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THE LOCALS ISSUE P LU S DA RY L K E R R I GA N, LY N N E O ' N E I L L, J OS H D R U C K M A N, K A R E N S C H O E M E R , S H A N N O N S H U LT Z A N D T R E Y S P E EG L E


From Farms to Forks – keeping the distance short connecting farmers, patrons and the community through economics and food

939 Main Street, Honesdale, Pennsylvania 18431 | TELEPHONE: (570) 253-2266 Â www.dyberryforks939.com | EMAIL: dyberryforks939@gmail.com


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EDITORIAL

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DV8 DELA W ARE VALLEY EI G H T I S S U E NO 2

Publisher & Creative Director N H I M U NDY Editorial Director M I C H AEL M U NDY Photo Director H ALI F RIE H LIN G Editor at Large H e a t h e r S m i t h M a cIs a a c Photography by Michael Bloom

The Locals Issue Leave it to a kid, born and bred in Callicoon, to school me on the fine points of what it means upstate to be truly ‘local’. “There are different types of locals: the ones who have been here for generations, the ones who were born here but their parents were from somewhere else, the ones who moved here and have lived here most of their lives, and then there are the recent locals, the ones who have lived here for one or two decades…but, they’re not really local.” So far so good, but then came the remark that got to me: “The crazy thing is, they don't like each other!” Why? We’re all here for the same reasons. It’s beautiful. It’s close enough to the city—if that matters—and it’s affordable. And yet, there seemed to be a distinct stratification of ‘localness’ in every town. Is it because we look different? Is it because we have different political views? Is it about money? Or simply, is it because we are averse to change? As a recent convert, I’ve encountered some resistance, mostly subtle, some of it maybe just in my head. When I first moved here, I swore everyone seemed unfriendly. “They don’t like me,” I would grumble to my husband every time I came home from the local market. “They’re nice to me,” was his reply. “You just have to smile more.” I shrugged off his comment and told him he didn’t understand. But then one day, something happened. The checkout lady at the market smiled at me. The next time I shopped there, she smiled again and we talked about the weather. Not long after, my interaction with everyone at the market became friendlier. Amidst

breaking tensions, I realized it was my own insecurity of being a new local that made me uneasy. It wasn’t that the checkout lady had something against me; she just didn't know me—and the feeling went both ways. Whether you’re a born and bred local or a more recent transplant what we all have in common is that we just want to be acknowledged for who we are, what we do, or how we contribute to our community. That’s what this issue is about. It’s about getting to know and recognizing those who’ve spent decades here, those who have circled back to their place of birth, and those who are newer to discover the richness of rural living. We’re all motivated by the same desire to make this region a better place. This issue is about celebrating locals. Producing it introduced me to wonderful, productive characters who are enhancing, in ways big and small, their communities and expanding my understanding of what it means to be a local. Perhaps one of the oldest residents in Sullivan County, NY (see page 12) said it best: “If you live here, you’re a local.” Wise words from a generous soul.

Copy Editor J ILLIAN S C H EIN F ELD Staff Writers C AITLIN G U NT H ER I S A B EL B RAVER M AN Advertising & Marketing B RENDA B ARRETT C AEL U M RO G ER S Contributing Writers EDDIE B RANNEN K AREN S C H OE M ER LA U RA S ILVER M AN TREY S P EE G LE Photographers C h a r l o t t e F e r gus o n K EVIN O ’ DONA H U E LA W REN C E B RA U N M ATT NOVA C K M I C H AEL B LOO M M I C H AEL M U NDY NOA H K ALINA Illustrator S TEVEN W EIN B ER G

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N H I M U NDY Publisher & Creative Director

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Delaware Valley 8 Issue 2, September 2015, Copyright 2015, Delaware Valley 8. All rights reserved. See magazine online at dv8mag.com. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Delaware Valley 8 is not available for individual retail sale. For copies, visit one of our partnering businesses or order online dv8mag.com For customer service or advertising inquiries, please send email to delawarevalley8@gmail.com or write us at P.O. Box 41, Jeffersonville, NY 12748.

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milkweed: A CURIOUS WORLD By the edge of a lake in the middle of nowhere. It’s the weekend, a thrown together Herschel duffle and your favorite Pendleton blanket. For some a country escape for others a way of life. Milkweed captures the outdoor vibe with objects for a lifestyle we all strive for—a few precious items that indulge and inspire. 1019 Main Street at maude alley, honesdale, pa 12723 | TELEPHONE: (570) 253-9400 www.milkweed.shoptiques.com | email: anton@nep.net


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I, CIDIOT: THE SEQUEL BY KAREN SCHOEMER ILLUSTRATION BY STEVEN WEINBERG

My 15-year-old daughter recently hit a major developmental stage: she decided she hates where she lives. She’s been mercilessly haranguing me: why do we have to stay in upstate New York? Our town is too small. It’s boring. She doesn’t relate to most of the people. The kids in her school are racist and homophobic. They use slurs and wear confederate flag t-shirts. Can’t we move back to New York City? She’d be happier there. I could get a real job again! I’d make more money. We could get an apartment—she doesn’t care how small. Why did we leave, anyway? I listen to this litany with a kind of hapless bemusement. Eleven years ago, when she was four, my then-husband and I moved upstate, in large part, on her account: to raise her in an environment we hoped would offer her a better quality of life. At this point, it’s a cliché. More space, a real yard, a driveway, a safe neighborhood where she could run around and play. Decent public schools, a slower pace, beautiful landscapes, easy access to farms and nature. I don’t need her complaining to alert me to the fact that our move didn’t pan out as expected—from the very beginning, harsh realities overwhelmed our rural fantasies. My husband couldn’t find steady work. Renovations on our rambling Victorian farmhouse drained us emotionally and financially. Though our chosen public school district turned out to be pretty good—at least through elementary school—my husband and I struggled socially to integrate. In 2010 we split up, painfully but amicably, and in 2011, determined to abandon the journalism that had always supported me in favor of far-less-lucrative creative writing, I took a day job at a bookstore/bar in nearby Hudson. Don’t think there weren’t days when I sourly questioned why a former staff writer for Newsweek with a six-figure salary was sweeping floors and pouring pints for $10 an hour plus tips. (Some of our upstate travails were chronicled in a 2007 article for New York Magazine, “I, Citiot.”) But that extremely humbling period after my divorce turned out to be what I needed. If, outwardly, I had pinned much of the rationale for moving upstate on my family, inside, I harbored a deeper, more personal reason. Reinvention is a cloying, obnoxious word, but I moved upstate in order to become somebody different—to alter stimuli and bombard myself with radical new influences. It took years to let go of my fantasies, but little by little, as I wiped the bar, put beers in front of interesting patrons, and immersed myself in literature and art instead of the pop culture that had swaddled me in the city, as I went on hikes in the Catskills and contemplated the iconic beauty of the Hudson Valley, it finally happened. A voice rose up in me, and came out in stories and poems. Timidly at first. Bathed in shame. I took writing workshops, and the participants and leaders encouraged me. I did a few readings, and audiences encouraged me. I submitted a few poems, and won $10 and honorable mention in a contest. (The old Monopoly community chest card rang in my brain: “You have won second prize in a beauty contest.”) Each tiny reward felt outsized, hard-earned. When I first started work at the bar, I used to shrivel if a city acquaintance or former colleague walked unexpectedly through the door. I didn’t want them to see me in a service job. But I was thriving more than I knew (and, pretty soon, was managing the place). One day, still wistful for what I’d left behind, I asked a rep from a publishing house in Brooklyn to let me know if any jobs opened up. “Sure,” he said. “But you know, we all secretly long to run a bookstore/bar in upstate New York.”

“Don’t think there weren’t days when I sourly questioned why a former staff writer for Newsweek with a sixfigure salary was sweeping floors and pouring pints for $10 an hour plus tips.”

That clinched it. I never again regretted my new life, or cheapened the value of something I’d paid dearly for. And, as if released from the past, more good things started happening. I made some spoken word recordings with musician friends who knew I’d been writing poetry. Other musician friends, fellow upstate transplants Wreckless Eric and Amy Rigby, heard the recordings, liked them, and asked if I’d be interested in forming a band. Eric, who’d gotten his start in the ‘70s British punk scene, dubbed us the Schoemer Formation—it sounds great in

a Cockney accent—and we began playing locally in bars and clubs. I don’t lie to myself—Eric and Amy have real music careers; I’m their side project. But I also don’t lie to myself: we’re good. This past July, we made our NYC debut at the Hi Fi Bar on Avenue A. In the fall, we’re planning to record an album. I thought it would be strange, being onstage in a city where I’d spent my life as a spectator. But if that ghostly younger girl was sitting in the audience, wide-eyed, I never saw her. Performing takes a lot of focus, and I fully embodied the person I am now. Sweeter still was the late-night ride on the Taconic in Eric and Amy’s van, knowing the place I was going was called home.

So when my daughter starts haranguing me about how lousy her life upstate is, I go through a series of responses. I tell her it’s normal for teenagers to hate where they live, and in a few short years she’s going to be old enough to make that decision for herself. I tell her that I’m proud of her for knowing that racism and homophobia are wrong, and that I admire her for standing up for her core values. Then I use what I call the airplane defense, after the video at the start of flights that tells parents to put on their own oxygen masks before attending to their children. I tell her that, while I wish she were happier, I love my life upstate. I’m settled here. I don’t want to turn it upside-down. I loved my old city life, too, but I left it a lot more easily than I will ever leave this one. Dusty floors and all.

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MATTHEW S ON MAIN FOOD. BAR. HAPPINESS. Matthew’s on Main serves the area’s best bar and comfort food with ex-New York City chef and restaurant owner Matthew Lanes in the kitchen. The menu features dishes made with prime, locally-sourced ingredients, like quail, chicken and farm-raised trout. For those interested in a change from the standard bar foods, Matthew’s offers ethnically inspired dishes like Peruvian BBQ chicken and lamb moussaka. Foraged products, like wild mushrooms and spring ramps, make seasonal appearances too. Matthew’s on Main is a place to come hungry and leave full and happy.

19 lower Main Street, callicoon, new york 12723 | TELEPHONE: (845) 887-5636 www.matthewsonmain.com


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THE RURALIST

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LYNNE O’NEILL Lynne O'Neill produces and directs fashion shows for New York and Honolulu Fashion Week. Her thirty year career includes fashion show consulting for CW's "Gossip Girl" and Bravo's "The Fashion Show." Her persona was the inspiration behind the Margaret Cho character in "Sex and City." When did you arrive? October 2000 What drew you to the area? I was charmed by the area while visiting friends who had a weekend home in Forestburgh, NY Favorite upstate anthem “Watching the Sun Come Up” by Ed Harcourt Favorite quote “The show must go on!” Favorite cultural experience The annual Magical History Tour by Sullivan County historian, John Conway. How does living here influence your work? It balances the often frantic pace of my work What is the thing you miss most when you’re away? The stillness. What has living up here taught you? How to be a country girl wearing Comme des Garçons. What is upstate’s best-kept secret? “A lady never reveals her age or weight” – or secrets.

SHANNON SHULTZ Sharon Shultz has been modeling since the age of 15 and has worked for Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, JCrew and more. Now a newly-certified aromatherapist, she currently resides in Bethel, NY where she splits her time between New York City with her husband and two sons. When did you arrive? Spring 2001 What keeps you up here? We’ve been here a long time and it has changed so much. It’s finally got a steady pulse. For so long there were small attempts to revitalize the area, which would sadly fail. Now it feels alive. What’s on your reading list? At the moment, the one that’s on the top is Norman Mailer’s, "The Executioner’s Song." And at 1,100 pages long, it will take me a year of weekends to finish. Favorite upstate anthem Richie Havens. If upstate had a voice, it would be his. Favorite quote “If you give me seventy one hundred kisses, you will break the spell and I won’t poop in my pants anymore.” – My kid, Walker Favorite restuarant Benji & Jake’s in White Lake, NY How does living up here influence your work? Living up here has given me perspective. It allows me the space to think, which helps in all aspects of my life. What has living up here taught you? Patience…

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NOAH KALINA

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smart WINE selection in a small town shop Whether you’re in the market for a simple French table wine or an old-world Austrian varietal, Callicoon Wine Merchant has got the bottle for you. Owner Robin Mailey curates a rotating selection of wines by independent producers from around the world, with an emphasis on providing moderately priced bottles. Build up an appetite while perusing the wine selection organized by taste profile, then head to the adjoined Windy Hill Cheese Shop, to feast on a worldly selection of cheeses, paired with wine by the glass or a cold craft beer. Also for purchase are quality olive oils and charcuterie. Callicoon Wine Merchant is a local spot where you can easily pass the afternoon shopping, swilling and snacking. 25 lower Main Street, callicoon, new york 12723 TELEPHONE: (845) 887-3016


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FLAVOR

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An Autumn Windfall BY LAURA SILVERMAN

Though we cling hard to the fleeting pleasures of summer, the abundance of fall is a glorious, if bittersweet, consolation. After last year’s scant harvest of apples, it’s reassuring to see trees everywhere—in orchards and along back roads— loaded with ripening fruit. With this bounty of heirloom apples, bake pies, crumbles, cakes and betties; put up chutney or dehydrate thin slices for winter storage; stuff and roast the biggest ones and leave the ugliest for sauce. Arguably the most beautiful expression of the fruit’s wonderful, winey essence is apple butter. It’s just a highly concentrated form of applesauce, produced by a slow stew that caramelizes the natural sugars. This concentration of sugar gives apple butter a long shelf life, making it a popular preserve from colonial times well into the 19th century. It was traditionally prepared outside in large copper kettles and people would take turns stirring with an enormous wooden paddle. My version substitutes today’s overplayed “pumpkin pie spice” in favor of highly aromatic mace—the bright lacy covering of the nutmeg seed shell— and exotic allspice, with its dusky notes of clove and cinnamon. It produces a thick, silky butter that is equally good stirred into yogurt or oatmeal, slathered on warm banana bread or a cheddar cheese sandwich, or dolloped onto roast pork. Apple Butter Makes about 4 pints 5 pounds mixed heirloom apples 1 1/4 cups organic apple cider 1/2 cup maple syrup, preferably grade B 1/2 cup dark muscovado sugar 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 1/2 teaspoons ground mace 1 teaspoon ground allspice

Peel, core and dice apples. Combine with remaining ingredients in large heavy stockpot and bring to a boil, stirring often and skimming off any scum that rises to the surface. Reduce heat to maintain a gentle simmer and cook until apples are very soft and mixture turns dark brown, several hours. Puree with an immersion blender until perfectly smooth. Pour into sterilized jars, seal and process in boiling water for 8 minutes. (Or scale recipe down and keep a few jars in the fridge.)

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THE LOCALS

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offered, Stanley began to miss the Catskills. She bought a ’73 Dodge Dart to make pilgrimages to her aunt and uncle’s camp in Hancock, NY, and soon acquired her own property outside Narrowsburg, perched above a narrow stretch of the 10 Mile River near where it connects to Luxton Lake. She hired a contractor to build what was intended as a weekend house but wound up leaving the city for good during the 2007 recession. “I’ve been doing the finishing work on the house ever since,” laughs Stanley. After apprenticing with a local carpenter to further hone her skills, she launched Woolheater’s Wares to take on contracting, sourcing, designing and styling projects. “I was inspired to work on older houses, with the idea of restoring their original character,” she says. “I wanted to do something historical that connected me to my family’s history in the area.” A sixth sense for sourcing antiques seems to run in Stanley’s blood. “I’ll be driving down the road and pass a barn or an old shed and I just have to stop because I know something’s in there.” She knocks on doors or leaves notes on cars and often comes away with a vintage refrigerator, a stack of weathered barn wood or some old windows that eventually wind up in clients’ homes. By catering to people who want to preserve the worn wallpaper and wainscoting in their 19th-century cottages, she is able to restore some of the Catskills’ former glory. At her own house, Stanley has teamed with friends to create a queer-friendly art retreat known as Smokey Belles. “It’s a haven for artists to reconnect with nature,” she says, “to escape the bubble of the city.” Writers including Darcy Steinke and Douglas Martin have worked on novels there and a range of performance artists and filmmakers have taken advantage of the opportunity to recharge in the fresh air. Stanley recently acquired a timber-frame cabin up the road, and the little compound is available for rent, B&B-style, to people looking for a rustic country experience circa 1940.

RETURN OF A NATIVE BY LAURA SILVERMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL MUNDY

Anie Stanley is a familiar figure around Narrowsburg, NY. You’ve probably seen her driving by in her bright red pickup, loaded up with tools and wearing one of her many jaunty caps or stringing up lights on Main Street during the holiday season, creating the enchanting aura of Christmas past. Wherever she goes, a trace of nostalgia lingers, as her wholly original aesthetic tends to reference an earlier time. Stanley was born near Oneonta into a family with deep roots in the Catskills. On her mother’s side, the Woolheaters were originally Germans from Strasbourg who came over in the early 1800s and settled near Margaretville. “My great-grandfather had a livery service that picked up city-dwelling New Yorkers from the train,” recalls Stanley, “and ferried them by horse and buggy to their boarding houses and summer homes.” Further north, her paternal

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grandfather worked as the head engineer for the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, operating the biggest roundhouse in the country. He was also a “picker” for antiques dealers, as was her father. Stanley’s nose for sniffing out wares of all kinds, a talent that has served her well, clearly has family roots. After attending college upstate, Stanley spent several summers painting in Provincetown, MA, then earned an MFA from Hunter College. She delved into the world of avant-garde filmmaking in New York City, finding her niche in Super 8 shorts. Ultimately, she became the art director and programmer for the NY Queer Experimental Film Festival. Over the course of nearly two decades in the city, she also joined a team of artists crafting and installing the props and scenery for the legendary windows of fashion retailer Bergdorf Goodman, styled commercial photo shoots and worked for a decorative painting company. Despite the excitement and inspiration the city

In Narrowsburg, Stanley has now hung a shingle at Maison Bergogne, the Bridge Street antiques store owned by her partner Juliette Hermant. The two frequently collaborate on sourcing and interiors projects. “In this town, it seems you’re only considered local if you were born here,” she says, “so I guess that’s why I think of myself as a Catskills native.” Nevertheless, she is deeply immersed in the community, sitting on boards for the Luxton Lake Property Owners Association, the Tusten Heritage Community Garden, the Narrowsburg Beautification Group, the Tusten Local Development

“I may not qualify as a true local, but I have local interests at heart.” Corp., the Merchants of Main Street and the Honey Bee Festival. Much of what she accomplishes helps bridge the gap between locals and the New York City expats and weekenders. “I created my own little community with artists and friends coming up from the city but getting more involved with the town has really enriched my life,” she says. “I may not qualify as a true local, but I have local interests at heart.”


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in a field where, as Propst points out, “89% of CEO positions are held by males.” Office life, however, was not all she wanted or thought it was going to be. The summer of 2012 was the turning point. Propst’s temporary return to Honesdale, to work as Project Coordinator for the non-profit The Cooperage Project, shifted to a permanent reorientation. “The Cooperage is a good anchor to what is happening in this community,” she says. “It’s giving people a place to meet and share thoughts.” It prompted her to examine her own and decide that it was home where she found the opportunity she desired. All of her skills are now being channeled into The Here & Now Brewing Company which will be housed on the corner of a stretch of handsome brick buildings on Honesdale’s Main Street that was once home to a Woolworth Five and Dime. Propst wants to restore the building, stripping away its ‘70s veneer to return it to the “Boardwalk Empire” look of its glory days. Here & Now, on the ground floor, will be a brew café that crafts local and seasonal beers to be accompanied by creatively simple and well-prepared foods. She hopes to turn the second floor into a boutique hotel. Propst, along with her team of Karl Schloesser and Steven Propst, plan to open the doors in early 2016. “People are afraid of changing the area too much,” she says. “But you can change and still stay attached to your roots.” Especially when you have such a deep understanding of them, because they are your own.

SMALL TOWN TITAN BY Isabel Braverman PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAWRENCE BRAUN

For Allaina Propst being a local means being “willing to understand what a community is.” That wisdom is not so much a reflection of her age—she is only 25 years old—but of the time she has devoted to a corner of Wayne County, PA that is dear to her. She was born in Beach Lake, a town of about 2,500, and raised, by example, to give back. Her grandfather, Dr. Harry Propst, spent five decades caring for his community, much of it as chief of staff at Wayne Memorial Hospital in Honesdale, PA. He offered his surgical skills to anyone who needed them, regardless of their station in life. Propst’s parents were similarly devoted to the area, serving on school and hospital boards in addition to owning a sawmill in Archbald.

The family compound at Beach Lake, populated by many cousins, mostly boys, provided Propst with a storybook childhood, one of carefree running around in the woods. “I was a boy growing up,” she joked. “having stick fights with my cousins.” She was also a keen student of finance, avidly watching business television shows with her entrepreneurial father. In high school, she was a star athlete, applied her interest in science to brewing beer and organized her prom. At Bryn Mawr college, she was no less busy, majoring in economics and Middle East Studies, playing basketball and interning at Goldman Sachs. Propst was on track to be a big city titan. A job at Goldman Sachs was followed by work at other venture capitalist firms, including Golden Seeds, an investment firm focused on women-led businesses,

“People are afraid of changing the area too much, But you can change and still stay attached to your roots.”

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A SISTER ACT FOR THE AGES BY LAURA SILVERMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY NOAH KALINA

Hazel and Helen Thony were born several minutes apart in 1919, together weighing scarcely nine pounds. They were a surprise to their parents, firstgeneration Swiss immigrants, whose dairy farm sat at the top of Swiss Hill Road, just outside Jeffersonville, NY. At the time, the town was little more than a small constellation of businesses: a pharmacy, a few restaurants, a butcher shop and a blacksmith’s forge. The Thony Twins, as they became known, attracted quite a bit of attention since multiple births were then relatively unusual and many people would stop by to catch a glimpse of the young girls. “We were very bashful,” remembers Helen, “so we would run and hide until they went away.” Nearly a century later, the twins are decidedly less reserved. Petite and bird-like, they are both very warm and friendly, with a pronounced twinkle and a touch of mischief. Helen now lives just across the road from the original dairy—their younger brother’s family still runs the farm—and she’s a familiar and welcome face in the area. One neighbor, Forbes March, tells the story of stepping outside his house one evening to find Helen weeding his carrot patch in the waning light. “She’d noticed that I wasn’t doing it right,” he laughs in amazement, “so she came by to take care of it herself!” It’s clear that being of service to others is deeply ingrained in the twins’ way of life. Despite their advanced age, these are not idle women. Quilters, cooks and gardeners in their day—including tending plots for the town and the church— they are still intent on being useful and remaining engaged with the world. Both regularly inquire how they can help, regardless of the circumstance. They are active and beloved members of Jeffersonville’s First Presbyterian Church and are quick to reminisce about the long-ago days when they walked the two miles to Sunday school. During the week, a bus came to take them to the local school. Life on the farm was all-consuming. Their grandfather made Swiss cheese in a big wooden mold and their mother made dandelion wine and apple cider. They grew all their own vegetables and sold milk from their cows. For fun they went fishing for bullheads, a type of local catfish, in Thony’s pond, which, despite its name, was located on a neighbor’s property. “We each had our own little garden,” says Hazel, “and we didn’t go anywhere unless we walked,” though Helen remembers riding on a wagon to the strawberry fields and picking berries the likes of which she rarely finds these days. Recently, she came

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“Our parents came here from Switzerland and bought land, and I guess that made them local... If you live here, you’re a local.”

close at the Callicoon Farmers Market—“It’s the best farmers market, they have everything and anything.” Getting up to rinse some cherries for a visitor, she offers them with the caveat that they could be sweeter. Modern fruit, never allowed to fully ripen, cannot compare to what once was. Growing up on Swiss Hill, there was a black cherry tree that is recalled fondly and with a hint of sadness. “It got very old and died,” says Helen. When asked if she herself feels ready to go, she doesn’t take long to answer with quiet conviction, “As long as I can take care of myself and do what I’m supposed to do, I don’t mind it.” There was no shortage of enthusiasm at even the simple prospect of a lunch outing. The twins dine out regularly with a local chapter of the Red Hat Society, a global organization of women who wear red hats and celebrate life at every age. In the company of a reporter and friend, they were greeted as regulars at the White Sulphur Springs Inn, a favorite destination. Hazel ordered a delightfully decadent meal—onion rings, rice pudding and a glass of red wine—but ate modestly. Helen tucked into her favorite chicken wings with relish. “They’re tender and you can have a little sauce to dip them.” With heads that incline in opposite directions, Helen and Hazel sometimes appear like a mirror image of one another but in spite of being twins, they are easily distinguished. They have no private language and don’t finish each other’s sentences, but the connection between them—beyond the merely physical—is clearly profound. “We think the same,” says Helen. “We never fight or argue,” adds Hazel. For decades, they lived in separate towns after Hazel married and moved to Tyler Hill, PA, where she and her husband raised their four children. During World War II, she went to work in a Newark factory, “making little formica things” for the war effort. Helen married a man who grew up down the road from the farm and they had three children. The sisters would travel the 50 miles that separated them by horse and wagon to visit each other whenever they could. Now they are together almost daily, though each one has her own home. Hazel still grows tomatoes and beans in back, and Helen tends lovely flowerbeds. Pressed for details about their past, the twins can seem a little hazy, but grounded in the moment, they are informed and focused. They’re also pretty clear on their definition of what it means to be local. “Our parents came here from Switzerland and bought land,” says Helen, “and I guess that made them local.” She ponders that for a moment. “If you live here, you’re a local.” And if you’ve lived here for a century, you become something of an authority on that.

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A BOY’S LIFE BY KAREN SCHOEMER PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEVIN O’DONAHUE

Sims Foster has mastered the proprietor’s stance. From the kitchen door in the tavern of the Arnold House, his nine-room retreat near Shandelee Lake in Sullivan County, he stands ready to glide forward at the slightest hint of customer need. A hipster-ish family eats beneath a vintage metal sign advertising the now-defunct tourist attraction Catskill Game Farm; toddler in high chair babbles happily. A group of eight boisterously competes with ‘80s rock and roll on the tavern’s sound system. At the bar, an overnight guest sips his second martini. The atmosphere is relaxed—pool table, vinyl album covers on the wall, bartender in pink gingham—and Foster blends right in: plaid shirt and shorts, a Richie Cunningham scrub to his cheek. Like his guests, one minute he may be hauling a canoe out of a shed, the next tipping back a microbrew on the hotel’s back deck. His focus and intensity, however, are anything but casual. Arms folded, eyes scanning the room, he’s tracking who’s enjoying what. As staff passes in and out of the kitchen, he leans discreetly sideways with a whispered word. Yes, attention must be paid, but this is a Monday night in the Catskills! Still, Foster’s intensity may be his best weapon. If the future of the Catskills isn’t exactly riding on his athletic shoulders—after all, an $800 million casino is underway down the road—the region’s broader health and wellbeing still depend on committed and

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impassioned business revivers like himself. Born and raised in Livingston Manor, where his mother was a schoolteacher (“same classroom for forty years”) and his father a teacher and principal (“a very gregarious guy”) Foster had the kind of Boys’ Life upbringing that many upstater-come-latelys yearn to reinstate. His father took him for haircuts in a back room at the Concord Hotel: “An accordion door would close, and he and the barber would have a nip back by the Playboy calendar. Then we’d get an egg cream at the soda shop.” Troublemaking meant wandering the woods, digging up milk bottles from trash pits. Like many ambitious tiny-towners, he ditched the area as soon as he was able, first for a music scholarship to a college in West Virginia, then for New York City. Through a series of circumstances, he wound up first as a maintenance man at Lotus, one of the primary celebrity nightclubs in the early-aughts, and soon after as its assistant general manager. The quiet, grounded upstater who seemed capable of handling any crisis was “all of a sudden being measured for Hugo Boss suits and outfitted with an earpiece I didn’t know how to use.” What he did know how to do was to be house mom to the club’s 2,000 revelers, promoting fun while keeping them and himself safe. Foster moved on to work with chef Geoffrey Zakarian at the Michelin-starred restaurant, Country. These days he’s a senior vice president at Commune

“I HAVE A LOT OF HISTORY HERE. My family’s been here for over a HUNDRED years.” Hotels and Resorts, overseeing cuisine and nightlife at nearly 50 hotels worldwide. But the more his career blossomed, the more his hometown tugged. On weekends he returned to Livingston Manor, opening a series of coffee shops and restaurants before fording the streamlet into hotel ownership with the Arnold House. Foster and his wife, Kirsten Harlow, an economist at the Federal Reserve, never bought property in NYC. “If we have capital,” he says, “we put it into something up here.” Currently, they’re finishing up a second hotel in nearby North Branch. The goal is to build a hospitality business in the Catskills that will eventually support them (and new son Maximillian) full-time. “I have a lot of history here,” he says. “My family’s been here for over a hundred years. One of my best friends growing up, his grandfather owned a fishing shack on the lake. I remember thinking, ‘One day, if I could just have one of these little houses…’” A Boys' Life gleam of pride comes into his eye. His shack and then some is making a good life.


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MEDICINE WOMAN BY EDDIE BRANNEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY NOAH KALINA

I’ve always been a bit wary of bees. Sure, I view them in the way most of us do, as industrious and necessary creatures that pollinate the local flora, as animals that labor intensively and selflessly for the common good of all: plants, animals, and yes, us humans. They’re a species I absolutely value but when I’m in close proximity to more than a few I start to think swarm and I start to think sting. So when Kelley Edkins welcomes me to her garden and waves me to sit mere feet from the hive—a traffic jam of apian ingress and egress at its keyhole door— well, I feel a flutter of trepidation. That soon passes. In fact the constant hum of the bees rapidly becomes a calming background note to an idyllic setting. Their to-ing and fro-ing and the pervasive waft of raw honey from the hive becomes a delightful aspect among many other scents, sounds and sights of an idyllic afternoon in the garden of a century-old house on a Sullivan County lane. This is where Kelley Edkins of Honeybee Herbs makes her home, along with her partner Brian, a thick-bearded and affable musician, computer programmer and angler. He helps her run Honeybee and joins her on foraging missions to find wild herbs, plants and vegetables. Raised between the Catskills and Staten Island, Edkins makes her living as a gardener, herbalist, medicine-woman and beekeeper in Roscoe, NY. Gardening is her primary occupation and she works closely with her clients to coax from their land not just produce and herbs, but aesthetic pleasure. “I started building gardens in 1999,” she explains. “I became a master gardener and ended up concentrating on sustainable permaculture designs.” Before it was widely understood, she followed a strictly noninvasive approach to horticulture. Her trained eye can now survey the terrain and assess where the presence of groundwater will help a garden, or its lack, conversely, hamper it. Her bare feet further assist, telling her what she needs to know about the nature of the soil, determining dry areas and those that are saturated from gravity-fed water run-off. As for tools, compost and worms are her primary ones; they’re far more efficient at preparing a good base than digging through top-soil and adding fertilizer. The end result: gardens that function like natural, fertile meadows. Edkins’s grandmother was also a gardener, and although the gene skipped a generation, she recalls an affinity for the soil from her youth. The attraction led to formal study which in turn developed into a business once Edkins moved to the country to raise her son after a separation. She acquired her knowledge of herbs from an herbalist with whom she’s been studying for 20 years. Her work with bees began as a mission of salvation. “I began to specialize in gardens because the

“I began to specialize in gardens because the honeybees were disappearing. I felt the need to chose plants specifically for honeybees.” honeybees were disappearing,” Edkins explains. “I felt the need to chose plants specifically for honeybees and my clients gave me that creative freedom.” In her own garden, she and Brian maintain a symbiotic relationship with the bees; the heirloom herbs feed the honeybees, the bees provide pollination services. While Edkins prepares and sells herbs and tisanes made from plants she grows, she will only

occasionally harvest and sell honey and wax from the bees, and only then if there is a surfeit after the winter has passed. She prefers not to see the bees as milch-cows but as co-workers and almost friends. Edkins’s approach to sustainability and natural symbiosis, once viewed as somewhat wacky, is now understood to be a horticulture method that’s both viable and valuable. Her at-one-with-nature attitude is infectious. As I said goodbye at the end of my visit I went over to study the hives, with my face only a few inches from the “doorway” where the drones enter and leave, something I would have been loath to do just an hour earlier. But by that point, after bidding adieu to both Kelley and Brian, I felt I couldn’t leave without acknowledging the rest of her team too.

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THE LOCALS

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LAST CALL/

IN CALLICOON

BY EDDIE BRANNEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL MUNDY

Arriving at the century-old Wahl farm, just outside of Callicoon, NY, is to encounter a bucolic scene unchanged by time. A dog bounds over in welcome while a cluster of tiny piglets beat a retreat to the barn. In the distance grey clouds hover over woodland alternating with fields recently mown for hay. It is a charming and delightful scene, appealing in its rusticity, intimate in its scale, reassuring in its tangible sense of tradition and heritage. A vista comfortingly familiar to Americans a century ago has become, in this age of industrialized agriculture, an anomaly. As has the appeal of farming. The fallout of large-scale operations absorbing mom-and-pop farms is the disappearance of inheritances and job opportunities. With rare exceptions, young Americans do not hear the call to farming, so how can they possibly heed it? It’s a question Ross Wahl wishes he didn’t have to ponder. And unless things substantially change for farmers like Wahl, the practice of raising heritage breeds on organic feed in free-range environments is doomed. “My great-great-grandparents came here in the 1850s,” he says. The land the current farm occupies was bought in 1921 and has been passed down from father to son. Wahl, slender and rangy with sandy, greying hair worn pragmatically short, would appear to be in his mid-fifties, though it’s hard to tell. He works his roughly 220 acres of land largely singlehandedly. Literally so—he recently lost most of the use of his left hand due to nerve damage and a surgery-related infection has curtailed the use of his right thumb.

All of which present extra challenges in wrangling the farm animals, especially the five sows who weigh in at more than 500 pounds each and the boar who serves as their stud. Smaller pigs are kept inside the barn, along with piglets piled on top of each other like puppies. In six months’ time, a piglet will be heavier than the average man; at 200-300 pounds, they’re ready for slaughter. “And there are the guinea hens!” A flock of vivid grey and white birds, tall with strong legs, are patrolling the pasture. “They eat up the ticks and bugs,” says Wahl, “and are as sharp as watchdogs,” sounding the alarm with a squawk instead of a bark. With free-range animals, especially small, vulnerable ones like ducks and chickens, predation is a constant worry. Losing nearly half a flock is typical between egg and market. Such losses, unavoidable for those who farm this way, drive up the price of free-range meat. As do USDA slaughterhouse regulations. To ensure that health and hygiene standards are met, farmers cannot slaughter on their own premises. For Wahl, bringing animals to be butchered requires up to 600 miles of round trips. With the added cost of storing the meat in freezers and transporting it to several different farmers’ markets each week, it’s a small wonder that the meat must be priced at a “boutique” level. But high prices don’t just buy wonderful meat from heritage breeds humanely treated. They support farms that in turn sustain the picturesque villages. “Farms are traditionally what have kept rural towns going,” says Wahl. “Losing one jeopardizes the other.

“Farms are traditionally what have kept rural towns going. Losing one jeopardizes the other. It’s a loss across the board, of economic viability, of community, even aesthetics.” It’s a loss across the board, of economic viability, of community, even aesthetics.” Without support of small farms, the bucolic agricultural landscape that has long characterized the Upper Delaware Valley may be reduced quite literally to postcards. Farmers like Wahl, working twelve-hour days, seven days a week, to produce high quality meat and dairy products, are a rarity, but the tide may be turning. A resurgence of interest in the source, quality, humaneness and sustainability of food has led to a flourishing of farm-to-table businesses upstate and to increasing attendance at farmers’ markets. Slowly, finally, we are recognizing not only that we are what we eat but that this land, and its future, is what we eat, too. Slowly, finally, Ross Wahl and like-minded fellow farmers have reason to be hopeful.

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GIMME SHELTER

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THE BARN BY TREY SPEEGLE PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL MUNDY

‘Upstate’ is a catchall word like ‘Manhattan,’ only much bigger and spread out. There’s no single version of what upstate is. Like New York City, it’s a state of mind as much as a place. It means different things to different people. To me, it’s a place I originally went to escape the city. But over the years, it’s become more personal. My home is called ‘The Barn,’ because that’s what it is (I know, original huh?). I’ve had my converted red barn for nine years now and being here is always a new experience for me. Every season is radically different. Summer gets the most praise, fall is gorgeous and winter can be picture postcard pretty if a little long. Spring is magical: come April, 2,000 daffodils and a 200-foot forsythia hedge announce the thaw, adding primary yellow to the red of the barn, the greening of the lawn and the crisp blue sky.

"When people in the city ask what I do upstate, honestly, 'as little as possible,' IS MY STOCK ANSWER.”

When I purchased The Barn, the structure still had its original beams. Its main floor is essentially one big room with 25-foot ceilings, anchored by a giant field stone fireplace that divides the space in two. The upstairs hayloft was cut away (not by me) to create a bridge that connects three bedrooms and an upstairs bathroom. Since the original beams had already been painted brown, I felt free to white out the entire space with 100 gallons of paint and primer. I also stained the floors a glossy black and eventually added large front windows and big barn doors along the patio on the deck side. The giant openings frame my yard and a pond in the distance. Years ago I came across a drawing I did as a child of maybe ten or twelve. It was a sketch of my ideal house that was a square with movable walls and had furniture on wheels. Although not exactly the same, I realized that I was now living in a version of a dream house of my childhood. It took over thirty years to get here but I found it. I daydream a lot here. My artwork is based on vintage paint-by-number paintings. The front end of The Barn is devoted to my painting studio and a shelved entryway where I store my collection of 3,000+ paintings. I designed The Barn so that it would be multipurpose. It functions as an exhibition and storage space (for decades of collecting), a retreat and a creative lab for artwork. I also rent out the space on a short-term basis. Besides my own work, not much of which is on view, I have around 200 framed pieces throughout the space, as well as three big vintage glass display cases where I keep all of my sentimental items and odd bits in view without looking like a crazy pack rat. (Or maybe I still look like one – do I?) Outside The Barn is a world of complete privacy. I can’t see a single neighbor. On any given day one or two cars at most travel down my road. Seclusion and solitude during these hectic times is priceless. So when people in the city ask what I do upstate, honestly, “as little as possible," is my stock answer.

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MEET YOUR MAKER

THE OUTLIER BY JILLIAN SCHEINFELD PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATT NOVACK

On a hazy day in June, I pulled up on a dirt road next to a Toyota Tacoma pickup truck and a 1968 Pontiac Firebird convertible—the only signs of Joshua Druckman, owner of the Outlier Inn. He could have been anywhere on the 12 acres of his farm, a retreat, recording studio and also his own home. Soon enough I found the 40-year-old producer and engineer, gathering a flock of chickens for their afternoon feeding. “Come on ladies,” he called, maneuvering through a muddy pen in Crocs and a vintage pinstriped shirt. The name Outlier is apt. What was not a traditional farm when he purchased the property 14 years ago, still isn’t. Outlier Inn is a demo of one way to live a life. “Initially the Inn was just going to be my home, my own little hideaway. It was a place for me to come to be isolated, to do what I didn’t feel like I could do in the city, which is build something. I felt too distracted in the city, like I wasn’t getting anywhere. I knew I had to get out and start creating a real place.” Druckman, who spent his summers as a kid in the Catskills, lived in New York City before “Brooklyn” was a thing, when the dream of making it in the city still seemed feasible for musicians. During his eight years there, he opened up a recording studio. With exorbitantly high costs and a flooded market, Druckman had to say “yes” to every project that came his way. What should have fed his love of music stifled it. After two years he shut the studio down. On the farm, he initially had only one, tiny control room atop a two-story house. As more parcels of adjacent property came up for sale, Druckman purchased them and began to shape the environment into what it is today: a man-made escape for the creation of music, sustainable agriculture and leisure. “At first I just invited bands and friends to come up and record, sort of as guinea pigs. I would do the occasional yoga or meditation retreat, but it was nothing like it is today. It all changed about three years ago when I produced a record with pop-folk singer, Luke Temple.” Temple, a well-connected Brooklyn-based musician, spent five months living the Outlier Inn experience and recording in Druckman’s then newly-built live room studio. According to Druckman, bands were sick of recording in the expedited “Frankenstein” system: multi-tracking take after take, loop after loop, a consequence of the digital recording evolution. “The whole experience of recording went from being a live, organic process to a highly programmed, quantized, auto-tuned process. Over the past few years, there has been a return of bands wanting to come together in a big space, be tight, play songs, record on tape and leave after a few days or a week with a record.” Shortly after Temple, bands such as Parquet Courts,

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TEEN, Yeasayer and Delicate Steve ventured up to the Catskills to write, record and produce their albums, all the while swimming in the Inn’s fresh water pond, fraternizing with the farm animals and reconstituting in the hammock from a long day of work. “The amount of work a band can get done here in a week is likened to a month in the city. And that week is not only hyper-productive, but also incredibly enjoyable.” “The studio, the animals and the farm are all very complementary. I always try and force the bands to take breaks and go for a swim and let the inspiration seep in. They get so much more out of stepping out of the studio onto the grass and into the fresh air than stepping outside to have a cigarette on the pavement.” Besides the euphoric, familial atmosphere, the Outlier Inn also contains the consummate balance of new digital and vintage analog equipment. “The plight of the 21st century recording studio owner is that you

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“I felt too distracted in the city, like I wasn’t getting anywhere. I knew I had to get out and start creating a real place.”

have equipment from the 1930s up until yesterday, all in the same room. A microphone from 1930 was not meant to interface with a pre-amplifier, so it’s a gigantic technical challenge. I have to act as the recording studio owner, the technician, the engineer, the producer and also a shrink, host and confidant.” Unlike most producers in the hurried and harried music business, Druckman prides himself on keeping the studio and space affordable. For him, it’s about sharing his space with musicians. With friends. With people who love the country air. And most importantly, with those who have misplaced their love of music somewhere within the red tape. It’s not only Brooklyn bands who are setting up shop at the Outlier Inn. Local musicians such as Debbie Palmieri, The Human Lard Dog and Doug and the Backseat Drivers are pleased to finally have a place to record and produce music near their own homes. “There’s such a great history of music in this area

of the Catskills, Sullivan County in particular,” says Druckman, “but it’s mainly, jazz, folk and blues. That’s awesome music, but there’s room for more. The audiences of the shows around here tend to be older; I don’t see many kids out. When I was young, going to shows was the best thing in the world. I would like to bring some music to the county that young people want to hear.” Although many of the bands that visit the Inn stay for weeks, even months, most of them travel back to play for city dwellers. In partnership with the DOWNTOWN Barn, a barn-turned-music venue in Liberty, NY, Druckman has set his sights on developing the upstate music scene to reflect the interests of younger audiences.

atmosphere will remain paramount. “The point is to make music, chill and relax. Simply put, bands kick ass up here.”

And he won’t stop there. Druckman’s next venture will be starting his own recording label at the Outlier Inn where bands will release music directly from Woodbourne. No matter how the business grows, the

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IN PERSON

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DARYL KERRIGAN

BY Heather Smith MacIsaac PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL MUNDY

We are living in the age of the yoga pant and that, as Daryl K would have it, is a sad thing. Not that she isn’t all for comfort. In the late ‘90s she roared to fame as a fashion designer with hip hugger pants that were so well cut and so easy to wear that they put her name on the map and her clothes on the backs, or more accurately asses, of everyone who was cool or aspired to be so. The New York Times’ Cathy Horyn, in a review of Daryl K’s fall 2000 collection, tidily summed up her winning way: “a renegade attitude with a knowing sense of modern sophistication.” In the years since, Daryl’s attitude has grown ever more independent. Never one to conform to a whiplash approach to fashion—it’s up, it’s down, it’s hard, it’s soft—Daryl Kerrigan, the Dublin girl who came to New York on a lark at the age of 22, is a seasoned woman of conviction and consistency. “Today there is too much fashion and not enough good design,” she says. We are sitting on the porch of her house in Equinunk, PA, sipping green tea and watching the rain travel down the valley toward us. “I understand the intention of yoga pants but who wants every nook and cranny to be visible? That’s not sexy.” What are sexy are the stretch leather leggings she’s been making lately. She disappears into the house to retrieve a pair. By the time she’s back the rain has pulled a curtain around the porch, turning the panoramic view into a green scrim that’s both soft and fragrant. Softer still are the leggings, made of lambskin bonded to a stretch cotton backing. A material originally designed for boots, its rich supple quality lends itself perfectly to pants with enough stretch for total comfort and enough substance for total chic. Daryl’s talent is first in seeing the potential of a material and then

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applying her design eye smartly. “Once you put these leggings on, you’ll want to wear them everyday,” she says. “Their second-skin nature moves with you and the stretch means they keep their shape so there’s no backing out of the room. And they work as a foundation for any look: under a silk dress, a sweater, a jacket, a white shirt.” Daryl’s fashion icon may be Jim Morrison but she designs with women of all ages in mind. She’s particularly sensitive to a category of women whom fashion ignores, those who are her own middle age and older. “We’ve come here together. We’ve been through the ‘60s,’70s, ‘80s, ‘90s. The turn of the millennium. We’ve seen the best and worst of everything and know better. I want my clothes to make women’s lives better, to be functional and sexy, to represent them, and in the end to simply improve their day.” Making life better, for Daryl, concerns far more than fashion. The more time she spends at her house in the country, tending her chickens, walking the land and studying the river from a platform her husband Paul built, the more her concerns have moved beyond her own work. “I don’t need to develop tons of things. I’ve done enough legwork; now I want to do brain work, to apply my energies to more important matters, like our gorgeous planet. What is life if you cannot drink the water and breathe the air?” “I feel a responsibility as a designer to move the needle, to have an opinion.” Being true to herself means living a life closer to nature, outside the cycles of fashion, and advocating for design that works, not just for women’s bodies, but on every front.


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“We’ve come here together. We’ve been through the ‘60s,’70s, ‘80s, ‘90s. the turn of the millennium. We’ve seen the best and worst of everything and know better.”

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SPONSORED STORIES

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STRAY CAT GALLERY Whether looking to brunch over live jazz, sip locally-crafted Most Righteous Bourbon, or browse sculptures and portraits with ties to the 1969 Woodstock Festival, The Dancing Cat empire has it all. Founded in Bethel, NY in 2010, The Dancing Cat is an idyllic hang for lovers of music, art and leisure,

all steps away from the Museum and amphitheater at Bethel Woods. Owners Stacy Cohen and Monte Sachs began crafting their own Shangri-La with the birth of the Catskill Distilling Company, an agriculturally minded craft distillery that attracts visitors for products such as Peace Vodka, One and Only Buckwheat and Curious Gin—not surprisingly, in homage to the era and generation that produced the best music in history. The Stray Cat Gallery—an arm of the Catskill Distilling Project, which includes the Catskill Distilling Company and the Dancing Cat Saloon— is sheltered in an airy, rustic restored building, and features a constantly changing array of photographs from photographer, Jerry Cohen, the intricate woodcarvings of Paul Stark and the eclectic mixed media of Ray Fiero. The Dancing Cat Saloon is lined with illustrious photos of Janice Joplin, Bob Dylan and the like, by famed 1960s photographers Elliott Landy and Jason Laure, and lead out to the sprawling “Peace Field,” a lush sculpture garden filled with structures by Denis Folz and Tom Holmes standing parallel to the iconic passageway to Woodstock. For Stacy, the Catskills was the obvious choice to build their ideal, multi-purpose compound. “We understand the area’s natural beauty, proximity to New York City, its agriculture and rich history. We also understand the opportunity that exists for good people doing good things here to help revitalize an economy based on the Catskills’ unique assets. There’s a lot to share here.” In addition to the unique dining experience and dinner tasting events—which feature paired cocktails and tasting dishes made with Catskill Distilled spirits—the Dancing Cat prides itself on building and supporting an artistic landscape in Sullivan County for those who connect with the roots of country living and the area’s colorful history. Infused with the whimsical spirit of the 1960s, the Dancing

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Cat is headfirst in creating an active and engaged community for tourists, second-homeowners and supporters of local arts, music and agriculture. Sunday, September 20th stop by for an Art Gathering and “Meet the Artists” event with an OOTRA Pop-up Boutique and Fashion Show.

STRAY CAT GALLERY 2032 State Route17B | Bethel, NY 12720 (845) 583-3141 | dancingcatsaloon.com stacy@dancingcatsaloon.com


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ROSCOE NY BEER CO. On a summer Saturday at Roscoe NY Beer Co., located right down the road from the famous Roscoe Diner, don’t be surprised to see a crowd at the bar or in the newly expanded tasting room. The former firehouse-turned brewery, known as the home of the Trout Town Hand Crafted Beers, offer self-serve taps, tours of its brewing facilities and live music throughout the week. For beer connoisseurs, Thirsty Thursday Growler Specials are a must. The Vallone and Fettig families—Roscoe natives who share a love for their hometown, the great outdoors and crisp beer—founded Roscoe NY Beer Co. in the spring of 2013. As the owners explained, they felt that “a town as all-American as ours deserves a beer of its very own.” Their ties to Roscoe, known for decades as “Trout Town USA," is apparent everywhere at the brewing company, from the name of their beers, like the popular Trout Town American Amber Ale, to the live trout swimming in the fish tank of the tasting room. Roscoe NY Beer Co. offers a range of brews to suit all tastes, including very light pale ales such as the Trout Town Tail Ale, to Trout Town Brown Ale, a robust, brown ale with rich chocolate and coffee notes, perfect for summoning fall days. For a break from your usual beer-of-choice, a pint of their Wild Ale, an expertly crafted brew made with 100% wild hops, will fit the bill. The owners of the company are very dedicated to local agriculture and use as much New York grown barley and hops as possible. Whether you’re hanging in the tasting room, sipping beer on a comfy, leather couch, or kicking back amongst the local paraphernalia and taxidermy on the walls, it really feels like you’re in the middle of the woods at a rustic, hunting lodge with a limitless supply of good beer.

The hardworking team behind the brewery, including Brewmaster Josh Hughes (pictured above), illustrates, “We are business owners, mothers, fathers, fishermen, hunters, bikers, horsemen, educators and hikers. We work hard, play hard and absolutely enjoy great beer when the time is right.”

When the team isn’t busy running brews and operations, you can find the Roscoe NY Beer Co. folks hunting, fishing and enjoying the natural beauty around Roscoe. Otherwise, the facility is open seven days a week year round. Be sure to also stop by the gift shop and pick up some local swag—like the comfy tees emblazoned with Trout Town USA. ROSCOE NY BEER CO. 145 Rockland Road | Roscoe, NY 12776 (607) 290-5002 | www.roscoebeercompany.com inquiries@roscoebeercompany.com

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THREADS: CONNECTING 60s TO MODERN ROCKWEAR

The Museum at Bethel Woods, situated on the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival, honors one of the most important eras in history – the 1960s. Since opening its doors in 2008, The Museum has presented exhibits ranging from “On the Cover of Rolling Stone,” a panorama featuring the leading 75 covers of the iconic magazine, to “Speak Truth to Power,” large-scale portraits of global human rights activists commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act.

The exhibit honors rock star fashion with 40 outfits that span from the 1960s to present time. Co-curated by fashion designer and musician, Andy Hilfiger, who once toured with The Ramones, Kid Rock and Blue Oyster Cult, the exhibit draws heavily on his personal collection of vintage clothing and textured couture he has created for rock legends including Stephen Tyler and Keith Richards.

Along with portraying the highly varied stories of the counterculture era, one of The Museum’s chief missions is to preserve the spirit of the 1960s and pass its lessons along to the next generation—which is why their current presentation on view is so fantastic.

In addition to their rotating exhibitions, The Museum’s permanent set is like taking a trip through the 1960s, if only multimedia technology and interactive displays existed. The main exhibit is completely immersive, highlighting the social, political, and musical transformations that all helmed at the Woodstock Festival. The colorful, expansive room and refurbished 1960s school bus make for a real “ah-ha” moment for adults and kids alike.

Displayed in the Special Exhibits Gallery is THREADS: Connecting 60s and Modern Rockwear.

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts in its entirety stands as a beacon of culture for Sullivan County. This

summer performances ranged from a chamber music series, to quintessential rock bands like Van Halen and Chicago. In the fall, Bethel Woods will present a variety of fall festivals, including the inaugural Live Well, Be Well – A Day of Peace, Yoga, and Wellness, and the return of the 17th annual Harvest Festival—a free community tradition for guests to browse handcrafted products while hopping from stand-to-stand for great eats and drink. And without mention, live music. For more information about The Museum at Bethel Woods and its diverse fall offerings including engaging speakers, contemporary movies, and a chance to spend A Night in The Museum, please visit bethelwoodscenter.org. Museum Fall Hours begin September 8th : Open 7 days a week, 10am – 5pm until October 12th Museum Winter Hours begin October 15th : Open Thursday – Sunday 10am -5pm until December 31st

BETHEL WOODS CENTER 200 Hurd Road Bethel, NY 12720 (866) 781-2922 bethelwoodscenter.org info@bethelwoodscenter.org

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SPONSORED STORIES

THE SULLIVAN HOTEL

BERNIE’S HOLIDAY RESTAURANT

Randy and Butch Resnick, proprietors of The Sullivan Hotel, consider themselves “Homegrown Sullivan County boys.” Both were born and raised in Mountaindale, NY, attended Fallsburg High School, and eventually broke off in different career paths. Randy pursued culinary arts and business management, while Butch took over the family supermarket equipment business. Itching to reunite, they found the perfect opportunity while in the midst of renovating a tuckered out restaurant in Rock Hill. With a foreclosed hotel right next door, the brothers decided to renovate the remnants and reestablish it as The Sullivan Hotel, a contemporary boutique hotel with onsite catering facilities and two adjacent restaurants. According to Randy, “What separates The Sullivan Hotel

from the rest is that this is personal for us. We love that we are apart of the Catskill renaissance and take great pride in our investments made up here.” The Sullivan Hotel is known for its premier wedding facility, where the Resnick’s and their staff handle everything from rehearsal dinners, to Sunday brunches and everything in between. Guests stay at the 70-room hotel, which offers a health club, as well as main ballroom that accommodates up to 300 guests. If a wedding isn’t in the cards, the Sullivan makes for a great stop along your way, conveniently located within a 20-minute drive from many Catskills land marks and neighboring towns.

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For newbies to the area, the team at The Sullivan Hotel is very knowledgeable about where to visit in the Catskills— and they especially know where to dine. After a long day traversing the Mountains, visitors can take a pre-evening nap in The Sullivan’s modern digs and a dip in the pool. With just a step outside, hotel-goers can access Crust Italian Eatery, a classic pizza and Italian restaurant. And for those seeking an elegant dining experience, Bernie’s Holiday Restaurant is an American fish house and sushi bar that prides itself on serving all locally sourced protein and in-season produce.

THE SULLIVAN HOTEL 283 Rock Hill Drive | Rock Hill, NY 12775 (845) 796-3100 | www.the-sullivan.com info@the-sullivan.com

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BUCK BROOK ALPACAS

On a 38-acre farm in the midst of the Catskill Mountains, sixty woolly, long-limbed Huacaya alpacas graze at Buck Brook Alpacas following the birth of a tiny alpaca named Maisy. The familyowned farm has had quite a busy summer welcoming 12 new crias in the span of two weeks. Surrounded by a perimeter of four barns on a bucolic plot of land in Roscoe, NY, owners, Kara and Justin McElroy lead the alpacas into an open pen where the animals calmly interact, seemingly sunning in the country light; some rest while others playfully nestle. The farm specializes in fiber production and is known for its award-winning herd sires, which range in hues of black, brown, grey and white. What sets Buck Brook Alpacas apart from the rest is its unique and environmentally friendly approach. Their alpacas are fed a primarily organic diet and shorn once a year every May. This fiber is then spun and produced locally to make beautiful alpaca products that range from soft classic scarves and mittens to luxurious throws and blankets. Buck Brook’s careful and humane process helps keep the farm running smoothly and their alpacas happy. Lighter than wool and more affordable than cashmere, Buck Brook Alpacas products are a big draw for many seeking locally, handmade goods in the state of New York. The fur is hypoallergenic, water resistant and extremely lightweight, making alpaca threads even more coveted. Buck Brooks Alpacas items are sold on-premises at the Buck Brooks Farm Store and online, as well as at various merchants throughout the county. Interested customers can also find their products on sale at The Farm on Saturday September 26th, when Buck Brook hosts their annual fall festival for the community in honor of National Alpaca Day. In addition to fiber production, Buck Brook Alpacas promotes agriculture within the region by educating clientele on the benefits of farming. Visitors, whether interested in acquiring their own alpaca or paying a visit to the store, are encouraged to ask questions about the animals, farming in general and the reality of tapping into the expanding alpaca industry in upstate New York.

BUCK BROOK ALPACAS 99 Bestenheider Road | Roscoe, NY 12776 (845) 807-3104 | www.buckbrookalpacas.com BuckBrookAlpacas@yahoo.com

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THE HOMESTEAD SCHOOL

“The point is to develop the childlike inclination for play and the childlike desire for recognition and to guide the child over to important fields for society. Such a school demands from the teacher that he be a kind of artist in his province.”— Albert Einstein

It’s a snowy Wednesday morning at the Homestead School, and there is no bustle in the classroom. But outside on a smooth, snow-coated hill, students between the ages of five and 12 years old are running sleds up and down the slope in snowsuits, with nowhere to go, nowhere to be, than at school. Detached from technology and any other demands, in this moment, there is nothing more than pure childhood, filled with tumbles, recuperation and unabashed delight. This is all before the studies formally commence—although there is nothing formal about the Homestead School, which makes it all the more refreshing. Academics, hobbies and out-of-class activities are dictated by the transitions of the seasons, by the ever-present reminder of change and growth. This is just a glimpse into what Homesteaders get to experience, and they indeed are the lucky ones.

After graduating the University of Washington in the early 1970s, Peter and Marsha Comstock settled on 85 acres of land, with a lone, standing farmhouse Peter inherited from his grandparents. Given their ample connection with the outdoors and pursuit of education, the Comstock’s found themselves in the position to establish the school of their dreams located in the hills of the Upper Delaware River Valley.

At the Homestead School—which is separated into preschool, elementary and middle school campuses— children are shaped into civic-minded, out-of-the-box explorers who learn how to be self sufficient, independent thinkers.

The Comstock’s are most excited to unveil their new Homestead Middle School Program this fall—which is led by their son and Montessori educator, Jack Comstock, and his wife, Nisha. Designed around community service, handson projects and building micro-businesses, children will learn skills from 3D printing to lessons in farm-to-table. At the elementary level, learning is further accelerated by off-campus visits, spanning overnight and multi-day trips, such as the Finger Lakes, Burlington and this year, an adventure in Portsmouth.

“We have been providing our students with an education that values engaging in hands-on-activities—as opposed to an exclusive regimen of pencil, paperwork and lectures—thereby developing a high degree of initiative and independence in our students,” said Peter Comstock, Head of School. Comstock along with wife and fellow-educator, Marsha, founded the Homestead School in the 1978, building its reputation as the first, largest and most established Montessori school in the Tristate area.

Whether students are gardening and composting; tapping maple sap from the trees; or spinning and weaving wool from the campus’ various sheep, Homestead School educators constantly challenge children to apply lessons learned in the classroom throughout day-to-day life.

Reflecting on all the joy his family has created over the past 37 years, Peter said, “Our biggest delight has been waking up each day and feeling good about what we are doing, and knowing that we are helping to make the world a better place.”

THE HOMESTEAD 428 Hollow Rd, Glen Spey, NY 12737 (845) 292-6200 | homesteadschool.com info@homesteadschool.com

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TENTRR

“Effortless camping” is a seldom heard phrase, but Michael D’Agostino thought it possible. His company, Tentrr, provides outfitted campsites and an online marketplace for landowners to earn extra money by opening their gates to a growing network of campers.

but frustrated to see so many fences plastered with “No Trespassing” signs. If only there was a way, he thought, to connect hospitable local landowners with nature-starved urbanites, so that everyone could benefit by sharing the land. Just like that, Tentrr was born.

D’Agostino and his wife Eloise were unable to find an available campsite during a busy weekend last summer, so they settled on a pricier vacation rental instead. They were awestruck by the landscape,

This year, D’Agostino began helping friends and local farmers in Upstate New York develop their private land into outfitted campsites. Tentrr provides its “CampKeepers” with the essentials that guests

will need to enjoy the outdoors, including a leveled wooden platform, toilet and Tentrr Campbox: a sleek, wooden dry-storage container, table and food preparation station that comes packed with a luxury tent and other useful equipment. Tentrr also hires local Camp Guides to help with site setup, maintenance and camper entertainment. With campsites in locations that have never before been accessible, Tentrr opens up a world of terrain – and makes it easier for everyone to enjoy it.

TENTRR Sign up to host or camp with Tentrr: www.tentrr.com Facebook: @TentrrCo Instagram: @TentrrCo Pinterest: Tentrr Twitter: @Tentrr

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FLOYD & BOBO’S It’s rare to stumble upon a familial restaurant in Sullivan County where you can access fresh baked goods, breakfast sandwiches, fresh wraps and paninis. Whether you’re on the go or looking to set up shop and relax with a pastry and a coffee, the husband and wife team at Floyd & BoBo’s Bakery & Snack Palace in Liberty, NY have breakfast and lunch down to a science. In the same vein as most New York City expats who move up to the Catskills, Ellen and Louis were weekenders coming upstate for the R&R and became vastly inspired by Sullivan County’s potential. Louis explained, “We were coming up on the weekends to decompress from the hustle and bustle of the city and came to Liberty and noticed that it was really quant; almost like the town had frozen in time.” The couple—who both previously worked in film and TV production—always had an interest in the food industry; Louie is an excellent cook and Ellen worked in the food industry peripherally for most of her adult life. Ellen elaborated, “Louis had the vision and skills to build something really special in a town that didn’t offer much when it comes to food and coffee. We felt we just had to open something here on Main Street.” What’s been so special to Floyd & BoBo’s team is the warm welcome they’ve received from Sullivan County residents since opening up their shop eight years ago. Customers are truly grateful for their contribution to the county, and you can tell by the smiling faces that walk into the restaurant, as well as the barrels of praise they receive for establishing such a transparent and accessible local business. Floyd & BoBo’s sole focus is to continue building a sustainable café style restaurant that offers the fresh food options taken for granted in the city in the midst of crisp air and the picturesque landscape of the mountains. At Floyd & BoBo’s, you can immediately feel that the owners not only love what they do, but love creating a service that is useful to the county. They consider most of their customers “friends” who keep coming back to the café for Louis’ countless family recipes and of course—habit-forming baked goods. Ellen and Louis are always trying new ideas for their menu and changing up the aesthetics outdoors and indoors. They recently added sculptures by local artists and source local landscapers for the beautiful plants and flowers every spring outside their storefront. Louie and Ellen both feel lucky to have set down their roots in Sullivan County and are most excited to take long rides and check out all the markets and outdoor activities that the area provides come fall. “For us, fall is pretty much Nirvana after a long, busy week at the shop.” And the sweetest news to local ears: Floyd & BoBo’s are open for business all year round.

FLOYD & BOBO’S 98 North Main Street | Liberty, NY 12754 (845) 292-6200 | floydnbobos.com info@FloydNBoBos.com

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CATSKILL CONCIERGE

Alan and Anna Li, partners in life and in business, have lived in cities all over the world. He was born in Hong Kong but raised in London, where he met Anna, a Brit who had spent time in Amsterdam and Frankfurt. After marrying, they moved to the States, setting up house in Washington, D.C where Alan led a very large technology team. While there, Anna, who had previously held senior positions at Condé Nast, Sotheby’s and the Financial Times, realized a long-held desire to launch her own business. “I started out in interior design but soon wanted to do more,” she explains. “I itched to take down walls and really see how houses could be transformed.” She became a licensed General Contractor known for a unique ability to revise floor plans, improve flow and enhance spaces so that homes are better suited to a modern lifestyle. Her projects have ranged from small cottages to large mansions, including several of the Lis own homes. After Alan stepped into a leadership role at AOL, the couple and their young son, Freddie, relocated to an apartment in Manhattan. Longing for a real house again, and wanting to expose Freddie to fresh air and the wonders of nature, they ventured upstate and bought a weekend place in the Catskills. They remodeled it, of course, and the longer they spent there, the more they yearned to live in it full-time. Like many other seasoned corporate execs, Alan had dreamed of

getting off the treadmill but wasn’t quite sure how. So he just took the leap and quit his job. The family transitioned to the country and has never looked back. “We feel so comfortable in this wonderful community,” says Alan “And we’ve made great friends, people who are focused on what’s truly important in life.” Still there was the question of how to make a living. Alan saw an opportunity to help weekenders with the upkeep of their homes, enabling them to enjoy their limited free time without worrying about chores or dealing with local contractors. And so Catskill Concierge was born. Alan then trained to become a licensed home inspector in order to provide his clients with a higher level of assurance. He knows what work needs to be done and uses a trusted network of local professionals to see it’s done right, from home maintenance and inspections to landscaping and pool services. A deft handling of budgets and timelines is a skill he brings from his corporate career. Not long after opening the business in 2014, it became clear that many clients also wanted help with refurbishing and remodeling their homes, so Anna joined Catskill Concierge to broaden the scope of services. Now they’re taking on projects large and small. “This weekend we found a puppy for a playdate with a client’s new fur baby,” she laughs, “did a walk-through of another client’s historic home house so we could begin envisioning the total remodel and then made a latenight run to check that a house had been properly locked up for a concerned client who had already returned to the city.” “I love not having to deal with the usual corporate hassles,” says Alan, “and being my own boss.” His wife gives a knowing smile. “But he still has to answer to me!” CATSKILL CONCIERGE INC. 910 Lenape Lake Road Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Office: (845) 288-2650 | Cell: (703) 609-2970 catskill-concierge.com alan@catskill-concierge.com

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CHEF SCOTT MYERS JOINS Hotel Fauchère The Hotel Fauchère has a long history of chefs bringing their best to Milford, PA. Swiss-born, French-trained Louis Fauchère was the first, arriving in Pike County in the mid 19th century. He was a master chef at Delmonico’s, New York’s first fine dining restaurant, and when he opened his summer hotel in Milford in 1852, he brought that elegant clientele with him. In the years that followed, many notables, including Charlie Chaplin, Sarah Bernhardt and a President or two journeyed to Milford, making the Hotel Fauchère an exemplar of destination dining long before the term was coined. Now chef Scott Myers is pulling in diners from around the corner and way down the road. Trained at the New England Culinary Institute and fresh from stints in Virginia at L’Auberge Provencale and the Inn at Willow Grove, Myers takes an approach to food and the experience of dining that respects traditional culinary foundations but rejects the binds of formality. “Diners are much more knowledgeable these days. They know good food and know you don’t have to go to a fancy restaurant to get it. Part of having a great meal is having a great time.” Just as fast as Myers is lining up providers, ingredients are appearing on the plate, like sous-vide guinea hen with chanterelles. His menu hits the sweet spot of special but not lavish in the Delmonico Room and comforting but not dim in Hotel Fauchère’s casual, bistro-style Bar Louis. Ingredients are emerging from farm, stream and forest as Myers taps the local bounty. And soon enough, the eggs at breakfast may be coming from his very own chickens once they settle in, having relocated with him.

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MICK’S BARBER SHOP When Michele “Mick” Frigoletto was a young girl, it was very uncommon for a woman to ever enter a barbershop. Today, Mick is the sole proprietor of a fourth generation, four-chair barbershop specializing in modern barbering techniques amidst a hip and pleasantly antiquated atmosphere in Honesdale, PA. When asked what’s been most challenging for Mick and her co-workers—known endearingly as “Mick’s Chicks”—the answer is simply earning respect as a team of courageous, talented women in a male-dominated profession. “At first, the attitude was very challenging. ‘A WOMAN?? In the barbershop? I’d never have a woman cut my hair!’ Now I laugh,” said Mick. “We have five very talented, professional woman barbers who give one stellar haircut after another all day long.” From hot towel shaves with a straight razor, to top-of-the-line exfoliating remedies and spa facials, Mick’s Barber Shop has a little something for everyone. Like her grandfather’s father before her, Mick and her team ascertain that each customer receives the full treatment, concluding each haircut with hot lather and a straight razor finish. Just a moment in Mick’s and one feels like they’ve been transported to a time that time forgot. The epitome of small town Americana, Mick’s Barber Shop has a clear anchoring in the past, elevated by its crew of savvy-minded professionals dedicated to maintaining an everyday, “feel good” vibe. With it’s modern barbering techniques and old school aura, Mick’s isn’t just another barbershop trying to be cool— it is the literal definition of cool. Mick’s Barber Shop is open for a clean cut all year round, except Sunday and Monday, when Mick and her team look forward to relishing in all that the area has to offer—especially Honesdale in the winter, which is illuminated by Christmas lights and holiday markets. As for future plans, Mick prefers to take it day-by-day. As her father advised, “you’re only as good as your last haircut.”

Hotel Fauchère 401 Broad Street Milford, PA, 18337 (570) 409-1212 hotelfauchere.com info@hotelfauchere.com

MICK’S BARBER SHOP 511 Main Street Honesdale, PA, 18431 (570) 253-2910 micksbarbershop.com mick@micksbarbershop.com

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rolling stone ranch Equestrians won’t find a more idyllic setting to ride off into the country sunset than at Rolling Stone Ranch. Lowell and Randi Feldman came across their magnificent property in 2005 while looking for a small parcel to breed miniature horses—but selecting the Catskills as their stomping ground was no mistake. As teenagers, the Feldmans spent their time summering in bungalows and camps in the Catskills. Their first family horse and beloved pet, Sundance, was an Appaloosa they kept in Roscoe. “Once the Catskill Mountain air gets into your blood, the memories never leave. Finding this property in Bethel was like coming home again,” Lowell said. At Rolling Stone Ranch, every animal—be it a pony, rabbit, or rooster—is treated like family. And of course, so are their customers. Lowell elaborated, “Our clients are made up of local residents, vacationers, weekenders and travelers passing through. We think of ourselves as down home and easy. It’s about having fun and learning about horses as you learn to ride.” The familyowned equestrian center provides riding lessons, trail rides, pony rides, boarding and parties for all animal lovers. The Ranch’s instructors and trail guides are top of the line, known for their ability to make the riding experience especially gratifying, educational and safe. Besides being a choice summer destination, Rolling Stone Ranch is open year round and offers a partnership program with the Boy’s and Girl Scouts, which cater to scouts from all over the Tri-State area. Young, old, experienced and complete novices are welcome with open arms at the ranch—one of its greatest charms. And when the lessons or trail rides are over, riders are encouraged to bask on the property and visit their famous miniature horses. At the end of the day, there is no greater joy for the Feldmans than to cultivate young equestrians, who as adults still come back with their own families to enjoy the rolling hills and unforgettable rides. rolling stone ranch 282 W Shore Road Bethel, NY 12720 (845) 583-1100 rollingstoneranch.com modge25@aol.com

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JAVA LOVE COFFEE ROASTING CO. If you asked the owners of Java Love Coffee Roasting Co. six years ago what the difference between a Sumatra and Papua New Guinea bean was, they would’ve stared at you blankly. Today, they’re the proud purveyors of two artisanal coffee shops—the flagship café here in Bethel, and its sister shop in Montclair, NJ. “After much consulting and deep breathing exercises, we decided to purchase an existing coffee roasting company and move the operations to Bethel, NY,” explained Jodie Dawson. At the time, neither Dawson nor cofounder, Kristine Ellis-Petrik, had any actual coffee experience, just a shared love for perk and a desire to contribute to the burgeoning creative community. “There are so many amazing artists, chefs, organic farmers here—people who are truly passionate about what they do and where they live. We wanted to find a way to be a part of that and provide a unique and desired product for the local community and visitors,” said Kristine. Unique indeed. Nowhere else in Sullivan County can you find a roasting company even slightly matched in caliber. Planted directly across from White Lake, customers are drawn by the proximity to Bethel Woods and the fragrant aroma of beans wafting from Java’s industrial coffee roaster. It’s common to find customers breezing through or hanging out on the front porch with a newspaper, a hot cup of coffee and freshly made pastries or breakfast burritos, which is packed with all local ingredients. The Java Love team will also custom grind coffee beans to suit specific coffee makers, and keeps a hefty stock of beans from all over the world. The Java Love shop has a welcoming, affable vibe, and its clear customer service is at the center of all they do. “When a new member joins the Java Love team, they are introduced to the Three “C’s” of the Java Love Experience,” said Kristine. “Customer, Coffee, and Community. “ Java Love is open seven days a week in the summer and part-time in the winter, so be sure to stop by for the fresh roasted coffee and linger for the view. JAVA LOVE COFFEE ROASTING CO. 1577 Route 17B White Lake, NY 12786 (845) 583-4082 JavaLoveRoasters.com info@javaloveroasters.com


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KRISTAL BOWL In 2009, Callicoon native Kristal Whitmore stumbled upon a gem in the rough: a defunct, old school bowling alley that required some tender loving care. Whitmore explained, “It was driving me crazy, just watching it sit there.” Unwilling to let the bowling alley waste away, Kristal took ownership and recruited mechanics to get those vintage pinsetters up and running again. Fast forward to present time, Kristal Bowl is now considered by locals as the best spot for beer, barbeque and bowling. Situated inside a retro 1940s-era bowling alley, Kristal Bowl keeps its vibe down-home and delicious with a menu offering items such as smoked chicken wings, pulled pork sandwiches, and yes, their signature barbeque ribs. Show up to Kristal’s ready to grub, bowl and dance to tunes from the electric juke box. Stop by for league night to scope the scene, and prepare to rub elbows with the best kingpins in the county. As far as its food quality, the giant black smoker in the parking lot guarantees that meats are smoked on the premises. For some pregame fun, fear not, there is a bar ready to serve a few rounds of pitchers.

KRISTAL BOWL 9202 Route NY-97 | Callicoon, NY 12723 | (845) 887-6887 bit.ly/ KristalBowl | kristalbowl@gmail.com

Locals will be happy to know that Kristal’s comfort food is now available for event catering, so if an opportunity presents itself for a whole roasted pig feast, call Kristal. She’s also known for baking the best cakes in the county. The alley is open for bowling and barbeque every day except Wednesday and seven days a week beginning in the fall. On Saturdays, order some ribs with a side of cosmic bowling – and without question, strobe lights.

murray’s chicken Murray Bresky has been up with the chickens for as long as he can remember. As a boy, Murray was constantly in-and-out of his father’s kosher butcher shop in the Catskills. Keeping up with the changing times and need for convenience, Murray’s father began his chicken processing business in the 1950s to offer customers fresh, ready-to-cook chicken. After college, Murray couldn’t imagine doing anything but joining the family business and helping it evolve into to the successful operation it is today. Raised without the use of antibiotics, growth drugs or hormones, Murray’s Chickens are free to roam and vegetable fed. As a family-owned business with deep roots in the region, Murray and his team focus on producing the finest quality of chicken in the safest environment possible. The chickens are shipped out within same or next day of processing, and the hands of the loyal team at Murray’s Chickens do all the work. According to Murray, they are like “one, big happy family.” Employing a team of 300 people, Murray has had about 200 of the same employees for the last 10 years, some starting straight out of high school. “I’ve watched my employees’ families grow. I’ve seen them buy houses, get married, and have children. It’s been very rewarding to offer jobs and contribute sustenance to the community,” said Murray.

MURRAY’S CHICKEN 5190 Main Street, South Fallsburg, NY 12779 Sales & Info: (800) 588-5051 | Plant: (845) 436-5001 murrayschicken.com

Murray’s strengthens the local economy and protects small farmers by allowing them to focus solely on the exceptional quality and taste of their Murray’s Chickens. Most meats travel a great distance to reach the dinner table. In comparison, Murray’s transport distance is always under 300 miles—consistently ensuring its signature product. City residents have greater access to Murray’s Chickens. Murray’s is sold at all big supermarkets in Manhattan, including Fairway and Key Food. For locals, Murray’s can be found at Peter’s Market in Napanoch and Eureka Market & Café in Grahamsville.

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BENJI & JAKES It all began with one wood-fired pizza oven built on an old jet-ski trailer and two brothers, Benji and Jake. The tight-knit duo, who spent summers in the Catskills, decided to merge their skills in sustainable agriculture and baking by taking their oven on the go to local events and farmer’s markets throughout the county. Undeniably, crowds couldn’t get enough and eight years later, Benji and Jake’s made a home on Kauneonga Lake. Their fresh, unique pizzas are still made with farm-picked ingredients, but now from a larger oven in a comfortable, two-story brick and mortar restaurant. In a region that had previously known only trattoria-style pizza, Benji and Jake’s specialty pies – like the Laughing Goat (vodka sauce, goat cheese, shitake mushrooms, caramelized onions) or the I Dream of Genie (aubergine sauce, black olives, pesto, sun-dried tomatoes, mushrooms) - are a delicious novelty. In addition to pizza, the brothers mix up their locavore menu with entrees like the Murray’s Free Range Brick Oven Roasted ½ Chicken and dangerously good desserts, such as their homemade chocolate brownie, served hot with a scoop of gelato. Benji and Jake have created a space where people come for the food—by car and by boat—and stay for the atmosphere. From the outset, they have welcomed local and visiting musicians to play live while customers feast, sip and listen. More recently, Benji and Jake’s opened an adjoining outdoor beer garden where one could easily pass a fall afternoon drinking crisp, craft beers overlooking the lake. For the gourmet pizza lover, Benji and Jake’s is a Catskills oasis.

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HEALTHY VIETNAMESE FOOD AT BÀ & ME Vietnamese cuisine at Bà & Me wholeheartedly makes the connection with Hippocrates' sage advice: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” The authentic chain of casual Vietnamese restaurants in the Upper Delaware Valley focuses on offering the freshest ingredients with health benefits that last long beyond the last serving of phở. Vietnamese food in general strikes the balance between satiation and mobility: the food is flavorful, the portion sizes are desirable and there’s never a lingering sense of a food hangover. Bà & Me’s menu features popular Vietnamese dishes including the classic lemongrass pork vermicelli noodle bowls, five-spice chicken sandwiches and the must-order garden summer rolls, stuffed with shaved carrots, cucumbers, lettuce, herbs and vermicelli noodles. Aiding in weightloss and packed with antioxidants, Bà & Me dishes rely on medicinal herbs, including cilantro, mint, garlic and ginger. Vegetables like cucumbers, lettuce and daikon radish, are fresh, never fried. The restaurant also offers gluten-free rice products like jasmine rice, rice noodles and rice paper, for those with sensitivities. To top it off, Bà & Me sources many of its ingredients from local farms and purveyors. Open year-round, patrons can now eat inside at the new Bà & Me location in Honesdale, PA. And coming soon this fall, phở lovers can finally warm their bones, as Bà & Me will be re-introducing their delicious signature dish made with a clean yet comforting vegetable broth, filled with garnishes like Thai basil, bean sprouts and a twist of lime.

BENJI & JAKES 5 Horseshoe Lake Road Kauneonga Lake, NY 12749 (845) 583-4031 benjiandjakes.com Halitara@me.com

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bÀ & Me 1023 Main Street Maude Alley Honesdale, PA, 18431 (570) 253-1985 bÀ & Me (Seasonal) 26 Upper Main Street Callicoon, NY 12723 (845) 887-3227 baandme.com


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catskill castles real estate It’s safe to say that when Nancy Fredericks, a fashion consultant, and her husband, Chuck, an advertising executive, bought a second home in Forestburgh in 1984, the Catskills real estate market was pretty lackluster. Attracted to the slower pace of life and mesmerized by nature, Nancy decided to start her own business and make a life up here permanently. Thus began her successful foray into real estate with her homegrown business, Catskill Castles, a full-service boutique real estate agency. Over the past five years, the market has grown at such a rapid rate that Nancy is working above and beyond just to keep up with the day-to-day buyer and seller demands amongst a surge of interest in living the Catskills lifestyle. It’s Nancy’s trustworthy demeanor, deep knowledge of the area and savvy business outlook that attracts her high-end clientele. According to the real estate agent, her buyers range from fashion and finance professionals to artists and entrepreneurs all seeking a woodsy respite from the chaotic bustle of the city. “People appreciate that they can come in their old clothes and be nobody. Clients come up restless, attached to their phones, and then I can literally feel it when they begin to change. They look around and start breathing,” said Nancy.

catskill castleS real estate (845) 794-1162 | catskillcastles.com nancy@catskillcastles.com

Her clients have become not just customers, but friends, which has resulted in making Catskill Castles a largely referral-based business. Whether inviting clients to the farmer’s market or to watch an evening sunset on her dock, Nancy simply wants to make her customers happy—and it’s her down-to-earth aura that makes people want to stick around.

catskill provisions When Claire Marin purchased her weekend retreat in the Catskills, she became completely captivated by the region’s unspoiled nature, and even more so by its lively honeybee community. Fascinated by bees and the art of beekeeping, she realized the potential in her own backyard for producing honey products and after eight years, quit her job in publishing to start her own line of fine foods, modeling the blueprint of natural purveyors found throughout Vermont and the Hudson Valley. By 2010, she founded Catskills Provisions, a company that has quickly grown into one of the finest foods distributors in the Northeast. Determined to make high quality raw, wildflower honey with no artificial ingredients or preservatives, Claire set out to be one of the best in the industry. “If someone is already doing something well, then we don’t make that product,” she explained. What began as a one-honey operation now offers a variety of seasonal honeys, including options like the fall honey: a rich and dark honey harvested mid-autumn when bees are known to feast on goldenrod, bamboo, asters and sunflower blossoms. All of Catskill Provisions honeys are locally sourced and never heated to maintain the natural antioxidants and amino acids that large-scale honey producers often sacrifice. For Claire, success has been a domino effect. Shortly after garnering a loyal following for Provisions honey, she noticed the opportunity for producing syrup from the region’s maple trees, leading to the creation of Catskill Provisions NY State Grade A Maple Syrup. Like any hungry, sentient being, she went to the cupboard to make some pancakes and it clicked: there were no quality, organic flour producers in the area; another hole in the market that welcomed Provisions to unveil a line of organic pancake and waffle mix. With the bees as her oyster and a blossoming reputation, Claire most recently partnered with a local distilling company to roll out New York Honey Whiskey, a handcrafted rye infused with late summer honey straight from the combs.

catskill provisions 244 Lake Road, Long Eddy, NY 12760 | (845) 418-6482 catskillprovisions.com | claire@catskillprovisions.com

There is no doubt that Claire Marin is as taken with honeybees as she is with producing first-rate products for like-minded, health-conscious customers. Her thriving company, Catskill Provisions, is sought after by food lovers and chefs alike, and can be found on the shelves of gourmet food and home décor retailers like Dean & Deluca, Union Markets and ABC Kitchen. 37


TUSTEN THEATRE Jazz music fills the theatre this fall, as DVAA presents two unique trios. Ameranouche plays Gypsy flamenco swing on Saturday, October 3 at 7:30 p.m. NYC-based jazz pianist and composer  Leslie Pintchik and her trio will play originals and standards on Saturday, November 7 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $18.

FORMULATING ORGANON | Rebecca Purcell September 4 th thru October 4 th BE(E)ing | Big Island Bees, Hope Ginsburg, Hal Klavsen, Barry Puett, Garnett Puett, J. Morgan Puett and others October 9 th thru November 4 th FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS | Jeffrey Jenkins and Amy Yoes November 6 th thru December 5 th THE MILDRED COMPLEX(ity) | Holiday Pop-up Shop December 11 th thru December 24 th

210 Bridge Street, Narrowsburg, NY 12764 | (845) 252-7272 INFO@ DelawareValleyArtsAlliance.org

37B main street, Narrowsburg, NY 12764 | www.mildredslane.com

CAS features contemporary artists from the region and across the country. In the galleries this fall: “Hand-Me-Downs” with Kathryn Kosto, Frank Mullaney, and Jake Seo from September 19 – October 18, followed by “Logarithmic Scale” with John T. Dinkey Jr. and Elise Freda from October 24 – November 22.

Now heading into our 4th year Allison Ward (Madame Fortuna) and Pamela Mayer (MayerWasner) are excited to present 30 talented artisans. We will be showing our wares two weekends in December, watch our Facebook page for details and updates; or email us to be added to our mailing list.

48 Main Street, PO Box 991, Livingston Manor, NY 12758 (845) 436-4227 | info@catskillartsociety.org

DVAA Recital Hall 2nd Floor | 37 Main street, Narrowsburg, NY 12764 (845) 252-3828 | pam@mayerwasner.com facebook.com/IndieNarrowsburg


MAIN STREET FARM Main Street Farm, market cafe, features small local organic farms and food artisans. Our market offers seasonal fruits, vegetables, fresh dairy and eggs, American farmstead cheese, charcuterie, quality meats and fresh baked breads. Catskill craft cider, beer, and wine. Our cafe prepares house made sandwiches, soups, sides, and salads using our fresh market ingredients.

The restored historic North Branch Inn marries casual elegance with fresh laidback style. The historic details take you back to a place where time mattered less and make you wish time once again stood still.  Our Bar Room and Restaurant, opening Columbus Day weekend, will have American made food and drink.  In the spirit of a blossoming community it will feature communal seating as great food is made even better by great discussion.

36 Main Street, LIVINGSTON MANOR, NY 12758 | (845) 439-4309 mainstreetfarm.com | Info@mainstreetfarm.com

869 N. Branch Rd, North Branch, NY 12766 | (845) 482-2339 northbranchinn.com | info@northbranchinn.com

Pottery inspired by the natural beauty surrounding this mountaintop studio.

Callicoon Brewing Company, a brewpub in a converted firehouse is open everyday at noon, year round. Local and regional beers, ciders, wines and spirits are featured along with our Callicoon Cow Pail Pale Ale and Brown Cow Porter. There is a full bar, pub food and growlers to go.

For artist Carolyn Duke, the transition from life in NYC to Sullivan County has been a journey of creative discovery. Duke Pottery has an art gallery and gift shop showcasing a wide variety of talented artists and local producers. 855 County Rd. 93, Roscoe NY 12776 | (607) 498-5207 dukepottery.com

16 Upper Main street, CALLICOON, NY 12723 | (845) 252-3828 callicoonbrewing.com


I S S U E NO 2 | F ALL 2 0 15

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EDITORIAL

DELA W ARE VALLEY EI G H T

DV8 Magazine Issue #2  

Featuring Fashion Designer Daryl Kerrigan and Fashion Show Producer Lynne O'Neill.

DV8 Magazine Issue #2  

Featuring Fashion Designer Daryl Kerrigan and Fashion Show Producer Lynne O'Neill.

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