VOGUE Hombre, Martha Stewart Weddings and most recently DVEIGHT. www.johnpaultran.com @johnpaultran

Senior Writer JILLIAN SCHEINFELD Associate Writer CAITLIN GUNTHER Contributors EDDIE BR ANNAN DORIS CHEVRON JASMINE GIBBS RISA KNIGHT MOA NIE LEE ERIN LINDSEY J O H N PAU L T R A N EM M A TUCILLO MIMI VU Photographers L AW R E N C E B R AU N M I C H A E L DAV I S M I C H A E L M U N DY JEFF RIEDEL M AT T H E W SC R I V E N S Advertising ESTHER DE JONG

JEFF RIEDEL PHOTOGRAPHER Jeff Riedel is a New York based photographer who has photographed many of the world's most renowned figures for nearly two decades. Riedel continues to shoot editorial across the globe, and his portfolio features ad campaigns for many high-profile clients including HBO, Nike, NBC Universal, Samsung, Microsoft and NBC among others. He is represented by Art Department. www.jeffriedel.com @jeff_riedel

Editorial Assistants ISA AC LEE M ARINA M ARCH I S A B E L L A M U N DY Special Thanks B O B B Y & LY N N E O ' N E I L L

www.dveightmag.com facebook.com/dveightmag instagram @dveightmag

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Delaware Valley 8 Issue 4, July 2016, Copyright 2016, Delaware Valley 8. All rights reserved. See magazine online at dveightmag.com. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. For customer service or advertising inquiries, please send email to nhi@dveightmag.com or write us at P.O. Box 41, Jeffersonville, NY 12748.

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The Milford Readers & Writers Festival will inspire and ignite conversations between people who love to read books and those who write them. Featuring conversations with MK Asante (Buck: A Memoir), Gloria Steinem (On The Road), John Berendt (Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil) and other authors and panelists. September 30th through October 2nd, 2016 – Milford, Pennsylvania TICKETS @ EVENTBRITE | WWW.MILFORDREADERSANDWRITERS.COM

VISIT OUR SEASONAL ART SHOWS AT THE LODGE AT WOODLOCH Kiesendahl+Calhoun Fine Art invite you to our tenth anniversary summer art show featuring artists Laura and Jim McManus, at the award winning destination spa: THE LODGE AT WOODLOCH | 109 RIVER BIRCH LANE, HAWLEY, PA Summer exhibit runs through September 13th | Fall exhibit opens September 15th WWW.KANDCGALLERY.NET


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EDITORS NOTE

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MEET YOUR MAKER ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER: A NEW VIEW By Jillian Scheinfeld Page 16 A CONVERSATION WITH DAVID CROSS: MAKING AMERICA GREAT AGAIN By Michael Mundy Page 20

GIMME SHELTER KIMBERLY VON KOONTZ: THE GARDNER WEARS PRADA By Doris Chevron Page 23 FLAVOR STEVE MUTTER: A SOUTHERN CHEF IN YANKEE COUNTRY By Eddie Brannan

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COVER STORY: ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER (PHOTO BY MICHAEL MUNDY)

hile planning our fourth issue during the hectic start of the summer season, we kicked around the idea that it had to be “fun”—without knowing quite what that meant. And so we looked for subjects who would inject that element, like actor/comedian David Cross of Arrested Development and indie-rock singer Eleanor Friedberger, known for her quirky, upbeat music videos. We organized a swimsuit photo shoot with model Hollie Witchey set around a friend’s gorgeous lakefront property. (What could be more fun than that?) We collaborated with upstate travel guide experts And North and Escape Brooklyn, who covered a fun road trip story on both sides of the river. We set one writer loose to explore retro diners in and around Sullivan County. We covered a local BBQ chef—thinking, yeah, BBQ sounds like fun. As the issue came together, the stories definitely added up to summer fun, but they also revealed something else.   The common thread that runs through all the stories in this issue—through the subjects, the writers, the photographers—is a shared interest in, and a love for, our little neck of the woods. Despite trying to steer things in a lighter direction, what came out of each interview, each moment, was something completely different. These stories are introspective, thoughtful and quiet, yet dappled with optimism. I had envisioned Norman Rockwellesque stories that evoked the season with classic images of swimming, friends shared food and laughter. This is not that issue. But I think that’s okay. While I had hoped to create an issue that was anchored by a strong, definitive theme, what’s ultimately more important is that we had fun creating it. I am often leery of the outcome of each issue, but I am pleasantly surprised by this one. The stories, the photography and the subjects have all aligned. It really feels like DVEIGHT. And that’s it’s own kind of fun.

IN PERSON HOLLIE WITCHEY: WITCHEY WOMAN By Mimi Vu

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ROAD TRIP ESCAPE BROOKLYN: DELAWARE VALLEY By Erin Lindsey

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AND NORTH: HUDSON VALLEY By Emma Tucillo

Page 36 N H I M U N DY Publisher

DINER HEAVEN: AN AMERICAN CLASSIC By Caitlin Gunther

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DESIGN AND RENOVATION − The first choice for your second home. From your ideas, we build a design and remodel plan that matches your needs and budget. Working with our craftsman and construction team, to bring your ideas to life. 3575 STATE ROUTE 55, KAUNEONGA LAKE, NY 12749 | (845) 293-3080 | WWW.CATSKILL-HOME.COM | ANNA@CATSKILL-HOME.COM

Celebrating our 80th anniversary! We’re a family-owned, fourth-generation business unlike the big box stores. Our three welcoming showrooms feature a unique mix of rustic lodge-style furnishings that bring the outdoors inside and evoke the natural beauty of the Upper Delaware River region. We also offer quality American-made brands like Sealy Posturepedic and La-Z-Boy. There’s something for every room of your home. Experience a relaxing shopping adventure! To celebrate our 80th birthday we’re awarding an $80 gift certificate every month during 2016 through a Facebook contest. “Like” our Facebook page to play along for a chance to win! BEAUTIFUL LAKE WALLENPAUPACK | 2561 ROUTE 6, HAWLEY, PA 18428 | (570) 226-9726 HISTORIC DOWNTOWN HONESDALE | CHURCH & 6TH STREETS, HONESDALE, PA 18341 | (570) 253-1860 CHARMING MILFORD | 321 WATER STREET, MILFORD, PA 18337 | (570) 296-9610 WWW.VANGORDERS.COM


CASUAL VIETNAMESE FOOD LOCATED IN THE CATSKILLS & POCONOS Serving authentic Vietnamese cuisine using fresh and healthy ingredients. CAFE: 1023 MAIN STREET, HONESDALE, PA 18431 | (570) 253-1985 | TAKE-OUT: 26 UPPER MAIN STREET, CALLICOON, NY 12723 | (845) 887-3227 WWW.BAANDME.COM | HONESDALE@BAANDME.COM | @BAANDME

Canaltown is an event based project creating opportunities for community members to share space and connect with the local landscape. Headquartered in downtown Honesdale’s 500 block, in our Space Three laboratory, we’ve thus far crafted engagements around art, food, and movies. The annual Canaltown Short Spooky Movie Festival aka Spookyfest is one such engagement, supported by the Wayne County Tourism Grant Program, featuring local and global moving picture shorts, and paired with organic coconut oil popped corn. It’s free to submit to Spookyfest so you probably should. Show: October 22, 2016. 552 MAIN STREET, SPC3, HONESDALE, PA 18431 | (570) 470-2563 | CANALTOWN552@GMAIL.COM | CANALTOWN552.COM/SPOOKYFEST | @CANALTOWN552


NEW YORK www.nyhoneywhiskey.com

IN THE MOOD FOR THE PERFECT OLD FASHIONED? HERE'S YOUR SUGARLESS OPTION Muddle orange slice at the bottom of the glass, 3-4 drops of bitters, 3 oz. Catskill Provisions NY Honey WhiskeyTM, add ice to taste and enjoy the buzz! Available at your local liquor shop or contact your Winebrow representative. WWW.NYHONEYWHISKEY | WWW.CATSKILLPROVISIONS.COM

The former firehouse-turned brewery is home of the Trout Town Hand Crafted Beers, offering flights, tastings, tours of its brewing facilities and live music and festivals throughout the summer. Roscoe, better known as “Trout Town USA”, is apparent everywhere at the brewery, from the name of the beers, to the live trout swimming in the fish tank of the tasting room.  Walking into this one of a kind space, you will quickly start to wander around and admire the artwork, antiques and trinkets on the walls, which makes for a great place to stop and enjoy life for a little while.  145 ROCKLAND ROAD, ROSCOE NY  | (607) 290.5002 | INQUIRIES@ROSCOEBEERCOMPANY.COM | WWW.ROSCOEBEERCOMPANY.COM


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THE RURALIST

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WHICH PART OF THE REGION DO YOU CALL HOME? Kingston, New York. WHAT'S YOUR VOCATION? Founders of Catskill Made and Diner Porn. WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN? Cooking, exploring our new Kingston neighborhood with our dog, photoshoots—yes, we do it for work but we like to do it for fun too! UPSTATE ANTHEM "Losers" by Belle Brigade—it's about turning away from a competitive, status-driven life and just carving out a path that's perfect for you, which is how we think about moving upstate. MODE OF TRANSPORTATION We get around via our trusty blue Subaru Outback (nicknamed "Ruby"), the unofficial-official car of upstate NY. FARMER'S MARKET? We like the Kingston farmers market—but we just joined Field Goods, a kind of group CSA, and we're LOVING it. FAVORITE FANCY RESTAURANT Miss Lucy's in Saugerties is about as fine as we get, but the food is AMAZING (it's a locally sourced menu that changes weekly). FAVORITE VIEW? The view of Mount Overlook from the Thorn Preserve in Woodstock. CHOP OR BUY WOOD? When we had a woodstove, we bought—we learned the first year to stock up on a few cords so you don't run out in January. We felt like we'd really become true upstaters when we had a "wood guy." HOW DOES LIVING UP HERE INFLUENCED YOUR WORK? We found that moving upstate, and the fact that everything was less expensive, allowed us to take on more passion projects, like Catskill Made and Diner Porn, instead of working constantly just to make ends meet. IF YOU WERE A FARMER... I have always dreamed of being a vegetable or flower farmer, and Tom and I have considered raising chickens (for the eggs!). We haven't made the leap yet, though.

CATSKILL MADE Interview CAITLIN GUNTHER Portrait TOM EBERHARDT- SMITH

Alecia Lynn and Tom Eberhardt-Smith, founders of Catskill Made, fondly recall their first home upstate−a one-room cabin heated by a wood stove, with outdoor trash cans that were frequently raided by locals (raccoons and bears). They quickly learned to navigate country life. Together they have made the transition from fledgling upstaters to engaged community members, ready to offer their intel on the best hiking spots and restaurants and spurning off passion projects that highlight the simple pleasures of upstate life.

WHAT SKILLS HAVE YOU ACQUIRED UP HERE? We learned pretty quickly the ins and outs of upstate living, like how to protect our trash cans from raccoons (and bears!) and how to thaw out frozen pipes. We also learned some less tangible skills: how to survive winter when it barely gets above 12º, how not to kill each other when you live in one room and you're getting cabin fever. WHAT'S YOUR NOT SO FAVORITE PART ABOUT LIVING UPSTATE? There is a conservative faction here, as in lots of rural places, that can feel disconcerting, and remind you that not all of upstate (or the country) is the liberal dreamland we wish it could be. It's always a little disturbing to head to the grocery store and park next to a truck with a Confederate flag waving from it. WHAT'S THE STRANGEST THING THAT HAS HAPPENED TO YOU HERE? Has to be the time a little garter snake got into our cabin and was discovered hanging out on the ceiling beam above our loft bed—about 2 feet from where we sleep. Poor guy, he must have been just as freaked out as we were. There's always new, fun wildlife to be discovered upstate. WHAT DO YOU GET UP HERE THAT YOU CAN'T IN THE CITY? Peace, beauty, fresh air, space and time. 15


ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER

A NEW

VIEW Words JILLIAN SCHEINFELD Photography MICHAEL MUNDY


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MEET YOUR MAKER

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ulti-instrumentalist and famed indie-songwriter Eleanor Friedberger is the most organized and self-aware hoarder I’ve ever met. “I’m a collector,” she remarks, as we walk the four-acre plot of land she refers to as her “work-in-progress commune.” Located in a defunct knitting factory in Ulster County, NY, the place actually seems more like a contemporary museum dedicated to all things Eleanor. When Eleanor and her former boyfriend (now platonic friend), Milton, decided to buy a place in the country three years ago, finding a home with out buildings was a top priority. A quick glance through the New York Times classifieds led her to a charming, historic compound replete with a three-bedroom home; factory-turned-rehearsal space and storage unit; tumbledown tiki bar; and potential Airbnb cottage. As a sentimentalist with retro sensibilities, Eleanor was most drawn to a massive factory on the property covered with peeling paint. Romantic and a little eerie, “It’s the perfect place to film a horror movie,” she muses. The factory is full of memorabilia from the Fiery Furnaces, the first band Eleanor started with her brother, in which she demonstrated an original talent for cramming poetic sentences into genre-bending melodies. The space, which reeks of antiquity, mildew and love, is furnished with vintage furniture and pop art. There are stacks of CDs and cassettes, guitars, drums, a sewing machine and two old Porsches. Seashells are scattered on a wooden worktable. The faint sound of wind chimes fills the air. Inside Eleanor’s cozy home with its mod decor, we sink into a midnightblue corduroy couch, a 1969 wedding present to her parents. The taupe drapes and quilted pillows come from her grandmother, who was a highly influential person in Eleanor’s life, introducing her to music and the value in objects that tell a story. Making the move upstate was a process for Eleanor, who refers to her life as a “series of happy accidents.” After attending the University of Texas in Austin, she meandered around London for a few years before settling down in Greenpoint, where she soon became a fixture in the Brooklyn music scene. “Since moving to Brooklyn, I haven’t made such a big change in so many years. As soon as I did, I was like, why haven’t I done this? I met Milton in 2001 and we would walk around Williamsburg fantasizing about having a big, industrial space and that wasn’t going to happen even then, so to find this place reminded me of how I felt when I was 23, wandering around a neighborhood that I felt cultivated me as an artist. To have that same feeling years later is really cool.” Getting used to the flora and fauna upstate was a process for the Chicago native. “As it turns out, I’m such a city slicker I didn’t know what I was going to have to deal with,” she laughs. “Last year was a bad year for me with poison ivy. There’s tons of it around this property and now I know what it looks like.” Eleanor also found out that she’s allergic to bees. After getting stung for the second time, she went into anaphylactic shock. “Luckily, my mother was visiting and took me to the nearest hospital.” Eleanor recently returned from Australia, where she was on tour for her third solo record, New View, which was recorded upstate, just a few miles from her home. It’s a bold yet mellow album, the kind you want to take on a long drive to really absorb—not so much listen to on a crowded subway. I studied the lyrics, hoping to demystify Eleanor’s experience writing and recording in the Catskills. I’m opening a tree museum, that’s my new hobby, goes a line on “Open Season.” I figured it had to do with Eleanor’s lush backyard, but she was really just poking fun at someone else. “It’s about a person who moved up here and spoke obnoxiously about all the trees he was planting,” she explains. “It was a dig at that sort of thing, which then, of course, I did, too.”

doing this for exercise,’” she says. “I have my walking friends that remind me of my mother and her friends who meet for power walks—I guess people call it hiking.” Eleanor likes Minnewaska State Park and the Mohonk Preserve, and is still bewildered that these natural wonders are practically in her backyard.

“I NOTICE I TALK TO MYSELF A LOT MORE. I'M REALLY GOOD AT BEING ALONE. I COULD HAPPILY SIT HERE FOR A WEEK AND NOT SEE OR TALK TO ANYBODY...”

Surprisingly, creating New View in the solitude of the Catskills had very little effect on Eleanor’s writing process. “I’ve always written about my own personal experiences or those of people I know, so I don’t feel like moving here has changed that,” she muses. “But I think the next album will be a better test for that.” From a technical point of view, recording in Germantown over the course of a few days and without an isolation booth, definitely affected how the album sounds. According to Eleanor, “That’s a direct result of no longer living in New York City.” The outcome is an album of live, freewheeling rock. What Eleanor misses most about the city is riding her bike. “Riding my bike in Brooklyn was practical—it was a way to get places. Here’s its like, ‘Okay, I guess I’m

“I also have a ton more time to think,” she continues. “I notice I talk to myself a lot more. I’m really good at being alone. I could so happily sit here for a week and not see or talk to anybody, so I have to push myself to be social. And, as you can tell, there’s so much puttering to do here, it’s never-ending chores.”

For a touring musician who has only lived upstate for three years, Eleanor already has a surprisingly local perspective on the area. Her possessiveness is a testament to the unspoiled nature of the landscape. “Down the street there’s this organic farm, Westwind Orchard. They’ve hosted the Phoenicia Flea a few times and make pizzas every weekend, and it’s really nice. But I have these mixed feelings about it. I ask myself, ‘Do I need that? Do I want that?’ There’s also this hops farm where you can go and drink craft beer. It’s good to have the option, but do I want more and more people to come here or do I want it to stay like it is now?” She ponders the answer. “It’s just one of those things. How much do you want the place to change and how many more amenities do you need? It’s hard to find the balance or know what that balance would even look like.” As for her summer agenda, Eleanor is slowly beginning work on a new, yet-to-benamed album. She’s tinkering with sound and lyrics and working hard on those endless home repairs. “We just got a canoe recently, so my next move is figuring out a place to use it.”

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A CONVERSATION WITH

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MAKING

AMERICA GREAT AGAIN

Actor and comedian Davis Cross is best known for his roles in Arrested Development and Todd Margaret and his searing stand up comedy routines. With his eye for detail and his unwavering insistence on truth, Cross is someone who doesn’t miss a thing. His latest stand up tour, “Making America Great Again,” is winding up after 89 cities across the globe. He took time out of his country respite to talk with us about film, writing, stand up and what he does upstate for fun. Interview MICHAEL MUNDY Photography JEFF RIEDEL

MICHAEL: David, you wear many hats—you write, you direct, you’ve also produced in some form or another. You do stand up and acting as well. Do you have a favorite? DAVID: No—I like all of them. I think the most fun is stand up. It’s the most immediately gratifying. The hardest thing and the most satisfying—when I’ve completed something—is writing. I think directing is fun too. You get to put your stamp on something. You’re definitely part of the process from beginning to end. The idea of creating something where there was nothing is the most difficult and one of the most unrewarded—in the sense of what people get accolades for. It’s certainly harder than acting. Acting is probably the easiest part of what I do. That’s not to say that I’m a great actor. It’s just that, for what I’m doing, it’s the easiest. I’ve only seen acting as sort of a paid vacation.

that would be the cheapest to do. So, I knew I could shoot it here and call in a lot of favors. We shot at Baker’s Tap—I know those folks. I had a lot of locals in the film playing small parts. I stayed here, and some of the production stayed here during pre-production. I wrote that specific idea up knowing I could make it for under a million. So,

DAVID: It was very much fun. It took me about two years to warm up to everybody here and for them to warm up to me. I’ve been here for over eight years now and I know people here. I helped Shane and Curtis open up The Lake House down on Mohican Lake—financially I mean. I love it here. I certainly didn’t mean any disrespect to anybody here. I’m also from rural suburban Georgia. I grew up in Roswell and didn’t move into the city until I was fifteen or sixteen—and even then I was still on the perimeter. MICHAEL: City being? DAVID: Atlanta. So I know that small town life. MICHAEL: You did a lot of that in your stand up comedy tour a while ago, Shut the Fuck Up You Baby. You talk a lot about rural towns. I was sensing that you have an eye for the dichotomy of people existing in the same area.

MICHAEL: You can just kind of walk in. DAVID: It’s by far the easiest thing. Stand up is hard. It’s fun and it’s rewarding but it’s really hard. Writing an entire idea and making sure it works. It’s way harder than acting or directing.

DAVID: The general unease and suspicion that everybody has…

MICHAEL: Your movie Hits (2014) was an idea you had. You seem to nail so many aspects of life upstate in that film in such a small space of time. Why did you choose to film it here?

that’s why I chose that idea, but again, it was really fun to write. Those Brooklyn hipster characters are really fun to write and work with and I had specific people in mind.

DAVID: I had several ideas for a movie but I chose one

MICHAEL: Sounds like a lot of fun.

MICHAEL: Totally. Like in Hits, there is a scene where a guy walks in and there are people talking about shotguns. And then there were all these really great pauses. You seem to get how to pace things and pull things out of silences. DAVID: Some of that comes from the frustration of working in TV comedy. I don’t think there has ever been

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anything edited as quickly as Arrested Development. Certainly working in sketch, you don’t get that kind of moment to breathe. It’s one of the things that I love about certain British comedies. The Office was so great because they have those moments and you just don’t have that in American television. Fifteen seconds of silence equals half a car ad. So that’s always something that I’ve always appreciated. MICHAEL: You allow your actors do their thing. DAVID: I come from a very improv appreciative background. Often, I think that’s why I’m hired. I kind of bring that skill to a role. And I understand from being on the other side of it—doing Todd Margaret—that you can only have so much room for improv. It’s gotta be whatever it is—26 minutes and 30 seconds—because you have a story that you have to get to. But with Hits, I just let the camera run. I hired people specifically knowing their skills in improv and their desire to do that. There’s a whole other movie that was on the cutting room floor, that we had to lose because they were too funny. It changed the story. But there was some amazing stuff that those guys did. All of them were really, really good and I just hope the camera got it. MICHAEL: You pulled a lot of talent in for Hits. Were they all friends? DAVID: Yeah, they’re all friends. There were a handful of people I didn’t know. The two guys that played the cops, the state troopers, I didn’t know the two kids. Jake Cherry and Meredith Hagner I auditioned. But pretty much everybody else I knew. All the Brooklyn hipster people, all of them were friends that came up for a few days. Matt Walsh, Carlson, Michael Cera—these are all friends, who had four, five, six days to work on it. MICHAEL: What was it like working on it? DAVID: It was so much fun. Every bit of the process. I think, pre-production wasn’t as much fun because our budget was so low. I wasn’t quite used to it. We were limited just being up in Sullivan County with places that could work. So those two things were a little frustrating. But actually shooting it was so much fun. Not having to get up at 6 a.m. and go to hair and make up, and sit in a trailer, and do rehearsals, and then sit around for an hour before the camera was ready—I mean that was actually a treat. If the first shot was for 7 or 7:30 a.m., I could roll in at 7:15 and be fine. I could show up on set in a T-shirt and shorts. I loved that. I didn’t have to shave. I didn’t have to worry about any of that shit. I didn’t have to memorize lines. That was awesome. MICHAEL: One of the things that stood out the most when watching your stand up was the courage you expressed —like calling out George W. Bush as the worst president in history after 9-11 when no one else did. DAVID: It’s very strange. I hear that occasionally about certain things and it’s certainly not a place from courage. I don’t feel courageous doing it. MICHAEL: You’re very honest, which I think takes courage. DAVID: Sure, I’ll say that. That’s an important part of my life—not just my stand up. And it’s reflected in that. To an annoying degree, my wife will tell you, I won’t even let people exaggerate around me. I think it’s less about me being courageous and more about other people being pussies. I would put it that way. I don’t think there’s anything courageous in a stand up comic. All you’re doing is making jokes and that’s not a difficult thing to do. I find people who come up with material or have an idea and then say, “Nah, I’m not going to do that right now,” to be just shockingly pussy. If those are the things that you believe in and you have that joke but are going to wait a year­—that to me is an odd way to live your life. MICHAEL: So honesty is obviously very important to you. DAVID: Yes, very.

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MICHAEL: That’s the beautiful thing about an artist because that’s what makes artists interesting. For me, the most interesting artists are the most honest ones. I think people can assume that one who is involved with acting and Hollywood doesn’t necessarily have to deal with that kind of honesty because they kind of go to the masses and get away with their own personas. How do you navigate that world and yet still remain true to yourself? DAVID: Well, I don’t really navigate that world. That’s really less of what I do. It’s something that I do occasionally, if I’m lucky enough to get an offer for something. But those things don’t come very often. I’m not doing anything that requires that kind of level of honesty and bearing your soul that you’re suggesting. And I don’t live in L.A. I haven’t lived there since 2001. I only lived there for 9 ½ years. It’s just not a world that I’m in too much. I mean look, half the shit I do is in London now. Three seasons of Todd Margaret and now I’ve got this new project pending for Sky, and hopefully I’ll be doing that. I’m in L.A. way less. Bob and David and Arrested Development, that’s it. MICHAEL: What do you enjoy most about working on projects like Todd Margaret? DAVID: Occasionally, it would be the acting because you’ve got such great people to work with. I kind of wrote it, so I do what I want in a sense. Not being a dictator or anything like that, but if I wanted to mix it up and switch it up, I can do that. I don’t have to be the one that I’d have to consult with. I think there are moments where you find it in the writing and the editing that can be really fun and satisfying. 80 percent of the writing is difficult. There’s a whole—like—logic shit we had to deal with, because everything took place the next day. Literally, there’d be a scene we write and we’re like, “Oh wait, it’s Sunday and that means that this thing wouldn’t be open and he wouldn’t have access to that.” Or, “Wait she’s cross-town and there’s no way she can get there in time. We’re going to have to rewrite this idea.” Shit that nobody gives a fuck about, except for the writers, you know? But we did care so we had to work on it—those things are not fun. But coming up with a riff, and riffing on those moments, with the writers—two great writers— you just make yourself laugh like for an hour. That’s fun. And editing, always love editing. MICHAEL: What’s in editing? DAVID: Well you create. You find stuff you didn’t. You’re at the very end of the creative process. Literally. Often, you’ll have a scene that isn’t working, or more often, this is the case, “Shit, we didn’t get the shot.” Whatever the thing is and you don’t have it, and you’re in editing and you’re realizing there’s a big problem and you’re trying to figure out, “How do we get from this point to this point?” We don’t have the shots and there’s only so much you can do with ADR (automated dialogue replacement), which Arrested Development did all the time. You don’t want to do that, when you can avoid it. In editing you can sit there and have those moments where you discover a way to make something work. It’s almost like detective work. If you’ve ever played those Room Escape games—to escape the room, you’ve got to figure it out. You’re like, “I can put this here and do this here.” You’re solving a big problem in a creative way and adding to the story where this thing didn’t exist. You can actually make this whole other scene that you had no intention and that never occurred to you. And that’s a really fun process. MICHAEL: What are you looking at or thinking about these days? What’s pissing you off? What’s making you laugh? DAVID: Well, we’re in an election year, for most people, that is preeminent in our consciousness. It’s all over the TV. All over the Internet. And unfortunately in America, the election cycles start two years before the actual election. That’s really what it has been about. Not to say it hasn’t been a fascinating year worthy of our attention. It’s pretty crazy and unprecedented. Like every election, people have very serious opinions about things. That’s not unique to this election. People on one side hate the people on the other side. But outside of that, it’s the usual

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suspects—just hypocrisy, authority figures and people who are voting against their own self-interests and things that are kind of obvious and frustrating. People that believe they’re helping when they’re actually hurting. That’s my take on a lot of progressives and liberals on the left—and social justice warriors are meanwhile, making things infinitely worst. MICHAEL: You can be perceived as being really critical of people, but it seems like you also have a great sympathy for people. DAVID: Some people. (laughs) MICHAEL: You seem to pay such close attention to the people you make fun of—that warrants some sympathy. DAVID: Those are feelings that are shared by people. The things that I’m describing are traits that people I love and respect have. I’m talking about family and friends, and if I do any bit of in-depth soul searching, probably myself as well. You know, I don’t hate my friends and family, and I have respect for them. I’m not contemptuous of them. But, those are things that I see. I guess it comes down to willful ignorance, in so many ways. MICHAEL: On whose part? DAVID: Everybody’s. The people I’m criticizing, myself. There’s that thing that so many people have, where they just don’t want to know the ugly truth and are ready to dismiss things away. They dismiss the intellectual side of it and embrace the emotional side of it. Often, much to their detriment. Sometimes that’s what I speak about. MICHAEL: And you’re not going to let them get away with it. DAVID: Well I’ll certainly address it. And that’s really where a lot of the religious stuff comes from too. There’s a nice little chunk in this current set [Making America Great Again.] It’s something that fascinates me and I can’t ever imagine a set where I don’t at least talk about it in some way. It’s fun. MICHAEL: How far along does a set evolve for you? DAVID: Well this tour, Making America Great Again— I’ve never done a tour this extensive in my life. This tour was 86 shows, all across the United States. I’m not even including Europe and Canada. I mean, 86 in the US. I think the most that I’ve done were 29 cities and probably like 32 shows in that time. So this is almost triple the kind of tour I’ve done. It’s very extensive and it’s evolved quite a bit. The set that I recorded in Austin in late April is vastly different than the set that I started with on January 26th in San Diego. And the set that I’m about to do is already different from the set that I did in Austin. Because stuff has expanded and you don’t want to be up there for an hour and a half or two hours— that’s self-indulgent. I try to keep it to an hour fifteen and then there’s an encore. So I’ve dropped tons of stuff on the way, tons. And as other bits have expanded, I’ve riffed on an idea and that becomes part of the set. That’s probably the coolest feature about stand up. It’s organic. MICHAEL: I have to ask you a few softball questions. What do you do for fun up here? DAVID: I’m really not as active as I thought I would be. I’m not kayaking every other week. My wife and I go on hikes. We have a number of friends here now. There are a handful of regular bars we go to and we’ll meet up with people. It’s corny as shit, but I like getting in the car and driving to the farmer’s market in Callicoon. I smoked a pork butt yesterday—that was the better part of my morning, afternoon and early evening. You know, we got this swimming hole down here and we’ll go. MICHAEL: It’s more about relaxing. DAVID: It really is. And just kind of getting into this headspace of how life moves up here and enjoying that. I mean fuck it. For fun, I’ll walk down to Peck’s and go get a River Reporter and a lemonade and walk back. That’s my fun.


THE GARDNER WEARS

PRADA Words DORIS CHEVRON Photography MICHAEL MUNDY


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GIMME SHELTER

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imberly von Koontz sits on the porch, bathed in the gentle, vanishing sunlight and enjoying a plate of prosciutto, olives and Parmigiano with a glass of Prosecco. She cherishes moments like this, a special ritual usually shared with friends. Von Koontz calls this idyllic location her “Halfway House,” though it bears no resemblance to the place of rehabilitation that would normally evoke. Instead, she’s referring to the old stone house’s location, halfway between Manhattan and the Greek-Revival home in Cooperstown that belongs to her friend, renowned New York interior designer Christina van Deusen. The designers exchange ideas and collaborate on the greenery there. Von Koontz’s picturesque old structure proves to be a good starting point for “weekend release prisoners” who are fleeing the tight spaces and overbearing noise of New York City for the freedom and endless vistas upstate. It’s a trip the two women—and a host of international friends en route to the Catskills, the Upper Delaware and the Hudson Valley—love to make. The building, whose oldest section is now the kitchen dominated by a walk-in fireplace, was established in 1713 as the homestead of a Dutch immigrant. “It’s a very small house with big flair,” says von Koontz, who had barely settled into Manhattan before seeking a quiet place to relax and read. Falling in love with a photograph on a realtor’s website, she impulsively fired

GIMME SHELTER

off a down payment to the broker, sight unseen. “The house seemed to talk to me,” she muses. “In an instant, I rediscovered the romance I indulged in while living in Europe and had been missing in America.” Von Koontz applied the same “gentle, exquisite attention” to the interior of the house that she normally focuses on her landscape projects. She preserved the character of the low-hanging oak beams and kept the dark red and mustard-colored lime-washed walls, transporting the colonial character into the present by splashing a fresh linden green onto the wood-paneled ones. The cosmopolitan mix of furniture and objects perfectly reflects the career trajectory of the 39-yearold designer. She was born in Sonoma Valley and studied architecture, first in Boulder, then in Florence. From there, she moved to Hong Kong—“a fascinating city in which I never felt grounded nor quite at home.” Guided by an immaculate sense of style, von Koontz initially entered the world of fashion. Her collection, applauded for originality and elegance, fell victim to the last financial crisis. She went on to design and create store concepts under the auspices of the iconic Roberto Baciocchi, architect for Prada’s global retail empire. Slowly, von Koontz began to notice that the color green played an increasingly important role in her life. “I come from a family of gardeners,” she says.

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“Landscapes were always second nature to me.” So she started to conceptualize and create private habitats. She still wears Prada as she dirties her fingernails working on luxury properties from the Hamptons to the Delaware Valley. As with her other endeavors, success came fast. Alongside Louis Benech, the legendary French landscape designer, she is working on roof installations for Sotheby’s. She is also collaborating on three projects with the architect Deborah Berke, Dean of the Yale School of Architecture. On Isola di Giglio, near Elba, von Koontz is developing a biotope for her friend Gherardo Follini, the Paris-based designer of Miu Miu. Because Benech, the first designer allowed to restore part of the Versailles gardens of Louis XIV, calls himself a “gardener” von Koontz takes no offense when the doormen of her privileged New York clients refer to her in the same way. Like Benech, she believes that the secret of a great garden lies in subtle intervention. She likes to spend three days on a new piece of land and always invites the owner to picnic with her on the grounds. “You have to direct your attention to the things that are already there.” There are no borders for the artistic scenes von Koontz creates, and there is no room for fatigue. “My biggest desire is to visit the world’s most interesting places,” she says resolutely. That seems to work even better if you have established strong roots, as von Koontz has done, both in Manhattan and in her enchanted garden upstate.

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A Southern Chef In Yankee Country

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Words EDDIE BRANNAN Photography MICHAEL MUNDY

teve Mutter is tall and lean with a surfer’s laid-back, loosey-goosey mien and a ready smile. He sports a dirty blond mustache with a long soul patch that extends down to his chin—a beach-bum version of the Anonymous mask—and he’s wearing a floppy but stylish sunhat, loose shorts and a baggy orange T-shirt that bears the logo of the 12 Bones Smokehouse barbecue restaurant in Asheville, North Carolina, where he learned the pit-master’s trade. When he changes into a chef’s jacket and checkered pants for a photo, he remains barefooted. He has a roguish, boyish charm and, even with a couple of missing upper front teeth, he’s undeniably a handsome guy. He looks 40 years old, though he’s probably closer to 60. We meet where he’s currently living, a neat grey-painted timber frame house that overlooks Callicoon Creek, near the town of North Branch, New York. Present is his daughter Caitlin, who exudes the kind of striking capability acquired by one who has had to be a rock in turbulent waters. She’s with her husband, an affable, bearded young man also called Steve who works in the excavation business, and their two children, a sweet and gregarious four-year-old tyke named Jace and his younger sister Lydia, a charmingly serious toddler. Since the plan is for Steve Sr. to barbecue for this magazine’s photo shoot, he has determined to make a day of it and have family over. It’s an idyllic, storybook setting—three generations seated around sturdy yard tables under a shade tree, while a squat rectangular smoker sits front and center, emitting white wafts of smoke and appetizing aromas. A folding table to one side bears an array of dishes containing all the requisite fixin’s for a North Carolina barbecue: collard greens, baked beans, corn pudding and a jug of iced sweet tea. All this in a trim and tidy roadside yard in Yankee Delaware County, while eagles and blue herons glide between the trees along the creek in back and a raucous crow sees off the buzzards making periodic incursions into its territory. Barbecue is, of course, a slow process. If you aim to eat at the laid-back hour of four pm then your meat needed to be in the smoker somewhere around two in the morning. While there isn’t a huge amount to do over the ensuing 14 hours, it’s by no means a set-it-and-forget-it operation. The temperature and the moisture within the smoker both need to be carefully maintained, and there’s no rushing the meat. If your butt or shoulder or picnic or brisket chooses to take its own sweet time to come up the final five degrees to temperature, there’s nothing to do about it but sit back on a lawn chair, open another beer, and chew the fat with whomever has dropped by while you wait. This we did, and so I came to hear Steve’s story. Like many, it began with a spell in the armed forces. “I did five years in the Navy,” he says. “I was 19 when I went in, saw 22 different countries. I wasn’t cooking—I was a machinist’s mate—and when I got out, I stuck in that line of work, worked in shipyards for a while.” But then he started traveling and came up north, to New York State. Mutter had a brief spell in the Delaware Valley almost three decades ago, working in a kitchen, but he wasn’t yet cooking. “I was at the Villa Roma in the late ’80s,” he says, referring to a well-known resort just outside of Callicoon, NY, where he held a variety of kitchen maintenance positions. He got married; he had a daughter. A divorce followed and he left town with a girlfriend to live in a Volkswagen bus. “We spent six months on South Padre Island, Texas, helping a guy build beach buggies and then we rented ’em

out. We made decent money, we lived on the beach in our bus.” The relationship with the girl did not last, but the one with South Padre Island did. “I went to Colorado on a road trip and that’s where it ended,” he explains. “She shit-canned me, so I went back to South Padre and stayed there for 14 years total. I waited tables at a restaurant that was voted one of the top 500 in the country.” Eventually Mutter moved back to North Carolina and, needing work, applied for a vacant position at the Asheville Barbecue Company. “Their pit master had just walked out one day, and didn’t leave any recipes written down,” he explains, so with supreme confidence he applied for the job, despite knowing very little about the art of barbecue. Improvisation was the order of the day, according to Mutter. “I took my ideas from what they had before and added my own twist to it, and just went from there.” Mutter’s relationship with barbecue took a significant turn when he joined the staff of the new 12 Bones Smokehouse in Asheville, NC. Neither of 12 Bones’ owners, Thomas Montgomery and Sabra Kelley, come from a barbecue tradition, nor were they originally from North Carolina. They were both graduates of New England Culinary Institute (NECI), and came to Asheville after pursuing careers as chefs around the country. “We got tired of driving to Memphis for ribs,” Thomas has said of their initial motivation. Despite their lack of history, or perhaps because of their willingness to explore non-traditional ingredients and techniques—so-called “progressive ’cue”—12 Bones became enormously successful, opening several locations and publishing the very popular 12 Bones Smokehouse, A Mountain BBQ Cookbook. “They just liked eating good southern food,” says Mutter of the owners’ motivation. “When we started we had no idea it would blow up the way it did.”

STEVE'S FAMOUS CORN PUDDING SERVINGS 12

5 free range eggs 1 1/2 cup heavy cream 1/4 lb. unsalted butter, melted 1 teaspoon baking powder 3/4 cup flour 3/4 cup sugar 1 tablespoon coriander 2 teaspoons salt 1 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 3 (14 oz.) cans of cream corn 3 cups frozen corn

Whisk eggs and cream together then tempure mix melted butter. Add dry ingredients and whisk until lumps are gone in batter. Add cream corn and frozen corn and mix. Spray 3-quart baking ban with vegetable oil spray and add batter. Bake at 375˚ for one hour and rotate 180˚ and bake until the center is set. Let cool and serve.

12 Bones’ original location, where Mutter manned the pit, became a favorite of President Obama, who visited every time the business of running the country took him to Asheville. I mention that he’s like Freddy, the pit master of the eponymous restaurant/confessional favored by Frank Underwood in House Of Cards, and Mutter is tickled pink, although he makes it clear that the POTUS simply came to eat his food, not to seek his counsel. In time, the pressures of running a thriving restaurant business became too much for Montgomery and Kelley, and in 2012 they sold out. Mutter, itinerant by nature, came north, and rebuilt the relationship with his daughter that had foundered during his journeyman years. He is currently serving up his eye-openingly good ribs and smoked wings at Bubba’s in White Lake, NY. Life hasn’t always been easy for Steve Mutter. He is candid about a prison sentence he served for failing to pay child support, and makes the old joke that goes “I did cocaine once…for two years” and isn’t joking, but that’s just how things are with Steve Mutter. That’s what brings him to a sunny yard with his daughter, a brook burbling in back and two delightful grandkids burbling in front. It’s ups and downs; things getting wrong before they get right. We talk long and slow beforehand, as the nature of barbecue demands, then we eat and talk again, to digest and to contemplate. Steve Mutter drinks a beer and smokes a cigarette and takes in his surroundings. “Just because the recipe says it’s so many hours, it doesn’t matter,” he muses quietly, perhaps talking about barbecue, perhaps not. “It’s ready when it’s ready, no matter how long that takes.”

SPICY JALAPENO SAUCE MAKES ABOUT 5 QUARTS

2 jalapenos 2 green bell peppers 9 garlic cloves 1 large yellow onion 6 cups white vinegar 6 cups apple cider vinegar 3 tablespoon table salt 2 tablespoons coriander 1/4 cup sugar

Put all ingredients except for sugar in a pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer. Cover and cook for an hour and a half. Remove from heat and add sugar. Process with an emersion blender or food processor. Add more sugar to taste.

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WITCHEY WOMAN Words MIMI VU Creative Direction JOHN PAUL TRAN Photography MATTHEW SCRIVVENS Styling RISA KNIGHT Makeup MOANIE LEE Hair JASMINE GIBBS


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This page: White bandeau bikini by Lan Gili Opposite: White tank and bikini by Onia


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IN PERSON

D E L AWA R E VA L L E Y E I G H T


D E L AWA R E VA L L E Y E I G H T

IN PERSON

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t’s all too easy to look at pictures of Hollie Witchey—with her wheat-blonde locks and Atlantic-blue eyes and willowy frame—and pin her down as your classic all-American beauty. Perhaps you’ve seen her on the covers of magazines such as Fitness, toned and tanned, sporting a teeny-weeny polka dot bikini. Or maybe you’ve spotted her in a beachy fashion portfolio— strutting on the sand, lounging on a sailboat—or in her advertising work for beauty brands such as Garnier and L’Oréal. In each image, there is a cocked head and a sunbeam smile, and you’d be forgiven for assuming she’s every upbeat American archetype, from the girl-next-door to the cheerleader, rolled in one. Visit her tucked-away home in the woods of Jeffersonville, New York, however, and you’ll find yourself thoroughly surprised at the scene that unfolds before you: Up a winding dirt road sits a 1790s old stagecoach house, clad in rustic live-edge siding and ringed by ferns and a mossy stone wall, that couldn’t be further from the ingénue image projected in all those editorials. What you discover instead is a magical, slightly dark folkloric world of secret nooks, arched windows and hammered iron that conjures up any number of fairy tales and fables, from the Brothers Grimm to Tolkien. Next to the main house, a small storybook cottage with diamond-paned windows serves as a garage. An 1840s barn is crammed with antique yokes and harnesses, relics of a bygone farming life. And wandering about it all is Witchey herself, a beautiful and elegant presence, but one rendered in a more somber minor key than her wholesome public persona. Hollie Witchey, it turns out, is an unlikely combination of different shades and tones. She has a bit of the fresh-faced farm girl in her, but she’s also a fearless world traveler and spiritual old soul. Perhaps it’s not so surprising for the aptly named Witchey (which happens to be her real name), who grew up feeling like an outcast in her football-loving small Ohio town. “I was actually not good at sports,” she explains. “I was painting in my bedroom, listening to Radiohead, Nick Drake, the saddest music I could find.” When she got the chance to model, fresh out of high school, she saw her ticket out of town and promptly fled to New York. The following years saw her crisscrossing the globe—driving across the Australian Outback in a 1969 Ford Falcon Ute, hiking up the Andes in Bolivia, scuba-diving off the Gili Islands of Indonesia—all the while building an impressive modeling portfolio (not to mention a collection of folk art and objets, from Javanese puppets to Native American portraits). Scattered amongst these sojourns were frequent upstate visits with her best friend, the artist Marianna Rothen, whose darkly atmospheric photographs often feature Witchey as a muse (while tapping into a moody spirit that is not always obvious in her commercial work). It was on one such jaunt that Witchey discovered this Hansel and Gretel house. The moment of introduction, as she describes it, was nothing less than an epiphany. “When I saw this place, it was more me than I ever could’ve imagined,” she says. “I was still in my 20s, and you know, at that age you’re still figuring yourself out. I didn’t even know a house like this existed up here, but I was like, Oh my god, this is it, this is who I am.” Here, the past is allowed to live, and it blends seamlessly with Witchey’s present. For years, she resisted tossing out anything belonging to the home’s previous inhabitants, a German-Jewish refugee and old-school survivalist named Wilbur Riff and his wife, Gladace. Riff’s old hunting and marksmanship books still line the shelves (“he was understandably paranoid,” she notes), and his tokens of love to Gladace (including license plates with her initials) are on display. Witchey treasures them almost as talismans. Wilbur’s many gun cupboards now hold her own baby clothes, and his closets overflow with her collections of vintage frocks. “It’s so important to me to honor everything that came before,” she says. “My style and the house’s style are so inseparable, you might have a hard time guessing what was here and what I brought in.” Likewise, when she’s upstate, the seemingly contrary sides of Witchey—the soulsearcher and the thrill-seeker—come together in a way that makes perfect sense. She meditates, spends time with her boyfriend, Todd Bogin, and in the summer, swims daily in her pond with her pit bull, Rocco. She tends her garden, gathering medicinal plants such as bergamot, horehound and motherwort and distilling them in a copper alembic still to make floral waters and essential oils for her holistic skincare line, Witchey Handmade (she is certified in nutrition, green medicine and homeopathy). But it’s in the woods that she also indulges a need for speed, through Western pleasure riding—guiding horses on trails, jumping creeks and riding up mountainsides. Until last year, she was a devoted student of Stuart Rybak, who ran the Rybak Horsemanship ranch in nearby Damascus, Pennsylvania. “There was all this crazy stuff going on there, like mustang challenges,” she says. “We would play soccer with the horses; we would do these jumps. There was a teeter-totter that you ride over—when the horse steps on it, it flips up, and you have to keep your horse on it. It’s all about building trust between the horse and the rider for the trail.” Rybak has since decamped to New Mexico, and while Witchey has ridden at other ranches, including Bridle Hill Farm in Jeffersonville, she now has her sights set on buying and keeping her own horses on her land (“Either that, or I’m going to get dirt bikes, because I like going fast”). It is when she’s at her wooded retreat that she feels a true clarity of self, Witchey says, because she’s found a home for all the different facets of her personality. “In the city, it’s all about career, it’s all about being successful, making money. And when you come up here, it’s like, you’re an ant. You’re a part of everything around you.”

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1. A favorite part of summer is the bounty available at all the farm stands. We snagged this giant, beautifully imperfect heirloom tomato last summer at Burnett Farms’ farm stand in Bovina, NY. 2. When we started Escape Brooklyn, we didn't have a car. Instead, we used Metro North whenever possible and also rented cars. When we realized how much we were spending on rental cars, we decided to splurge for a car of our own. We bought a 2000 Jeep Cherokee on eBay and, since then, have taken 1,0000 selfies just like this one. 3. Ever since I can remember, I've been drawn to chickens. Something about them is just so goofy. When we move to the Catskills permanently, we'll figure out a way to keep our own. This one is from Burnett Farms. Owner Steve Burnett gave us a tour there last summer and we shot the whole experience. 4. It's no secret that we love old stuff. Aside from

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our travel website, Denny and I sell vintage and antiques. This gorgeous specimen was parked outside of the Heron in Narrowsburg, one of Sullivan County's best restaurants.

window. The highlight on a summer day is the vegan bowl washed down with an icy and sweet Vietnamese coffee. Diners can eat in front of an antique shop that they shouldn't pass up afterward.

5. There’s no doubt that a big part of the charm of shopping at Maison Bergogne in Narrowsburg is Juliette, the owner. As a fellow collector and seller of vintage, I admire both her collection of treasures and how it's all put together. Next year, the shop will be replaced by Fish & Bicycle, a bar, café and small grocery. We can't wait to see how it unfolds!

8. We were so excited when our friends Sims and Kristin Foster opened the North Branch Inn earlier this year. They brought their best chef, Erik Hill, from their sister hotel/restaurant, The Arnold House, in Livingston Manor. Hand-set bowling, incredible dining and the best staff ever make this tiny town a gem in the rough.

6. No arguing here: The best restaurant (and only restaurant) in Bovina is Brushland Eating House. Fresh ingredients from local farmers combined with chef Sohail Zandi's wild culinary imagination makes this little hamlet one of the hippest destinations in the Catskills.

9. The best part of what we do is always exploring new towns and cities. I can't believe it took us so long to discover Callicoon—and now that we have, we're hooked! The shopping on Main Street trumps all the other Catskill towns, with tons of vintage and antique stores that are reasonably priced. It's not completely overrun with tourists and I hope it stays that way.

7. We finally made it to Bà & Me in Callicoon! Fresh Vietnamese fare is served from a takeout

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D E L AWA R E VA L L E Y E I G H T

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ESCAPE BROOKLYN/

DELAWARE VALLEY Words ERIN LINDSEY Photography ESCAPE BROOKLYN

Erin and Denny began pioneering through the region back in 2012. After just a few road trips they bought an old Jeep Cherokee and launched the blog Escape Brooklyn to inspire fellow urban dwellers to head north. Who better than Erin to guide you on a road trip through her favorite local spots. From accommodations in a renovated barn to a jaunt through the fly-fishing capital of America, get ready to fall in love with upstate. Every Friday morning, my husband and I pack up our car and leave the city until Monday night. The destination is always different. Our travel blog, Escape Brooklyn, documents these weekly journeys, highlighting all the wonderful places and people we find along the way. Recently, our weekends have been taking us to the western Catskills, where we've just bought an old motel that we'll be renovating for the rest of the year. But that's another story… Denny and I made our first trip upstate in September of 2012. We spent two days in Hudson, then rented a vintage trailer in Narrowsburg through "vacation rentals" on Craigslist (remember that?). We returned to the Catskills in July 2013 to check out the newly opened Graham & Co., hiked our butts off and reveled in the "hickster" vibe of the Phoenicia Diner. Two months later, another couple of road trips took us to Hudson and Ithaca. Seeing a photo of Taughannock Falls in Ithaca spurred a friend to comment that we should start a travel website. So the very next week, we did. What follows isn't a photo journey of one road trip, but of many. We began our 2016 summer travel season at MILK BARN in Hankins, a 3-bedroom converted barn with two tiny guesthouses. Since then, a series of road trips to Callicoon, Bovina, Roxbury and North Branch have followed, each one as memorable as the last. That's not to say that a single road trip doesn’t deliver. For this Escape Brooklyn road trip, begin by leaving the city on the Palisades Parkway to Route 17, through Harriman State Park, and over to the western end of the Catskill Mountains—our favorite part of the region. If you're traveling with friends, you'll definitely want to book MILK BARN. The beautifully renovated barn sleeps up to 10; it has a sauna, swimming pond, lovely grounds and charming design details from its last renovation in the 1970s. Solo travelers and couples should stay at the North Branch Inn, which features hand-set bowling and

Teepee AirBNB, Roxybury, NY

houses our favorite restaurant in the region, the Bar Room. From North Branch or Hankins, make a jaunt over to Callicoon for a day of antiquing, rounded out with lunch at Bà & Me, a Vietnamese take-out spot. Spend the rest of the afternoon at Skinner's Falls, a series of tiny waterfalls and rapids on the Delaware River ideal for a refreshing dip. Your next stop will be the bucolic hamlet of Bovina. On your way, you’ll pass through Roscoe, the birthplace of American fly-fishing. From Roscoe, take Route 206 along the Peptacon Reservoir, taking time to get that perfect Instagram shot at one of the several overlooks on this twisting country road. Consider a stop in Andes for antiquing at Kabinett + Kammer, adding to your wardrobe at Clementine Vintage Clothing and picking up a snack at the Andes General Store. For something more substantial, the Andes Hotel has delicious food and a nice patio for people watching. Once you reach Bovina, settle into your Airbnb of choice. Our three favorites include the FosterBuilt Inn, four unique country-style rooms in an 1850s house right on Main Street; Above Brushland, spacious suites directly above the town’s "it" restaurant (which also happens to be the only restaurant in town); and camping on the beautiful property at Green Shepherd Farm. Breakfast at Russel's General Store is a must, as is a stop at Burnett Farms’ farm stand.

Milk Barn, Hankins, NY

A half-hour away is Bellfire Farm, where you can round out your road trip with a stay in the teepee or one of the rooms in their farmhouse. A short jaunt into town and you can pop into Roxbury General to pick up Catskills-made art, chocolate or a piece of jewelry as a souvenir. And, if you're traveling on the weekend, don't miss Table on Ten’s wood-fired pizza night. Their tranquil backyard is the perfect spot to unwind after a day spent exploring. Founded by creative couple Erin Lindsey and Denny Brownell, Escape Brooklyn is a curated travel guide offering daytrips, weekends and worthy destinations from beyond New York City. www.escapebrooklyn.com | instagram: @escapebrooklyn

Trail, Skinner's Falls, NY

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Hudson River, Saugerties, NY

AND NORTH/

HUDSON VALLEY Words EMMA TUCCILLO Photography AND NORTH

W

hen I first fell in love with Upstate New York, it was by way of the roads I would aimlessly drive while living in the small town of Rosendale. On any given day, these excursions would lead me to roadside oddities, wide open spaces and conversations with locals. It was through this exploration that I was able to discover how truly special the area is and how much it has to offer the common passerby. After working on And North for over two years now, my visits now are as much a collection of pit stops to see old friends as they are an excuse to discover and overturn a new gem. With its close proximity to the city, vibrant culture and diverse landscape, the Hudson Valley is the perfect region to explore by car, with a network of towns and cities connected by scenic roads that cascade up and down mountain ridges. Our team set out one bright Saturday morning for the

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Hudson Valley with an extensive list of places to visit. These long summer days make us feel like anything is possible and we often pack a weekend’s worth of excursions into a single day trip. After filling the car with summer essentials−bathing suits, camera gear and iced coffee−Design Director Tim LaSalle, Editorial Director Sylvie Morgan Brown and I felt ready to begin our adventure. Ninety minutes on I-87 flew by as we listened to our favorite songs and planned the rest of our busy summer. Before we knew it, we were taking exit 19 for the city of Kingston. Originally the capital of New York State, Kingston has a rich history as well as a strong community of creatives and new businesses. We headed downtown to the the Rondout District to visit Broadway, a steep street leading towards the Hudson with some of our favorite shops and bars in all of upstate. Once an important port in the 1800s, this district has incredible 18th and 19th century architecture, and is one to keep an eye on as it expands and flourishes further.

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D E L AWA R E VA L L E Y E I G H T

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Starting at the top of the street and working our way down, we stopped into Hops Petunia, a floral design and gift shop specializing in wild arrangements and unique objects. Directly next door is the newly opened Clove and Creek, a locally focused mercantile with a curated collection of goods for the home, body and spirit. Together, they compliment each other perfectly and offer differing goods within a similar palette.

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Brunette Wine Bar, Kingston, NY

Whenever we travel to Kingston, we make sure to visit Brunette Wine Bar. This former barber shop turned wine bar is where you’ll find longtime upstate weekenders, Jamie and Tracy Kennard, pouring natural wine and unique bar snacks from behind their elegant marble bartop. If you find a bottle you love, make sure to visit Kingston Wine Co. up the street to grab a similar bottle or two for the weekend from the shop’s knowledgeable owners, Michael and Theresa Drapkin. After spending the morning in The Roundout, we packed into the car with picnic supplies in tow, and set off for the next location. After a 25-minute drive north, we arrived at the trailhead to the historic 1869 Saugerties lighthouse, a stunning stone structure that is now a bed and breakfast, preserved by the Saugerties Lighthouse Conservancy. We walked along the half mile trail surrounded by willow trees, tidal pools and patches of wildflowers until the path opened up to present the Hudson River in all its glory. After a picnic on the lighthouse’s deck, accessible to the public, we found ourselves eager to run into the blue river dotted with green lily pads. As soon as our feet touched the warm water it became clear that this was the moment we were waiting for all year. We stood there, water up to our thighs, looking out at The Hudson with kayakers floating by. It was one of those summer moments you live for. There is nothing like an afternoon in the bright sun to inspire an appetite. We crossed the river and drove to Gaskins, a new favorite gathering place for the local community and Hudson Valley visitors. Set in Germantown, just a 15-minute drive from Hudson, Gaskins features a seasonally-changing menu of classic American dishes where ingredients from nearby farms can shine. We sat on the porch overlooking Luddite, a beautiful new antique store, and dined on burrata with garlic scape pesto, house-made cavatelli and sugar snap peas. It was only 6 p.m. and we all smiled knowing that we still had three more hours of light ahead of us. The drive to Hudson took us down glowing country roads as the sun slowly descended. Hudson is one of those cities that is unlike any other with

Saugerties Lighthouse, Saugerties, NY

River Town Lodge, Hudson, NY

its exceptional architecture, fine antique stores and vibrant community. Whenever we visit, we make sure to visit 2 Note Botanical Perfumery, a small-batch perfumery that also sells an incredible assortment of bath and body products, Red Chair for their beautiful collection of french antiques and Hawkins, NY, for their modern tableware, furniture and accessories. Mostly, we like to wander the side streets and alleyways to peer at the homes, some restored, some covered in a stunning patina of time. When we finally lost the summer light, we checked into the Rivertown Lodge, a 27-room boutique hotel that is set in a 1920s movie house. Designed in partnership with Workstead, it is simple and modern with hints of a rustic early American decor. We laid our things down in our cozy room and walked downstairs to the handsome hotel bar for a whiskey. We recounted the day, a beautiful reprise from our usual busy weekends of photoshoots and events. It is still amazing to us after exploring the area for so many years, how much there is still to see, how many wonderful people we have yet to meet and how well time slows down when you are in a state of constant exploration.

Gaskins, Germantown, NY

And North is a curated guide to upstate, NY, featuring the best of travel and lifestyle north of NYC. And North was created to inspire creativity and collaboration among those interested in connecting the neighborhoods of NY with the vibrant regions that lie North. www.andnorth.com | instagram: @andnorth

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DINER HEAVEN Words CAITLIN GUNTHER Photography LAWRENCE BRAUN

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t’s a Sunday morning in June, so early that the sun and most upstaters are still rising. The parking lot at Tilly’s Diner, a stone’sthrow from the Monticello Raceway, is halfempty. Within the hour, a line of people will snake outside the door of the steel dining cart. Inside, in the calm before the storm, Chico Rodriguez stands before the countertop griddle, eyeing the handful of tickets that float before him. Chico has been working at Tilly’s for the past 23 years, first as a dishwasher before becoming the owner ten years ago. From his youthful face, you’d never guess he had that many years in the business. “Best breakfast chef I’ve seen,” says Barbara, waitress for the morning shift, as she glides two plates of pancakes with sides of sausage off the counter, “and I’ve been working in restaurants my whole life.”

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or night. My tour kicked off with Tilly’s, Sullivan County’s quintessential diner. A steel structure with a gleaming bar, swivel stools and portraits of Elvis-era starlets lining the walls, it’s a popular destination for travelers and locals alike. My breakfast order of a short stack and two eggs over easy arrives in under ten minutes. Except for a moment to turn around and smile for a photo, Chico never leaves the helm. His nephew, Joe, keeps the hot coffee coming.

I set out on a tour of some of the region’s favorite diners with a plan to sit a moment longer in the corner booth and take a closer look at these roadside eateries. From the iconic Edward Hopper painting to the ‘50s culture of shakes and fries epitomized by Grease, diners are pure Americana. Across the decades, they have offered refuge to all—from truck drivers fueling up to high-schoolers feeding the munchies to grizzled regulars looking for a spot to read the paper and shoot the breeze.

The Blue Horizon, my next stop, is located just a short ride from several of the once-popular resorts that put the Catskills on the map. From the Pacman arcade game at the entrance to the photos of Borscht Belt performers, it’s clearly been untouched by the passing years. The proprietor, an elderly man named Steve, sits at the edge of the dining room quietly observing the goings-on. He’s owned the place since the mid-80s. Nearby hangs a portrait of his late wife, who passed away just a few months ago. These days, their daughter runs the Blue Horizon and their son is in charge of the nearby Roscoe Diner, another destination for hungry travelers. Steve watches as plates are ferried to our table. The sandwiches come with dill pickle spears, fries and coleslaw. The only frills are the fancy toothpicks that hold them together.

Every diner has its unique story, its own special menu items, often reflecting the owner’s past. Yet the commonalities are what define them as diners and make them a unique presence in the culinary landscape. With the growth of chain restaurants and to the rise of farm-to-table dining, there is a comfort in the quiet resilience of the diner. The owner is usually there every day, either manning the griddle or leading the front of house, and customers can always find breakfast staples done well, any time of the day

My final stop, Janet Planet’s Kozmic Kitchen, came highly recommended by several local diner experts. Located on Route 17B, the historic route to the original Woodstock festival, Janet’s is more Jerry Garcia than Buddy Holly. The specialties are the allsirloin burger (unfortunately not served on Sundays, the day I visited) and the corned beef hash, a divine mix of crispy fried corned beef, onions and potatoes. Janet, who reigns over the grill, cooks 40 pounds of brisket for days to go into this dish. It makes for a

perfect lunch, washed down with a fizzy egg cream. Because of her downstate roots, Janet knows how to make an authentic one: Fox’s U-bet chocolate syrup, whole milk and seltzer. Thanks to her past occupation, the place is immaculate. “I was in the tattoo business for 27 years,” she says in a thick Long Island drawl, “so I know the value of cleanliness.” Her tattoos and punky hairstyle allude to her biker past. She’s also got less apparent but equally legit claims to fame—two appearances on the Geraldo show (a motorcycle episode and being on the receiving end of a tattoo gun in another) and one on Howard Stern when she tied for the win in a female burping contest. “I look like I’ve been diggin’ graves,” says Janet with a cackle, as she takes a moment to inspect her hands. “I’ve got blueberries under my fingernails.” With Janet, customers always know what they’re getting. Her food is fresh and made with care. But will she share the secret recipe to her famous hash? “She could tell you,” says regular counter patron Gene, “but then she’d have to kill you.” The comforting thing about the diners we grow up with is that they remain largely unchanged. If I go to Miss Monticello Diner today, I can still get the same cup of matzoh ball soup and grilled cheese with sliced tomato I ordered every Sunday back in high school. If I’m feeling decadent, I’ll order rice pudding— something I never order anywhere other than the diner. It always comes topped with that pristine mound of Reddi Whip. Occasionally, there’s a style outlier like Janet’s but even at the most basic diners, you can count on getting a fresh, hot meal without breaking the bank. No doubt that’s why, in the midst of a constantly shifting culinary landscape, the trusty diner never loses its appeal.


Blue Horizon Diner, Monticello, NY

Tilly's Diner, Monticello, NY

Steve, Blue Horizon Diner

Short stack, Tilly's Diner

Bacon and eggs, Tilly's Diner

Pac-Man, Blue Horizon Diner

Chico Rodriguez, Tilly's Diner, Monticello, NY

Corned beef hash, Kosmic Kitchen

French toast, Kosmic Kitchen

Cream pie, Kosmic Kitchen, Bethel, NY

Janet Planet, Kosmic Kitchen


Melissa Easton Jewelry is hand-carved, cast and hand-finished in 10K recycled gold. Her pieces are simple and modern, with a classic whirl. They become personal signatures that you’ll end up wearing every day. Available online and at MayerWasner in Narrowsburg NY.

CALLICOON, NEW YORK 12723 | (845) 887-4740 WWW.MELISSAEASTONJEWELRY.COM

Upstate Seasonal Shoppe coming soon to Callicoon NY within a 1906 Victorian era house. Home • Accessories • Clothing • Pottery Apothecary • Shoes • Baby

ROBIN@WELCOMESHOPPE.COM | (347) 489-6272 WWW.WELCOMESHOPPE.COM | @WELCOMESHOPPE

TARU Pottery inspired by the natural beauty surrounding this mountaintop studio. For artist Carolyn Duke, the transition from life in NYC to Sullivan County has been a journey of creative discovery. Duke Pottery has an art gallery and gift shop showcasing a wide variety of talented artists and local producers. 855 COUNTY RD. 93, ROSCOE NY 12776 | (607) 498-5207 DUKEPOTTERY.COM

is a 4-day festival celebrating the transformational power of women's bodies. Under the guidance of leaders in Pilates, yoga and dance, we will gather to explore the connection between mind, body and spirit, unearthing the true potential of the divine feminine. CONTACT BIANCA VELEZ, DIRECTOR OF TARU 1931 ROUTE 97, POND EDDY, NY 12770 | (516) 423-9431 BIANCA@FINDTHEMIDLINE.COM | WWW.FINDTHEMIDLINE.COM/TARU


THE

MADE

& FOUND

REBECCA WEISS

EST. 2015

ACUPUNCTURE & TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE Explore THE STONEHOUSE, a tiny Boutique filled with an eclectic mix of Hand-Picked, Hand-Made, Vintage, New, One-of-a-Kind and Small-Edition pieces from all over the World. Find an ever changing selection of HomeGoods, Objects, Art and beautiful Textiles, ranging from locally crafted Ceramics to hand-spun Peruvian Rugs. Hours: Wednesday - Saturday 10am-5pm Sunday 10am -3pm 92 MAIN STREET, DELHI NY 13757 | (917) 224-6718   INFO@THESTONEHOUSE.NYC  | INSTAGRAM @ANDREAMENKE 

INN, BAR ROOM & RESTAURANT The North Branch Inn marries casual elegance with some fresh laidback style. Our Bar Room and Restaurant serves a menu that is seasonally changing as we are committed to getting product only from good people we know.  Our open kitchen is in our 100+ year old bowling alley and our deliveries from the farms come through the front door. 869 N BRANCH RD, NORTH BRANCH NY 12766 | (845) 482-2339 WWW.NORTHBRANCHINN.COM | INFO@NORTHBRANCHINN.COM

Rebecca Weiss combines acupuncture, diet and lifestyle modification recommendations to improve your health. She has been successful in treating conditions as an alternative to Western medicine. Her specialties include: Acupuncture, Moxabustion, Cupping, GuaSha, Nutrition Counseling, Reiki and Mai Zen Cosmetic Acupuncture System Face & Neck. Rebecca Weiss is a NY and PA State Licensed Acupuncturist with the following certifications: M.S.W., L.Ac., Dipl. Ac. NCCAOM 95 FREMONT STREET, CALLICOON, NY 12723 | (845) 887-4250 WWW.REBECCAWEISSACUPUNCTURE.COM | REBECCA.WEISS14@GMAIL.COM

Tay Tea is your source for all things tea. Founder Nini Ordoubadi specializes in creating hand-blended artisan teas for retail and wholesale. The shop doubles as a tea bar and a blending studio. Come visit us here and online to experience the exciting world of tea. “We drink tea to forget the noise of the world” 159 MAIN STREET, DELHI, NY 13753 | (607) 746.6086 NINI@TAYTEA.COM | WWW.TAYTEA.COM OPEN SATURDAY 10-6 •  SUNDAY 10-3


Red Cottage Inc. is recognized among savvy travelers as the go-to source for vacation rentals in the Catskills, Delaware River Valley and Hudson Valley. With our carefully selected portfolio of rustic cabins, bright country farmhouses, sunny lake houses and country estates, guests know that Red Cottage Inc. provides the finest lodging experience to complement their Upstate travels. 7991 STATE RTE 55, GRAHAMSVILLE, NY 12740 | (845) 985-7153 REDCOTTAGEINC.COM | RENTALS@REDCOTTAGEINC.COM

Couple of Dudes Photography Upstate NY and Beyond Natural wedding documentations since 2010. Aiming for connectedness but navigating unobtrusively, creating a timeless aesthetic. Mixing film and digital mediums. It will feel like you added two more friends to your guest list. Serving Upstate and beyond. WWW.COUPLEOFDUDES.COM | INFO@COUPLEOFDUDES.COM

Indoorsy for the Outdoorsy! Gallery: Original paintings and screen prints by Jim and Laura McManus. Vintage Rugs: Collection of antique tribal rugs (Kilims, Yastiks, and Turkmen) from Istanbul to Samarkand of Austin, Texas. Shop: Handcrafted Modern Camp Style Furniture and handpicked mercantile items to give your home a “Cabin Vibe.” THE CAMPTONS ART AND DESIGN STUDIO AND GALLERY 422 EAST FRONT STREET, HANCOCK, NY 13783 | (607) 637-4120 WWW.THECAMPTONS.COM

Catskill Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine is an integrative medical practice utilizing the best principles and methods of conventional and alternative medicine, led by Barry Scheinfeld M.D. Established in 1986, acupuncture and nutritional assessments are among the services offered. David Behar, LAC and Yvette Guzman, LAC, bring years of expertise in healing through Chinese medicine. Allison Scheinfeld, MS, RD, CDN helps clients achieve their nutrition and wellness goals through personalized one-on-one counseling. 14 HARRIS-BUSHVILLE ROAD, HARRIS, NY 12742 | (845) 794-0209 BSCHEIN100@MAC.COM | WWW.CATSKILLREHAB.COM


Charles Hadley Blanchard has been a weaver and artisan for over two decades. Since that time, he has integrated many of the world’s weaving traditions and techniques into his unique work having traveled extensively in Europe, Africa and Asia. His use of colors and designs spans the range from bold and dramatic to subtle and intricate. He works with a variety of fibers including linen, wool, silk, alpaca and worsted acrylic. 101 MAIN ST, NARROWSBURG, NY 12764 | (845) 252-7289 WWW.DYBERRYWEAVER.COM

Commercial Brick Building at 41 Lower Main Street, Callicoon, NY Began life as a bank in 1906 and most recently was home to a fine dining establishment. For Sale at $289,000 Contact Rosie DeCristofaro 36 LOWER MAIN ST., PO BOX 556, CALLICOON, NY 12723 | (845)887-4400 HOMES@CALLICOON.COM | WWW.CALLICOON.COM

the place gallery • vintage goods • graphic design

The Delightful Place is an eclectic, curated shop featuring fine art made by local and New York City artists. Find a wide variety of stylish vintage goods including clothing, records, housewares, and fun handmade souvenirs such as hand silkscreened t-shirts and bags. The shop also offers graphic design services for print and web. Stop by to browse and spin some records, visit online at delightfulplace.com, or follow at facebook.com/delightfulplace and instagram.com/delightfulplace. THE DELIGHTFUL PLACE ART GALLERY • VINTAGE GOODS • GRAPHIC DESIGN 54 MAIN STREET, LIVINGSTON MANOR, NY 12758

Mick's Barber Shop... For the well groomed gentleman. Located on Main Street in historic Honesdale, Pennsylvania, Mick's is a fourth generation, four chair barber shop. We specialize in traditional as well as modern barbering techniques in a clean, comfortable and classic atmosphere. Have a seat... you're next. 511 MAIN STREET, HONESDALE, PA 18431 | (570) 253-2910 MICKSBARBERSHOP.COM


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New fashionable women's apparel at prices you won't believe. All sizes XS-XXX. International gifts and discounted clothes. The Clothesline opened in April, 2010, fulfilling a dream of its owner, Danielle Hilson. Born in France, raised in the US, Danielle has always had a love of clothes and shopping! She now sells quality and stylish fashions at an affordable price.

Good Food at Stickett Inn featuring Intelligentsia Coffee, highlights from The Heron, Henning's Local, The Fork, Natural Contents Kitchen, specialty foods, and more.  Open Friday-Sunday. 3380 SCENIC ROUTE 97 BARRYVILLE, NY 12719 | (845) 557-0913 WWW.STICKETTINN.COM | INFO@STICKETTINN.COM

27 LOWER MAIN STREET, CALLICOON, NY 12723 | (845) 887-3116 WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/THECLOTHESLINENY

MAIN STREET FARM FLOYD & BOBO'S Stop by for some home style desserts and a fresh brewed cup of coffee or a frothy cappucino. Grab a panini or sandwich-wrap with a cold beverage. Fresh baked bread, cookies, cakes and brownies are just some of the delicious treats you'll find when you visit us. Come see us for your place in the country. 98 NORTH MAIN STREET, LIBERTY, NEW YORK 12754 (845) 292-6200

Main Street Farm, market cafe, features small local organic farms and food artisans. Our market offers seasonal fruits, vegetables, fresh dairy and eggs, American farmstead cheese, charcuterie, quality meats and fresh baked breads. Catskill craft cider, beer, and wine. Our cafe prepares house made sandwiches, soups, sides, and salads using our fresh market ingredients. 36 MAIN ST., LIVINGSTON MANOR, NY 12758 | (845) 439-4309 MAINSTREETFARM.COM | INFO@MAINSTREETFARM.COM | @MAINSTFARM


D E L AWA R E VA L L E Y E I G H T

ASK A LOCAL

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WHICH PART OF OUR REGION DO YOU CALL HOME? I was born in Sullivan County, NY. I was raised in Monticello. My parents are originally from Fair Oaks, Alabama. WHAT DO YOU DO FOR A LIVING? Blues musician. WHAT KEEPS YOU HERE? This is my home. I don't care where you go around this world. I've been to a lot of places in and out of the country but there's no place like home. A TOOL YOU USE EVERYDAY. These hands were made to play the guitar. This is my tool of choice right here. DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE RESTAURANT? I like anything that makes me feel good—anywhere that has that love and energy that people put into their food. If I'd have to pick just one it'd be right here where I am sitting at Floyd and Bobo's in Liberty. If you need something sweet or savory to eat, this is the place to get it. The cooking here comes from the heart. You can't go wrong. FAVORITE SWIMMING SPOT? That's one thing I don't do! I don't swim. I get nervous in the bath tub. I've played on cruise ships for months at a time but swimming ain't my thing. SOMEONE SHOULD OPEN UP A (BLANK). Someone needs to open up a community based facility where people can come and congregate on the regular basis. THREE THINGS A LOCAL SHOULD NOT BE WITHOUT. Food, shelter and love.

SLAM ALLEN Interview and Photography by MICHAEL DAVIS

Singer-songwriter and Sullivan County native Slam Allen began his musical career as the lead singer and guitarist for legendary Chicago blues musician James Cotton. Since then, he’s forged a successful solo career, producing several albums and hitting number one on the Blues Radio Chart. Allen is a recipient of the prestigious Master Blues Artist award from the New York Blues Hall of Fame and a 2016 Blues Music Awards nominee.

HOW DO YOU SPOT A LOCAL? Growing up here you get to know your environment. You get to know everyone. You can tell once somebody else comes here that wasn't from here originally. It's like they're not apart of the extended family. WHAT ARE SOME ERRORS YOU SEE NEW LOCALS MAKE? You can't judge a book by its cover. You have to come here with an open mind. Don't perpetuate stereotypes and you'll see there are a lot of people here who are interesting and have things to offer. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE SOMEONE INTERESTED IN MOVING UPSTATE? Don't look for anything to just happen, come and make something happen. And don't let something happen to you while you're here. WHAT'S THE BEST KEPT SECRET UPSTATE? Me.

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FREE RANGE

D E L AWA R E VA L L E Y E I G H T

Marc Switko is an artist, musician and psychotherapist based in Sullivan County, NY. His inspiration involves intensive focus on present time consciousness. He does not wait for inspiration to strike, but rather works and lets go of the worry. “Focus on the result and you undo the doing.� 46


1O19 MAIN STREET | HONESDALE PA | 57O.253.94OO | MILKWEED.SHOPTIQUES.COM | SUMMER HOURS: SUN – TUES 12PM – 4PM | WED – SAT 11AM – 5PM

A Curious World


Profile for DVEIGHT Magazine

DVEIGHT Magazine Issue #4  

Featuring Singer Eleanor Friedberger and Comedian David Cross.

DVEIGHT Magazine Issue #4  

Featuring Singer Eleanor Friedberger and Comedian David Cross.

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