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FLIP FOR OUR GLOBAL BEAUTY ISSUE

FRESH FACES

MAKING HOLLYWOOD GREAT AGAIN

YARA SHAHIDI

SOPHIE TURNER ISSA RAE RILEY KEOUGH KATHERINE LANGFORD

MAY 2018

HEAT WAVE SWIMSUIT, SANDALS, SHADES & OFF YOU GO!


FLIP FOR OUR GLOBAL BEAUTY ISSUE

SOPHIE TURNER YARA SHAHIDI ISSA RAE RILEY KEOUGH KATHERINE LANGFORD

FRESH FACES MAKING HOLLYWOOD GREAT AGAIN

MAY 2018

HERE COMES THE SUN SWIMSUIT, SANDALS, SHADES & OFF YOU GO!


FLIP FOR OUR GLOBAL BEAUTY ISSUE

MAY 2018

FRESH FACES MAKING HOLLYWOOD GREAT AGAIN

ISSA RAE

SOPHIE TURNER YARA SHAHIDI RILEY KEOUGH KATHERINE LANGFORD

HEAT WAVE

SWIMSUIT, SANDALS, SHADES & OFF YOU GO!


FLIP FOR OUR GLOBAL BEAUTY ISSUE

MAY 2018

HERE COMES THE SUN RILEY KEOUGH SOPHIE TURNER ISSA RAE YARA SHAHIDI KATHERINE LANGFORD

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FRESH FACES MAKING HOLLYWOOD GREAT AGAIN


FLIP FOR OUR GLOBAL BEAUTY ISSUE

MAY 2018

FRESH FACES

MAKING HOLLYWOOD GREAT AGAIN

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contents VOLUME 25 ISSUE 5

57 SWIMSUIT, SANDALS, SHADES & OFF YOU GO!

110 FRESH FACES Riley Keough, Katherine Langford, Issa Rae, Yara Shahidi, and Sophie Turner are making Hollywood great again FLIP FOR OUR SPECIAL BEAUTY ISSUE

FIRST 36 WHAT WE LOVE ABOUT MAY

44 VANITY FILES The latest global beauty news, from the brow shapes trending around the world to a hidden Ibizan spa

46 INSPIRATION BOARD Spice up your beauty routine with products influenced by Serge Lutens’ colorful Marrakech

48 WHO WE LOVE Zue Beauty’s quinoabased skincare line is taking down the Colombian drug cartels, one product at a time DRESS $1,495, Emporio Armani; armani.com.

110 RILEY KEOUGH DOESN’T PLAY BY THE RULES— WHICH IS WHY WE LOVE HER 18

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY ERIK MADIGAN HECK. COVER PHOTOGRAPHS BY ERIK MADIGAN HECK. ON RILEY KEOUGH: DRESS, EARRINGS, LOUIS VUITTON. ON KATHERINE LANGFORD: DRESS, VALENTINO. ON ISSA RAE: COAT, TOP & SKIRT, EARRINGS, BROOCH, CÉLINE. ON YARA SHAHIDI: DRESS, NECKLACE, EARRINGS, CHANEL. ON SOPHIE TURNER: DRESS, LOUIS VUITTON

ON THE COVER


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57 YOUR GUIDE TO WARMWEATHER ACCESSORIES, FROM STUDDED SUNGLASSES TO EMBELLISHED SLIDES AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN; MORE

@WORK 88 POLITICS AS (UN)USUAL White House veteran Krishanti Vignarajah is running to become Maryland’s first-ever female governor

NEWS FEED 99 NIKKI HALEY, U.S. AMBASSADOR TO THE U.N., HAS THE WEIGHT OF THE WORLD ON HER SHOULDERS; THE HIJAB PROTEST MOVEMENT; MORE

@PLAY 103 DON’T MESS WITH

contents

ACTRESS CONDOLA RASHAD ONSTAGE (AS BROADWAY’S JOAN OF ARC) OR AT THE POKER TABLE; CHARLIZE THERON ON HER NEW MOVIE TULLY AND THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE WTF OF MOTHERHOOD; MORE

MAY

101 IDEAS

IN EVERY ISSUE 41 EDITOR’S NOTE 28 MARIECLAIRE.COM 42 WHAT YOU SAID 146 SHOPPING DIRECTORY

147 THE SHRINK IS IN

SWIM TOP $99, L*Space; lspace.com. SKIRT $295, Maje; us.maje.com.

124

SUMMERTIME AND THE LIVING IS BREEZY

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 5

PHOTOGRAPH BY CARLIJN JACOBS

148 BACKPAGE

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ACCESSORIES THAT SHINE LIKE THE SUN

FASHION & FEATURES 110 FRESH FACES

124 SUN DAY Soak in the season’s latest vacation-ready swim silhouettes, prints, and après-beach styles

138 MEET THE KARDASHIANS OF THE MIDDLE EAST The social-media influencers ’gramming for social reform in their home countries

Ireland has one of the strictest bans on abortions in the world. Thanks to years of protest fueled by brave women, that law may soon be repealed JACKET price upon request, SWIM TOP $317, SKIRT $1,495, Michael Kors Collection; (866) 709-KORS. SUNGLASSES price upon request, Miu Miu; miumiu.com for stores.

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 5

PHOTOGRAPH BY ALLIE HOLLOWAY

142 THE FIGHTING IRISH

contents

Our five cover stars— Riley Keough, Katherine Langford, Issa Rae, Yara Shahidi, and Sophie Turner—are redefining success and giving Hollywood a muchneeded reboot

MAY

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FIRST

MARIECLAIRE.COM INSTA-BEAT OUR PHOTO-HAPPY EDITORS HASH(TAG) IT OUT

Cassandra Tannenbaum Associate Photo Editor/@rosecassandra Vatican, Rome

Kayla Webley Adler Senior Features Editor/@kaylaw Hello up there!

ALL SHADE THESE FIVE MULTIFACETED BRANDS REIGN WITH FULL-RANGE FOUNDATIONS, HAIR PRODUCTS FOR CURLS, AND BODY-POSITIVE MODELS THAT FINALLY CELEBRATE DIVERSITY.

marieclaire.com/inclusive-beauty-brands SOFT MATTE LONGWEAR FOUNDATION $34, Fenty Beauty; fentybeauty.com.

STAY IN TOUCH SHARE YOUR LATEST STREET STYLE, BEAUTY PICKS, AND MORE!

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MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

Adrienne Faurote Fashion Market Assistant/@adriennefaurote Day 1 of NYFW summed up in a photo.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF FENTY; COURTESY OF THE SUBJECTS (4)

Carolina O’Neill Senior Fashion & Accessories Editor/@carolinaxoneill Leave it to @tanyataylor to brighten up this rainy day.


FIRST OPEN SEASON Sparkly jewels, heavenly scented perfumes, and a luxe beach getaway top our list of the best gifts for Mother’s Day this year. marieclaire.com/mothers-day-gifts

CLUTCH $215, Claire V.; clairev.com.

BRACELET $350, Monica Vinader; nordstrom.com.

COAT $295, Cuyana; cuyana.com.

sephora.com.

TOWEL from $18, Lululemon; lululemon.com.

Treat your mom to a stay at the Shore Club in Turks and Caicos WATER BOTTLE from $10, Simple Modern; amazon.com.

HIT SEND Meet the latest and greatest monthly beauty boxes that include cruelty-free, nontoxic sets and under-the-radar cult favorites.

CLEANSING SWIPES $14, Clinique; ulta.com.

marieclaire.com/best-subscription-boxes SHOES $150, Brooks; brooksrunning.com.

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SOCKS $10, Stance; bandier.com.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THE SHORE CLUB; COURTESY OF THE BRANDS (10)

IN THE BAG


FIRST Lady Bird writer and director Greta Gerwig with actors Saoirse Ronan and Lucas Hedges

YEEZY $620, stylebop.com.

DEPTH OF FIELD MOTHER $345, nordstrom.com.

BALENCIAGA $1,250, stylebop.com.

REJINA PYO $520, net-a-porter.com.

BLUE JEANS, BABY STONE- OR DARK-WASHED, CROPPED OR OVERSIZE, DENIM JACKETS ARE AS VERSATILE AS THEY ARE COOL. DISCOVER THE COUNTLESS WAYS TO WORK THIS SEASON’S STAPLE PIECE.

Smalls

marieclaire.com/denim-jackets LEGGINGS $148, Tory Sport; torysport.com.

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jacket

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: MERIE WALLACE/COURTESY OF A24; GP IMAGES/WIREIMAGE (SMALLS); COURTESY OF THE BRANDS (5)

CHECK OUT THE TALENTED LADIES OF HOLLYWOOD WHO’VE SWAPPED THE ACTOR’S TRAILER FOR THE DIRECTOR’S CHAIR. marieclaire.com/female-film-directors


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FIRST WHAT WE LOVE

WHAT WE LOVE ABOUT MAY 2018 WHAT YOU NEED TO DO, SEE, HEAR, AND TALK ABOUT THIS MONTH 1. LOST AND FOUND

Hibiscus with Plumeria (1939) by Georgia O’Keeffe

2

2. IN BLOOM Stop and smell the art at the New York Botanical Garden’s “Georgia O’Keeffe: Visions of Hawai‘i.” The exhibit, opening May 19, features 20 works inspired by the artist’s nine-week visit to Hawaii in 1939, as well as Hawaiian flora.

3. MOTHER KNOWS BEST We’ve got your post–Mother’s Day mimosa brunch plans: Breaking In. This pulpy thriller flick packed with jump scares and ass-kicking action stars Gabrielle Union as a mother protecting her children during a home invasion. Don’t mess with mom.

4. RIOT GIRL Forget festival season. This month, we’re copping tickets to see L.A.-based Brit indie-pop rocker Bishop Briggs kick off her North American tour in Vancouver, British Columbia.

1

LEFT: Zora Neale Hurston, circa 1940s. RIGHT: Gabrielle Union stars in this month’s Breaking In. BELOW, FROM LEFT: Bishop Briggs hits the road; personalize this classic Longchamp bag at its new NYC flagship; Deadpool 2 explodes into theaters May 18

4

5. SPELL IT OUT New York is getting even chicer, like, Parisian chic, this month. French accessory brand Longchamp is opening the doors of its new, 4,000-squarefoot, bi-level flagship store in the city. The shop will feature the full range of Longchamp’s collections and offer in-store personalization of its signature style staple, the Le Pliage.

6. ALIVE AND KICKING Your favorite foulmouthed superhero is back: Deadpool 2 opens May 18. Expect even more of Ryan Reynolds’ oddly sexy Deadpool swagger, explosions and expletives, and bad-guy moves from the likes of Josh Brolin and Zazie Beetz.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: 2018 GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; DANIEL ZUCHNIK/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF THE BRAND; COURTESY OF 20TH CENTURY FOX; MEREDITH TRUAX; CARL VAN VECHTEN/COURTESY OF THE VAN VECHTEN TRUST; COURTESY OF THE PUBLISHER

Chances are, you’ve read (and love) Zora Neale Hurston. Which means, like us, you already preordered your copy of Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” (Amistad), available May 8. Hurston’s never-beforepublished manuscript chronicles the life of one of the last known living survivors of the Atlantic slave trade.


WHAT WE LOVE

7

11

ABOVE: Your go-to date-night look just got sustainable

8

9

7. GOOD TASTES

11. CAPTAIN PLANET

If you’re one of the gazillion readers who devoured author Stephanie Danler’s Sweetbitter—about Tess, a twentysomething surviving and thriving in New York’s food scene— then check out Starz’s new show of the same name. Based on the best seller, the Brad Pitt–produced series stars Ella Purnell as Tess and premieres on May 6. Bon appétit!

Haney’s newly launched green label collection is as good for the earth as it is for your closet. Like this breezy, sexy, ’70s Jerry Hall–inspired LBD, available this month. The dress, like the rest of the line, is made entirely in L.A., ensuring a low carbon footprint and supporting local factories. (Dress, $395, Haney Green Label; shophaney.com)

8. ROSÉ ALL DAY

12. GIDDYAP

Fill your ice bucket: National Wine Day is May 25. There’s no better way to savor the unofficial start of summer—Memorial Day Weekend— than with a chilled glass of whatever you want.

Our favorite sci-fi horror-thriller series Westworld returns to HBO. Spoiler: Those creepy humanoid robots are back, still angry, and even more hell-bent on revenge than ever before. But we’re still Team Evan Rachel Wood, no matter what.

9. GOLD RUSH

ABOVE: Ella Purnell is sugar and plenty of spice in Starz’s Sweetbitter. BELOW: Azzedine Alaïa in 1985 and his 1990 Bandelettes dress

Clear out some serious closet space: Tomasini, the fashion accessories brand with an It girl cult following, is launching its first-ever shoe collection. (Boots, $950, Tomasini at Barneys; 212-826-8900)

10. PHANTOM THREAD Book your flight to London ASAP: The Design Museum’s exhibition “Azzedine Alaïa: The Couturier” opens May 10. The show features more than 60 garments spanning the late fashion icon’s career alongside commissioned pieces from a curated group of designers.

13. CHILD’S PLAY Sally Hansen has teamed up with Crayola for its new Insta-Dri Spring Fling Collection. The six seasonal shades, in colors like Melon and Cotton Candy, dry in just 60 seconds, so you can go back to your adult coloring books in no time.

14. GLOW UP Ready your skin for summer with Seed Phytonutrients. The newly launched natural beauty brand’s first collection includes ingredients like sunflower seeds (rich in vitamin E) and Camelina seeds (brightening and antiaging).

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LEFT: Evan Rachel Wood is taking over in HBO’s Westworld

CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT: HEIDI TAPPIS; EKATERINA MOLCHANOVA/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF THE BRAND; COURTESY OF HBO; COURTESY OF THE BRAND; RICHARD MELLOUL/SYGMA/CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF AZZEDINE ALAIA

FIRST


3 1 9 N O R T H R O D E O D R I V E B E V E R LY H I L L S


FIRST EDITOR’S NOTE

PHOTOGRAPH BY CARLIJN JACOBS. FULENWIDER: SHARON SUH

Hit Refresh There are so many reasons to love spring: warmer weather, longer days, the hint of summer. We couldn’t resist filling this issue with swimwear—flip to “Sun Day,” page 124, for simple-yet-sophisticated bathing suits and cover-ups, or to page 57 for sunglasses and all beachworthy accessories. But if I’m being totally honest, I have to admit that my absolute favorite thing about this season is spring cleaning. It’s a chance to shed the baggage of the winter (or, really, of all year) and begin again, renewed by having less weighing me down. It turns out I am not alone in thinking this way. The brilliant and funny Issa Rae, one of our five cover stars, admits she loves early mornings, Mondays, and even the month of January for the same reason. “Anytime I feel like I have a fresh start, I feel more powerful,” she says. Hollywood is in desperate need of a reset, and our five fresh faces are bringing it (page 110). In addition to starring in some of the buzziest movies and TV shows this season, each of them has a strong sense of self and know what they stand for—and what they Hit the won’t stand for. Actress Riley Keough heads her own beach in production company that’s developing a film about the sporty geometric Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (she has Native swimsuits, American roots on grandfather Elvis Presley’s side). page 124 Eighteen-year-old Yara Shahidi shows the truest portrayal of a college experience I’ve seen on television on Grown-ish—one year before she lives it herself and enters Harvard in the fall of 2019. Game of Thrones’ leading lady Sophie Turner is not sorry that people are living in fear of being called out for sexual harassment, and after a struggling-actress phase that involved dressing up as the Easter Bunny at the mall, 13 Reasons Why’s breakout actress Katherine Langford is modernizing the way we view mental health. These young but mighty powerhouses are redefining what it means to be a starlet in Hollywood, and we’re beyond impressed. Covering women carving out their own paths is a specialty at Marie Claire. I have admired Krishanti Vignarajah ever since she worked as Michelle Obama’s director of policy. The daughter of Sri Lankan immigrants has never held a public oice and had just given birth to her first child when she decided to run to be the first female governor of Maryland. She says she couldn’t just stand by and watch the Maryland she grew up in—the place she lived out her American

OK, NOW TALK TO ME!

dream—change in a way that would make those same dreams impossible for others. With her running mate, Sharon Blake, theirs is the first gubernatorial ticket to feature two women of color. Read about her historic run in “Politics as (Un)usual,” page 88. Call spring whatever you like—an awakening, a refresh, a closet cleaning—but take inspiration from the women resetting norms on our screens, in our government, and around the country, then carve out your own path to change.

Anne Fulenwider EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

annefulenwider@marieclaire.com

Tell me what you love, don’t love so much, or want to see more of in Marie Claire. I want to hear it all! Bear with me if I don’t respond immediately.

May 2018

M AR I ECL A I R E. COM

41


FIRST

WHAT YOU SAID

WHEREVER YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT MC, WE’RE LISTENING. HERE’S WHAT YOU HAD TO SAY ABOUT OUR MARCH ISSUE Joint Task Force

@megannenicole: WORD. “How do you distmantle a system plagued with harassment? By talking about it!” Seriously recommend reading this series by @ Esquire and @marieclaire! #MeToo @carolinedettman: From the minds at Marie Claire and Esquire, this is the best I’ve seen in terms of where we go from here to get to a culture of empowerment. @gwenfaviles: The collaborative spread by @marieclaire and @Esquire about the #MeToo movement culminates in some of the strongest writing during this time.

Nailed It Fashionablykateandco: Spotted in the latest @marieclairemag. Once again I am ahead of the trends!

LET IT OUT!

42

March cover star Reese Witherspoon in Proenza Schouler

Reese Rules @maarit_tanen: You are an inspiration, @RWitherspoon! After all these years, I am finally getting to have my self-esteem back, and your example, and that of @jes_chastain and @ava and other women I admire have given me the strength to go out into the world and realize my dreams. Thank you! @Baylee_garred: @RWitherspoon @marieclaire @AnneFulenwider Loving how you are 100% no exception @whodjonez: @RWitherspoon @marieclaire @AnneFulenwider Did you ever think you’d turn into a creative powerhouse? @Sarah_Wardell: @RWitherspoon @marieclaire @AnneFulenwider Reese, hire me!

@Kyrzayda_: Some of my favorite things: Brunch, makeup, flowers and inspo magazines!!

@Iam_marie3: Thursday night #sorelaxing

@Bombbooks_: Had to buy this just because @ReeseWitherspoon was on the cover

Tell us what you really think about this issue. Visit marieclaire.com to join the fray, or send your feedback directly to annefulenwider@marieclaire.com. Letters may be edited for space or clarity.

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

FROM TOP: THOMAS WHITESIDE; COURTESY OF THE SUBJECTS (4)

Your package on sexual harassment [“Sex, Lies, and Human Resources”] is an inspiring take in the wake of this conversation. What I like most is that the writers don’t pretend to know everything. A lot of times people talk about this issue in black and white, in terms of what is acceptable and what’s not. This package addresses the gray area, the uncertainty, which I think makes the conversation more accessible, especially to those who aren’t well-versed in the topic. Many people are confused but are too afraid to say or do the wrong thing, and then never get clarification. This piece doesn’t try and pretend to be perfect or know all the answers, which is why I think it’s a crucial read. —Amanda Marconi, Philadelphia


*


FIRST BEAUTY PASSPORT

Having a Moment

JENNIFER YEPEZ

MONOI

This coconut oil infused with Tahitian gardenias has long been revered for its intoxicating scent, but it’s also being used for treatment benefits. In Éminence’s night cream, it helps hydrate and firm your complexion. L’Oréal Paris combines it with floral extracts and sunflower oils for a shine-enhancing hair elixir. And SheaMoisture’s multipurpose hydrator can be used alone 2 or as a booster: Add a pump or two to your 3 favorite products for extra moisture and a hit of that famous floral fragrance.

THE KÉRASTASE PARIS STYLIST (CLIENTS INCLUDE ZENDAYA AND THE HADID SISTERS) SHARES HER TRAVEL TIPS

Plane musthaves: “Bioderma’s

1. ÉMINENCE Monoi Age Corrective Night Cream for Face & Neck, $64. 2. L’ORÉAL PARIS Elvive Extraordinary Oil Treatment, $7. 3. SHEAMOISTURE 100% Pure Monoi Oil Head to Toe Illumination, $9.

ARCH EXPLORER Women all over the world define their brows in different ways. Here are some of the top trends, according to Jared Bailey, Benefit’s global brow expert

MIDDLE EAST The women of this region have always loved winged eyeliner; now, they’re gravitating to a similarly winged brow shape. “It’s eye-opening and gives you a mini face-lift,” notes Bailey. SCANDINAVIA “This European market always seems to be ahead of the curve with beauty,” says Bailey. The new look: oversize arches that start closer together, for a noseslimming effect. KOREA Locals call this gently arched brow with a tail that trails off dramatically the shooting star. “It took off when actress Song Hye-Kyo sported it on Descendants of the Sun,” says Bailey. BENEFIT COSMETICS Precisely, My Brow Pencil, $24.

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VANITY FILES THE LATEST IN MAKEUP, SKIN, AND HAIR—FROM AROUND THE GLOBE! By Jennifer Goldstein

ALL HEART

The revamped Healthy Sexy Hair line got some love from an international art star: Its new hair oil is plastered in an amorous print from London-born artist JGoldCrown, whose “Love Wall” murals appear worldwide in places such as New York, L.A., Brazil, and China. HEALTHY SEXY HAIR Love Oil, $23.

GARDEN SECRET Mamonde, a new-to-the-U.S. line from K-beauty giant AmorePacific, takes its inspiration—and its ingredients—from flowers grown in Korea: camellia from the company’s garden just outside

Mamonde’s garden outside Seoul, South Korea

MAMONDE Petal Purifying Bubble Mask, $25.

Recovery plan: “I always pack a travel-size V.I.P. spray [above] to give my hair some postflight volume so I can go straight to work when I land.”

Treatment to try: “The deep tissue massage at the Address Downtown, in Dubai, is the best I’ve ever gotten.” Top spa: ”Hacienda na Xamena, in Ibiza, has a treatment where you move through eight pools at different temperatures, and they all have hydro-jet massagers. The views from the pools are stunning.” International inspo: “My family is from Quito, Ecuador, and I love the beauty culture there. There are so many indigenous tribes with unique styles; some even decorate their hair with different-colored clays.” KÉRASTASE Styling V.I.P., $17. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. SWIPE: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM CENTER: WILL WHIPPLE/ THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM; COURTESY OF JENNIFER YEPEZ/KÉRASTASE; MAMONDE; COURTESY OF BENEFIT COSMETICS (3)

1

Atoderm lip balm is the only one that really hydrates my lips. And I bring Joanna Vargas’ face masks and Honest Beauty’s facial oil, which I also use on my hands because it helps with my eczema.”


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FIRST

1 4 3 The courtyard of Lutens’ riad

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Interior of the Serge Lutens Foundation

INSPIRATION BOARD 14 13

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MARRAKECH Creative types have long been drawn to Marrakech: Yves Saint Laurent was influenced by its exotic textiles and lush gardens, style icon Talitha Getty basically invented bohemian-chic when she was photographed lounging on a local rooftop in a now classic image, and makeup artist, photographer, and perfumer Serge Lutens has lived and worked there for decades. On a recent trip, I got an astonishExecutive Editorial ing glimpse of the world that the famously private Lutens Director, Beauty has created: In 1974 he purchased a riad, a traditional ERIN F LAHERT Y Moroccan palace built around a courtyard, and spent the next 30 years restoring it, employing local artisans to create interior spaces decorated with handcrafted tile and woodwork in elaborate geometric arabesque patterns. I even got a peek at the fragrance laboratory where Lutens creates scents—a true magician’s lair filled with mysterious bottles and potions and olfactory ingredients. Until now, this sprawling, maze-like residence was closed to the public, but thanks to a special partnership with the Royal Mansour hotel (royalmansour.com), guests can now sign up for a private tour. Beauty lovers, take note: It doesn’t get more inspiring than this. 1. RITUALS The Ritual of Hammam Warming Massage Oil, $19. 2. MOROCCANOIL Color Complete Protect & Prevent Spray, $30. 3. KAHINA GIVING BEAUTY Lip & Face Balm, $44. 4. JOSIE MARAN Argan Liquid Gold Self-Tanning Oil, $38. 5. NEST Moroccan Amber Reed Diffuser (reeds shown), $44. 6. PAULA’S CHOICE Moisture Renewal Oil Booster, $36. 7. GOOP G.Tox Detox 5 Salt Bath Soak, $35. 8. TOCCA Marrakesh Hand Wash, $20. 9. GROWN ALCHEMIST Persian Rose & Argan Extract Intensive Hand Cream, $27. 10. GARNIER Whole Blends Illuminating Moroccan Argan & Camellia Oils Leave-In Treatment, $7. 11. L’ORÉAL PARIS Elnett Precious Oil Satin Hairspray Extra Strong Hold , $15. 12. CREME OF NATURE Heat Protector Smooth & Shine Polisher, $7. 13. ANASTASIA BEVERLY HILLS Eye Shadow Singles in Morocco, $12. 14. SERGE LUTENS Dent de Lait Fragrance, $230. 15. LAURA GELLER Line-N-Define Dual Dimension Eyeliner in Black, $24. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

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STILL LIFES: JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MARIUSZ_PRUSACZYK/GETTY IMAGES; ROYAL MANSOUR; MARIUSZ_PRUSACZYK/GETTY IMAGES; ENCRIER/GETTY IMAGES; ANDREA PAVAN/GETTY IMAGES; ROYAL MANSOUR

12


FIRST Zue Beauty cofounders Gabriel Maya and Nathaly Millan (top row, both in black) with students, teachers, and community members of La Mesenia, Colombia The Cauca municipality is home to many of Colombia’s indigenous people

WHO WE LOVE

Seeds of CHANGE QUINOA-BASED SKINCARE LINE ZUE BEAUTY FOCUSES ON SOCIAL ACTIVISM—AND SMOOTH SKIN Olga Alvear Medina and fellow farmers in Colombia’s indigenous Páez community have been at the mercy of their country’s notorious drug wars for years. Her husband was killed by guerrillas four years ago, and armed groups with ties to drug cartels—many are dissidents of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN)—have been active in her hometown of Jambaló for decades. Just three years ago, a man who sold crafts in the local market was approached by guerillas and “asked to pay ‘vaccines,’” Alvear Medina explains, using the local term for the cut of profits taken in exchange for leaving locals alone. When he refused, “he was disappeared”—another victim of the country’s armed conflict. But this year, things seemed to be improving. Many in Jambaló and other Páez villages had stopped growing coca for the cartels’ cocaine production and were instead harvesting quinoa for U.S.-based skincare company Zue Beauty. Then, a setback: In February, three more Páez disappeared, and the residents of Jambaló received notices on FARC letterhead saying the safety of strangers passing through the area could not be guaranteed. “Things had been better since the government signed a peace treaty with FARC in 48

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

2016, so I’m not sure what’s going on now,” says Gabriel Maya, the CEO of Zue and one of its founders. “But this is why we started the company. We want to support this community and bring about change.” Rather than building an ethical beauty brand in typical fashion—developing products, sourcing fair-trade ingredients, and giving to philanthropic causes—Maya and his cofounders, Nathaly Millan and Felipe Maya, wanted social activism to come first. “If you change the life of the guy who grows coca,” he says, “you can slow the drug trade, and then you might end Colombia’s drug war.” His first challenge: How to convince farmers not to grow coca? Before cofounding the company, Gabriel Maya met with people in Jambaló and other Páez villages and learned they were growing small amounts of white quinoa, which sold for about 2,000 Colombian pesos (less than $1) a pound. To survive—and often because they were coerced to do so—they also cultivated coca. Gabriel Maya figured if he could pay more for the quinoa than farmers got for coca, they would change crops. “It’s not like I could ask them how much drug runners paid,” he says. “The cartels would see me as competition, and that could be really bad.” Instead, he hosted community meetings and negotiated

ZUE BEAUTY Daily Facial Moisturizer, $20

with locals until they settled on a price that was high enough to persuade several brave farmers to make the switch. Just like that, Gabriel Maya was the proud owner of some really expensive quinoa. He knew if he used it to make something cheap, such as a snack bar, the company would never be profitable. So he had a chemist study the grain’s skincare potential and develop a process to manufacture a cosmetic quinoa extract that can be preserved without chemicals. The ingredient is now produced in a plant in Cali, Colombia, that is also part of the socialactivism-first philosophy: The entire staff is female, and many are from the surrounding La Floresta neighborhood, which has a history of drug-related crime. The activism doesn’t stop there. Zue products also have a GiveBack code on the label that lets the customer choose a cause—in Colombia, the U.S., or Canada—that benefits from a portion of the purchase price. One close to Gabriel Maya’s heart is La Mesenia Paramillo, a nature reserve that employs villagers from La Mesenia, a community deep in the forest, four hours outside Medellín. On a recent visit, he stopped by La Mesenia’s school, which also receives a Zue donation. “Twenty years ago, kids here were in the middle of the war between the government military and guerillas,” he says, pointing to bullet holes on the school’s exterior, barely visible beneath a coat of bright yellow paint. Today, many in La Mesenia are working for the reserve (the forest remains practically untouched by humans, and, in 2013, researchers discovered a new mammal species on the land). “This is how a social-first company works,” Gabriel Maya says. “Sure, we make natural products that are good for you, but what we really do is help the community, so they can support themselves, which ends up helping the environment, too.” That’s really how you pay it forward. —Jennifer Goldstein

STILL LIFE: COURTESY OF THE COMPANY. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: AGE FOTOSTOCK/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; JENNIFER GOLDSTEIN; SEBASTIAN TERAN

Quinoa growing in Jambaló, Colombia

Zue Beauty products feature a proprietary quinoa extract high in antioxidants (vitamins B, C, and E) and lysine, a protein that supports skin health.


S I M O N G J E W E L RY.CO M


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

ANNE FULENWIDER @annefulenwider

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

KATE LANPHEAR

SUNGLASSES $400, Chloé; neimanmarcus.com.

RIZA CRUZ @rizagcruz MANAGING EDITOR JOYCE BAUTISTA FERRARI @joycebferrari LEAH WYAR ROMITO @leahwyar EXECUTIVE EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, LUXURY BEAUTY ERIN FLAHERTY @erinflahertynyc DESIGN DIRECTOR WANYI JIANG CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR, HEARST MAGAZINES ALIX CAMPBELL @alixcampbell PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JAMES MORRIS @j_alexander_photo EXECUTIVE EDITOR

CHIEF BEAUTY DIRECTOR, HEARST MAGAZINES

SENIOR EDITORS

F E AT U R E S KAYLA WEBLEY ADLER @kaylawebley COLLEEN MCKEEGAN @clmckeegan JEN ORTIZ @jenortiznyc SENIOR INTERNATIONAL EDITOR ABIGAIL HAWORTH @abihaworth

FAS H I O N JOSEPH ERRICO @j_errico ACCESSORIES DIRECTOR JULIA GALL @juliasgall FASHION EDITORS-AT-LARGE ENRIQUE CAMPOS, ALISON EDMOND @aledmond ZANNA ROBERTS RASSI @zannarassi SENIOR FASHION & ACCESSORIES EDITOR CAROLINA O’NEILL @carolinaxoneill FASHION FEATURES ASSOCIATE SARA HOLZMAN @saraholzman MARKET ASSISTANTS KATIE ATTARDO (ACCESSORIES) @katieattardo ADRIENNE FAUROTE (FASHION) @adriennefaurote FASHION ASSISTANTS TAYLOR AYERS @ayers_taylor BELLA KHOSHABA @bellakhoshaba FASHION DIRECTOR

B E AU T Y JENNIFER GOLDSTEIN @jenn_edit ALEXANDRA ENGLER @alex_blair_ BEAUTY ASSISTANTS TAYLORE GLYNN @tayloreglynn SAM NEIBART @sneibart BEAUTY DIRECTOR/FEATURES EDITOR

ASSOCIATE BEAUTY EDITOR

A RT/ P H OTO/ P RO D U CT I O N CARL KELSCH CASSANDRA TANNENBAUM @rosecassandra DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST REBECCA IOVAN DESIGNER SUSANNA HAYWARD @susannahayward ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR

ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR

ENTERTAINMENT CONSULTANTS

NICOLE VECCHIARELLI & ANDREA OLIVERI FOR SPECIAL PROJECTS @specialprojectsmedia

A D M I N I ST R AT I O N JULI CHIN EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MEGAN D I TROLIO @meganditrolio BUSINESS DIRECTOR

M A R I EC L A I R E .C O M SALLY HOLMES @sallyholmes SENIOR FEATURES EDITOR DANIELLE M C NALLY @danismcnally CHLOE METZGER @chloe_metzger ASSISTANT EDITOR RACHEL EPSTEIN @rachelepstein_ DIGITAL DIRECTOR

BEAUTY EDITOR

H E A RST P H OTO G R A P H Y G RO U P BARBARA GROGAN, DARRICK HARRIS, JUSTIN O’NEILL DEPUTY DIRECTORS CARY GEORGES, FIONA LENNON SENIOR EDITOR LAUREN HECHEL EDITOR LAUREN BROWN ASSOCIATE EDITORS SARAH ECKINGER, CORI JAYNE HOWARTH, LARISA KLINE, IGNACIO MURILLO ASSISTANT AMY COOPER DIRECTORS

P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S RANDI FRIEDMAN @randilfriedman SENIOR PR MANAGER GABRIEL FORD @_gabrielford

C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I TO RS Samantha Boardman, M.D. @sambmd Christy Turlington Burns @cturlington Jessica Coen @jessicacoen Joyce Corrigan @joycecorrigan Kimberly Cutter @kimcutter Audrey Gelman @audreygelman Mary Alice Haney @maryalicehaney Whitney Joiner @whitneyjoiner Sarah Kunst @sarahkunst Lauren Leader-Chivée @laurenchivee Alyssa Mastromonaco @alyssamastro44 Janet Mock @janetmock Courtney Diesel O’Donnell@courtdiesel Alexandra Robbins @alexndrarobbins Karen Schwartz @pithywidow Amy Wechsler, M.D. @dramywechsler C O M A RY, I N C. CHAIRMAN Evelyne Prouvost-Berry MANAGING DIRECTOR Arnaud de Contades M A R I E C L A I R E I N T E R N AT I O N A L EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF MARIE CLAIRE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Jean de Boisdeffre INTERNATIONAL DEPUTY & FINANCE DIRECTOR Félix Droissart INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Nicia Rodwell INTERNATIONAL DEPUTY COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR Elisabeth Barbier INTERNATIONAL CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER Ludovic Lecomte SYNDICATION MANAGER Thierry Lamarre INTERNATIONAL CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Sèverine Harzo INTERNATIONAL FASHION & BEAUTY DIRECTOR Sylvie Halic EDITORIAL OFFICES: 300 W. 57TH ST., 34TH FLOOR, NEW YORK, NY 10019-1497; (212) 841-8400. MARIE CLAIRE IS PUBLISHED BY MARIE CLAIRE/HEARST, A NEW YORK GENERAL PARTNERSHIP WHOSE PARTNERS ARE HEARST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., AND COMARY, INC., A SUBSIDIARY OF MARIE CLAIRE ALBUM S.A. MARIE CLAIRE IS A TRADEMARK OF, AND IS USED UNDER LICENSE FROM, MARIE CLAIRE ALBUM, 10 BD. DES FRÈRES VOISIN, 92130 ISSY-LES-MOULINEAUX, FRANCE; 011-33-1-41-46-87-90. COPYRIGHT © 2018 BY MARIE CLAIRE/HEARST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN U.S.A. FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE, CHANGES OF ADDRESS, AND SUBSCRIPTION ORDERS, LOG ON TO SERVICE.MARIECLAIRE.COM, OR WRITE TO CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT, MARIE CLAIRE, P.O. BOX 6000, HARLAN, IOWA 51593.

COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS


VICE PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER/ CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER NANCY BERGER @nymaggirl

BRENT ALLEN @brentsallen ERIN LOOP PETRAUSCH @ekloop GENERAL MANAGER KATHY RIESS

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/SALES & MARKETING ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/INTEGRATED MARKETING

I N T EG R AT E D A DV E RT I S I N G SA L E S COURTNEY ANNE GIBSON @lujalove EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF SALES DEVEL OPMENT JESSICA REED AMIT INTERNATIONAL FASHION & LUXURY DIRECTOR MARLY GRAUBARD LUXURY & BEAUTY DIRECTOR HILLERY STACK ACCOUNT MANAGER COURTNEY SANDS ACCOUNT DIRECTOR MARGOT BECKER ACCOUNT DIRECTOR ALISSA MCCONACHIE ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER MELANIE SINGER DIRECT RESPONSE SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER ANGELA HRONOPOULOS MIDWEST DIRECTOR ELIZABETH GROVE @eagrove, (312) 984-5159 EXECUTIVE WEST COAST DIRECTOR MARJAN DIPIAZZA, (310) 664-2891 SOUTHEAST DIRECTOR SARAH WILEY @shwiley, , (404) 256-3800 SOUTHWEST DIRECTOR DAWN BAR, WISDOM MEDIA, (214) 526-3821 FRANCE ELISABETH BARBIER, MARIE CLAIRE, 011-33-1-41-46-89-82 UNITED KINGDOM DANIELLE KLEIN, HEARST INTERNATIONAL, 011-44-20-7439-5542 HEARST ADVERTISING WORLDWIDE ITALY PIETRO ROMAGNINI, 011-39-02-6619-3147 SWITZERLAND FRANK EIMER, 011-41-87-9304-8871 GERMANY VANESSA VON MINCKWITZ, 011-49-89-9250-3532 EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER SAMANTHA KAYNE SALES ASSISTANTS NICOLE KILLEEN, LOGAN SCHLOSSBERG, LINDA WILOFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING SERVICES

I N T EG R AT E D M A R K E T I N G S E RV I C E S ELIZABETH PETRELLI @lizpetrelli BRAND DEVEL OPMENT DIRECTOR LINDSEY OFFICER @lindsofficer SENIOR INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGER ELISABETH BUNDSCHUH INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGER RAIA SAVAGE INTEGRATED MARKETING & SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER JENAE GREEN ASSOCIATE INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGER MICHELLE RUDIN ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR ALICE STEVENS SENIOR DESIGNER JORDAN KOPSTEIN

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF INTEGRATED MARKETING

P RO D U CT I O N A N D A D M I N I ST R AT I O N HOWARD GRIER PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS DIRECTOR CHUCK LODATO OPERATIONS ACCOUNT MANAGER PETER FARRELL

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CONSUMER ENGAGEMENT

P U B L I S H E D BY H E A RST C O M M U N I CAT I O N S, I N C. PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER STEVEN R. SWARTZ CHAIRMAN WILLIAM R. HEARST III EXECUTIVE VICE CHAIRMAN FRANK A. BENNACK, JR. SECRETARY CATHERINE A. BOSTRON TREASURER CARLTON CHARLES

Published at 300 W. 57th St., 34th Floor, New York, NY 10019; (212) 841-8314, advertising fax (212) 492-1390.

SUNGLASSES $860; Céline; (212) 535-3703.

COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER

H E A RST M AGA Z I N E S D I V I S I O N PRESIDENT DAVID CAREY @careyathearst PRESIDENT, MARKETING & PUBLISHING DIRECTOR MICHAEL CLINTON @maclinton PRESIDENT, DIGITAL MEDIA TROY YOUNG CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER JOANNA COLES SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DEBI CHIRICHELLA PUBLISHING CONSULTANTS GILBERT C. MAURER, MARK F. MILLER GROUP VP, BRAND DEVEL OPMENT & GL OBAL CHIEF LICENSING DIRECTOR STEVE ROSS


©2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc.

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Time to shine.

Mother’s Day gift edition The Dyson Supersonic™ hair dryer is designed for fast drying and controlled styling, with Intelligent heat control to prevent extreme heat damage – and protect natural shine. Now with a special edition red presentation case.

Fastest digital motor. Designed for fast drying. dyson.com


BASK IN THIS SUMMER’S MOST VERSATILE SWIMSUITS AND #GETFRAMED WITH SUNGLASSES THAT WORK FROM BEACH TO STREET FROM TOP: SUNGLASSES $1,150, Chanel; (800) 550-0005. SWIMSUIT $350, Marysia; marysia.com. SUNGLASSES $445, Givenchy; solsticesunglasses.com for stores.

Photographs by ALLIE HOLLOWAY SHOT ON LOCATION AT AMERICAN COPPER BUILDINGS

IDEAS

CHEAT SHEET


1

4

THE SANDALS

1. SWIMSUIT $325, Isabel Marant; isabelmarant.com. SUNGLASSES $495, Jimmy Choo; solsticesunglasses.com for stores. 2. SHOES $845, Manolo Blahnik; (212) 582-3007. 3. SHOES $1,250, Roger Vivier; (212) 861-5371. 4. SHOES $650, Giuseppe Zanotti; (212) 650-0455. 5. SUNGLASSES $300, Moschino; solsticesunglasses.com for stores. 6. SUNGLASSES $1,380, Gucci; gucci.com. 7. SUNGLASSES $895, Alaïa; alaia.fr.

THE FORMULA

5 6 7

3

DOUBLE DOSE ON YOUR SPARKLE FACTOR WITH EMBELLISHED METALLIC ACCESSORIES

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

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Look to the future in boxy shield shapes with bedazzled rims

THE SHADES

2

HIGH SHINE

1

Catch the light with crystallized summer slip-ons

FASHION EDITOR: JULIA GALL; HAIR: ERIC WILLIAMS FOR KERASTASE US/WALTER SCHUPFER MANAGEMENT; MAKEUP: MEGAN KELLY FOR NARS COSMETICS/ATELIER MANAGEMENT; MANICURE: NORI YAMANAKA FOR NARS COSMETICS/ARTLIST NEW YORK; MODELS: AFIYA BENNETT/MARILYN MODEL MANAGEMENT; JISU HONG/MARILYN MODEL MANAGEMENT

101 IDEAS


101 IDEAS

Style Hack Top off your tan with multiple rose-gold bangles and coordinating eyewear.

EXTRA CREDIT

MAGIC HOUR AN INSTANT HIT WHEN IT DEBUTED IN 1983, CARTIER’S PANTHÈRE WATCH EVOLVES FOR A NEW GENERATION WITH A DOUBLE-LOOP BRACELET BAND TOP $228, Equipment; equipmentfr.com. SUNGLASSES $1,145, WATCH price upon request, BRACELETS from $4,050, Cartier; (800) CARTIER.

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FOSSIL.COM

#fossilstyle


101 IDEAS

Style Hack Get more mileage by layering swimwear over shirts or underneath blazers.

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1. SWIM TOP $118, Tory Burch; toryburch.com. SKIRT $795, Altuzarra at Neiman Marcus; (888) 888-4757. EARRINGS price upon request, Ana Khouri x Narciso Rodriguez; anakhouri.com. 2. SWIM SET $595, Lisa Marie Fernandez; lisamariefernandez.com. PANTS $109, DKNY; macys.com. SUNGLASSES $79, Crap Eyewear; crapeyewear.com. 3. SWIMSUIT $267, Derek Lam 10 Crosby; (646) 747-4403. SKIRT $995, Altuzarra; altuzarra.com for similar styles. EARRINGS $42, Vince Camuto; vincecamuto.com. 4. JACKET $1,850, SHORTS $790, Burberry; us.burberry.com. SWIMSUIT $225, Tomas Maier; tomasmaier.com. EARRINGS $1,195, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello; (212) 980-2970. 5. TOP $395, Alberta Ferretti at Barneys; (212) 826-8900. SHIRT $145, Polo Ralph Lauren; ralphlauren.com. 6. SWIMSUIT $300, Proenza Schouler; (212) 420-7300. PANTS $235, AG; agjeans.com. BELT $790, Givenchy; (212) 650-0180 for similar styles.

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HAIR AND MAKEUP: MEGAN KELLY FOR NARS COSMETICS/ATELIER MANAGEMENT. MANICURE: NORI YAMANAKA FOR NARS COSMETICS/ARTLIST NEW YORK. MODEL: VALERY LESSARD/PARTS MODELS

DOUBLE DUTY

PACK LIGHT BY TURNING MAILLOTS INTO BODYSUITS AND BIKINIS INTO CROP TOPS


E Y E W E AR

645 FIFTH AVENUE | NEW YORK CITY | LONGCHAMP.COM


101 IDEAS

TRIPLE THREAT

EARRING, BRACELET & SHADES

ENAMEL DETAILS FROM BULGARI’S ICONIC SERPENTI WATCHES SLITHER THEIR WAY ONTO EYEWEAR TURBAN price upon request, Stephen Jones for Marc Jacobs; (212) 343-1490 for information. SUNGLASSES, EARRINGS, WATCH, BRACELET prices upon request, Bulgari; (800) BULGARI.

Style Hack Throw it back with a turban.

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ΤΗΕ ΝΕΩ ΛΟΧΚΕΤ ΧΟΛΛΕΧΤΙΟΝ Λοϖε ιτ. Λοχκ ιτ. Γιφτ ιτ τηισ Μοτηερσ Δαψ.

πανδορα.νετ ♥ 2018 Πανδορα ϑεωελρψ, ΛΛΧ % Αλλ ριγητσ ρεσερϖεδ


101 IDEAS

WHAT’S YOUR EYEWEAR PERSONALITY? I WEAR GYM CLOTHES TO …

NEVER! GIVE OFF “I’M FIT” VIBES WITHOUT ACTUALLY BREAKING A SWEAT

WORK OUT,

DUH, IT’S MY MIDDLE NAME

HOW MUCH DIVA DO YOU HAVE IN YOU?

ZERO. I’M CHILL

WHEN I SAY “FLOWER,” YOU SAY … “AH, THE GREAT OUTDOORS!”

AT THE CLUB … BUSTING MOVES ON THE DANCE FLOOR

WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR IN A PARTNER? “CHILD”

SOMEONE WHO WILL TAKE ME TO COACHELLA

SIPPING CHAMPAGNE IN THE VIP SECTION, SIZING UP THE CROWD

DO YOU LIKE TO BE THE CENTER OF ATTENTION?

MY ALMOST FAMOUS CHARACTER IS …

? IT’S MY NIGHTMARE

SERIOUS FASHION GAME (KANYE WAS RIGHT: BIG SUNGLASSES ARE SO OUT) PENNY LANE ALL THE WAY

DOESN’T EVERYONE?!

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT LOGOS?

WHAT’S YOUR GO-TO HALLOWEEN COSTUME? ANYONE IN THE BAND

TOM CRUISE IN RISKY BUSINESS

NEVER SAW IT Editor’s Pick

DAVID BOWIE LOVE ’EM HATE ’EM

HELI-SKIING)

As seen at Mido Eyewear Show, Milan

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SPORTS STAR

’70S QUEEN

CLASSICIST

NEW WAVER

PRIMA DONNA

DIOR $385, (800) 929-DIOR.

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO $375, (866) 337-7242.

POLAROID EYEWEAR $98, solsticesunglasses.com for stores.

CÉLINE $460, (212) 535-3703.

DOLCE & GABBANA $1,240, dolcegabbana.com.

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

PHOTOGRAPHS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP, CENTER: GARY NULL/NBC/GETTY IMAGES; BETTMANN/GRTTY IMAGES; UNIVERSAL HISTORY ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES; MEDIAPUNCH/BAUER-GRIFFIN/GC IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES; JOHN SPRINGER COLLECTION/CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES (2); HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES; ABC PHOTO ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES; LOOMIS DEAN/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES; © DREAMWORKS/EVERETT COLLECTION; BETTMANN/GETTY IMAGES; PA IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES.

FOLLOW ALONG TO SLEUTH OUT WHAT SUNGLASSES STYLE BEST SUITS YOU.


PROMOTION

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Beauty With a PURPOSE. TRY

Love Beauty and Planet® is a new beauty brand featuring six collections of hair & body products. It believes in the power of small acts of love that make you and the planet a little more beautiful every day. How are they proving it? 100% recyclable packaging and a Fast Rinse Conditioner technology to help save water, among other initiatives. lovebeautyandplanet.com For more exclusive ofers, special events and promotions, and up-to-the-minute mc updates, visit: MARIECLAIRE.COM/PROMOTIONS

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101 IDEAS

Style Hack Sweeten the look with a candy-colored pedicure.

NEW SCHOOL

RUBBER SANDAL SLIDE THROUGH THE SUMMER IN AN EMBELLISHED UPGRADE OF THE CLASSIC SHOWER SHOE SHOES $395 each, Marc Jacobs; (212) 343-1490.

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MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018


LIQUID LASH LOVE Care for your lashes, brows and lids like never before with New Micellar Water Lash Wash. This oil-free, 3-in-1 cleanser gently and effectively removes makeup while conditioning and hydrating skin, leaving a fresh, clean feel that’s free of residue. Ophthalmologist Reviewed / Dermatologist Reviewed / Hypoallergenic Non-irritating / Oil-free / Safe for use with Lash Extensions

ETERNALLY PINK RevitaLash® Cosmetics honors the courage and strength of our Co-Founder, Gayle Brinkenhoff, and that of women everywhere by supporting breast cancer awareness, research and education initiatives year-round, not just in October. This is our Eternally Pink Pledge. revitalash.com ©2018 Athena Cosmetics, Inc.


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1. SWIMSUIT $225, Max Mara Leisure; (808) 926-6161. SUNGLASSES $400, Chloé; neimanmarcus.com. SHOES $110, Michael Michael Kors; (866) 709-KORS. BAG $575, Frame; framestore.com. TOWEL $118, Tory Burch; toryburch.com. 2. SWIMSUIT $465, Emilio Pucci; (212) 230-1135. SUNGLASSES $79, Crap Eyewear; crapeyewear.com. SHOES $495, Helmut Lang; helmutlang.com. BAG $295, Brahmin; brahmin.com. TOWEL $600, Hermès; (800) 441-4488. 3. SWIMSUIT $700, Chanel; (800) 550-0005. SUNGLASSES $188, Ray-Ban; ray-ban.com. SHOES $995, Tod’s; tods.com. BAG $98, Sam Edelman at Lord & Taylor; (212) 391-3344. TOWEL $251, Missoni Home; (212) 719-2338. 4. SWIMSUIT $122, Michael Michael Kors; (866) 709-KORS. SUNGLASSES $149, McQ; mcq.com. SHOES $138, Kate Spade New York; katespade.com. BAG $795, Emporio Armani; armani.com. TOWEL $725, Versace; versace.com.

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THE CHECKLIST

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101 IDEAS


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PRESENTED BY TACORI

ICONIC CRESCENT SILHOUETTE This signature Tacori design element features an embedded heart shape—a hidden symbol of true love.

SHINE ON: MOMENTS THAT

MATTER Your jewelry tells a story. It signifies style. Speaks to your passions. And connects you to those you love the most. Discover the story of Tacori—an exquisite heritage brand powered by innovation. SETTING THE STAGE: A young Nadine at Tacori headquarters in the downtown L.A. Jewelry District.

A CELEBRATION OF SUCCESS. When Tacori COO and Design Director Nadine Tacorian was a little girl she worked alongside her father, legendary jeweler Haig Tacorian, as he built his business.


“WE TOUCH LIVES & CREATE LEGACIES.”

HANDCRAFTED IN CALIFORNIA: Tacori’s signature pieces are all crafted by expert artisans in their California Design Studios— ensuring direct designer and family oversight with a nod to Tacori’s CA heritage.

– NADINE TACORIAN, TACORI COO & DESIGN DIRECTOR

AN EYE FOR INNOVATION. In 2016, Nadine stepped into the role of COO and Design Director at Tacori, building upon the company that her parents had built. Nadine has shaped the Tacori we know today, redefining designs with a refreshing emphasis on everyday wearables and innovative styles, while upholding the belief that women are brilliant—and that, together, we shine.

THE POWER OF CONNECTION. Tacori’s remarkably detailed pieces are timeless symbols of connection that join individuals and generations. The iconic Tacori crescent silhouette on the inner face of each wedding band is a secret symbol of love that only the couple knows. It’s totally unique and truly Tacori. NADINE: COURTESY OF E! ENTERTAINMENT.

WHAT ’S NEXT? We love that Tacori is proclaiming 2018 the year of women shining together, spotlighting female professional and personal success to create positive change in the world. Stay tuned for more exciting news on #ShineTogether in the coming year.

SHAPING THE FUTURE: Finalizing designs for the latest collections.

THE LEGACY LIVES ON.


101 IDEAS

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101 IDEAS

PROJECT RUNWAY ALL STARS

The Crown Season 6 winner Anthony Williams proves the third time’s a charm Anthony Williams is first and foremost a beauty queen: “I am a true pageant girl,” says the 37-year-old designer from Atlanta. “I was a female impersonator in college [the

thread into his own hands. “From that point on, I decided I would make gowns.” When his pageant career ended in 2006, Williams turned to another creative outlet: Project Runway season 7. Despite finishing fifth, a challenge win landed his blue oneshouldered dress on Heidi Klum for a cover of Marie Claire. The fan favorite returned for the first season of All Stars in 2012 (when he placed ninth) and was back this year for season 6, during which his evolution as a designer was evident. “Anthony had great energy on set and his designs were showstoppers,” says Marie Claire editor-in-chief and All Stars mentor Anne Fulenwider. “It was a true delight to watch his aesthetic evolve over time.” For his latest shot at stardom, Williams sought to capture the essence of timeless elegance. “Growing up, there was nothing more sophisticated than a black woman dressed up for church,” he says. “There was a certain pride and confidence. I watched my mother go through a lot of situations with men and finances, but she never stopped being a lady. I learned at an early age that being a lady never goes out of style.” His muses, Rihanna and Audrey Hepburn, inspired the seven vintage-meets-eclectic looks in his finale collection, filled with hand-painted details, fitted silhouettes, and bare shoulders. Standout looks included a dress with a halter neckline and asymmetrical pleated-leather detailing, and a sculptural strapless top paired with tailored cigarette pants. Williams was crowned the first male black winner in the show’s history (it was also the first time all three finalists were men of color). “It’s a right and a privilege to be an African-American designer in the United States of America,” Williams says. “No matter how hard life is, you have a responsibility to show up. I have a responsibility to be a credit to the human race, my race as African-American, my gender, and my sexuality. I want my community to be proud of me.” —Megan DiTrolio

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: SHOES $845, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN; (212) 396-1884. SHOES $660, CHURCH’S; CHURCH-FOOTWEAR.COM. SHOES $398, STUART WEITZMAN; STUARTWEITZMAN.COM. SHOES $515, SANDRO; US.SANDRO-PARIS.COM. PHOTOGRAPHS: ALLIE HOLLOWAY/STUDIO D. FASHION EDITOR: J.ERRICO; HAIR: MATTHEW TUOZZOLI FOR ORIBE HAIR CARE/ATELIER MANAGEMENT; MAKEUP: MARCO CASTRO FOR KAHLO MAKEUP ART/DE FACTO INC.; MODEL: YARIS CEDANO/MARILYN NY; PROJECT RUNWAY ALL STARS WINNER: ANTHONY WILLIAMS. GROOMER: GREG COOPER SPENCER. FASHION: YOKI WINTOUR

Anthony Williams with model Yaris Cedano wearing looks from his finale collection


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101 IDEAS 1

R&B sister duo Chloe, 19, (right) and Halle Bailey, 18, were discovered by Beyoncé on YouTube

The Serra de Collserola mountains overlooking

2 A street artist posing as a fruit vendor on the Las Ramblas promenade

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“I’m very out there, so that reflects in my clothing choices. I like something that hugs my body and makes me feel confident in my own skin, but I also like to experiment

Gaudi’s Casa Batlló

sunbathers! We spent one day on a big yacht swimming, dancing to music, and admiring the view: You can see the Serra de Collserola mountains from the water—it’s breathtaking. We document everything with our GoPro so it’s easier to live in the moment. On our way to the docks we snapped a picture of a man covered with colorful birds [@chloexhalle].

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1. EARRINGS $790, Céline at The Webster; (305) 674-7899. 2. BAG $1,195, Dolce & Gabbana; (877) 70-DGUSA. 3. PANTS $2,200, Gucci; gucci.com for stores. 4. BRACELETS $210 (for set of three), Roxanne Assoulin; modaoperandi.com. 5. SHOES $595, Jimmy Choo; (866) 524-6687. 6. RING $350, Pandora Jewelry; pandora.net. 7. TOP $340, Sandro; us.sandro-paris.com. 8. SUNGLASSES $465, Fendi; solsticesunglasses.com for stores.

Another Gaudi work, the Park Güell, in Barcelona’s La Salut neighborhood

LOCATION IMAGES: GETTY IMAGES. PRODUCTS: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS. PORTRAIT: ROBIN HARPER/COURTESY OF THE SUBJECT

UNCOMMON THREADS

“I value comfort. I love sweats (we lived in them on this trip), but when I need to dress up I’m into Free People and Gucci. We’re big flea-market shoppers—as much as we love brands, there’s nothing like finding a one-ofa-kind piece that stands out.” —Halle


A look from Chromat’s resort 2018 collection. LEFT: Bruce McBroom’s iconic 1976 pinup snap of Farrah Fawcett in a red Norma Kamali suit.

The mother of modern swimwear, 71-year-old design innovator Norma Kamali has been revolutionizing fashion with her body-celebrating bathing suits (see Farrah Fawcett wearing a red NK maillot in a nowlegendary 1976 poster), sleeping bag coats, and sportswear-as-ready-to-wear since opening her first boutique in New York City in 1968. Rising star Becca McCharen-Tran, the 33-year-old founder of architectural bodywear label Chromat, which launched in 2010, is making her own waves with pieces that cater to all sizes and gender identities. Here, the two trailblazers come together to talk body politics, feminism, and the future of fashion. —Carolina O’Neill NORMA KAMALI: How did you go from studying architecture at the University of Virginia to creating clothes? BECCA M C CHAREN-TRAN: Chromat started as a fun side project. Designing a building is like looking at lines on the body—shoulder seams, arms, legs. You’re connecting points. We started with bustier tops and bondage gear, but evolved into swimwear because it represents our ethos: making women feel empowered in their bodies while wearing something exposing. NK: I was sort of forced into it. I designed bathing suits from my little shop, then after one landed on a magazine cover I had to start making more. My stuff wasn’t typical at that time, and I don’t think buyers thought it was salable. What inspired your spring collection? BMT: Fall was about survival during political upheaval, so for spring we felt the urge to cling to rocks, feel grounded, and practice selfcare. We looked at zen gardens, salt baths, and healing crystals. We felt a volcanic energy—things are about to burst, but new land is forming. NK: Swim is a crowded space. How do you differentiate yourself? BMT: Growing up, I saw only one way to be beautiful: Be skinny. I had an eating disorder, I was depressed. I want Chromat to stand out by celebrating different ideas of beauty and showing people that they don’t have to fit into a specific body mold. Chromat founder Becca McCharen-Tran (far left), and Norma Kamali

NK: When I launched my Stop Objectification campaign [stopobjectification.org] five years ago, encouraging women to speak up about their experiences, I began tracing the root of my own self-esteem issues. I believe they’ve come from being objectified as a female business owner. It’s so important for us to now tell these difficult stories with the #MeToo movement. I’ve lived through several feminist movements and there are always loud voices and lots of energy, then we hit a wall. My fear is that it will happen again this time. BMT: Why do you think they hit a wall in the past? NK: Taking on feminism while managing a family, kids, and career is difficult. Many women have to make a choice and leave the workforce. Men need to become advocates and play an equal part in helping raise children to create a power balance. BMT: Toxic masculinity is so prevalent in our culture. We teach daughters to “be careful around guys,” but don’t teach sons to “be a good person around girls.” NK: Men feel like their power is being taken away. BMT: As more women design for women, do you think they’ll implement more functionality in garments? You can’t run in high heels—they’re debilitating! NK: Sneakers are becoming popular because women want to be able to do anything. Apparel has to get more intelligent: Generate energy, regulate body temperature, help someone float. Clothes that give us power, not take it away, are the future. BMT: Because I’m gay, I never think about the male gaze. People talk about how sexy Chromat’s clothes are, but I don’t see them through that lens. Thinking about power in garments becomes totally different when you’re not just concerned with generating a feeling for men. NK: What was the first thing you ever designed? BMT: Barbie clothes … ironically. NK: Ha! For me, it was a pair of velvet patchwork hot pants. I had to sew myself into them because I didn’t know how to do zippers at the time. BMT: What do you want your legacy to be? NK: As you grow, you more clearly realize your purpose. I believe women trust me, and I want to help improve their lives. Right now, I’m really interested in abortion rights and finding ways for women to have more choices. What attracts me to you is that as a strong voice for gender fluidity and equality, you’re also driven by a higher message. That’s never been more important.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP CENTER: COPYRIGHT (C) 1976 THE FARRAH FAWCETT FOUNDATION. WWW.THEFARRAHFAWCETTFOUNDATION.ORG; COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER; NADYA WASYLKO/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM; ART STREIBER/AMAZON STUDIOS. SWIMSUIT $298, CHROMAT; CHROMAT.CO.

WITH SWIMWEAR DESIGNERS AND DISRUPTORS NORMA KAMALI AND BECCA MCCHAREN-TRAN OF CHROMAT

101 IDEAS


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Trump’s election drove a record number of women to seek public office. Meet one of them: Krishanti Vignarajah, who’s vying to become the first female governor of Maryland BY KIMBERLY CUTTER

P

eople like to tell Krishanti Vignarajah she has a lot of nerve. She’s never held public oice, she has a baby less than a year old, and, here she is, at age 38, the first woman in history to run for governor of Maryland. “So many people told me not to run, or they told me to run for a lesser oice,” she says as she walks through the Bethesda Farm Women’s Market in Maryland on a breezy September morning, chatting with shoppers and vendors while her husband, Collin O’Mara, hangs back with their 3-month-old daughter, Alana, in his arms. O’Mara is CEO of the National Wildlife Federation (America’s largest wildlife conservation organization), but today he’s on baby duty. “Collin was actually the biggest proponent for me running,” says Vignarajah, who has a friendly smile and a politician’s gift of listening with her entire body. To talk with Vignarajah is to feel not so much heard as absorbed. “After watching President Trump come to power, we both felt that there was too much at stake for me not to.” Having spent five years working for the Obama administration (as policy director for Michelle Obama, she spearheaded Let Girls Learn, an international coalition that helps girls complete middle and high school), Vignarajah found it hard, she says, to watch as “President Trump reversed or threatened to reverse everything from our efforts on climate change to girls’ education to bipartisan issues like labeling on food so parents know exactly what their kids are eating.” PHOTOGRAPH BY SKYE PARROTT 88

Krishanti Vignarajah— with her husband, Collin O’Mara (CEO of the National Wildlife Federation), and their daughter, Alana— announces her gubernatorial campaign in Woodlawn, Maryland, September 2017


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create an Oice of Sexual Harassment and Violence in Maryland, which addresses a host of issues, from requiring disclosure of a history of sexual harassment and violence for anyone seeking public oice or state funding to supporting survivors and ending Maryland’s rape-kit backlog. “Krish and I spent a lot of time talking about how she would govern,” Judd says. “I learned that male rapists still have paternity rights in Maryland, and when I found out she was willing to take that on, I wanted to get involved. She’s a very gutsy leader.”

ABOVE: The candidate delivers a speech at the Youth Assembly at the U.N., 2016. ABOVE LEFT: Vignarajah (center right) with (from left) her father, Ely; brother, Thiru; and mother, Sothy Vignarajah, Baltimore, 1980

“I AM TRYING TO CREATE A WORLD IN WHICH BEING A MOTHER IS NOT AN OBSTACLE.” In some ways, Vignarajah seems like a born politician. Her friends have always teased her about how driven she is. She was the captain of the Division III tennis team at Yale and won pretty much every academic prize you can think of while she was there; she generally sleeps only three or four hours a night. “I get very impatient and anxious if I’m not in motion,” she says. But Vignarajah didn’t grow up dreaming of

COURTESY OF THE SUBJECT

But Trump’s rise to power hit her on a deeply personal level as well. As the child of Sri Lankan immigrants who fled that country’s impending civil war in 1980 with $200 when she was 9 months old, Vignarajah is, as she likes to say, “Donald Trump’s worst nightmare.” Her parents were public school teachers. She grew up in a basement apartment in the Baltimore suburb of Woodlawn and attended public schools from kindergarten through high school before heading to Yale, and then Yale Law School—an immigrant daughter who excelled as a direct result of public education programs currently disappearing in Maryland. Under her watch, Vignarajah says, education will come first. “I lived the American dream that a lot of us worry is slowly fading. My daughter is growing up in this world, and I’m worried that it’s going to hell in a handbasket,” she says, weaving her way through the stalls of zinnias and sugar snaps, asking questions and listening as vendors tell her their problems. A local farmer complains of skyrocketing operating fees and land prices. A jewelry seller who immigrated from Calcutta 25 years ago tells a tale of her husband being harassed in the wake of Trump’s election: “What’s happening in this country is why we left India in the first place.” On the way back to the car, Vignarajah says quietly, “I can’t tell you how many people tell me stories like that. And our governor just stands by in silence.” Historically, Maryland is a blue state, with Democrats leading two to one, but current governor Larry Hogan is a Republican. Under him, the Maryland Vignarajah knew has changed. “We have always led the country in terms of education, having a thriving economy, and protecting our natural resources, and all of that has been questioned or threatened by Governor Hogan’s leadership,” she says. “The opportunities I had growing up would not exist if we continue on the path we’re headed down.” With her choice of former Baltimore Teachers’ Union president Sharon Blake—an African-American woman and lifelong teacher—for lieutenant governor, Vignarajah’s becomes the first gubernatorial ticket in history to include two women of color. Since Trump was elected, a whole lot of women have decided to run for public oice: 423 women are planning to run for the House of Representatives—the highest figure in American history—52 for Senate, and 78 for governor (at press time.) But in Maryland, the case is particularly stark. All four elected executive seats and 10 seats in Congress are held by men. “That has to change,” says Vignarajah. “This past year, folks have awoken in ways that I’ve never seen before, but it’s what we do with this moment that matters.” Vignarajah had announced her campaign a day earlier at the modest Saint Agnes Apartments complex where she grew up, exactly the kind of economically depressed area she says has suffered under Hogan’s leadership with his cuts to public school funding. She herself attended the magnet program at Woodlawn High School, and, along with her older brother, Thiru (a former Maryland deputy attorney general currently running for Baltimore city state’s attorney), spent much of her free time at Enoch Pratt Free Library studying, using the computers, and soaking up the free air-conditioning that their parents couldn’t afford at home. “I’ve watched the state’s education ranking fall from first to sixth,” she says. “I’ve watched him cut funding from the neediest public schools. For him it’s just a line item, but I’ve lived it.” Asked why she decided to run for governor her first time out, Vignarajah says, “There’s something about being the antithesis. One of the ways that we fight back is to show that a Democratic immigrant woman can be elected governor. In a state where the wisdom is ‘No man can beat Larry Hogan,’ well, I’m no man.” Indeed, she’s not. In November, Vignarajah was the first candidate to roll out a specific sexual harassment and violence policy in the wake of the #MeToo movement. Working with Ashley Judd, she crafted a detailed proposal that would


COURTESY OF THE SUBJECT

public oice. Instead, she worked hard at things she cared about and trusted that the work would lead her where she needed to go. “My approach, whenever I consider doing anything in life, is to ask myself: Is it something I think is important to do? And, Is it something I’m passionate about?”After the Obama administration left the White House, Vignarajah—newly married and pregnant—launched a sustainable-development consulting firm called Generation Impact, and started giving keynote speeches around the country. “Afterward, people kept coming up to me saying, ‘Why aren’t you running?’” says Vignarajah, who gave the 2017 commencement speech at Hood College when she was eight and a half months pregnant. “I looked down and couldn’t see my feet, but then I realized that that was exactly why I should be running.” Folks in Washington seemed to agree with her. After progressive strategist Liz Jaff saw Vignarajah deliver a keynote speech at the Western Maryland Democratic Summit in April 2017 (in the middle of Vignarajah’s third trimester) she walked up to Vignarajah’s husband and told him, “You’re not gonna like me in five minutes, and you’re going to hate me in five months.” Jaff, who understood the grind of the campaign trail, had been looking for a woman to run for governor in Maryland. Vignarajah recalls, “She said, ‘Watching you, I thought, I just saw the only woman who can beat our current governor.’” Of course there were naysayers telling her that stepping up was a terrible idea. “A lot of people said, ‘You just had a child. Is this the right time?’” she says as she strides across the lawn at our next stop, Betamore—a tech startup and entrepreneurship incubator in Baltimore’s Federal Hill—with Alana on her hip. “But for me, it is the best time. I’m not trying to make a point by running, but I am trying to create a world in which being a mother is not an obstacle to going back to school, like my mom did, or trying to make partner at your firm, or running for oice.” (In a campaign ad released in March, she breastfeeds Alana on camera.) Within 24 hours of launching her campaign, Vignarajah says she received more social-media attention than “all the guys combined.” People came out in droves to hear her speak. Meryl Streep donated to her campaign. (So did Mario Batali, and after the sexual harassment allegations against him came out in December, she used his donation to fund a symposium on sexual misconduct at Johns Hopkins.) When it came to figuring out how to run a campaign, Vignarajah reached out to political veterans. Barbara Mikulski, the former Maryland senator, provided a crucial idea. “She said, ‘You need a MOM— someone in charge of Messaging, someone in charge of Organizing, and someone in charge of Money.’ That was really good advice.” But she’s frank about the diiculties of going first, including how to assemble a staff. “There are exceptionally loyal people who are campaign veterans, but some of my best people have never worked on a campaign before,” she says. “A good friend of mine who ran for governor said, ‘Be prepared to be disappointed by close friends and amazed by strangers. There are folks very close to you who you think will be there who aren’t, and there are the folks you meet along the way who become invaluable to the campaign.” She admits that the learning curve has been steep. “I feel like I’m running a think tank, a company, and a PR firm right now,” she says, laughing. “Basically I’m running a conglomerate.” Also, she’s had to teach herself how to fundraise. “I did it in the Obama administration, but I find it much easier to pitch an initiative than to ask people to invest in me.” Also part of the job has been watching her fellow male candidates welcome one another to the race while pointedly ignoring her. “I do not play the gender card normally, but it stung.” And then there are the trolls. “People say horrible things on Twitter,” says Vignarajah. “They say, ‘What’s she gonna swear in on, the Kama Sutra’? People suggest I’m an illegal immigrant, that I’m not eligible to run for oice because I voted in D.C. while working for the Obamas. Thick skin is

something you know you’re going to need going in, and I’m lucky—I don’t really get fazed by the chatter, but I do get affected by the fear that someone in my family might see something a troll writes. When someone makes a racist or sexist comment, it makes your blood boil.” (Addressing those carpetbagging claims, Vignarajah responds: “With a 3-month-old, I’m not going to throw my hat in the ring without doing my due diligence. We’re good.”) Vignarajah’s up against six other Democrats in the primary on June 26—all men. Most notable are Prince George’s County executive Rushern L. Baker III and former NAACP president Ben Jealous (who has been endorsed by Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont). In a late-February Baltimore Forum straw poll, she came in second. “I’m an outsider, and I see that as an advantage in the sense that I think a lot of people are sick of the political infighting, the same old, same old,” says Vignarajah. “If you like the status quo, then you should vote for a regular politician.” In the meantime, Vignarajah has her eye on the future. “On the day I launched my campaign, the little girl growing up in the apartment I grew up in told me that after meeting me, she’s considering a career as a politician. That’s the kind of thing I live for.”

LEFT: At Sharps Creek Farm in Salisbury, Maryland, September 2017. BELOW: With her former boss Michelle Obama at the White House, 2016


IN PARTNERSHIP WITH COSMETIC EXECUTIVE WOMEN

Beauty’s Next-Wave

LEADERS.

Marie Claire salutes COSMETIC EXECUTIVE WOMEN’S 2018 TOP TALENT AWARDS honorees, celebrating the next wave of exceptional, innovative beauty leaders.

THE RETAIL VISIONARY.

BROOKE BANWART VP/DMM FRAGRANCE, SEPHORA Brooke has helped lead the charge in revolutionizing the beauty retail environment as we know it: scouting trends, building brand relationships, creating category distinctions, all the while putting the consumer at the center of their universe.

“Success to me entails components that make the journey more rewarding than just the end goal. I have found that my value system around success is rooted in collaboration, developing and leveraging talent around me, sharing a common mission, and— above all—always listening to the client.”

THE LAUNCH LEADER.

MOLLY LANDMAN GLOBAL BRAND DIRECTOR, LOVE BEAUTY & PLANET AND APOTHECARE ESSENTIALS, UNILEVER In less than a year, Molly led the creation of Unilever’s two new personal care brands, exhibiting entrepreneurialism, an eye for beauty & design, and a tremendous passion for consumers.

“While there’s no magic formula, focusing on three key components helps drive me forward: 1. Curiosity and resilience are my North Star. 2. Advocating for your team and yourself ensures that you are always looking to the future. 3. Staying true to your passion is the most rewarding end to every day.”


YO U A R E A H E R O .

CONGRATULATIONS to MOLLY LANDMAN and ALL of the HONOREES. WE are INSPIRED by YOUR TENACITY, RESILIENCE, and PASSION EVERY DAY.


Beauty’s Next-Wave

LEADERS. THE INDIE INNOVATOR.

SOPHIE LILLEY GLOBAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, URBAN DECAY Sophie has led the global business development of Urban Decay—a fiercely indie brand—since L’Oréal acquired it five years ago. As the first American and the first female in this role, she has spearheaded Urban Decay’s launch in 45 countries.

“In beauty, passion is critical for success. And not just passion for product, but passion for people. Bringing people together is invaluable in any role, at any level. Diversity of thought is key in this rapidly changing market, but collaboration will always fuel the magic.”

THE SUPER STRATEGIST.

ADA LIEN SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, GLOBAL MARKETING, LA MER With a keen sense of the rapidly evolving global luxury skincare market, Ada has shepherded La Mer to execute strategies and launches that strengthen the brand equity while appealing to the modern luxury consumer worldwide.

“Follow your heart and do what you love. Find opportunities when others see obstacles. Have the courage to fail and the humility to learn. Understand that real success is about laying the groundwork for others to thrive.”

THE CHANGE LEADER.

RUKEYSER THOMPSON, PHD SENIOR MANAGER, PROCTER & GAMBLE HAIR CARE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Rukeyser has dedicated her career to understanding the millions of women who feel they aren’t represented or supported by the majority of beauty brands, and to creating products that go beyond their expectations.

“Take calculated risks. Challenge the status quo, champion excellence, and lead with integrity to get to new, different, and innovative.”


Beauty’s Next-Wave

LEADERS.

THE THOUGHT LEADER.

BARBARA GREEN HEAD OF RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT, NEOSTRATA COMPANY INC., A JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY Barbara’s vision and profound understanding of the derma, pharmacology, and consumer spaces has enabled her to develop superior ingredients, products, and solutions that have transformed the skin of patients and consumers across the globe.

“Seek out mentors and surround yourself with a talented team that believes anything is possible! Understand your customer and recognize their needs. Build credibility, think creatively, and approach each project with enthusiasm. Be passionate, pursue excellence and success will follow!”

THE TEAM BUILDER.

DOREEN BUCHER VICE PRESIDENT GLOBAL MARKETING, FINE FRAGRANCE, SYMRISE Among many other talents, Doreen is known for developing and fostering teams. The members of her U.S. team have been with her a minimum of 6 years, speaking to the loyalty and trust she has garnered while guiding the next generation of women to advance in the beauty industry.

“Success comes from a combination of luck, hard work, and perseverance. Never be afraid to ask questions, or let fear of failing prevent you from trying. Be kind, be curious about everything in life, find a romantic partner who supports you and your goals. And have a sense of humor—life is short. If you aren’t having fun or feeling creatively/ spiritually/mentally fulfilled, forge a different path.”

POWERING A MORE BEAUTIFUL FUTURE.

As an organization, Cosmetic Executive Women is dedicated to recognizing, encouraging, and empowering women at every stage of their careers. Our Top Talent Awards provide a platform to applaud the accomplishments of the next generation of female achievers, while also providing inspiration to future rising talent within our industry.”

-Carlotta Jacobson, President, CEW COSMETIC EXECUTIVE WOMEN (CEW) IS A GLOBAL COMMUNITY OF SUCCESSFUL EXECUTIVES MOVING BEAUTY FORWARD. CEW’S ANNUAL TOP TALENT AWARDS, RECOGNIZING THE ACCOMPLISHED WOMEN YOU SEE HERE, TAKES PLACE IN NYC ON APRIL 11.

Discover more at CEW.ORG


NEWSFEED WHAT INFORMED, SAVVY WOMEN NEED TO KNOW NOW Nikki Haley being sworn in as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, 2017

UNITED STATES

EYES ON THE WORLD

As the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., Nikki Haley is the face of American diplomacy

WIN MCNAMEE/BLOOMBERG/GETTY IMAGES

By KAYLA WEBLEY ADLER

A

mbassador Nikki Haley has the tricky job of being the diplomatic face of an administration whose foreign policy is often set in motion by a president who tweets his thoughts to the world before most of us have even had our morning coffee. Suice it to say, any given day can be quite a wild ride. But rather than smoothing things over behind the scenes, Haley has been more visible and vocal than ambassadors past. She’s publicly disagreed with her boss, Donald Trump; successfully lobbied for tougher U.N. sanctions against North Korea; and had fiery words for Russia, calling the Kremlin’s election meddling “warfare” and saying the country “is not, will not, be our friend.” But perhaps none of that should come as a surprise, since Haley has made a career out of being different. She was the first female governor of South Carolina and the second IndianAmerican to serve as governor of any state, and she is widely expected to run for president someday. In an interview conducted in her oice on International Women’s Day, she discussed the challenges facing female politicians, her response to all those presidential tweetstorms, and what she thinks of potentially being the first female president.

MARIE CLAIRE: WHAT HURDLES MUST WOMEN OVERCOME TO REACH THE HIGHEST LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT, LIKE YOU? NIKKI HALEY: It’s hard for anyone to be in politics. Politics is not easy.

The challenges women face, from what I have seen, is just having the strength to believe in themselves. Men tend to just do things, while women second-guess themselves a lot. So what I wish for every woman is to trust their gut from the very beginning, because it’s always right. MC: TWICE IN YOUR CAREER, PEOPLE ALLEGED YOU WERE HAVING EXTRAMARITAL AFFAIRS. HOW DID YOU DEAL? NH: It’s a sad thing. What I’ve found is if you do your job well, and if

you get attention for doing your job well, people are going to want to bring you down. They do that to men; they do that to women. The difference is with women they immediately go, not to something credible, but to the one thing that weakens them immediately: They throw out the affair [allegation]. When that happens, stand strong and call them out, because they don’t get the right to do that. I laugh at it because it doesn’t mean anything—you expect it. But it bothers me more for my daughter and for girls growing up—they shouldn’t have to worry if they get too loud or too good that they are going to have to face May 2018

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NEWSFEED MC: WHAT DO YOU THINK OF #METOO? NH: I love any time women find the power in

their voice, so the idea that women are stepping up and speaking out is important. I think the warning has been shot across the bow that you better think twice before you prey on a woman or victimize a woman in any way. But we have to make sure we are responsible with the movement. It’s not just about these incidents—it’s about changing the culture and changing the way things are and doing it in a way that we get men to understand why they don’t want to do it. I think we are at a very sensitive point with the #MeToo movement that it can either go too far to where men are going to be fearful of even working with women, or it can be really good, where men learn from women on what the barriers are. MC: WHAT IS IT LIKE FOR YOU TO BE A HIGH-RANKING WOMAN IN AN ADMINISTRATION THAT HAS A CHALLENGING RECORD ON WOMEN, FROM THE ACCESS HOLLYWOOD TAPE TO ROB PORTER? NH: I’ve always seen my role as telling the

truth. And I’m not just honest with the public, I’m honest with the president. If I see or hear something that makes me uncomfortable, I pick up the phone and call him. He has always been very receptive to hearing my concerns and taking them into consideration, and that’s really all I could ask for. MC: YOU’VE CONTRADICTED THE PRESIDENT PUBLICLY. HOW DOES IT FEEL TO STICK YOUR NECK OUT LIKE THAT? NH: If you stick your neck out, you have to

stick it out responsibly. You have to do it in a way that doesn’t hurt anyone, but moves the ball. So [my statements] are never about just getting something in the paper or pleasing the administration—it’s, How do I get the truth out in a way that’s respectful? I’m going to do it quietly—I’m not going to go and expose you publicly or try to embarrass anybody. You can make a difference when you do it that way. MC: YOU SEEM FEARLESS. NH: That didn’t just happen—I grew into it.

What I wish I knew 20 years ago is if you push through fear, you will be amazed at what you’re capable of. I am the product of pushing through fear over and over again, and when you do that, you realize the sky doesn’t fall and you’re a lot tougher than you thought. My biggest lesson to every girl and woman that I come across is: Push through fear, because when you do, you change the world. MC: WHAT DO YOU MAKE OF THE U.S.’ PLACE IN THE WORLD UNDER TRUMP? NH: Every country in the world now knows

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Haley attending a U.N. Security Council meeting on Syria, 2018

that we mean business. They realize we are not going to sugarcoat it, and they realize if we say something, we follow through with it. I don’t want any country to wonder where we are or wonder what we think—I want it to be very black-and-white. After the chemical-weapons strikes in Syria, the president sent in those missiles, and the overwhelming comment I kept getting was: It’s so good to see the U.S. lead again. That was impactful to me because all that really means is they need you to do what you say you’re going to do. It’s really important that we stand strong, and I think the president does that. Whether people appreciate how he communicates or not, you know where he stands, and you know what he’s for. MC: DO YOU EVER SEE HIS TWEETS AND THINK, OH, NO, I’M GOING TO HAVE TO CLEAN THAT UP? NH: Sometimes I see his tweets and I laugh—

that’s probably the extent of it. He is the president, and so what he puts out there is taken very seriously, every single tweet. I look at it as [part of ] the job. I’ve never seen it as hard because it’s who he is. He was elected, he is our president, and so I just move with it. And I say things in my own way. Maybe he says it in a way that’s hard for some to hear; I try to say it in a way that’s a bit more diplomatic. But it’s amazing how he has taken Twitter to a whole new place, because now you have foreign leaders reading his tweets to see where he stands on certain things. But I don’t think it has made my job hard. MC: YOU’RE ONE OF TWO WOMEN ON THE U.N. SECURITY COUNCIL AND ONE OF JUST

39 FEMALE AMBASSADORS WORLDWIDE. NH: I’ve always been one of the only women in

everything. In my first job as an accounting supervisor, I was the only woman on the executive board. In the legislature, we were the lowest in the country on women elected oicials. I was the first female governor for South Carolina, and there weren’t a lot of us [nationwide]. So it’s become unfortunately commonplace that I tend to go to places where there’s not long lines to the women’s bathroom. But it doesn’t change the way I work or what I do. I push just as hard whether it’s women or men in the room. I’m not intimidated by men at all. Do I wish there were more women? Always. I would love to have more girlfriends all around me. MC: THERE’S SPECULATION YOU’LL RUN FOR PRESIDENT ONE DAY, WHICH COULD MAKE YOU THE FIRST FEMALE PRESIDENT. WHAT WOULD THAT MEAN TO YOU? NH: I can’t even comprehend it. I know that

people love to talk about it, but it’s one thing to talk about it and another to do it. That’s a hill that I can’t imagine what the climb is like, and I really don’t think about it. I didn’t think I’d be governor, I didn’t think I’d do this job. What I try to think about is doing the best I can every day, because if you do good work, doors open. And if a door opens, that’s great. And if it doesn’t, I’m blessed, and I’ve had a very cool life and would be very happy with it. This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity. A longer version appears online at marieclaire.com/nikki-haley.

SIPA/AP IMAGES

such criticism. But if people lie, call them out—don’t run from it.


Genius!

IRAN

ONE WOMAN, ONE BRILLIANT IDEA

LIFTING THE VEIL

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF THE PUBLISHER; SALAMPIX/ABACA/SIPA USA/AP IMAGES; COURTESY OF THE SUBJECT: COURTESY OF THE BRAND

In her new memoir, the leader of the hijab protest movement encourages women to go head-to-head with the morality police Masih Alinejad was 2 years old in 1979 when wearing a headscarf became law in Iran. Since then, the country’s socalled morality police have been beating, fining, and jailing women for not only being unveiled, but also “bad hijab”: wearing headscarves too loosely, or too far back, or otherwise failing to fully conceal hair. The law extends beyond houses of worship, schools, and workplaces to include sidewalks and even private cars. “Growing up in Iran, a really familiar expression anytime I wanted to do something was, ‘First cover your hair,’” says Alinejad, now 41. She recounts such experiences in her memoir, The Wind in My Hair: My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran (Little, Brown and Company), out this month, which describes her journey from schoolgirl in a small village to igniter of the compulsory-hijab protest movement. Alinejad, who faces arrest in Iran for her activism and now lives in Brooklyn, didn’t plan to start a hair revolution. In 2014, she posted photos of herself on Facebook without a headscarf, in both London—where she was living at the time—and in Iran, and asked if other women back home ever slipped off their hijabs in public. “I was bombarded by pictures of unveiled women,” Alinejad says. “I realized that with social media, the government can’t control us—they can’t censor us.” Emboldened, she created the My Stealthy Freedom Facebook page, encouraging Iranian women to upload secret moments of themselves enjoying the wind in their hair. “I have nothing against the hijab,” says Alinejab, whose mother and sister in Iran both

Vida Movahed took her headscarf off on a busy street in Tehran to protest Iran’s compulsoryhijab law, 2017

SONYA PASSI M A KING FREEDOM FROM DOMESTIC V IOLENCE A FFORDA BLE

wear one. “I’m against compulsion. I’m fighting for freedom of choice.” When the campaign’s Facebook followers topped 1 million last year, Alinejad decided to take the movement to the streets. She started #WhiteWednesdays, urging women in Iran to wear white hijabs (which symbolize peace) or remove their hijabs completely—in public, every Wednesday. The movement gained steam in December, when 31-year-old Vida Movahed was detained for a month for waving a white headscarf on a stick on Enghelab (which means “revolution”) Street in Tehran. Images of her bold act of defiance went viral, and within a month, at least 28 more women were arrested. While the government has no plans to change the law, for Alinejad, a major battle has already been won. “We have been ignored and censored for four decades,” she says. “Now, even the state-run media inside Iran is talking about us. We cannot be ignored anymore.” —Jayme Moye

U.S.

Ahead of the Game Three women in tech created “Persist” to put men in our shoes “You are poised and assertive with your boss while negotiating a salary increase. He calls you ‘too emotional.’” “While on maternity leave, Eric takes credit for your work.” “You overhear a male colleague joking that your ‘sales are flat’ in reference to your chest size.” Those are scenarios posed by a card game made by three Amazon coworkers, called Persist, that gets players to think about the challenges women face in a lighthearted way.

Players draw cards with charades, trivia, or calls for sharing a story—from hiding a pregnancy at work to a time they’ve ended a friendship—to spur discussion between men and women. “I believe in its ability to make the awkward and taboo accessible,” says MaryBeth Pecha, 32, who created the game along with Kathryn Ekloff, 30, and Amber Hanson, 31. The women raised $12,610 on Kickstarter to fund Persist and started selling it last year. Next,

they may also make an office edition to prompt dialogue among coworkers. “By having something approachable and fun, people might be more open to these discussions in a workplace,” Hanson says. “It’s a great conversation starter, but it’s also a possible medium for change.” —Claire Trageser

May 2018

HER INSPIRATION In 2012, during her second year of law school, Sonya Passi learned the top reason domestic-violence survivors stay in abusive situations is because they can’t afford to leave. “I went up to my professor and said, ‘We’ve got to do something!’” Passi recalls. With that, the Family Violence Appellate Project, which provides free appellate legal services, was born. HER BIG IDEA Passi didn’t stop there. In 2016, the Los Angeles– based activist founded a second nonprofit called FreeFrom, which put survivors on a path to long-term financial stability by helping them build credit, get compensation for harm they have suffered, and launch small businesses. “To be able to make a wage they can live off can make all the difference between staying safe or going back,” says Passi, 30. THE RESULTS She’s been “blown away” by the response: Within 48 hours of launching FreeFrom, 25,000 women utilized its tools for obtaining compensation. In April, the nonprofit opened an online store (freefrom.org) selling goods made by survivors, including bath products, essential oils, candles, and cards. So far, 24 survivors have started businesses with FreeFrom’s support; none have returned to their abusers. —Savannah Scott M ARI ECL A I R E. COM

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OFF-DUTY

We’re all in on Condola Rashad, who stars as Joan of Arc in this month’s Saint Joan on Broadway and in Netflix’s new dramatic film Come Sunday, streaming now. And she’s winning big offstage, too

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AGE 31. LIVES IN New York City. YOU KNOW HER FROM Showtime’s Billions (2018) and Netflix’s Master of None (2017). WHAT DO YOU DO IN YOUR DOWNTIME? I play poker every day. I have a poker app on my phone— I play it on the subway and at night when I’m winding down. But the chips are fake. I’m getting my skill set together and then we’ll get this game started. My goal is to one day be a master poker player. GUILT Y PLE A SURE? I’m not a big shoe or bag person—I like sunglasses. I have about 40 pairs; it’s a mix of designer and some I got off the street. People would be afraid to wear my sunglasses—I like pairs that are a little bit crazy. When you have to wear something that’s super plain, just throw on a bright pair of crazy sunglasses, and it changes the whole moment. FOUND YOUR CHILL? I’ve been practicing Vinyasa yoga since college. It’s beyond exercising or burning calories; that’s secondary to what yoga is actually about. Yoga’s about breathing, no matter how challenging the poses are. It really helps you to stay in this neutral space. I’m kind of just breathing through my life. L ATEST OBSESSION? Joan of Arc. This was a person who was not trying to prove anything. She was a woman and she accomplished her purpose. And to me, that’s so powerful. I think that the next level of strength for women is to claim our humanness and just be. FOLLOW HER @dolabunny. —Caitlin Brody TOP $3,500, FENDI; FENDI.COM.

May 2018

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PLAY QUICKIE TV REVIEW

Mackenzie Davis and Charlize Theron in Tully; BELOW: Screenwriter Diablo Cody

MOVIES

FAMILY TIES Charlize Theron stars in this month’s Tully, screenwriter Diablo Cody’s chilling dramedy, as Marlo, a harried stay-at-home mom. Her lifesaver: Tully, a twentysomething night nanny (Mackenzie Davis) who’s nothing and everything she appears to be By J E N O RT I Z MARIE CLAIRE: TULLY IS ONE OF THE REALEST DEPICTIONS OF MOTHERHOOD EVER SEEN ON-SCREEN. WHAT DID YOU WANT TO CAPTURE THAT YOU DIDN’T SEE ELSEWHERE? DIABLO CODY: I actually wrote this

script for therapeutic reasons—it was something I was living through. I’ve never seen an accurate representation of what it feels like to be underwater when you’re struggling to care for your kids and to honor the person you used to be. CHARLIZE THERON: There was something so authentically true about everything in Diablo’s script. I couldn’t find a note of something that wasn’t true, and I think that, for me, ultimately was the reason why I really wanted to be a part of it. We often gloss over what mothers go through, and we don’t necessarily always get the entire truth told about what it takes to be a mother and what it takes to go through every single moment of motherhood. The uneasy, unpretty stuff. MACKENZIE DAVIS: The script addressed all of the war-zone shit of being female and being a mother and having your identity shift in such a dramatic way. I was so into knowing all the dirt, the real dirt.

with our friends and the conversations that we hear. That kind of longing or romanticizing your young adulthood is something people don’t talk about very truthfully because, for some reason, we feel like we didn’t grow into the adults we were supposed to grow into or that something is lacking in our lives. I’m interested in characters who explore that part of themselves. I think those people are more well adjusted. It’s the ones who don’t acknowledge it who are way more scary as humans, and I am always like, Oh, there is something that I don’t completely trust there. MD: Tully is in that sweet spot of her 20s right before you start being disappointed with who you are. And all the potential, all of your dreams feel like you haven’t quite reached them yet. You’re old enough to feel momentum and young enough to think that you have all the time in the world. It can be nauseating in large doses, but in small doses, it’s a really nice reminder not to be so cynical. MC: IT’S IMPOSSIBLE NOT TO FEEL FOR MARLO AND WANT TO CONNECT WITH HER. MD: It’s harrowing to watch Marlo in the movie doing

everything alone. You just want to shake her, or shake her husband, and be like, “Notice this!” MC: “HARROWING” IS A GOOD WORD. MD: That scene where Charlize is picking up the baby and

MC: THAT SAID, THE FILM IS STILL RELATABLE, WHETHER YOU HAVE KIDS OR NOT. DC: Emotions are universal. And the relationship between

putting her down over and over … even just being there on set and watching them film, I almost had a panic attack. It’s just too much.

Marlo and her husband in this movie is something people can relate to. A lot of us know how it feels when a relationship matures, and maybe some of that initial sparkle is gone, but you have to find something to cling to to keep it going.

MC: IF YOU COULD TELL MARLO ANYTHING, WHAT WOULD YOU SAY? CT: You think, This is my life forever, and it isn’t. DC: I would reach through the screen and tell her that in a

MC: NOSTALGIA ALSO DRIVES THIS FILM. CT: For Jason [Reitman, Tully’s director] and Diablo and I,

this theme is something we can see within ourselves and

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few years things will settle down; it’s just that moment she’s in is so specific and so dizzying, and when it’s happening, it feels like it’s never going to end. I could be the lighthouse in the distance.

There’s no place like home— thank God. There’s no place that makes your eyes roll, or heart break harder than your childhood home, neighborhood, or town. Starz’s brilliant new halfhour drama series, Vida, stars Emma (Mishel Prada) and Lyn (Melissa Barrera) as two estranged MexicanAmerican sisters who begrudgingly return to their home in Los Angeles’ Eastside after their mother’s unexpected death. It’s a refreshingly realistic portrayal of the Millennial Latina experience, underrepresented in pop culture, that poignantly tackles universally recognizable struggles—how we identify and accept ourselves, damaged relationships and the bad things we do to fix them, the mistakes we inherit from our parents, even urban gentrification—with heart, humor, and sharp-as-hell wit. “It isn’t a homecoming until someone calls you a puta,” Emma tells Lyn in the series premiere. It’s good to be home. —J.O. Melissa Barrera and Mishel Prada in Starz’s Vida

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: KIMBERLY FRENCH/FOCUS FEATURES; COURTESY OF STARZ ENTERTAINMENT; GEORGE PIMENTEL/GETTY IMAGES

Viva Vida


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BOOKS

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What We’re READING Our roundup of the must-reads hitting our bookshelves this month

B Y SAM AN T H A I R B Y

1. THE ENSEMBLE

3. THAT KIND OF MOTHER

5. THE FAVORITE SISTER

by Aja Gabel (Riverhead) This lilting, richly detailed story follows a group of friends—also a string quartet—as they grow and change together throughout adulthood. Told from alternating perspectives, it gives us a riveting look inside the world of classical musicians and an intimate study of friendships as they wax and wane over the course of a lifetime.

by Rumaan Alam (Ecco) What makes a mother? A family? How much (if at all) can love mitigate the crushing inequities of race, class, and privilege? Alam explores these questions with exquisite tenderness, palpable detail, and excruciating empathy in a story of two mothers, two babies, and the ways in which their lives intertwine.

by Jessica Knoll (Simon & Schuster) Picture a fictional feminist reality TV show that’s basically The Real Housewives of Startup Boardrooms. We find out early that one of the five castmates is dead, but we have no idea who did it, or why. This is the kind of soapy, hilariously vicious book you’ll gobble up in one sitting.

4. YOU ME EVERYTHING

6. THE PERFECT MOTHER

2. THE PISCES

by Catherine Isaac (Pamela Dorman Books) Jess left her disinterested, cheating boyfriend within months after giving birth to their child and never looked back. Ten years later, to honor her mother’s dying wish, Jess travels to reconnect her son with his father. Equal parts wry comedy and touching family drama, it’s ultimately a total heartbreaker that’ll stay with you long after you’re done.

by Aimee Molloy (Harper) A group of friends, all moms, decide one summer night to let loose at a bar to get a break from the tears and the feedings and the endless pressure. While they’re out, one of the babies is abducted. What follows is a desperate, thrilling mystery that you’ll think you have all figured out—until you realize you don’t.

by Melissa Broder (Hogarth) What begins as a tale of a woman grappling with a recent breakup and existential inertia winds its way to an unexpected interspecies love affair. Expect (quite literally) messy and thrilling consequences. Broder delivers her signature hilarity, intelligence, and spot-on examination of the human (et al.) condition.

STORYTELLERS

JUDGMENT DAYS

COURTESY OF THE PUBLISHERS (8)

Rachel Kushner’s latest novel, The Mars Room (Scribner), is the darkly comic, tragically poignant tale of a stripper turned convict and the life that awaits her behind bars By JULIA FELSENTHAL MARIE CLAIRE: Tell us about your study of prisons, which partly inspired this novel. RACHEL KUSHNER: In 2012, I decided I wanted to learn everything that I could about prison in California. (I live in Los Angeles.) What I undertook was much more about my concern for women, my sense of society as being dysfunctionally divided by class, and the way that gets expressed through race. The book also involves a lot of things that aren’t about prison. It’s just another novel, where I get to say what I think about the mechanics of the world.

chance. A huge part of being a writer is being able to look without

MC: SO YOUR CHARACTERS ARE OF CIRCUMSTANCE. RK:

ROOM UPEND YOUR EXPECTATIONS OF THE SYSTEM?

out. It really is like music for me, this braiding of voices. It’s not like I have a political idea about society’s structure and then want to create characters that will illustrate that injustice. I just

RK: The book forced me to think about justice: Is there one law for all people? What do you do with the incredible unevenness of society? I didn’t meet a single person in prison who had what I would call a fair

Marguerite Duras quote I love: “A life is no small matter.” It’s so true.

MC: DID ANYTHING YOU ENCOUNTERED WHILE WRITING THE MARS


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The characters they play— wide-eyed college freshman, crusading journalist, fantasyworld survivor, insecure Millennial, tortured high schooler—are vastly different. But the outrageously talented

RILEY KEOUGH, KATHERINE LANGFORD, ISSA RAE, YARA SHAHIDI, AND SOPHIE TURNER all deliver a much-needed refreshing jolt to Hollywood

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B RI G HT FUTURE “EVEN WHEN YOU REACH VOTING AGE, THERE ARE SO FEW RESOURCES THAT ARE NONPARTISAN IN WHICH YOU CAN DEVELOP YOUR OWN POLITICAL OPINIONS,” SAYS YARA SHAHIDI. “MY ULTIMATE GOAL IS TO TURN THE PASSIONS AND INTERESTS WE HAVE INTO POLICY CHANGE.” DRESS, $4,980, TOP, PRICE UPON REQUEST, GUCCI. ON LIPS: CHANEL ULTRA HYDRATING LIP COLOUR IN EDITH. FASHION EDITOR: J. ERRICO


M AKE A STATEM ENT ”CLOTHES ARE INHERENTLY POLITICAL,” SHAHIDI SAYS. “WHEN I WEAR AN OUTFIT I LOVE, I’M MORE APT TO FEEL PROUD OF THE SPACE I TAKE UP. I FEEL I’VE CREATED A SPACE FOR MYSELF TO EXIST.” JACKET, $3,200, SWEATSHIRT, $550, TOP, $375, BODYSUIT, PRICE UPON REQUEST, MARC JACOBS; EARRINGS, $20, GUESS.


YARA SHAHIDI AGE: 18 HOMETOWN: Minneapolis CURRENT RESIDENCE: Los Angeles YOU KNOW HER FROM: Black-ish (ABC) and Grown-ish (Freeform) NEXT UP: Season 2 of Grown-ish; animated film Smallfoot (September); The Sun Is Also a Star (May 2019) DID YOU KNOW: Shahidi equates her love of writer James Baldwin to “a boy-band obsession, with posters and stuff.” Her high school graduation gift from her parents was attending a talk by Raoul Peck, director of the Baldwin documentary I Am Not Your Negro.

“Quite honestly, I’m a square,” says Yara Shahidi. “Maybe an octagon. Or a rhombus.” That’s in comparison to Zoey Johnson, Shahidi’s alter ego on ABC’s Black-ish, and now on Freeform’s Grown-ish. The new spin-off follows Zoey as she leaves behind the sheltered confines of Johnson family life and moves into the dorms at fictional Cal U, where she encounters coke, Molly, weed, and hookup culture, and develops a minor Adderall problem. “I’m completely progressive,” Shahidi elaborates, “but in terms of the things Zoey’s tried versus the things Yara plans on trying—very different. If anything it really solidified I won’t be doing Adderall.” The actress is in a transitional moment. Last June, she graduated from high school and announced that she’d be taking a gap year before matriculating at Harvard. Now she’s spending the months until college starts playing a character already enduring all the awkward ups and downs of a freshman’s first semester. The absurdity isn’t lost on her. “I have a lot of friends in college, and they’ve said I give great hypothetical advice now. I was like, ‘Oh, my character’s gone through all this roommate drama. Let me download you.’” Plus, she’s used to it: Shahidi spent all of high school inhabiting Zoey—and sometimes learning from her. “Yara has never dated”—present tense, to be clear—“and my character dated three guys in the span of two shooting weeks. So there was a lot that was new to me.” She pauses: “One thing I’m learning to do is respect my own timeline. Things will happen when they happen.” Shahidi has always operated on her own schedule. She booked her first modeling job in Minnesota at the age of 6 weeks (for a life insurance company), moved to Los Angeles at 4, and has been acting since she was 7. Her mother is a commercial actress, her father a cinematographer who became Prince’s personal photographer. (The legendary musician influenced her sense of style:

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“On anyone else his clothes would have looked like costumes; on him they looked like an extension of who he was.”) As an unnervingly eloquent teenager, Shahidi began speaking out about causes near to her heart. She’s worked with Michelle Obama on her Let Girls Learn initiative (in return, the former first lady wrote her a college recommendation letter); she’s railed against Trump’s immigration policies (her dad is from Iran, one of the countries listed in the president’s travel ban); and she’s become a vocal advocate for diverse representation in the entertainment industry. “I’m in no way trying to be the face of blackness,” she says. “The goal is to open doors, role by role, and be drowning in a sea of people who look like me, or like someone else, so anyone can see themselves reflected on-screen.” When she jokes that she’s a square, Shahidi means it: “You want to go to a dance; I want to read a book.” Perhaps you’ve heard about the Tumblr she made in iconic writer James Baldwin’s honor? When Shahidi and her stylist brainstorm looks for events, “He sends silhouettes and colors, and I’m like, ‘Here’s a picture of James Baldwin. Can we do something like this?’” (Google her Prada ensemble at the American Music Awards to see what she means.) In her own telling, she’s also a “professor stalker, in the non-creepiest way possible,” and has been email pals with some of her personal heroes since she was 14. Part of why Shahidi chose Harvard is that she’s a Henry Louis Gates Jr. superfan. “He set up the Oxford African American Studies Center at Yale, but he currently teaches at Harvard. I was like: ‘Sold!’” (She first visited the campus at 13 when her cousin Nas, the rapper, started a fellowship there: “I had the fortunate experience of being surrounded by students who were writing their thesis on Tupac.”) When she turned 18 in February, Shahidi was excited largely because it meant she could vote in November’s elections (she even launched a new project, Eighteen x ’18, to get her peers as amped as she is). “Midterms are when we establish redistricting, how your vote will count,” she explains. “Is there a border through your city that makes you a Democrat in a red area? It’s important to make those connections.” She’s thrilled about recent Democratic victories in Alabama and Virginia. “I was just listening to [political podcast] ‘Pod Save America,’ and they were talking about how so many May 2018

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B OLD M OV ES “I FEEL A LOT MORE FREE TO SPEAK NOW THAT I AS A FEMALE MATTER MORE,” SAYS RILEY KEOUGH. DRESS, PRICE UPON REQUEST, DIOR; EARRINGS, $2,500, TIFFANY & CO.


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people are running for the first time. This administration has forced people to be the representatives we’re looking for.” Would she run for oice? Unlikely; her ideal career is “policy-adjacent.” “But if it comes down to it,” she hedges. “If California needs me … ” In other words: Stay tuned.

RILEY KEOUGH AGE: 29 HOMETOWN: Santa Monica, California

CURRENT RESIDENCE: Los Angeles YOU KNOW HER FROM: Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); Logan Lucky (2017); and The Girlfriend Experience on Starz (2016)

NEXT UP: HBO’s Paterno; Netflix’s Hold the Dark (June); Under the Silver Lake (June); Lars von Trier’s The House That Jack Built (November)

DID YOU KNOW: She was homeschooled because she didn’t like traditional school (not because of security concerns, as has been reported); loved playing piano growing up; and was so nervous for her first audition (2010’s The Runaways), she has blocked out the memory.

Riley Keough calls me from the road just outside Denver, listening to the true-crime podcast “Dirty John” on her way home to L.A. from South Dakota’s Badlands, where she’s been visiting friends for the past few days. She’d spent time there in 2016 while filming American Honey, Andrea Arnold’s epic road movie, made on the move with a caravan of actors and crew hopscotching across the country. “I’m very interested in being immersed in whatever world we’re 115


creating,” Keough says. “So that was kind of the ideal situation. You really got to live it.” In that film, she played Krystal, den mother/pimp to a roving band of runaways, an inscrutably reptilian hustler who shared some DNA with Keough’s other iconic character: Christine, law student turned highend escort in Steven Soderbergh’s 2016 Starz series The Girlfriend Experience. Keough has been acting for nearly a decade and modeling since high school (she’s currently a face of Louis Vuitton) but has stayed remarkably low-key. She’s earned an industry reputation for picking demanding, psychologically complex parts, many of them characters who live on the fringes and make their way trading on sex. “They’re all kind of, like, tough, bad bitches,” she observes. “Maybe people just see me that way?” In real life, the actress says she’s “such a silly person” and “kind of a hot mess.” This month, she stars in Barry Levinson’s HBO film about infamous Penn State football coach Joe Paterno (played by Al Pacino), who concealed information about defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky’s long pattern of molesting young boys. Keough plays Sara Ganim, the then Patriot-News reporter who won a Pulitzer for breaking the story. “It’s topical because it’s [about] sexual abuse tied into this power-andmoney machine,” the actress says. “This woman was so green, and she took on these huge football gods and just didn’t give a shit.” Keough is hightailing it back to L.A. to promote Paterno at a junket. It’s true she was visiting friends, but it emerges that she may have had other reasons for being in South Dakota. The actress, who launched production company Felix Culpa (Latin for “happy accident”), is working on a film about the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, home to the Oglala Lakota Sioux Tribe. While she’s not ready to talk about the project, she will talk about her own Native American heritage (part Cree, part Cherokee, on her grandfather Elvis Presley’s side) and her interest in indigenous rights. Keough has protested with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe against the Dakota Access Pipeline, called out Halloween revelers who accessorize with headdresses on social media, and has worn a “Make America Native Again” baseball cap on the Sundance red carpet. “Robert 116

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Redford”—they were both in 2017’s The Discovery—was like, ‘Oh, I have the same hat.’ I was like, ‘Cool, man.’” You’ll forgive her if she’s not easily starstruck: At various points in her childhood Keough had Nicolas Cage and Michael Jackson for stepdads. Her parents—her mom is Lisa Marie Presley; her father is musician Danny Keough—split when she was 6, but they all remained so close that he moved back in at one point, although Presley had another boyfriend. “When I was a teenager, I would break up with guys and still try and hang out. They’d be like, ‘No, that’s crazy. I’m not talking to you.’” Now she’s married to Australian stuntman Ben Smith-Petersen, whom she met on the set of Mad Max: Fury Road, and who shares her high metabolism for experiences. “We like doing stuff,” she says. “We don’t just sit around.” Her low tolerance for boredom sometimes results in getting another tattoo (she has eight), dyeing her hair (she likes to change it for roles), and messing with people online. “I have so many personalities on social media,” she says when I bring up her recent tweet about wanting to play superhero Poison Ivy. “My friends are always texting me: ‘What is up with your Instagram or Twitter?’” She’s also a self-proclaimed workaholic, though one with very high standards. “I have to really love it. I don’t care if I do one or two movies a year and not 10.” She stops and laughs. “I was thinking about it as I was talking. I have done a lot of movies. Now I’m contradicting myself. That’s life, though: contradiction.”

SOPHIE TURNER AGE: 22 HOMETOWN: Chesterton, Warwickshire, U.K. CURRENT RESIDENCE: London YOU KNOW HER FROM: HBO’s Game of Thrones and X-Men: Apocalypse (2016) NEXT UP: X-Men: Dark Phoenix (November); the final season of Game of Thrones

DID YOU KNOW: Her first crush was on professional wrestler John Cena, and she recently got into boxing: “It’s fun to feel like a badass.”

Sophie Turner is sitting cross-legged in an armchair at New York City’s Bowery Hotel, her legs elegantly pretzeled up so that you’d never guess she’s quite tall (5'9") and apparently a klutz. “I’m a bad-luck charm,” she says, and she’s not talking about her Game of Thrones character, the notoriously unlucky Sansa Stark. “When I go out with friends, I end up being the person that spills all over everyone or rips something or cracks someone’s phone. I’m a liability.” Make no mistake: Turner loves her height “despite my gangly awkwardness.” A face of Louis Vuitton and global brand ambassador for Wella Professionals, Turner is wearing what she calls a typical outfit: vintage Pink Floyd tee, high-top white Chucks, and $81 pleather motorcycle pants from a brand she swears by called I.AM.GIA. “I have loads of their pants. You will hardly ever find me in a skirt, always pants.” When we meet, it’s post–Harvey Weinstein, pre–Time’s Up, and the #MeToo reckoning is top of mind. “Guys I know that haven’t even done anything are like, ‘I’m shitting myself,’” Turner says. Her response: “Good. Everyone should live in fear that they’ll get outed if they do something like that.” Working on a hush-hush show like Game of Thrones offers a unique perspective on the kind of culture of secrecy that enabled Weinstein-like predators to operate with such impunity. “Being involved in a production is like lockdown,” she says. “If something does happen to you, and you’re not supposed to talk about the job or the people that you’re working with, you get swept up in that feeling [that] you can’t talk to anyone about anything.” Lately, she feels liberated: “I’m so much more comfortable going into work knowing


LEAP OF FAI TH “I LIKE TERRIFYING, BECAUSE IF YOU’RE EVER SATISFIED OR FEEL COMFORTABLE, YOU’RE GOING TO FAIL,” SAYS SOPHIE TURNER. JUMPSUIT, $1,090, MAX MARA; BRACELET, $800, CHANEL; SOCKS, $38, DARNER SOCKS. ON HAIR: WELLA PROFESSIONALS STAY ESSENTIAL HAIRSPRAY.


that there’s a group of people who will believe me if something does happen.” Game of Thrones is not Turner’s only top-secret franchise. She also stars as a young Jean Grey in the latest slate of X-Men movies: 2016’s Apocalypse and the forthcoming Dark Phoenix, which centers on her character’s story. To prepare, Turner and director Simon Kinsberg considered how Jean’s superpower— telepathy—mirrors mental-health disorders like schizophrenia. “There’s this thing where you can put on headphones and hear what a schizophrenic person might hear,” Turner says. She did it for a day, walking around her London neighborhood, “trying to function with this madness in your head of voices. It got so overwhelming that by the end of the day, I was shutting everyone out.” Anchoring a tentpole blockbuster was akin to “jumping out of a plane and hoping my parachute worked.” That metaphor is no coincidence: Turner recently signed on to star in Girl Who Fell From the Sky, a true story about Juliane Koepcke, a German teenager who unfathomably survived a nearly two-mile plunge through the air and 11 days in the Amazon after her plane was hit by lightning over Peru. Will she have to jump out of a plane for the film? “No, but I would love that. Maybe I could do it as preparation.” It’s not the only big leap in her future. “He did a good job, right?” Turner asks, showing me the ring her boyfriend, DNCE frontman Joe Jonas, gave her in October: two delicate bands, linked by a pear-shaped diamond. The couple announced their engagement in simultaneous Instagram posts. “We didn’t want TMZ to be the ones to do it for us,” Turner says. The response from her nursery-schoolteacher mom: “When’s the wedding?” Turner thought: “Wedding? I’m still like: ‘Holy shit! I’m engaged.’” (Turner’s Game of Thrones bestie Maisie Williams has already confirmed her bridesmaid status.) But seriously: “There’s this weird misconception that being married is the greatest thing that’ll ever happen to you. But I’ve always found that my career is something that I work for, and when I achieve something, there’s a sense that this is the greatest thing I’ll do in my life. It’s lovely to be engaged. Not like I achieved anything, but I found my person like I’d find a house that I love and want to stay in forever. There’s a sense of peace that comes with finding your person. But there’s a drive that comes with your career.”

KATHERINE LANGFORD AGE: 22 HOMETOWN: Perth, Australia CURRENT RESIDENCE: Perth and Los Angeles YOU KNOW HER FROM: 13 Reasons Why (Netflix) and Love, Simon NEXT UP: Season 2 of 13 Reasons Why (late 2018) DID YOU KNOW: She told a high school career counselor her preferences were, in order: medicine, politics, musical theater.

The tale of how Katherine Langford got her big break is long and harrowing, and when she shares it with me via Skype, her storytelling skills—if not the gravity of her trials and tribulations—remind me of her fictional character: doomed high school student Hannah Baker, whose suicide note, recorded onto a set of 13 cassette tapes and delivered posthumously to the classmates who 118

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TRUE COLORS “AS MUCH AS I ADMIRE OTHER PEOPLE,” KATHERINE LANGFORD SAYS, “I WOULD ALWAYS WANT TO BE THE BEST VERSION OF ME.” DRESS, PRICE UPON REQUEST, GUCCI. ON HAIR: PAUL MITCHELL ULTIMATE WAVE BEACHY TEXTURE CREAM-GEL.


V I S I ON QUEST “I’M HAPPY AND GRATEFUL TO BE IN A POSITION WHERE I CAN WANT TO SEE SOMETHING AND THEN SUPPORT THE PEOPLE WHO ARE TELLING STORIES I WANT TO SEE,” SAYS ISSA RAE. JACKET, $1,725, UNDERCOVER; DANGLE EARRING, PRICE UPON REQUEST, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM; HOOP EARRING, $430 (PER PAIR), SALVATORE FERRAGAMO. ON EYES: COVERGIRL PEACOCK FLARE MASCARA.

wronged her, gives 13 Reasons Why its narrative backbone. If that comparison seems odd, well, 13 Reasons Why is kind of an odd show. Adapted from Jay Asher’s 2017 novel by a team that includes director Tom McCarthy (Spotlight) and executive producer Selena Gomez, it’s been both lauded for drawing attention to the issue of teen suicide and excoriated for making, as one critic put it, “a smarmy spectacle” of its very serious subject. The fact that it made such a big splash at all is a credit to Langford, who earned a Golden Globe nomination for her sensitive, winning performance—her first acting job!—as Hannah, who endures bullying, revenge porn, and sexual assault, ultimately taking her own life on-screen. Back to Langford’s story: “I feel like a lot has happened,” she says, then launches into a multipart saga that involves two failed attempts at getting into drama school; lying to her parents about attending college; a stint dressing up as the Easter Bunny at the mall; blowing half of her life savings on an ill-fated L.A. pilot season; and a brush with carbon monoxide poisoning (her L.A. Airbnb host “left the gas stove on at night to heat the house”). The overachieving daughter of doctors, Langford grew up in Perth, trained as a classical singer, and was once a nationally ranked swimmer. It wasn’t until her last year of high school that she caught the acting bug, but post-graduation she was turned away from the country’s biggest drama school and told she needed more “life experience.” That’s what she got—in the form of a series of character-building setbacks. She thought she’d hit bottom during that trip to L.A., when she was so broke she had to walk to the grocery store because she couldn’t afford an Uber and once there couldn’t pay the surcharge for grocery bags, repurposing the free baggies from the produce section instead. She actually hit bottom when she finally (on attempt number three) got into that prestigious acting program (good), then turned it down (bad) to audition for two promising TV shows and got neither part (very bad). By the time Langford received the script for 13 Reasons Why, she was, she says, “so anxious about acting.” Maybe all those bumps in the road helped her tap into Hannah’s

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mind-set? “I think everything happens for a reason.” Soon she was packing with 36 hours’ notice for six intense months of shooting in Northern California. Really intense: “It takes a toll emotionally and physically,” she admits. “Even if you’re not going through these things, you have to evoke it. It’s hard for your body to discern.” The show isn’t for everyone: “I have friends who can’t watch it because it resonates with them in a way that’s very painful.” But those who love it really love it. Promoting the series—and engaging with its fans on social media, which Langford did at Gomez’s urging—has also been intense. “I want to be able to talk to them in a way that is helpful,” she says. “But I need to give myself the time to be who I need to be.” Time off is in short supply—Hannah appears in flashbacks in season 2 of 13 Reasons, and Langford’s got sci-fi comedy movie Spontaneous, written and directed by Brian Duield and costarring Charlie Plummer, in the works—but she’s “learning how to prioritize things.” Like seeing friends when she’s back in Perth: “I almost have a maternal feeling; I want them to do their best, and I’ll cook food for them.” And doing the stuff she hesitates to do stateside: “I like going out in outrageous costumes and weird makeup. Being in the public eye, you get robbed of your anonymity, then if people take photos of you dressed a certain way, it suddenly becomes a part of your image. The wonderful thing about going home and having balance is that you can gain freedom over yourself again.” Fashion is vital to her self-expression, whether it’s wearing Dolce & Gabbana and Alexander McQueen on the red carpet or her ainity for “feel-good clothes.” She disappears momentarily to retrieve a slightly garish turquoise-and-aubergine secondhand sweater (“It just makes me happy”) and describes a pair of two-sizes-too-big glittery platform boots she stuffs with tissue paper to fit. “It’s a creative thing,” she muses. “Sometimes it’s not so much about looking a certain way as it is about feeling a certain way.”

ISSA RAE AGE: 33 HOMETOWN: Los Angeles CURRENT RESIDENCE: Inglewood, California YOU KNOW HER FROM: The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl on YouTube and Insecure (HBO) NEXT UP: Season 3 of Insecure (summer); The Hate U Give DID YOU KNOW: Her Insecure character loves to freestyle, but Rae wouldn’t want to be a rapper: “Especially as a woman—Cardi B can’t even live without them dissecting every line to wonder if she was taking shots at Nicki. Besides, you also have to have talent.”

Issa Rae wakes up at 5 a.m. to work out, which means “grandma power walking,” as her friend describes it. “She was like, ‘Do you raise your arms and do the little running hands, too?’ And I was like, ‘Yes. Fuck you.’” The writers’ room for Rae’s hit HBO show Insecure doesn’t get going until 10, but she comes in at 7 to take care of business. Unlike the rest of the world, Rae also likes May 2018

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Mondays and the month of January. “Anytime I feel like I have a fresh start, I feel more powerful,” she says, laughing. There’s also, to be fair, a lot of work to get done: three HBO shows in development; another she’s shopping around; a role in George Tillman Jr.’s forthcoming drama The Hate U Give, based on the novel by Angie Thomas. Plus, if the rumors are true, Rae is writing the Ava DuVernay–directed heist movie starring Lupita Nyong’o and Rihanna that Netflix bought on the basis of a viral Tumblr meme (“Things are developing,” Rae confirms). Then there’s her main gig: writing season 3 of Insecure, the show that earned the Stanford grad two Golden Globe acting nominations. If you’re not familiar (and please fix that), Insecure is a dramedy about two L.A. besties—Issa and Molly (played by Yvonne Orji)—navigating life, relationships, and the challenges of being black in predominantly white workplaces. It’s a love letter to friendship, to the pains of emerging adulthood, and also to Inglewood, where Rae currently lives and where rising rents are transforming communities. “You see so many ‘For Lease’ signs go up because people are being pushed out,” she says. “Part of me is conflicted. I want a cycling studio. I want a coffee shop. But it’s always at the expense of black and Latino people. There’s never an assumption that we could benefit, too.” Gentrification is a major plot point on Insecure, which is among the most incisive explorations of race and class on television. Fans include Michelle Obama, who offered Rae

“I DON’T WANT PEOPLE TO GET TIRED OF WHAT IT IS I HAVE TO SAY, AND THAT’S ALWAYS PRESENT,” RAE SAYS. “SO I’M ALWAYS FOCUSED ON JUST BEING ABLE TO APPRECIATE AND MAKE GOOD WORK WHILE I HAVE THE LIGHT ON ME.” JACKET, $2,500, TOP & SKIRT, $2,100 EACH, EARRINGS, $620, CÉLINE.

bother putting parental controls on the television if you were going to have a mouth like that?” and sent her a scandalized text: “You’re basically making porn!”), but real-life Issa keeps her romances very much under wraps. “I get so much feedback about everything. The one thing I don’t need feedback about is who I’m fucking.” There’s a tension between how Rae sees herself and how other people see her. She’ll fangirl over Beyoncé and Drake, but she’s mortified when people do the same to her. When Jay-Z asked her to reprise the Jennifer Aniston role in his “Moonlight” video, an all-black meta-commentary on Friends (and the way it ripped off Living Single), Rae was perplexed. “I would never peg myself as a Rachel. Definitely more of a Phoebe. Maybe with Monica neuroses.” She’s endlessly selfeffacing. She cites Rihanna as her

“AS A FAN OF TELEVISION, AS A FAN OF GOOD STORIES, AND AS A CHAMPION OF PEOPLE OF COLOR, THIS IS A DREAM COME TRUE.” —ISSA RAE some constructive criticism on the season 2 finale. “It made me so proud. To be playfully insulted by Michelle Obama is a dream come true.” (She feels quite the opposite about the current administration: “I don’t want Trump anywhere near the show. People always tag him as #insecure. That’s already too much association.”) Last fall, Rae added “CoverGirl model” to her already impressive résumé. “Awkward CoverGirl,” she clarifies. For the record, that’s on-brand: She made her name with the Web series The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl and later, in a memoir with the same title, chronicled her fish-out-of-water early years, growing up in a family that moved from L.A. to Senegal to Maryland and back to L.A. (where her family lived in Windsor Hills, the setting for the 90210-esque HBO teen drama Rae is currently cowriting). She has some regrets about the book, which reflects her much younger self (“A lot of the writings were from the ages of 23 to 26. Being older and having experienced much more, you have a different outlook”). She’s extra careful now about what she’ll put out there. For example: Insecure may be full of sex and graphic language (so much so that Rae’s Christian mother told her, “Why did I even 122

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style inspo for night (“I know I could never—just in the slay capacity”); for day, it’s Denise Huxtable. But when I refer to her as glamorous—check out her Prabal Gurung Golden Globes look for proof—she’s quick to deflect: “What’s glamorous? I guess going to glamorous events, maybe, where other people are glamorous?” In other words, she’s not about to let burgeoning mogul-dom get to her head. “I’m just really happy to be in a position where I can support people who are telling stories that I want to see,” she says. When it comes to Insecure, “I don’t want to overstay my welcome. That’s constantly on my mind.” Little risk of that. But in case you forgot: Issa Rae has a thing for fresh starts.

PRODUCTION (LOS ANGELES): LIZ KOMROY AT 3STAR PRODUCTIONS. PRODUCTION (LONDON): ALICE GUARD, GAWAIN RAINEY AT 10-4 INC.

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HAIRSTYLIST (LANGFORD, KEOUGH): CHRISTIAN WOOD/THE WALL GROUP HAIRSTYLIST (SHAHIDI): NAIVASHA JOHNSON FOR ORIBE HAIRCARE/ EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS MANAGEMENT HAIRSTYLIST (RAE): FELICIA LEATHERWOOD/ LOVING YOUR HAIR CARE HAIRSTYLIST (TURNER): EARL SIMMS/CAREN MAKEUP (SHAHIDI): EMILY CHENG FOR CHANEL PALETTE ESSENTIELLE MAKEUP (LANGFORD, KEOUGH): RACHEL GOODWIN FOR NARS COSMETICS/ STREETERS MAKEUP (TURNER): MARY JANE FROST FOR MAC COSMETICS/ CLM HAIR & MAKE-UP MAKEUP: JOANNA SIMKIN/THE WALL GROUP MANICURISTS: EMI KUDO FOR CHANEL LE VERNIS/OPUS BEAUTY; TRACY CLEMENS FOR CHANEL LE VERNIS/OPUS BEAUTY MANICURIST (TURNER): SAFFRON GODDARD FOR CHANEL LE VERNIS.


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SOAK IT IN THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT: SWIMSUIT, $265, ISABEL MARANT; SHOES, $280, K.JACQUES. SWIMSUIT, $470, LA PERLA; SHOES, $350, CLERGERIE. OPPOSITE PAGE: BODYSUIT, $1,900, BOTTEGA VENETA; HAT, $325, MIRJAM NUVER.

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BODY & SOL THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT: SWIMSUIT, $265, ISABEL MARANT; SHOES, $280, K.JACQUES. SWIMSUIT, $470, LAÂ PERLA; SHOES, $350, CLERGERIE. OPPOSITE PAGE: CAFTAN, $1,670, MISSONI MARE; TOP & BOTTOMS (WORN UNDERNEATH), PRICES UPON REQUEST, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO. For stores, see Shopping Directory. Hair: Hester Wernert for Wella Professionals at Unspoken Agency Makeup: Kathinka Hastert for Chanel at Unspoken Agency Models: Mariana Pardhino at Storm Management; Luanna Pinheiro at Modelwerk

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Meet the

KARDASHIANS of the

MIDDLE EAST Influencers from Amman to Dubai have adopted show-all, tell-all lives with a fevered passion, ushering in a new kind of celebrity culture in a region where women’s thoughts and wardrobe choices are often kept private. Meet the women snapping their way to social change By SABA IMTIAZ

“BONJOURRRRR! HOW ARE YOU, SNABIES?” Zain Karazon trills to her Snapchat followers on a gray morning in Amman, Jordan. She’s just completed her lengthy beauty routine: her long, caramel hair expertly twisted into waves and fake eyelashes applied, giving her face a doll-like appearance. Her outfit is a Yeezy-esque ensemble of black tights, boots, and an oversize hooded denim tunic with distressed sleeves and the phrase “Where is my mind?” After posting a shot of her coffee, she grabs her two bedazzled iPhones and heads to a meet-andgreet at a café, where she’s welcomed by a small army of teenage girls who chant their nickname for her, Zoozoo, and by baristas, transfixed behind the counter. “When I was young, I wanted all people to know who I was,” says Karazon, 27. “Now, thanks to social media, I can say one thing and it reaches 1 million followers.” Her Snapchat, she says, is Zain TV, 24 hours a day. “Everyone knows me—even leaders and kings,” she adds. Everyone may know of Karazon, but they might not know what she does. She isn’t a conventional celebrity; rather, Karazon is one of a homegrown coterie of social-media mavens

in the Middle East bucking tradition and repressive laws to seek fame and fortune online. The women are not unlike their hashtagging counterparts in the West, but the influencers here are forging their public profiles in a region much less comfortable with women showcasing their bodies and speaking their minds. In addition to Karazon, there are the Abdel Aziz sisters—Alice, 30; Nadine, 26; and Farah, 25, in Beirut—who work with Adidas and Tod’s and who spun a reality show out of their outfit-of-the-day posts on Instagram, where they collectively have more than 1.4 million followers; Fouz Al Fahad, 28, a makeup artist in Kuwait with 2.3 million Instagram followers who has collaborated with MAC Cosmetics on a lipstick; and Sazdel El Kak, 29, a Lebanese TV and radio host, who works in Kuwait and parlayed her social-media success (339,000-plus followers on Instagram) into a skincare clinic that launched in November. Their lives are a seemingly endless stream of promoted products and party appearances, but they’re not just helping to shape the hottest looks of the season. They’re pushing the boundaries of acceptability by talking about

OPPOSITE PAGE: Haya Awad (1), Farah Abdel Aziz (2), Nadine Abdel Aziz (3), Sazdel El Kak (4, 10), Zain Karazon (5, 9), Huda Kattan (6, 7), the Abdel Aziz sisters (8), Fouz Al Fahad (11), Alice Abdel Aziz (12) May 2018

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Zain Karazon @zoozkarazon Karazon, a Jordanbased influencer, calls her Snapchat Zain TV

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The Abdel Aziz sisters @styleinbeirut The Beirut-based trio parlayed daily outfit posts into a TV show

developed a signature look (her naturally straight hair blown out into a voluminous, honey-toned mass of waves), and caught the attention of brands. She began traveling to events: a salon opening in Doha, Qatar, a perfume launch in Dubai, a Carolina Herrera preview in Bahrain. Soon, social media was taking over her life, but she had a day job as an administrative and faculty assistant at Kuwait University. She wanted to quit, but her parents, whom she lived with, objected. “You don’t know what’s going to happen with social media,” they told her. But the double life was exhausting: She would finish work in Kuwait City around 3 p.m., then fly to Dubai or Bahrain for events, return home after midnight, and start her university job at 7 a.m. After a few months, she quit. “I didn’t even tell my parents until a month later,” she says with a laugh. “I had to pretend I was going to work!” When she finally confessed, they “didn’t freak out much,” she says. Al Fahad is now sought after by major cosmetics brands trying to tap into the Middle East’s market of young makeupobsessed women. Her manager declined to share how much she earns, but influencers in the region charge anywhere from $500 to $10,000 for appearances, says Zayna Al-Hamarneh, CEO and founder of MODE Marketing & PR in Jordan. Al Fahad now splits her time between Kuwait and Dubai and elsewhere; last year, she appeared at Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty launch in New York and promoted Messika jewelry at the Cannes Film Festival. At an event celebrating her MAC lipstick in Saudi Arabia, abaya-clad women crowded around her to take selfies. “It’s a weird thing, because I never thought social media could be this powerful,” she says. “Now, when I meet people, they get me flowers, iced coffee from Starbucks—it’s great.” Perhaps none of the Middle Eastern influencers knows more about just how great social-media stardom can be than the Abdel Aziz sisters. They developed a taste for European fashion on summer trips to visit extended family in Romania (their mother is a Romanian homemaker; their father is a Lebanese doctor). In 2012, Alice, the second-oldest (the eldest Abdel Aziz sister, Diana, lives in Nigeria with her husband and children), started an Instagram account, @styleinbeirut, and began by posting photos of her and her younger sisters’ outfits each day. Soon, other fashion accounts began reposting the images, and the feed grew to more than half a million followers. The sisters

Haya Awad @haya_awad_fashionattack Awad uses Instagram to promote her clothing line

Sazdel El Kak @sazdell The Lebanese TV and radio host launched a skincare clinic

THE ABDEL AZIZ SISTERS: COURTESY OF THE SUBJECTS. HAYA AWAD: COURTESY OF AWAD. SAZDEL EL KAK: COURTESY OF EL KAK. HUDA KATTAN: WILLIAMS + HIRAKAWA/AUGUST. ZAIN KARAZON: MAHMOUD OTHMAN. FOUZ AL FAHAD: CEDRIC RIBEIRO/GETTY IMAGES

everything from their love lives to body shaming to child marriage, inspiring other women in the region to chase different kinds of lives for themselves, too. “There are many people who are doing this for free things,” Alice Abdel Aziz says. “That’s not our goal. Our goal is to inspire and motivate people, and leave a mark.” The rise of social-media influencers in the Middle East began in a far-off yet familiar place: Calabasas, California. In 2012, after the Middle East Broadcasting Center started airing Keeping Up With the Kardashians, salons in the region started noticing a demand for a Kardashian-fueled trend: contouring. “It freaked me out,” says Pierre Lahoud, a Lebanese makeup artist. “Women like to copy Kim Kardashian. They think she has that sexy look and Arabian curves”—referring to the family’s Armenian heritage—“and they have half of what she has.” And it wasn’t just their looks: As the Kardashians became full-fledged moguls, women in the Middle East began pursuing similar branding opportunities. El Kak, who bears a striking resemblance to Kim, down to her long hair and penchant for bodycon dresses, was touted as a look-alike on local websites. “I thought, That’s OK—they’re comparing me to a pretty girl,” says El Kak, whose goal is to franchise her name to beauty ventures. Motivation also comes from a source closer to home: Huda Kattan, 34, cofounder of the Dubai-based Huda Beauty, who amassed 24.8 million Instagram followers from the success of her beauty tutorials. With a relatable tone (she once candidly wrote about being “blessed with super-hairy syndrome”) and an approach tailored to the region (she often reviews false eyelashes, an especially popular local trend), she developed a fan base that feverishly follows the trends she popularizes. Kattan’s fame—and her classic Middle Eastern features (full brows and lips, olive skin, long hair)—led to her own line of fake eyelashes at Sephora, and, today, makeup artists aspire to be featured on her feed. Al Fahad, the Kuwaiti makeup artist, got a boost in 2014 when one of her photos appeared on @hudabeauty. She profusely thanked Kattan, calling her a “true inspiration.” Growing up in Kuwait, Al Fahad was a fan of Cindy Crawford. “I love a really strong woman who has it all,” she says. She studied finance but was into makeup and began posting about it online. Once she hit 7,000 Instagram followers, she realized the potential of social media. She studied up on best practices,


started wearing local designers, working their way up until they attracted the attention of global brands. Their big break came in 2015, with the premiere of The Sisters, a reality show exhibiting their high-flying lives. The show drew comparisons to Keeping Up With the Kardashians and generated a slew of international press, but it was panned as boring (an animated spoof called The Cousins poked fun at the sisters’ banal conversations) and went off-air after one season. The short run had little negative impact on the sisters’ success. Alice has since launched a line of sunscreen and tanning oil; Nadine has modeled for Guess and appeared on the Lebanese edition of Dancing With the Stars; and Farah has collaborated with Adidas. Social media is now the sisters’ full-time job, netting them a collective $500,000 last year. “We make good money,” Nadine says with a touch of pride. One humid evening, Nadine arrives at Métropole café in Beirut’s upscale Minet El Hosn neighborhood wearing Céline sunglasses and an off-the-shoulder dress, then seats herself at a sidewalk table. Soon, Farah walks up in sweats, a tube top, and Hermès logo flats; she looks around and notes how “everyone is in Mykonos these days.” Alice arrives late, takes in the heat, and sweeps everyone inside to a table with air-conditioning and a view. It’s clear she’s the leader of the group. The sisters insist on ordering a round of desserts. “Pain perdu!” they exclaim, promising it’s the finest in Beirut. When it arrives, they halt their conversation to film the server drizzling caramel over the dish, while Alice narrates into her phone, saying, “This is the best part!” as she posts to Instagram. As they dig in, they bicker like, well, sisters. “I think people don’t know my romantic side,” Alice muses. “Yes, they do, because you post about it!” Nadine interjects. They talk about boys: “It’s very important for a guy to be supportive of his girlfriend’s job, because it’s not easy,” says Alice, whose fiancé manages the sisters. “We have to take pictures all the time and know how to deal with fame.” In any case, she says, men can’t really object, since “almost all girls have public Instagrams.” The ideal man is “smart,” Farah says. “We should be able to have a conversation at the table.” Being outspoken about equality in romantic relationships is the kind of talk that has gotten the sisters noticed for more than their fashions. Their Instagram posts—many snapped by their personal photographer—reflect people living in a rela-

Huda Kattan @hudabeauty 24.8 million follow the Dubai-based Kattan’s Instagram beauty tips

Fouz Al Fahad @therealfouz Kuwait-based Al Fahad collaborated with MAC on a lipstick

tively free city, in a social class where they don’t have to contend with many of the cultural restrictions governing other women. As a result, rather than play nice with critics, the sisters are empowered to talk back. Alice has had fiery words about body shaming for those who say she and her siblings are too skinny; in 2015, Farah was quick to correct an interviewer who asked if the sisters were “scared to be taken for another Lebanese bimbo.” “Lebanese women are not bimbos,” she said. “Just because women of our society like to dress up and take good care of themselves, people will rush to categorize them. ... Who ever said that a beautiful woman must be stupid?” There are limitations—for example, they don’t collaborate with alcohol brands. “Most of our followers are from Saudi Arabia and the Gulf, and we cannot promote something that is taboo for them. They’ll find it offensive,” Alice says. “You have to respect their lifestyle.” But that doesn’t stop them from posting selfies in bathrobes or hitting clubs in thigh-skimming dresses. “We live in a society that will criticize no matter what,” says Nadine. “We’re in the 21st century and the world is changing,” adds Alice. “Look at our ancestors, it wasn’t like they could go out wearing skirts. So the world is improving, and with all the social media and technology, we have to be different.” ut the spread of flashy, selfie-driven Instagram culture is in opposition to the moral codes of the Middle East. Conservatives are not in favor of how the growing popularity of social media is changing the region. At a 2016 conference on the impact of technology on families organized by the National Council for Family Affairs in Amman, attendees from Palestine, Lebanon, Algeria, and Egypt discussed how social-media obsession was increasing moral degradation. In 2017, a Jordanian television host launched into a diatribe on Facebook, calling on women in Jordan to “repent” for how they dress and saying they encouraged “prostitution, adultery, and rape.” Images of women defying conventions online have caught the eye of law enforcement, too. Karazon, the Jordanian Snapchat star, spent a week in jail in 2016 over an allegedly defamatory post in which she accused a doctor of having conducted the wrong surgery, leading to a woman’s death. In the same year, a woman named Malak al-Shehri was arrested in the Saudi capital of Riyadh for tweeting a photo of herself walking without an abaya, which is mandated by the country’s dress code. More recently, a 27-year-old aspiring Saudi model was seen walking around a historic site in a miniskirt in a viral Snapchat video. (She was detained by the Saudi police and released without charges.) Haya Awad, 35, a fashion designer in Amman who has more than 78,000 Instagram followers, knows to tread carefully. “People following you online are really curious about your lifestyle, but, as a woman, I know my limits,” she says. She remembers once receiving a call from a friend who thought she was revealing too much. “I bought a pair of ‘hot shorts’ and snapped them—I wasn’t even wearing them—and my close friend in Dubai called me and said, ‘Haya, why are you posting this? This is too intimate!’” Awad says. Despite such critiques—and the risk of arrest—a growing number of women are boldly sharing their opinions on a range of topics, including feminism and cyberbullying. In January 2017, a woman in Saudi Arabia used Twitter to call attention to the fact that her infant daughter was [CONTINUED ON P. 146]

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THE

FIGHTING

IN THE EARLY MORNING DARKNESS in the fall of 2011, Siobhan Donohue kissed her two sleeping children goodbye and left for Dublin Airport. Her flight to Liverpool, England, took off just as the sun began to glimmer across the runway. Seated among briefcase-carrying businessmen and rowdy bachelorette parties, Donohue clutched her stomach protectively, knowing on her return trip she would no longer be pregnant. Just a week earlier, Donohue had sat ashen-faced in her doctor’s office during her 20-week checkup as she received the devastating diagnosis that the fetus she was carrying had anencephaly, a condition that prevents the brain from fully developing. Donohue, herself a doctor, understood the severity of the condition, remembering photographs of infants with half-developed skulls she’d seen during her schooling. “Most of these babies will either die before delivery or shortly after,” says Donohue, now 46. “When you hear this news about your child, everything is just gone—just like that, your whole reality is turned upside down.” Knowing the likely outcome, Donohue decided to terminate her pregnancy. But doing so meant she had to leave the country. Ireland bans abortion except when the mother’s life is at risk. A constitutional clause, Article 40.3.3—or the Eighth Amendment, as it’s known—“acknowledges the right to life of the unborn … and guarantees in its laws … to defend and vindicate that right,” criminalizing women who seek the procedure. Although there are no known cases of anyone being prosecuted, procuring an abortion carries a 14-year prison term. Under the law, once Donohue had decided to have an abortion, her doctor had to relinquish care, leaving her on her own to make the arrangements. The trip and procedure cost about $4,000, an unduly high amount for many women in similar situations. According to the Center for Reproductive Rights, a global legal-advocacy organization, approximately 4,000 Irish women travel to a foreign country each year to have an abortion. The most common destination is the U.K., with more than 3,200 Irish women seeking abortions there in 2016. “Ireland can export its abortion problem, but prohibitive laws don’t prevent the problem,” says Ailbhe Smyth, who has fought for abortion rights for more than 40 years. “It hasn’t worked anywhere in the world.”

Ireland is so rigidly antiabortion, its law criminalizing the procedure is written into its constitution. On the eve of a referendum to repeal the ban, women are leading the charge to end reproductive restrictions that have endangered their health for nearly 100 years

By JENNIFER DUGGAN

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FROM TOP: A mural painted on a wall in Dublin’s Temple Bar district was removed by authorities, prompting cries of censorship, 2016; prochoice campaigners counterprotest at Dublin’s annual antiabortion All Ireland Rally for Life, 2017

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IRELAND IS ONE OF SEVEN European countries (along with Poland, Cyprus, Malta, and microstates Andorra, Liechtenstein, and San Marino) where abortion is restricted to the point of being mostly illegal, and the only one to have a ban written into its constitution. In Northern Ireland, which is a separate country from Ireland and part of the U.K., a ban on abortion in almost all circumstances has been maintained, even though the rest of Britain legalized the procedure in 1967 and its National Health Service covers the cost. (Last year, the U.K. government agreed to pay for abortions for women from Northern Ireland if they can travel to England, Scotland, or Wales.) “Ireland is extremely unusual,” says Leah Hoctor, European regional director of the Center for Reproductive Rights. “There are very few countries that have constitutional provisions regulating abortion.” It’s never been completely legal to terminate a pregnancy in Ireland. When the country gained independence from the U.K. in 1922, a statute known as the Offenses Against the Person Act—which stated that any woman with intent to “procure her own miscarriage” … “shall be liable ... to be kept in penal servitude for life”—remained in effect. Ireland was very much under the control of the Catholic Church for decades afterward, and there was a “secrecy and stigma surrounding anything having to do with sex or reproduction,” according to Smyth. The sale of contraception was banned in Ireland until 1980; once legal, it was available only by prescription to married couples for family-planning purposes. Unmarried women were often sent to church-run Mother and Baby Homes to hide a scandalous pregnancy from public view; the mothers were forced to live and work at the institutions for up to two years and were almost never allowed to keep their children, with the majority ending up in “industrial schools,” Catholic-run homes for orphans, or adopted by families in England, Germany, or the U.S. (In 2017, on the grounds of a former Mother and Baby Home in Tuam, a mass grave inside a septic tank was discovered; it contained the remains of nearly 800 babies and toddlers born to unmarried mothers.) After two years, if the unwed mothers weren’t welcomed back home by their families, they were sent to Magdalene laundries, institutions also known as Magdalene asylums for “fallen women,” where they were subjected to forced labor (typically washing clothes and bedding) and physical abuse as punishment for their promiscuity. The last Magdalene laundry closed in 1996. Despite the existing law banning abortion, when the Roe v. Wade ruling legalized the procedure in the U.S. in 1973, hard-line Catholics worried the same thing could happen in Ireland if they didn’t enact a constitutional mandate. A group of antiabortion and right-wing Catholic organizations joined to form the Pro-Life Amendment Campaign and curried favor with legislators by sending postcards that read “Where have

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all our children gone? Abortion kills.” In 1983, the Eighth Amendment easily passed, with 67 percent of voters in favor. But Ireland is a different place today. Thanks to low corporate-tax rates that attract multinational companies, the country has been transformed into a technology hub with a well-educated, multicultural workforce. At the same time, rocked by child-abuse scandals, the Catholic Church has seen its influence wane. While 78 percent of the population still identifies as Catholic, church attendance has dwindled. The most dramatic shift away from the church’s teachings came in May 2015, when Ireland became the first country to legalize same-sex marriage by popular vote. The months leading up to the referendum were colorful, with rainbow flags dotting the streets and people wearing clothes with YES printed across their chests. Droves of emigrants returned home to cast ballots, and those who couldn’t appealed to voters back home with the hashtag #BeMyYes on Twitter. The amendment was approved by 62 percent of voters, setting the stage for abortion as the next fight. “After the marriage-equality referendum, there was this closer examination of the church’s hold over Irish people,” says Anna Cosgrave, a Dublin-based pro-choice activist. “I think people felt very motivated and quite charged—they had a bit of outrage.” The repeal movement was also galvanized by some high-profile tragic cases. One of the first, in 2012, was Indian-born Savita Halappanavar, a 31-year-old dentist, who was admitted to the hospital for a miscarriage that unfolded over the course of a week. When it became clear the fetus would not survive, Halappanavar asked for an abortion but was denied because the fetal heartbeat was still detectable. Both the fetus and Halappanavar died from

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: ANDREA HORAN/TROPICAL POPICAL & THE HUNREAL ISSUES; DEIRDRE BRENNAN/REDUX. PREVIOUS SPREAD: PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SUSANNA HAYWARD. PREVIOUS SPREAD, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: LISA CONNOLLY; MARK HENDERSON/ALAMY; CLODAGH KILCOYNE/REUTERS; MARK HENDERSON/ALAMY (2); NURPHOTO/GETTY IMAGES; FABRICE JOLIVET PHOTOGRAPHY/ALAMY; CLODAGH KILCOYNE/REUTERS; MARK HENDERSON/ALAMY

But now, in an unprecedented cultural shift, following six years of annual protests during which thousands have taken to the streets of Dublin to march against the law, in March, the taoiseach (Ireland’s term for prime minister), Leo Varadkar, who is the country’s youngest and first-ever openly gay head of government, said a vote on whether to repeal the law is set to be held on May 25. If a majority votes for repeal, it would allow for the passage of a new law permitting women access to abortion until the 12th week of pregnancy or later in exceptional circumstances.


FROM LEFT: NIALL CARSON/PA IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES; LAURA HUTTON/ALAMY

FROM TOP LEFT: A woman holds a candle at a vigil marking the fifth anniversary of the death of Savita Halappanavar, who died after she was denied an abortion, 2017; protesters dressed as Handmaids outside the gates of the Irish parliament, 2017

septic shock, and at the inquiry into her death, a doctor said Halappanavar would likely still be alive had she been allowed a termination when she first requested it. Candlelight vigils took place across the country, and angry protesters congregated at parliament. Similar outcries erupted in December 2014 after the devastated family of a pregnant woman in her 20s, who had suffered brain trauma and was clinically dead, had to get a court order to take her off life support. The unnamed woman, who was 18 weeks pregnant, had been kept alive artificially, because her doctors feared the potential legal consequences of allowing her fetus to die with her. (Doctors face 14-year prison sentences for illegally terminating pregnancies, though none have been prosecuted.) And then there’s the 2011 case of Amanda Mellet, a now 44-year-old woman from Dublin, who learned at 22 weeks her fetus had an abnormality that would cause it to die in the womb or shortly after birth. After deciding she couldn’t continue with the pregnancy, Mellet and her husband, James, flew to Liverpool for an abortion. Mellet had an adverse reaction to pain medication, which left her weak, bleeding, and struggling not to faint on the flight back to Dublin the next day. In 2013, the Center for Reproductive Rights filed a complaint against Ireland on Mellet’s behalf before the U.N. Human Rights Committee in Geneva, arguing that the country’s abortion laws violated her human rights by “subjecting her to severe mental suffering and anguish.” Her lawyers noted she had been denied adequate postabortion care and bereavement counseling typically offered to women with nonviable pregnancies, and that the stigma associated with abortion, along with the obstacles she faced in getting information about the medical options open to her, aggravated her suffering. “How can it be justified that a pregnant woman must sneak over to England like a criminal to do what she feels is the most humane thing?” Mellet said in a statement at the time. Three years later, in June 2016, the committee issued a unanimous ruling that found in prohibiting Mellet from accessing an abortion, Ireland had “violated her right to be free from cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment, as well as her right to privacy.” They urged the country to redress the harm Mellet suffered and reform its laws to ensure other women would not face similar violations of their rights. The Irish government paid Mellet ¤30,000 (about $37,000 today) in compensation. While the ruling isn’t enforceable by law, it sent a clear message and embarrassed the Irish government.

BACK IN 2012, Anna Cosgrave was nearing graduation from university and was looking for work when she came across stories of Halappanavar’s death and felt she couldn’t “just sit outraged behind my computer screen.” She attended a candlelight vigil but wanted to do more to take “the conversation offline and onto the streets.” She remembered the YES shirts from the gay-marriage campaign and thought those opposing the Eighth Amendment could use their own unifying article of clothing. She kept it simple, designing a plain black sweatshirt with REPEAL emblazoned in white across the front, and began selling them online. The sweatshirts proved to be a powerful form of silent protest, much like the pink “pussy hats” seen during the Women’s March in the U.S. and elsewhere. “I had no idea how to run an online store,” says Cosgrave, 28. But the orders kept coming, so before long she formally launched the Repeal Project with the tagline “Outerwear to give voice to a hidden problem.” The sweatshirts have become a common sight on the streets of Dublin. Last year they even made an appearance in Ireland’s parliament when six opposition leaders—four men and two women—took off their jackets to reveal the shirts during a debate on the Eighth Amendment. They’ve also helped women feel comfortable sharing their stories. Cosgrave recalls hearing from one woman who said that, before the sweatshirts, she had never told anyone she had traveled to the U.K. for an abortion. “She’d kept it secret,” Cosgrave says. “But her workplace brought in REPEAL sweatshirts, and seeing her colleagues wear them empowered her to open up to them.” Historically, abortion in Ireland was discussed in abstract medical and theological terms. But the bravery of women telling their personal stories helped humanize the movement. One of the first prominent women to share her experience was comedian and actress Tara Flynn. Onstage at an Amnesty International abortion-rights event held at a music festival in 2015, Flynn recounted how traveling to the Netherlands in 2006 for an abortion made her feel stigmatized and isolated. Going public was both “liberating and terrifying,” she says. But it’s important to “change the conversation on abortion from a taboo to something that impacts ordinary women, not criminals. It’s the woman at your bus stop.” Despite the attacks she gets from pro-lifers online, she’s glad she spoke out. “There is something about living your truth,” says Flynn, 48. “I felt you can’t say you are honestly campaigning without disclosing your situation.” Women are showing their support in other ways, too. Andrea Horan, the owner of Tropical Popical nail salon in Dublin, became an activist when [CONTINUED ON P. 146] May 2018

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SHOPPING DIRECTORY FRONT COVERS On Riley Keough: Dress, Earrings, prices upon request,

[CONTINUED FROM P. 145] she started dis-

cussing reproductive rights with her clients. Soon, customers were requesting political nail art, with hot-pink 8s an especially popular design. “I was looking at the communications of the repeal campaign, and nothing really touched me,” she says. “All the girls in the nail bar ... it wasn’t even something they knew about, and I thought, There has to be a way to mobilize the girls to care.” Her shop has also sold “Healthcare Not Airfare” luggage tags. In July 2016, Horan, 37, commissioned a street artist to paint a mural in Dublin’s trendy Temple Bar district. The painting—a red heart with “Repeal the 8th” in white across the middle— was removed after authorities received complaints. But the removal sparked cries of censorship, and the heart became the unofficial logo of the campaign and was reproduced on prints, bags, jewelry, and even doughnuts. “At the time, it was devastating,” Horan says of the mural’s removal. “But the attention it got in coming down was amazing—it kicked things off.” This past September, the annual March for Choice was the largest since the Abortion Rights Campaign, an alliance of pro-choice groups, began hosting the rallies in 2011. By some estimates, 30,000 people took to the streets (up from some 20,000 in 2016), hopeful this would be the last time they’d have to gather for the cause. The buoyant crowd, peppered with black REPEAL sweatshirts, snaked its way through Dublin’s streets chanting, “Pro-life, that’s a lie, you don’t care if women die” and “Get your rosaries off my ovaries.” In February, a public-opinion poll conducted by the British research firm Kantar Millward Brown showed 63 percent of Irish voters favor repealing the Eighth Amendment, a reality that Smyth, the longtime rights activist, says would have been “unthinkable” even a year ago. “Repeal would simply not be on the political agenda if the campaign was not there,” she says. “When they hear women’s experiences, they change their minds.” Get-out-thevote efforts are under way on social media with a #HometoVote hashtag encouraging citizens living elsewhere to return to cast ballots. Regardless of the outcome, Irish women, wielding newfound confidence in standing up to the Catholic Church’s long-standing control over their bodies, will no longer be silenced or shamed for their reproductive decisions. “Now we feel empowered—like we can make change happen!” says Flynn. “The snowball has started rolling down the hill, and there is no pushing it back up.” 146

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[CONTINUED FROM P. 141] being abused by the baby’s father (the baby was removed from the father’s custody and given to the mother). Also in 2017, Ghina Ghandour, 38, an image consultant in Lebanon, posted an Instagram about an anti-sexual-harassment campaign in her country known as #mesh_ basita (which translates to “It’s not a small thing” in Arabic), writing “sexual harassment is not okay, it should not be normalized, and there is need for legislative reforms.” Even in the most conservative countries in the region, women are increasingly posting photographs of themselves from the neck down, or focusing cameras on their shoes or coffee cups. “The more you grow, the more you’re exposed to different mentalities and beliefs,” says Al Fahad, the Kuwaiti makeup artist. “I feel like there’s a long way to go, but in the Middle East, people are more accepting that there are different kinds of girls and guys.” The influencers are gratified by their impact. “I always have women tell me, ‘Because of you, we changed our life and started caring about ourselves, not only about brands and looks,’” says El Kak, the Lebanese TV and radio host. Karazon thinks her outspoken nature has helped other women find their voices. “When I started, it wasn’t possible for Jordanian girls to speak out on Snapchat,” says Karazon, who has opposed underage marriage and stood up to criticism she receives for not wearing a hijab. “I was the first woman to start talking about modern issues, and that made people start following me.” Now her fans clamor for her commentary. “It’s not possible for me to take a day off,” Karazon says. “People say, ‘Zain, please, you’re like family; we need to get your advice.’” What women like Karazon have achieved is more than just fame and freebies. Their success is what makes a teenager capture herself on Snapchat as she tells the world how she styled her headscarf, confident that she has the right to do so. It’s a change evident throughout the Middle East and one that isn’t driven by a government or a campaign to rid women of their burkas—it’s real and organic, and it’s being narrated 24/7, through filters and emojis. “When many people said to me, ‘Without a man in the house, you would not be able to succeed in life,’ Zain taught me that we don’t need anybody to succeed,” says Inès, an 18-year-old who ran the now-defunct @ZainKarazonFans account on Twitter. “We have to persevere, and then we can do anything.”

Louis Vuitton; (866) VUITTON. On Katherine Langford: Dress, price upon request, Valentino; (212) 772-6969 for similar styles. On Issa Rae: Coat, $2,500, Top & Skirt, $2,100 each, Earrings, $620, Brooch, $680, Céline; (212) 535-3703. On Yara Shahidi: Dress, Necklace, prices upon request, Earrings, $1,025, Chanel; (800) 550-0005. On Sophie Turner: Dress, price upon request, Louis Vuitton; (866) VUITTON.

BEAUTY COVERS On Riley Keough: Dress, Earrings, prices upon request, Louis Vuitton; (866) VUITTON. On Katherine Langford: Dress, price upon request, Valentino; (212) 772-6969 for similar styles. On Issa Rae: Top, $620, Turtleneck, $690, Burberry; us.burberry.com. Earrings, $550, Jennifer Fisher; jenniferfisherjewelry.com. On Yara Shahidi: Dress, Necklace, prices upon request, Earrings, $1,025, Chanel; (800) 5500005. On Sophie Turner: Top, $1,450, Dolce & Gabbana; (877) 70-DGUSA. Earrings, $2,580, Messika Paris; messika.com for stores. BEAUTY Aerin, aerin.com; Anastasia Beverly Hills, anastasiabeverlyhills. com; Angela Caglia, angelacaglia.com; Benefit Cosmetics, benefitcosmetics.com; Bioderma, dermstore.com; Bond No. 9, bondno9.com; Chanel, chanel.com; Chantecaille, chantecaille. com; Charlotte Tilbury, charlottetilbury.com; Clarins, clarinsusa. com; Covergirl, walmart.com; Creme of Nature, cremeofnature. com for locations; Darphin, darphin.com; De Mamiel Botaniques, demamiel.com; Dermalogica, dermalogica.com; Dior, dior.com; Dr. Andrew Weil For Origins, origins.com; Dyson, dyson.com; EltaMD, dermstore.com; Éminence, eminenstore.com; Floraïku, us.floraiku. com; Four Sigmatic, us.foursigmatic.com; Garnier, garnier.com; GHD, ghdhair.com; Gingerchi, gingerchi.com; Glamglow, glamglow. com.; Glossier, glossier.com; Goop, goop.com; Grown Alchemist, grownalchemist.com; Hair Ritual by Sisley-Paris, sisley-paris.com; Harmonist, theharmonist.com; Healthy Sexy Hair, sexyhair.com; Herbivore Botanicals, herbivorebotanicals.com; Innisfree, Innisfree. com; It’s A 10 Haircare, ulta.com; Jo Malone London, jomalone.com; Josie Maran, josiemarancosmetics.com; Kahina Giving Beauty, kahinagivingbeauty.com; Kérastase, kerastase-usa.com; Klairs, klairscosmetics. com; L’Occitane, loccitane.com; L’Oreal Paris, lorealparisusa.com; La Mer, cremedelamer.com; La Prairie, laprairie.com; Laura Geller, laurageller.com; Louis Vuitton, louisvuitton.com; Mamonde, mamonde. com; Maybelline New York, maybelline.com; MDNA Skin, mdnaskin. com; Moroccanoil, moroccanoil.com; Naïf, naifcare.com; NARS, narscosmetics.com; Natura Bissé, naturabisse.com; Naturals by Gina B, naturalsbyginab.com; Nest, nestfragrances.com; Olly, olly.com; OPI, opi.com; Paula’s Choice, paulaschoice.com; Paul Mitchell, paulmitchell. com; Perricone MD, perriconemd.com; Peter Thomas Roth, sephora. com; Philosophy, philosophy.com; Proenza Schouler, proenzaschouler. com; Rituals, rituals.com; Sephora Collection, sephora.com; Serge Lutens, sergelutens.com; Shea Moisture, sheamoisture.com; Shiva Rose, shivarose.com; Skin Gym, skingymco.com; Sonya Dakar, sonyadakar. com; Sukin, sukinorganics.com; Supergoop, sephora.com; Tata Harper, tataharperskincare.com; Tatcha, tatcha.com; The Ordinary, theordinary. com; Tracy Martyn, tracymartyn.com; Urban Decay, sephora.com; Vichy, vichyusa.com; Wella Professionals, wella.com for locations; Yves Saint Laurent, yslbeautyus.com.

FRESH FACES 111: Gucci Dress, Top, gucci.com for stores. 112: Marc

Jacobs Jacket, Sweatshirt, Top, Bodysuit, (212) 343-1490. Guess Earrings, shop.guess.com. 114-115: Dior Dress, (800) 929-DIOR. Tiffany & Co. Earrings, (800) 843-3269. 117: Max Mara Jumpsuit, (212) 879-6100. Chanel Bracelet, (800) 550-0005. Darner Socks Socks, darnersocks. com. 118-119: Gucci Dress, gucci.com for similar styles. 120: Undercover Jacket, undercoverism.com. 3.1 Phillip Lim Dangle Earring, 31philliplim. com. Salvatore Ferragamo Hoop Earring, (866) 337-7242. 123: Céline Jacket, Top & Skirt, Earrings, (212) 535-3703. SUN DAY 125: From left: Araks Swim Top, araks.com. Dior Bottoms, (800) 929-DIOR. Flagpole Swim Top & Bottoms (sold as set), flagpolenyc.com. 126-127: Jacquemus Dress, jacquemus.com. 003: Polo Ralph Lauren Dress, ralphlauren. com. 128: Chloé Cape, chloe.com. Michael Michael Kors Swim Bottoms, (866) 709-KORS. 129: Bottega Veneta Bodysuit, (800) 845-6790. 130: From left: Isabel Marant Swimsuit, isabelmarant.com. K. Jacques Shoes, (718) 923-5777. La Perla Swimsuit, laperla.com. Clergerie Shoes, (212) 207-8600. 131: Bottega Veneta Bodysuit, (800) 845-6790. Mirjam Nuver Hat, mirjamnuverhats.com. 132: Gucci Dress, gucci.com for stores. 133: Hermès Top, (800) 441-4488. Missoni Hat, (212) 517-9339. 134: Fendi Swim Top, Top, fendi.com. 135: Emporio Armani Swimsuit, armani.com. Giorgio Armani Hat, (212) 207-1902. 136: Missoni Mare Caftan, (212) 517-9339. Salvatore Ferragamo Top & Bottoms (worn underneath), (866) 337-7242. 137: Isabel Marant Swimsuit, isabelmarant.com. K. Jacques Shoes, (718) 923-5777. La Perla Swimsuit, laperla.com. Clergerie Shoes, (212) 207-8600.

JUST ADD WATER 43: Dior Sunglasses, solsticesunglasses.com for stores. Versace Seashell Earring, Starfish Earring, versace.com for stores. 44: Matteau Swim Top, matteau-swim.com. Rebecca de Ravenel Earrings, rebeccaderavenel.com. 45: Max Mara Leisure Swim Top, Swim Bottoms, (808) 926-6161. 46: Sonia Rykiel Striped Briefs, (212) 396-3060. 47: Miu Miu Checkered Briefs, miumiu.com for stores. 48: From left: Marni Top, (646) 532-6015. Emporio Armani Swim Bottoms (sold as set), armani.com. DVF West Top, dvf.com. Fella Swim Bottoms, fellaswim. com. Dolce & Gabbana Swim Top, Swim Bottoms, (877) 70-DG-USA. 49: Missoni Dress, (212) 517-9339. Lola Hats Hat, modaoperandi.com. Droomfabriek de Groot & de Jong Earrings, droomfabriekantiek.nl. All prices are approximate. For help finding the items in this issue, e-mail marieclaireshops@hearst.com. No subscription inquiries, please. For subscriptions, log on to subscribe.marieclaire.com.


Q&A

The SHRINK IS IN

Our resident psychiatrist offers an exit strategy for a toxic friendship, suggests the great outdoors as a way to bond with Mom, and spins a workplace meltdown into a career win type. It need not be a strenuous hike. Sneakers aren’t even required. Just a 20-minute walk is enough to reap the benefits.

Q: Does showing emotion at work undermine my authority as a boss?

MOVIESTORE COLLECTION LTD/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

Q: How do I break up with a toxic friend? A: There is a saying that you are the average of the five people you spend the most time with (meaning we are greatly influenced by our friends, for better or worse), and research backs this up. Good friends are the cornerstone of well-being, while toxic ones can take a toll on our mental and physical health. If a friend is a negative influence, doesn’t wish you well, makes you feel weak or inadequate, or is untrustworthy, it might be time to remove

that person from your life. But before you do, be sure that a misunderstanding is not at the heart of the problem. If you don’t want to talk it out or you know there is no point in engaging the person in a dialogue, allow some distance before making any hasty decisions. Unless the person has done something egregious, a gradual unraveling may be easier on everyone involved. Do your best to leave other friends out of it and not to incur your ex-friend’s wrath. Above all, be kind and try to minimize hurt feelings so you can both move on.

Q: My mom and I don’t share many common interests, so how can we make the most of our time together? A: While it may be tempting to persuade your mom to take you shopping, if you want to make the most of your time together, take a walk in the park. A University of Illinois study found that mothers and daughters had more positive interactions, which helped them get along better, on a stroll together in nature than a trip to the mall. No worries if your mom isn’t the outdoors

A: On the contrary, it can underscore your commitment to your work, depending on how you spin it. If you have a meltdown, instead of saying “I was too emotional,” say, “I was very passionate.” According to a recent study, those who pulled the passion card were perceived to be more competent than those who said emotions got in the way. “Passion is associated with determination, motivation, and having a high degree of selfcontrol,” explains lead researcher Sunita Sah, assistant professor of management and organizations at Cornell University. “Being emotional, however, is associated with irrationality, instability, ineptitude, and a low degree of self-control.” Showing emotion makes us human. When I became a doctor, I burst into tears the first time I had to tell a family that their loved one had died. At the time, I was mortified, but a few weeks later I received a lovely note from the family, which said they were touched by my tears. It showed how much I cared. DR. SAMANTHA BOARDMAN IS A CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR IN PSYCHIATRY AND ASSISTANT ATTENDING PSYCHIATRIST AT WEILL CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE IN NEW YORK CITY AND THE FOUNDER OF POSITIVEPRESCRIPTION.COM.

May 2018

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BACKPAGE

Carol

@itscarolburnett

BURNETT

The legendary comedian—whose Netflix series, A Little Help With Carol Burnett, premieres this month—loves good news and enchiladas. The paparazzi? Not so much 1. IF I WEREN’T AN ENTERTAINER, I’D BE: A cartoonist with my own comic strip. 2. BEST CAREER ADVICE I’VE GOTTEN: Never make a career decision based on money. 3. THE THREE QUALITIES THAT GOT ME WHERE I AM TODAY: A love of performing. Believing that when one door closes, another one will open. Patience.

4. MOMENT I FELT I MADE IT: When I got the lead in Once Upon a Mattress (an off-Broadway show) and was hired to be a regular on The Garry Moore Show, in the same year.

5. EASIEST CAREER DECISION I’VE EVER MADE: Turning down a six-week job in Las Vegas paying a lot of money to be in a six-week run of Once Upon a Mattress for $80 a week. Turned out that Mattress moved up to Broadway and ran for a year.

6. WORST PITFALL OF THE JOB: The paparazzi. 7. CHANGE I’D LIKE TO SEE IN MY INDUSTRY: More women in higher positions. It’s getting better, but it’s not there yet. 8. HOW I MADE MY FIRST DOLLAR: I was an “usherette” at a movie theater on Hollywood Boulevard when I was in college for 65 cents an hour.

9. LAST THING I BINGE-WATCHED: Stranger Things. 10. BOOK THAT LEFT A LASTING IMPRESSION ON ME: The Initiate: Some Impressions of a Great Soul, by Cyril Scott. 11. SONG THAT ALWAYS MAKES ME CRY: “Here’s That Rainy Day,” by Jimmy Van Heusen (composer) and Johnny Burke (lyricist). 12. MOVIE WITH THE GREATEST ENDING: Casablanca. 13. SONG I’D WANT PLAYED AT MY FUNERAL: “I’m So Glad We Had This Time Together” [theme song from The Carol Burnett Show]. 14. ON MY BUCKET LIST: To go to the moon and look at the earth. 15. FOOD I’M NOT ASHAMED TO ADMIT I LOVE: Enchiladas. 16. HOW MY PERFECT DAY WOULD BEGIN: Coffee and the New York Times crossword puzzle. 17. HOW MY PERFECT DAY WOULD END: Watching only good news on television. 18. ONE THING I’M EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD AT: Listening. 19. ONE THING I’M EPICALLY BAD AT: Math. 20. HOW I CLEAR MY MIND AFTER A CRAPPY DAY: By thinking there’s always a better day tomorrow. 22. MY FIRST KISS: Was from a dog. 23. ADVICE TO A WOMAN WITH A BROKEN HEART: It will pass. 24. RELATIONSHIP ADVICE TO MY YOUNGER SELF: Hang in there, kid. FOR MORE CAROL, GO TO MARIECLAIRE.COM/CAROL-BURNETT

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Flip to See Our

GLOBAL BEAUT Y ISSUE

RAMONA ROSALES/NETFLIX

21. IF I COULD COMPETE IN AN OLYMPIC SPORT, I’D LIKE IT TO BE: Running.


PROMOTION

celebrates the 5th anniversary of

FRESH FACES HONORING

Riley Keough Katherine Lang ford Issa Rae Yara Shahidi Sophie Turner

Follow along Friday, April 27 th at 6pm PST/9pm EST @ MARIECLAIREMAG

TO GO BEHIND-THE-SCENES OF THE PARTY!


100% VIRGIN COCONUT OIL COCONUT OIL Antioxidant Vitamin E nourishes the scalp. Natural triglycerides hydrate hair.

COCONUT MILK Conditioning properties smooth and soften hair.

ACACIA SENEGAL Locks in moisture to support hair elasticity and suppleness.

HYDRATE & EMPOWER what if TOGETHER we empower women every time we pop our curls, every time we moisturize our skin and every time we wash our hair? You + SheaMoisture invested in 15 US-based minority owned & operated businesses who employ over 900 people; empowering women to lead and dream big. Learn more at SheaMoisture.com @SheaMoisture #SheaMoisture #CommunityCommerce NO Sulfates • NO Parabens • NO Phthalates • NO Propylene Glycol • NO Mineral Oil • NO Paraffin • NO DEA • NO Animal Testing


HERE’S WHAT WOMEN ARE SAYING*. / L’Oréal invited women to try Revitalift Triple Power. See why they love it. / *Women were cast and compensated in an interview panel using Revitalift Triple Power Moisturizer for 2X a day for 14 days.

My skin actually looked younger and I couldn’t believe it. Andrea W.

It was like an investment in me… makes my skin feel revitalized. Veronica A.

You’ll see a difference in your skin... I saw it in my own skin and I was a huge skeptic. Jennifer C.

L’Oréal Paris Revitalift Triple Power Day Cream, $24.99, available at Walgreens.


SKEPTICAL? HERE’S THE ANTI-AGING CREAM WOMEN CAN TRUST.

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VISIT REVITALIFT.COM ©2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc. *Money back guarantee, up to $24.99 (sales tax will not be refunded). Restrictions apply. For details, call 1-800-630-5585. Valid in the 50 U.S./D.C. and only on purchase of a Revitalift Triple Power skin care product made between 1/1/18 and 12/31/18 with original store receipt. Request must be postmarked by 1/30/19 and received by 2/14/19. Void where prohibited. Limit 1 refund per person and per household.


FROM LEFT: One of my favorite images from “Just Add Water,” shot in Santa Cruz de Tenerife; new spring fragrances are inspired by destinations near and far

EDITOR’S NOTE

Culture SHIFT

6

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

CONTENTS

E

xploring beauty rituals around the world and discovering trends overseas have always been an important part of Marie Claire’s DNA. But when we started working on this year’s Global Beauty issue, something dawned on us: For a new generation of Americans, there’s no need to look abroad for the next big thing, because plenty of beauty discoveries are happening right here in the USA. We asked some of these outspoken young women how their heritage informs their beauty philosophies—and, of course, grilled them for their skin, hair, and makeup secrets, too—in “Facing the Future” (page 18). That said, we’ve still got plenty of international intrigue. Our diverse network of editors from Marie Claire foreign editions always play an important role in this issue. Not only do we ask them to share the coolest local trends (like, say, the chicest place to get a blowout in Moscow) (page 66), but many of them are part of our Prix d’Excellence jury, where we come together every year to select what are considered “the best beauty products in the world” (page 54). We’ve also identified the hot new brow look in the Middle East, a must-have Korean lava face mask, and a fragrance that transports you to the Sonoran Desert. Finally, I hope you enjoy reading about my

Executive Editorial Director, Beauty

FROM LEFT: The U.S. Prix winners; a rose-quartz face roller; ice swimming in Lapland

FLIP FOR OUR FRESH FACES!

There’s more to love about May: It marks our annual Fresh Faces celebration. Flip the issue to meet the five fabulous women taking Hollywood by storm.

8 BEHIND THE COVER Our Fresh Faces give travel tips

14 WHAT I LOVE ABOUT ME London’s streetstyle royalty

18 FACING THE FUTURE “Third culture” women talk beauty

29 FIELD GUIDE Mushroom foraging in Lapland

30 DIG DEEP What on earth? Inside the world of geo-skincare

40 HAIR DIARIES A hair color to match the jet-set lifestyle

42 JUST ADD WATER Think spring with the season’s skincare, hair, and makeup updates

50 JOURNEY IN A BOTTLE Fragrances for armchair globe-trotters

54

PRIX D’EXCELLENCE BEAUTY AWARDS 2018 Products that are among the best on the planet

66

INTERNATIONAL EDITORS’ GUIDE Marie Claire contributors reveal their favorite things

ROLLER: COURTESY OF THE COMPANY. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP CENTER: CARLIJN JACOBS; COURTESY OF CHLOE; ERIK MADIGAN HECK (5); JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D; COURTESY OF SUPERCHARGE. COVER PHOTOGRAPHS BY ERIK MADIGAN HECK. ON RILEY KEOUGH: DRESS, EARRINGS, LOUIS VUITTON. ON KATHERINE LANGFORD: DRESS, VALENTINO. ON ISSA RAE: TOP, TURTLENECK, BURBERRY; EARRINGS, JENNIFER FISHER. ON YARA SHAHIDI: DRESS, NECKLACE, EARRINGS, CHANEL. ON SOPHIE TURNER: TOP, DOLCE & GABBANA; EARRINGS, MESSIKA PARIS

Marie Claire (ISSN 1081-8626) is published monthly, with a combined Holiday issue, 11 times per year, by Marie Claire/Hearst, a New York general partnership whose partners are Hearst Communications, Inc., 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019 U.S.A., and Comary, Inc., c/o Marie Claire Album S.A., 10 boulevard des Frères Voisin, 92130, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. Hearst Communications, Inc.: Steven R. Swartz, President & Chief Executive Officer; William R. Hearst III, Chairman; Frank A. Bennack, Jr., Executive Vice Chairman; Catherine A. Bostron, Secretary. Hearst Magazines Division: David Carey, President; John A. Rohan, Jr., Senior Vice President, Finance. © 2018 by Marie Claire/Hearst. All rights reserved. Marie Claire is a registered trademark of Marie Claire Album S.A. Periodicals postage paid at NY, NY, and additional entry post offices. Canada Post International Publications mail product (Canadian distribution) sales agreement No. 40012499. Editorial and Advertising Offices: 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019-3797. Subscription Prices: United States and possessions, $19.97 for one year. Canada and all other countries, $39.97 for one year. Subscription Services: Marie Claire will, upon receipt of a complete subscription order, undertake fulfillment of that order so as to provide the first copy for delivery by the Postal Service or alternate carrier within 4–6 weeks. From time to time, we make our subscriber list available to companies who sell goods and services by mail that we believe would interest our readers. If you would rather not receive such mailings, please send your current mailing label or an exact copy to Mail Preference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. For customer service, changes of address, and subscription orders, log on to service.marieclaire.com, or write to Customer Service Department, Marie Claire, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Marie Claire is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or art. None will be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Canada BN NBR 10231 0943 RT. Postmaster: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 707.4.12.5); Non-postal and military facilities: Send address corrections to Marie Claire, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Printed in the U.S.A.

GLOBAL BEAUTY


©2018 P&G

FEEL the CLEAN. SEE the GLOW. Body washes that draw out impurities and draw in hydration for naturally glowing skin. A cleanser’s just a cleanser. Unless, it’s Olay.

NEW


8

Yara SHAHIDI

1

2

One and Only Palmilla in Los Cabos, Mexico

3

Sophie TURNER R&R: “Aire Ancient Baths in New York City is so relaxing. It offers services like holistic rituals and wine baths … It’s a dream. And the 60-minute massage ain’t bad either.” QUICK FIX: “I’m loving the new Wella Hair Stabilizer. It’s a quick conditioning treatment I can do anywhere that restores the health of my hair to prepare it for another transformation. I swear by it.” IN-FLIGHT ESSENTIALS: “A big bottle of water, Carmex, and Dermalogica cream. Keep it dewy, ladies.” FAVORITE FIND: “Peter Thomas Roth eye patches. They brighten up my under-eyes and feel amazing in the morning.” MAKE A GETAWAY: “One and Only Palmilla in Los Cabos, Mexico, is so beautiful. You’re right on the beachfront, and there’s a pool in your room!” SWEAT IT OUT: “If it’s warm, I’ll choose swimming as my workout every time. If not, I’ll hit up the hotel gym.”

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

R&R: “My skincare and self-care have really aligned in the past year. I’ll put almond oil in my hair and on my body at night, which helps me transition from a workday to rest time. It’s just a relaxing moment for focusing on myself.” IN-FLIGHT ESSENTIAL: “In the recirculated plane air, my skin is prone to breakouts, so I always use a sheet mask. It freaks out the flight attendants, but I arrive looking fresh.” TRAVEL COMPANIONS: “Because I live in L.A., hydration is important, so I use rose hip oil. My other go-to is brow gel—even if I have a really light look otherwise, I just want my brows going in the same direction.” TOP TOOL: “I discovered jade rollers on Instagram; I have one in my bag right now. It has natural properties to help with inflammation, so I use it in the morning. It’s really cold and refreshing, so it wakes me up.” PLUGGED-IN: “Podcasts are one way I get my news, and they give me a global perspective. One of my favorites is ‘Still Processing’ by the New York Times, and ‘This

5

4

1. WELLA PROFESSIONALS No3 Hair Stabilizer, $14. 2. PETER THOMAS ROTH 24K Pure Luxury Lift & Firm Hydra-Gel Eye Patches, $75. 3. DERMALOGICA Calm Water Gel, $48. 6. GLOSSIER Boy Brow, $16.

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ERIK MADIGAN HECK (2); COURTESY ONE&ONLY PALMILLA RESORT

FROM SECRET VACATION OASES TO MILE-HIGH MUST-HAVES, OUR COVER STARS SHARE HOW THEY STAY CENTERED WHILE TRAVELING THE GLOBE By TAYL O R E G LYN N

BEHIND THE COVER SHOOT

FRESH FACES

GLOBAL BEAUTY


DIOR.COM DILLARDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S


PROMOTION

celebrates the 5th anniversary of

FRESH FACES HONORING

Riley Keough Katherine Lang ford Issa Rae Yara Shahidi Sophie Turner

Follow along Friday, April 27 th at 6pm PST/9pm EST @ MARIECLAIREMAG

TO GO BEHIND-THE-SCENES OF THE PARTY!


GLOBAL BEAUTY

Issa RAE

Riley KEOUGH

MAKE A GETAWAY: “Arenas del Mar in Costa Rica was my first destination traveling out of the country by myself. It’s in the middle of the rain forest, and there were monkeys and sloths outside my window.” TRAVEL COMPANIONS: “I take lemongrass body butter with me, and I love a good CoverGirl lipcolor.” PACK LIGHT: “My notebook and Bose noise-canceling headphones are always in my backpack. No crying babies on the plane for me.” SLEEP TIGHT: “No matter what, I force myself to go to bed at the right time. I like to wake up early, so I take melatonin gummies to keep me on a schedule.” ROOM SERVICE: “When I’m really feeling bold or like cheating, I’ll

IN-FLIGHT ESSENTIALS: “My skin gets extra dry, so I’ll pack moisturizer and maybe eye cream if I’m feeling crazy. Sometimes I’ll use Charlotte Tilbury’s dry mask before layering on her cream. It looks weird, but it’s wonderful!” JET LAG CURE: “I can sleep anywhere, honestly, but if I’m somewhere especially beautiful, I’ll lie on the beach.” SAFEKEEPING: “I don’t always wear makeup, but I wear oil-free sunscreen every single day. Supergoop has a pink lip and cheek stain with SPF that’s really cool.” ROOM SERVICE: “I get burgers everywhere—well done with cheese, and french fries.” SLEEP TIGHT: “Tatcha’s camellia oil lip balm is really lovely. I use it every night before I go to sleep.”

Sloths roam the grounds at Arenas del Mar in Costa Rica

1

3 2

12

Training Mate

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Katherine LANGFORD BEAUTY MUST-HAVE: “There’s this Dior lip balm that has a beautiful tube and is so hydrating without messing up my makeup. I layered it over my lipstick at the Golden Globes this year.” IN-FLIGHT ESSENTIALS: “I used to have chronic acne, so I like to take care of my skin. Bioderma has a gentle makeup remover for sensitive types, and I finish with a lightweight moisturizer from Sukin, an organic company from Australia.” JET LAG CURE: “I try and go for a walk or a run or something that feels active after a 14-hour flight.” SWEAT IT OUT: “I live out of a suitcase for the good majority of the year, so I try and maintain a fitness routine to keep me grounded. Training Mate, a cardio class in L.A. with Aussie instructors, brings me back to my athletic roots.”

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1. OLLY Restful Sleep Melatonin Gummies, $14. 2. NATURALS BY GINA B Kiss My Ash Body Balm, $18. 3. COVERGIRL Melting Pout Metallics Liquid Lipstick in Don’t Be Gelly, $7. 4. DIOR Lip Glow Hydrating Color Reviver Balm in 001 Pink, $34. 5. BIODERMA Sensibio H2O Wipes, $10. 6. SUKIN Facial Moisturiser, $11. 7. SUPERGOOP Perk Up! Lip and Cheek Treat SPF 40, $22. 8. TATCHA Camellia Gold Spun Lip Balm, $30. 9. CHARLOTTE TILBURY Revolutionary Instant Magic Facial Dry Sheet Mask, $22. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

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STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ERIK MADIGAN HECK (3); COURTESY OF ARENAS DEL MAR; COURTESY OF TRAINING MATE

BEHIND THE COVER SHOOT: FRESH FACES


GLOBAL BEAUTY

What I Love ABOUT ME

From charmingly classic to wildly eccentric, consider these London locals street-style royalty INTERVIEWS BY ALEXANDRA ENGLER PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOEL BARHAMAND

FRED BUTLER

Guest Editor: ROCKY BAL BROWER

“I’m a calm, quiet person, which no one expects from how I dress. But I just love color!”

KAY DAVIS “Lipstick is my thing. I like cocktailing them—like this purple and rose nude—to make whatever shade I want.”

JADE LAURICE “I never thought makeup existed for my skin color, but once I found products that worked, I started to have fun.”

For this world-traveling model, there’s no place like London. Sleep over: I cannot think of one person who wouldn’t find something to love at the Ham Yard Hotel (firmdalehotels.com): It has a rooftop terrace, bowling alley, theater, and beautifully decorated rooms. Hang out: A lesser-known but supercool spot is the membersonly club Library ($28 for a day pass; lib-rary. com) in Leicester Square. I go there to have a cocktail, do some work, and socialize. Go green: The Kew Royal Botanical Gardens (kew.org) features the most diverse collection of plants of any botanic garden. It transports you away from the city immediately. Retail therapy: Preloved Vintage Kilo (@prelovedkilo) is a roving secondhand pop-up shop that sells the best stock of big and indie brands. Must try: I am a total foodie, so this year I’m hitting up the London Foodies Festival (May 26–28; foodiesfestival.com). It’s the only place where you can find Michelinstarred chefs, unique restaurants, craft cocktails, and even live music all in one spot.

FOR YOUR CHANCE TO BE A GUEST EDITOR, POST A PHOTO OF YOURSELF IN YOUR CITY ON INSTAGRAM USING #MCTRAVELS.

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MA R I E C L A I R E .COM May 2018


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GLOBAL BEAUTY WHAT I LOVE ABOUT ME

PARIS LEES “As a trans woman, I think my clothing choices are more deliberate. It’s a message about how I want the world to view me.”

LULU STONE “I love clean, bright, fresh skin. I use U.K. brand No7’s exfoliators because they make you feel baby-soft after.”

KÄTLIN BALAM “I use coconut oil for everything: makeup remover, face masks, and hair treatments.”

GRACE VICTORY “I feel most like myself when I wear my braids. Plus, they’re so easy—I’m able to just wake up and go.”

HOLLIE MERCEDES PETERS “I’m very outgoing. People say I have ‘resting smiley face.’”

JESSICA KIM EVANS 16

“I believe your skin reflects how you treat your body, so I complement my skincare with being healthy.” MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018


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© J&JCI 2017


GLOBAL BEAUTY The majority of young Americans say they wish they didn’t have to label themselves, according to new research

SPECIAL REPORT

Get to know the next generation of America: young women who defy demographic labels and say self-expression—and the beauty products they use to achieve it—is fundamental to who they are By SAR A SP RU CH - FE I NE R

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MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

Thanks to smartphones and social media, there’s now a generation of women who see their own faces on a screen at least once a day. And 79 percent of these young Millennials and Gen Z–ers (ages 13 to 34) say the way they present themselves is fundamental to who they are, according to recent findings published by Beautycon Media in conjunction with Culture Co-Op, a research and trends agency. “We call them the Pivotals, and they’re driving a revolution in beauty,” says Moj Mahdara, CEO of Beautycon Media. Many of these Pivotals reject the concept of identity as we (used to) know it and define themselves in groundbreakingly niche, specific terms. Identity is even more complex for the 44 percent of them who are “third-culture kids,” those from two or more racial, ethnic, or cultural groups who consider themselves part of a unique third culture of their own. Marie Claire interviewed six women in the center of the Pivotal age group who are currently living in the New York area (but hail from a diverse list of places) and use beauty as a form of cultural expression. Growing up intimately acquainted with social media, they enjoy its benefits and are simultaneously cognizant of its dangers. They are firm believers that true beauty comes from within, but also unafraid to express themselves with a red lip or by drawing designs on their face with eyeliner. And even though they share an unprecedented conviction that gender is a construct and that society’s definition of beauty comes from a patriarchal framework, they’re not afraid to admit that clean edges and sick nail art can make a girl feel damn good.

STUDIO FIRMA/STOCKSY.COM

Facing the FUTURE


ogxbeauty.com |

ogxbeauty


GLOBAL BEAUTY SPECIAL REPORT

DAILY GRIND:

Singer and songwriter. IDENTITY STATEMENT:

“Both of my parents are from Ethiopia, and I was raised in the same traditional, strict culture a kid living in Ethiopia is raised in. I’m actually not very Americanized, in the sense that I have very Ethiopian mannerisms and feel deeply connected to my culture. I’m also fluent in the language, Amharic. I use the pronouns she and her, but, honestly, I don’t really get the whole concept of gender and having to identify with one.” BEAUTY PHILOSOPHY:

DAILY GRIND:

Junior at New York University, intern at a music label, freelance music journalist. IDENTITY STATEMENT:

“I am a South Asian woman raised in California by Indian immigrants. I was pretty lucky to grow up with parents who let me try whatever different styles I wanted. My style inspiration is drawn from men and women. I think the separation of clothing by gender is stupid.” BEAUTY PHILOSOPHY:

“Beauty is subjective, which is what makes it so dope. For me, it’s about confidence: dressing in clothes that make me feel good, surrounding myself with people who care about me, and prioritizing my self-care.” HAIR STORY:

“Over the past four years, I’ve tried a bunch of different colors, but, other than that, I’m pretty low-maintenance. I apply Malin + Goetz’s styling cream to my damp hair while it’s drying, and then I use coconut or almond oil as an overnight treatment. Every four or five months, I get a cut at Vacancy Project, in New York City; I love that pricing isn’t dependent on gender or hair length.”

HAIR STORY:

“It’s not good for me to shampoo that frequently, so I often just get out of bed, spray my hair with water, pick it out, and call it a day. I also use Cantu’s curl cream made for girls with a 3C curl pattern.” MAKEUP ROUTINE:

“I look at applying makeup like painting. I use paint techniques and try to mix different colors and blend them out. When I’m bored with my look, I like to use a liner to draw on my face.” SHOP TALK:

“I buy my products at a range of places, from the local beauty supply store to Target and also online.”

IDENTITY STATEMENT:

“I was raised by a white British mother and a black father from Guinea-Bissau, in West Africa. He immigrated to Portugal, which is where my parents met. Those demographics—white British, Portuguese, and black African—play important but different roles in my racial, ethnic, and cultural identity.” BEAUTY PHILOSOPHY:

“I take inspiration from influencers and public figures on social media, but I also try to remind myself that they probably didn’t #wokeuplikethis.” HAIR STORY:

“I usually get my hair trimmed twice a year. Because of my African heritage, it needs a lot of moisture. This means regular conditioning with coconut or olive oil, and co-washing, or washing with conditioner and skipping shampoo. Snapping [breakage] is also an issue. I swear by Lush’s R&B Hair Moisturizer. I’ve actually had people ask me what I’m wearing that smells so nice, and I have to tell them it’s my hair!”

SHOP TALK:

SHOP TALK:

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

DAILY GRIND:

Freshman at Barnard College, peer language tutor for French and Spanish.

SKIN REGIMEN:

“I like to draw one black dot directly under my lower lashlines—it’s my signature. Most of my products come from brands like NYX, Glossier, Milk, and Nars, but sometimes I use my grandmother’s homemade kajal, a naturally pigmented eyeliner.”

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Hometown: Whitley Bay, England

“Acne is a problem, but it’s been better now that I wash with Dermalogica’s cleanser, which is super gentle. Following a low-dairy diet and getting plenty of sleep also helps.”

MAKEUP ROUTINE:

“If I’m experimenting with a new look, I usually shop at NYX; I like to go to brick-and-mortar stores so I can see the pigments. For products like body wash, I love Amazon.”

Carla Melaco, 18

Hometown:

Brooklyn

“Call me a technophobe, but I prefer to shop in stores. I like to compare textures and packaging before buying. I mostly shop at Sephora, Lush, and Amazon. And I use Groupon for beauty services. Supporting local businesses while saving money is a win-win.”

FROM LEFT: KAMAU WAINAINA; @HABEMARK; CARLA MELACO

Siya Bahal, 20 Hometown: San Francisco Bay Area

“Beauty to me is happiness and comfort. I’m happiest when I make music and bring comfort to others—that’s what makes me feel beautiful. Ethiopian parents usually don’t let their kids wear makeup, so you have to learn to love your natural beauty, and it’s the reason I think less is more.”


ogxbeauty.com |

ogxbeauty


GLOBAL BEAUTY SPECIAL REPORT

DAILY GRIND:

Taking a gap year to work on music, looking for a part-time job, worked at Urban Outfitters until recently. IDENTITY STATEMENT:

“I’ve always thought of myself as AfricanAmerican; both of my parents identify as African-American, though my dad is from Panama. I started to identify as queer my junior year of high school. Gender and sexual identity are fluid and complex things, and I allow myself to give and receive love from anyone without restrictions.” BEAUTY PHILOSOPHY:

Soraya Ferdman, 22 Hometown: Guaynabo, Puerto Rico

“I’m in love with drag culture—RuPaul’s Drag Race is my favorite—and I follow drag queens like Violet Chachki [@violetchachki] for inspiration.”

Cami Arboles, 19 Hometown: Los Angeles

HAIR STORY:

Senior at Brown University, occasional babysitter, freelance illustrator. IDENTITY STATEMENT:

“I was born in Puerto Rico to an Iranian mother and an Argentinian Jewish father. I’m too white in comparison to my Puerto Rican counterparts, too liberal according to my Jewish-Latino counterparts, and far too Westernized for some Iranians. It’s taken time, but I’ve come to enjoy the weird gray zone I occupy.” BEAUTY PHILOSOPHY:

“By 14, girls in Puerto Rico were contouring and curling their eyelashes, but I never really got into makeup. I like that it can bring women together, but I don’t like making myself look so different that I would be embarrassed to be without makeup.” HAIR STORY:

“I have memories of other girls braiding and playing with each other’s hair at sleepovers, and not being able to participate because my hair is so fragile and breaks easily. Once I got older, I started trying styles that protect my natural hair, like crochet braids or box braids, with some hair from Kanekalon woven in. I use sulfate-free shampoo once a month, so I don’t strip or dry out my hair, and I use castor oil and leave-in conditioner.” SKIN REGIMEN:

“I use a bit of coconut oil on my face and face masks to exfoliate or get a deeper cleanse; I really love the Yes to Miracle mask that I get at Target.” SHOP TALK:

“I tend to shop at beauty supply stores, because they’re a treasure trove of random fun products to test. But if I’m buying a specific product, I’ll check different websites to find the best price.”

“I used to get a keratin treatment, back when I straightened my hair. Now I use OGX’s Quenching + Coconut Curls shampoo and conditioner, which smell amazing.”

MAKEUP ROUTINE:

“I love red lipstick, and a Solange-inspired, bold-eye look is a quick way to add color to an outfit.”

HAIR STORY:

“I wash my hair about two times a week because I’ve found that my scalp’s natural oils help keep it healthy. My favorite shampoo is the tea tree one from Trader Joe’s. It smells fresh and fabulous. I air-dry whenever possible, but if I have an important event or special occasion, I love to go for a blowout at Drybar.”

SHOP TALK:

SHOP TALK:

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

BEAUTY PHILOSOPHY:

“Being healthy makes a huge difference in the way I look, and I don’t mind spending on wellness activities or services. I am more likely to pay $20 to attend a yoga class than to buy a new mascara.”

SKIN REGIMEN:

SKIN REGIMEN:

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IDENTITY STATEMENT:

“I am a Latina woman of Nicaraguan, Mexican, and Spanish descent, born and raised in Los Angeles.”

“I wash with a Trader Joe’s cleanser morning and night and use its jojoba oil to remove makeup. After my freshman year of college, I had the worst acne of my life, had put on weight, felt lethargic, and hardly recognized myself. Eventually, I found out I had polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a hormonal disorder. My doctor said I’d have to start birth control and take drugs for the acne, but, in a last-ditch effort, I changed my diet and exercise regimen and switched to eating whole, unprocessed foods and eliminating sugars. After those changes, my skin improved dramatically.”

“I have a quirky skin hack I picked up from a friend: I apply Vaseline to my lips, the space between my cheeks and nose that always gets dry, and over my eyes and forehead. It protects me from the cold, but it also darkens my eyelashes and eyebrows.”

“I buy most of my products at CVS or websites and stores for brands like Lush, Glossier, and MAC. Sephora overwhelms me.”

DAILY GRIND:

Sophomore at Yale University.

New York Hometown:

“Trader Joe’s is a standby, but I also love to support local markets and small businesses. I bought a tub of coconut shea butter from South Pasadena Farmers’ Market a while back, and I’ve been using it for months.”

FROM LEFT: COURTESY OF FERDMAN; KRISTOFER LÖFGREN; SCOTT FEINER

DAILY GRIND:


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P R E S E N T E D BY A M O R E PAC I F I C

GLOBAL BEAUTY SPOTLIGHT:

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1. MAMONDE Floral Moisture Cream. Mamonde discovered key floral properties and benefits, like this moisture-locking skin-fortifying cream infused with Hibiscus, Koreaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Heritage Flower celebrating strength and resilience. $35, ULTA.com

2. SULWHASOO First Care Activating Serum. Using traditional Korean herbal ingredients, this serum is a vital first step in skincare routines to restore balance. $84, us.sulwhasoo.com

3. AMOREPACIFIC Vintage Single Extract Essence. A revolutionary antiaging essence powered by fermented green tea to improve skin clarity, texture, and elasticity. $145, sephora.com

4. IOPE Air Cushion. Always ahead of the trend, IOPE created the first-ever cushion foundation and it continues to deliver full coverage and ultimate hydration, leaving you with a flawless finish. $42, us.aritaum.com/storelocator

5. LANEIGE Water Sleeping Mask. This highly acclaimed hydrating sleeping mask is revered worldwide among beauty editors and insiders alike. $25, sephora.com

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6. INNISFREE Intensive Hydrating Serum with Green Tea Seed. Packed with amino acids and minerals, this lightweight yet nourishing serum is changing the rules of hydration. $25, innisfree.com

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GLOBAL BEAUTY FIELD GUIDE: LAPLAND

NORTHERN EXPOSURE After foraging for the beauty world’s latest It ingredient, Erin Flaherty caps off a trip to the Arctic Circle with a Finnish tradition

People travel from around the world to see the region’s famous northern lights. BELOW: The writer takes an icy dip

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STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: SARA_WINTER/ GETTY IMAGES; LIGHTPIX/GETTY IMAGES; ALEXANDRITE/GETTY IMAGES; ALEX ROBINSON/AWL IMAGES/ GETTY IMAGES; ERICLATT/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF SUPERCHARGE

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In Lapland, chaga mushrooms grow on trees

I’m going to assume that, like me, you vaguely know the difference between your garden-variety portobellos, shiitakes, and psychedelics, but, other than that, there are blanks in your mushroom education. All it takes is some casual foraging with a Finnish mycologist (or fungi expert) in a land where many varieties literally grow on trees to convince me that I. Know. Nothing. This adventure takes place during a recent trip to fungi-friendly Finland, where I guess you could say I get mushroom “woke.” While it may be spring in the States, Lapland—the snowy northernmost region of Finland—is a true winter wonderland. Locals maintain that Santa lives here (no, kids, I didn’t meet him, so don’t ask), and I do spy a number of reindeer on my way to the Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort in the remote village of Saariselkä. By the time I check into my cabin, it’s evening, and after a fortuitous glimpse of the famous northern lights, I realize that I am most definitely coming down with a mean cold. It’s then I discover a mysterious box of Four Sigmatic chaga mushroom powder in my hotel room, so I mix a packet with hot water and nurse cup after cup all evening. Strangely, the next morning, I wake up feeling fine. Robust, even. It seems my education has begun! Later, I sit down for lunch with another man with a big white beard, Dr. Andrew Weil, whom many consider the father of integrative medicine. Besides the many formidable accomplishments this botanist and health guru has achieved (and, please, do yourself a favor and google his life-changing “4-7-8” video), it was more than a decade ago when he partnered with beauty giant Origins to create the first-ever skincare products to harness the antiaging benefits of mushrooms. When I tell Weil of my miraculous, potentially mushroominduced recovery, he nods with a St. Nick– esque twinkle in his eye and says he isn’t surprised at all. Finnish health expert and mycologist Jaakko Halmetoja, who has also joined us, agrees; he says that it’s common for locals to boil a big chunk of chaga in hot water and have the brew on hand to drink all through the week as a tonic.

(I surmise that maybe the Finns need to rely on the rejuvenating, endurance-building properties of mushrooms because it is seriously cold here: minus 22, according to my semi-frozen iPhone.) Halmetoja points out that chaga is a potent source of antioxidants that’s great for immunity— hence my Lazarus-like resurrection—and Cordyceps mushrooms can provide so much energy that athletes often depend on them. Then there’s reishi, said to lower blood pressure … Basically, it sounds like you could stock a medicine cabinet with mushroomy cures for what ails you. Although Weil and the esteemed mycologists of Finland concur on the benefits of ingesting fungi, the idea to use them topically was a leap. But Weil originally hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory powers of medicinal mushrooms would translate to skincare, and now, after 10 years of the best-selling Mega-Mushroom collection and additional research, “The bottom line is these products really work,” he says. Recently, Origins upped the ante by revamping its original formula—adding the Coprinus comatus mushroom (the existing elixir already contains fermented chaga, reishi, and Cordyceps) and incorporating the probiotic ferment, lactobacillus—to boost the skin-calming, antioxidant benefits. Once it’s clear to me that you can spend a lifetime studying mushrooms, there’s just one thing left to do, and that’s traditional Finnish ice swimming. I cannot be more clear when I state that I hate chilly water, yet one must do as the locals do. Here’s how it goes down: Hit the sauna and get your body nice and toasty, then go outside, run through the snow, and jump into a hole cut into an icy lake. After I achieve this herculean effort, I wrap myself in a warm robe and sit down with a big cup of chaga. I don’t want to get sick now, do I? 1. DR. ANDREW WEIL FOR ORIGINS MegaMushroom Relief & Resilience Soothing Face Mask, $39. 2. FOUR SIGMATIC Chaga Mushroom Elixir Mix, $45. 3. DR. ANDREW WEIL FOR ORIGINS Mega-Mushroom Relief & Resilience Advanced Face Serum, $73. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

May 2018

M ARI EC L A I R E. COM

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GLOBAL BEAUTY SKINCARE REPORT

DIG DEEP

WE’VE LEFT NO STONE UNTURNED IN THE QUEST FOR SMOOTHER, SOFTER SKIN. MEGAN MCINTYRE UNCOVERS THE BEST INGREDIENTS INSIDE THE EARTH

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MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

PATRIC SHAW/TRUNK ARCHIVE

i

f you want to put your best face forward, look down—way down. “Metals, muds, and even some spring waters are natural sources of the essential minerals needed for a healthy, radiant complexion,” explains Dr. Shereene Idriss, a dermatologist in New York City. “They’re key for the structural development of your skin and also play an important role in protecting it from environmental damage.” Read on for more reasons why crystals, precious metals, and even lava (!) should be on regular rotation in your beauty routine.


NEW

nourished hair, glowing skin a little for the planet Our luscious blend of coconut oil and ylang ylang repairs hair and softens skin. Packing them in bottles made with 100% recycled plastic is just one of the small acts to give a little love to the planet.

Learn more at lovebeautyandplanet.com


GLOBAL BEAUTY SKINCARE REPORT

Magic Crystals

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“In ancient times, crystals were crushed into powders or carved into tools that were used to stimulate the skin,” says Sadie Kadlec, a crystal specialist at Maha Rose Center for Healing in Brooklyn. In pulverized form, they contain trace minerals that may benefit skin and can also act as exfoliants. As for all the purported emotional and mystical benefits of crystals? “Using them may make you feel better,” says Idriss, but it’s probably just a placebo effect.

MALACHITE Sometimes referred to as the Botox crystal, malachite is rich in natural copper that gives it skin-firming benefits, according to Ginger King, a cosmetic chemist in Parsippany, New Jersey. Kadlec says it can also “reduce inflammation and encourage collagen and elastin formation, helping to combat wrinkles.” Tracie Martyn’s aptly named Complexion Savior mask has a malachite-centric complex to brighten skin and temporarily plump fine lines and wrinkles.

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1. TRACIE MARTYN Complexion Savior, $80.

QUARTZ This semiprecious rock is a crystallized version of the mineral silica, and the pulverized particles make excellent exfoliators. The mix of rose quartz and red jasper in De Mamiel Botanique’s polisher sweeps away dead skin for a glow that makes other exfoliating grains feel pedestrian by comparison. 2. DE MAMIEL BOTANIQUES Brightening Cleanse & Exfoliate Powder, $64.

AZURITE This copper-rich stone is believed to stimulate natural skin processes, Kadlec says. Shiva Rose includes it in her eye cream, which also has aloe for its anti-puffing powers. 3. SHIVA ROSE Blue Crystal Eye Cream, $95.

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MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

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Chances are your Insta feed has been taken over by crystal face rollers in recent months. These pretty tools—usually made out of jade or rose quartz—may seem like the latest trend, but they’re nothing new to aestheticians. “I’ve been using a roller in my treatment room for years,” says celebrity facialist Angela Caglia, who uses it to massage her clients’ faces and move along lymphatic fluid so skin looks less puffy and wrinkles become less noticeable. (To get the benefits at home, just roll it over your face for a few minutes in gentle outward strokes.) Gua sha, an ancient Chinese practice utilizing a special flat stone, works in much the same way: Skin Gym founder Karina Sulzer recommends “zoning” your face—jaw, chin, cheeks, under-eyes, brows, and forehead—and then sweeping a gua sha tool downward and outward over each area. Press lightly so you don’t damage skin, and repeat three times on each area for best results. And if a facial massage feels like too much work, check out GingerChi’s eye 2 mask, which looks like a sleeping mask made out of tiny pieces of jade. The cool weight of the stones can help reduce puffiness. Just place it over your eyes and relax— that’s all there is to it. 1. ANGELA CAGLIA La Vie en Rose Rose Quartz Face Roller, $65. 2. SKIN GYM Jade Gua Sha Crystal Beauty Tool, $32. 3. GINGERCHI Jade Chi Mask, $38.

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STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, FROM TOP: VLADVG/GETTY IMAGES; MYKEYRUNA/GETTY IMAGES; DOMICIANO PABLO ROMERO FRANCO/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

ROCK AND ROLL


GLOBAL BEAUTY SKINCARE REPORT

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Earth Angels

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used skincare ingredients. They come in many variations— and from many different locations—but in general they’re effective for reducing sebum production, clearing pores, and making skin feel temporarily tightened. That’s not to say benefits, depending on their mineral makeup,” says Idriss.

1. L’ORÉAL PARIS Pure-Clay Clarify & Smooth Mask, $13.

KAOLIN CLAY This pure white clay is often sourced from—and, in fact, is named for—Gaoling, a hilly region in

oil and dislodge grime from within pores.

southeastern China. Philosophy uses it alongside salicylic acid in its Purity mask, which helps clear blackheads and dissolve oil and dead-skin buildup that can clog pores and lead to breakouts.

3. INNISFREE Jeju Purifying Pore Clearing Color Mask, $9.

RHASSOUL

2. PHILOSOPHY Purity Made Simple Pore Extractor, $35.

VOLCANIC MUD Mineral-rich soils and clays often come from volcanic regions, like Jeju Island, in Korea. Innisfree harvests clays from the island’s cooled and solidified lava fields for its range of colorful masks that remove excess surface

Sometimes referred to as Moroccan lava clay, this skin booster comes from the country’s Atlas Mountains. “It’s rich in magnesium and oil-absorbing silica, making it great for those with oily skin,” says Idriss. Shea Moisture makes a version you can combine with water and other ingredients to make DIY treatments. 4. SHEAMOISTURE Beauty Hack Face + Body + Hair Moroccan Rhassoul Clay, $10.

3 2

Smart Water It’s not all rocks and mud in the beauty underworld: Thermal and spring waters are a prime source of geological goodness. Water that flows deep below the Earth’s surface picks up trace minerals and elements from the stones it passes through, and many of these, like zinc, magnesium, and calcium, have skin benefits, according to King.

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RÉOTIER SPRING

L’Occitane tapped this famous spring in the Hautes-Alpes region of France for its new skincare line. The water contains one of King’s favorite skin-boosting minerals: calcium. “It has the ability to open the channels that moisture flows through between skin cells, and that boosts overall hydration,” she explains. Add a little magnesium into the mix (also present in Réotier spring water), and you’ve got an even more potent hydrator. 1. L’OCCITANE Aqua Réotier Ultra Thirst-Quenching Gel, $29.

ANCIENT BATHS Italians have been bathing in the therapeutic baths of Montecatini since the 14th century. Madonna’s MDNA skincare line used these “blessed waters” to create its signature complex, M.T. Parca, which contains the same moisture-boosting minerals (in the same ratio) that naturally appear in skin. 2. MDNA SKIN The Reinvention Cream, $75.

VICHY WATER

Sourcing H2O for its products from the volcanoes of the Auvergne region of France, Vichy has found that the 15 trace minerals in it make for a holistic protector by strengthening the skin. 3. VICHY Minéral 89 Fortifying & Hydrating Daily Skin Booster, $30.

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BORISLAV DOPUDIA/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; CALYPSOART/GETTY IMAGES; CRAIG LOVELL/GETTY IMAGES; SUBMAN/GETTY IMAGES; LUBILUB/GETTY IMAGES; THOMASVOGEL/GETTY IMAGES; DIYANA DIMITROVA/GETTY IMAGES

MONTMORILLONITE The negatively charged particles in the creamy green clay, named after the region in France where it’s mined, attract positively charged debris in pores, pulling them out for a skin-clearing effect. L’Oréal combines it with two other clays and yuzu-lemon extract in its new skin-brightening mask.


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GLOBAL BEAUTY

HAIR DIARIES

JET BLACK

Globe-trotter and beauty minimalist Erin Flaherty explains how a single-process hair color suits her hectic schedule just fine

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are not the constant issue they once were, so I can coast longer between cuts as well. It’s not all fun and effortless jet-setting, though: Roots have become a totally unanticipated and unwelcome issue. Evidently, all those highlights were covering the fact that I was going gray! (Let’s just chalk that up to time travel.) That said, I’m trying to embrace those pesky silver strands, lest I get sucked into yet another cycle of upkeep. Besides, a couple of stray grays is no big deal compared with a whole head of dark roots. And at the end of the day, if racking up experiences is our generation’s most precious luxury, I’d rather spend more of my time exploring thrilling parts unknown than clocking way too many hours in a salon chair.

A lowmaintenance beauty regimen is especially TSA-friendly

TESH/AUGUST IMAGES

I am a naturally dark brunette. So much so that it’s hard to believe that I used to be a blonde. Remember that moment when the fashion world was obsessed with super-dark brows and bleached-out hair? I lapped it up just like everyone else. The problem was, I am a naturally dark brunette. It takes a lot of time to bleach dark hair, so becoming a blonde happened slowly (and almost accidentally) over the years. Like many dark-to-fair transition stories, it started with some innocent highlights. But because the contrast seemed too great, I had to lighten the base, and so on. Each of these ambitious endeavors took hours—hours!—under heat lamps, once every other month. For someone who adores living life on the go, the weight of the aluminum foil was becoming soul crushing. It was no way to live. Being a global beauty editor means logging a lot of miles, so I’m constantly time-crunched after I’ve landed. As a lifestyle choice, the high-maintenance hair routine was simply not working out, so I decided to go in the opposite direction: In one comparatively brief salon visit (think an hour and a half as opposed to, say, five), an inky blend of charcoal-hued dye erased years of blonde ambition. It was a bit jarring, but it also lent me an edgy, tough vibe, which seemed to appropriately suit the current cultural zeitgeist. It was as if, aesthetically, I had traded California sun for cold winter nights. And I was totally OK with that. Today, I realize the shift comes with unexpected benefits. For example, as long as I use a moisturizing, color-protecting shampoo and conditioner, I can go months and months without the shade fading. Also, as everyone knows, bleach does one hell of a number when it comes to damage, but now my hair feels thicker and healthier and, dare I say, looks kind of glossy? Split ends


JUST ADD

FROM SPF AND SELF-TANNERS THAT LEAVE SKIN GLOWING TO LIPCOLORS SO JUICY THEY GLISTEN, BEAUTY IS HAVING A REFLECTIVE MOMENT Photographs by CARLIJN JACOBS


SPLASH GUARD Beachside extras are having a moreis-more moment: oversize glasses; big, bold earrings; and a supercharged moisturizer that doubles as sunscreen. SU NGL ASSES, $465, DIOR; SE ASHELL E A RR ING, $550 PER PA IR, STA R FISH E A R R ING, $725 PER PA IR, V ERSACE. ON FACE: PERR ICONE MD PHOTO PL ASM A MOISTUR IZER BROA D SPECTRUM SPF 30.

Fashion editor: IMRUH ASHA

Beauty editor: ERIN FLAHERTY

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MAJOR GLAZER When lips are glossy, keep the color palette subdued— bronze, brick red, copper— then pair with voluminous hair and a minuscule suit for best results. THIS PAGE: SW IM TOP, $130, SW IM BOT TOMS, $90, MAX MARA LEISUR E. ON H A IR: W ELL A PROFESSIONA LS EIMI OCE A N SPR ITZ SA LT HA IRSPR AY FOR BE ACH Y TEXTUR E. OPPOSITE PAGE: SW IM TOP, $135, M AT TE AU; E A RR INGS, $325, R EBECCA DE R AV ENEL . ON LIPS: UR BA N DECAY HI-FI SHINE ULTR A CUSHION LIP GLOSS IN BA NG.


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WITH THE GRAIN Skin-baring suits call for a healthy (read: faux) bronze glow. Choose sunlesstanning sprays with built-in tint for immediate gratification. STR IPED BR IEFS, $720, SONIA RY K IEL . CHECK ER ED BR IEFS, $745, MIU MIU. ON BODY: SEPHOR A COLLECTION TIN TED SELFTA N NING BODY MIST.


WARMING TREND Climbing temps call for slick skin (try an oil-based sunscreen) and moisturedrenched lips. THIS PAGE: FROM LEFT: TOP, $2,600, MARNI; SW IM BOT TOMS (SOLD AS SET), $225, EMPORIO A R M A NI. TOP, $198, DV F W EST; SW IM BOT TOMS, $70, FELL A. SW IM TOP, $345, SW IM BOT TOMS, $195, DOLCE & GA BBA NA. ON BODY: CL A R INS SU NSCR EEN CA R E OIL SPR AY. OPPOSITE PAGE: DR ESS, $1,680, MISSONI; HAT, $270, LOL A HATS; E A RR INGS, $240, DROOMFA BR IEK DE GROOT & DE JONG. ON LIPS: GL A MGLOW POU TMUD W ET LIP BA LM TR E ATMEN T. FOR INFOR M ATION ON W HER E TO BU Y, SEE SHOPPING DIR ECTORY.

Hair: Hester Wernert for Wella Professionals at Unspoken Agency Makeup: Kathinka Gernant for Chanel at Unspoken Agency Models: Mariana Pardinho at Storm Management; Luanna Pinheiro at Modelwerk; Gertrud Hegelund at Scoop Models

TENERIFE PRODUCTION: INSIGHTS PROJECTS

Production: Anneloes Bakker at Unit CMA

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GLOBAL BEAUTY FRAGRANCE FILES

JOURNEY in a BOTTLE Choose your own travel adventure, and there’s a new spring scent that will get you there—in spirit, at least By JENNIFER GOLDSTEIN

Ariane Labed filming the Chloé Nomade campaign in India

HAWAIIAN BEACH VACATION THE SCENT: Aerin Hibiscus Palm 1.7 oz. eau de parfum, $120

Is this the only perfume that’s ever attempted to conjure the sensory experience of an island escape? No. But the intoxicating blend of ylang-ylang, hibiscus, ginger, and coconut milk does a damn good job of making you forget your (nontropical) surroundings.

Resort-side red hibiscus

WRITER’S ESCAPE IN JAPAN

THE SCENT: Chloé Nomade, 1.7 oz. eau de parfum, $105

Imagine quitting your job, packing a bohemian wardrobe into the saddlebags of a vintage Triumph, and setting off on a solo journey through Europe and Asia. OK, maybe that’s a stretch for you, but it seems in character for actress Ariane Labed, who played a 15th-century Spanish badass in the fantasy game turned movie Assassin’s Creed and has a role in this spring’s film Mary Magdalene. That’s probably why she’s the muse for Chloé’s latest fragrance. “I could never imagine not traveling. I love the idea of nomadism,” says Labed, who grew up in Greece, has lived in Germany and France, and now calls London home. Her memories of these places are deeply connected to scents: “Greece is smashed olives, the sea, the sand. … France is my grandparents’ and uncle’s farm—the cows, the chickens, the rabbits, mirabelles in the garden.” As for Nomade, which she began wearing while shooting the fragrance campaign in Rajasthan, India, “It’s feminine, but not in a sweet, passive way. It is deep and inspiring,” she says. To create that dichotomy of softness and strength, perfumer Quentin Bisch wrapped intense oak moss in sweet mirabelle plum and freesia. The floral chypre “is like sun-warmed skin. I think one can wear it anywhere, anytime,” says Labed. Sounds fitting for a free-spirited wanderer. 50

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Your inner creative genius may dream of a week at a secluded ryokan, but hopefully she can find inspiration closer to home in this musky floral based on a haiku printed on the back of the bottle (“Walking in the darkness/A cricket song/How torrid the heat is!”). The oversize cap doubles as a carrying case for the travel spray included in the set’s box. A ryokan in Gifu, Japan

FOODIE GETAWAY IN BRAZIL THE SCENT: Jo Malone London Tropical Cherimoya Cologne 3.4 oz. spray, $140

This juicy blend of cherimoya, fruition after Jo Malone

visited the fruit stalls of São Paulo’s Mercadão ing notes will satisfy foodies and perfume connoisseurs alike.

Fruit in São Paulo’s Mercadão market

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF CHLOE; SANDIEGOSUNSHINE/GETTY IMAGES; DAVID KLEYN/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; PRISCILA ZAMBOTTO/GETTY IMAGES

Intercontinental Motorcycle Tour

THE SCENT: Floraïku Cricket Song 1.7 oz. eau de parfum and .33 oz. travel spray, $351


COUNTRY WEEKEND IN NEW ENGLAND

Cacti blooming near the Grand Canyon

THE SCENT: Oscar de la Renta Bella Blanca 3.4 oz. natural spray, $95

Oscar de la Renta’s Connecticut garden

The best kind of friend is a fabulously rich one with a country estate and an open-door policy. If you don’t have that, at least bag this: a big, white floral (tuberose, jasmine, orange flower, and rose) inspired by designer Oscar de la Renta’s famous gardens, including the one he had at his home in Kent, Connecticut.

Desert Glamping THE SCENT: Proenza Schouler Arizona, 1.7 oz eau de parfum, $100

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: RICHARD FELBER/GETTY IMAGES; DAVID HAYES/ ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; KEREN SU/GETTY IMAGES; STACEY BRAMHALL/GETTY IMAGES; BILETSKIY_EVGENIY/GETTY IMAGES

Mountain flowers at sunrise

HIKING THE ALPS zesty mandarin and apricotlike Osmanthus You know when the hills are flowers to alive? When the sun first hits capture that them as you’re about to trek same sense of optimism and to the next inn on your tour of adventure in Le Jour Se Lève the French Alps. Perfumer Jacques Cavallier Belletrud used (translation: the day begins).

THE SCENT: Louis Vuitton Le Jour Se Lève, 3.4 oz. eau de parfum, $240

SPRING FLING IN NYC THE SCENT: Bond No. 9 Spring Fling, 3.4 oz. eau de parfum, $375

The world is full of beautiful backdrops for a vacation, but places like the Arizona desert will never be mere scenery—they have a sense of mystery and spirituality impossible to ignore. For their first perfume, Proenza Schouler designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez hoped to bottle that star power: “We wanted to communicate a somewhat psychedelic and mind-bending feeling of escaping and reconnecting to things that matter—that sense of the outdoors, unexplored nature, and a kind of universal energy.” When International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF) master perfumer Carlos Benaim got wind of their wishes, he set to work researching Southwestern flora and soon found inspiration in the torch cactus flower. “The scent is in the same family as jasmine, but light, green, and watery,” he says. It’s also extremely rare, blooming only once a year in the dead of night. Luckily, Benaim had access to a liquid re-creation; years earlier, a team of researchers had analyzed the molecules in the air around the flower (grown in IFF’s greenhouse) and used that information to make a synthesized version. “Livings”— as IFF calls this type of engineered scent—“aren’t meant to be exact; it’s an impression of nature,” says Benaim. To build the note into a fragrance that lasts, he added jasmine and orange flower, and a “solar accord,” then paired it with creamy orris and Cashmeran, a musky note. He calls the finished product “a snapshot of the desert—a woody solar-floral with a mineral effect.” Spray it on and you’ll realize this is no basic blend; it opens your mind and makes you think, not unlike an evening spent under the stars of the Sonoran Desert.

You want to visit the Big Apple when the days are sunny, the nights are still cool, and Central Park is in

TAI CHI RETREAT IN CHINA THE SCENT: Harmonist Magnetic Wood, 1.7 oz. eau de parfum, $235 A Taoist monastery in the Wudang Mountains

Central Park’s Shakespeare Garden

Five elements—water, wood, metal, fire, and earth—are at the heart of Chinese philosophy, and the Harmonist’s 10

vetiver, this one—representing the yin side of wood—will leave you feeling almost as balanced as a tai chi session at a temple. May 2018

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PRESENTED BY DERMAFLASH®

makeup celebrity tin Dara withartist Daniel Mar

MEET DARA TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT DERMAFLASH® DERMAFLASH® changes women’s lives by instantly revealing their best skin while preparing a flawless canvas for a full face of makeup or no makeup at all. DERMAFLASH® provides a superior level of exfoliation. By removing the barrier to product absorption, skincare is able to work more effectively and makeup will glide on effortlessly. BESIDES DERMAFLASH®, WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR BEAUTY SECRETS? I love multitasking high-SPF tinted moisturizers. They are chock-full of antioxidants, moisturizing agents, and skin-loving ingredients.

THE SKINCARE INNOVATOR WHO

LAUNCHED A

MOVEMENT DARA LEVY, FOUNDER AND INVENTOR, DERMAFLASH® Dara has never been a sit-around-and-wait-for-anything kind of gal, which is why she fell in love with dermaplaning’s instant results. She made dermaplaning the foundation treatment at her MedSpa and tradmarked DERMAFLASH® as the name of her dermaplaning facial. Five years and 6,000 DERMAFLASH® treatments later, Dara realized an at-home dermaplaning solution did not exist and she knew she had to create it. In 2016, DERMAFLASH®, THE at-home, PATENTED dermaplaning system, was launched.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO ASPIRING INNOVATORS AND ENTREPRENEURS? I have learned that “if it can go wrong, it will go wrong,” and each obstacle is a learning experience. I also believe that “if you say you will, you will. Say you can’t and you won’t.” We all have the power to manifest our own destiny.

DERMAFLASH®: Inspired by dermaplaning. INSTANTLY removes dead skin cells and pesky peach fuzz. DERMAFLASH 2.0, $189.

Go from fuzzy to fabulous in a FLASH: DERMAFLASH.COM


DERMAFLASH: THE at-home sonic dermaplaning device. Exfoliates and removes peach fuzz, INSTANTLY revealing smooth, radiant, camera-ready skin. Created by a woman for ALL women.

S E P H O R A • N O RDS TRO M • N E I M AN MARCUS • D E RM A FL A S H .CO M


BEAUTY

Prix dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Excellence de la BeautĂŠ Marie Claire 2018 Every year, we sift through the best beauty launches from around the world to find the standouts. It sounds like a dream task, but also a little daunting, no? Thankfully, the 26 journalists we enlisted as judges were more than diligent in their skincare, haircare, and makeup testing. Among the many products that debuted in 2017, these winners impressed our esteemed panel of beauty experts from around the globe. Think of these hall of famers as your spring beauty shopping list Photographs by Sunny Ringle. Still life by Thomas Pico. Fashion Editor: Julie Cristobal 54

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Dream Cream Sisley-Paris

PRODUCTS PHOTOGRAPHER: THIERRY LEGAY

Black Rose Skin Infusion Cream Sisley-Paris’ original Black Rose face oil is already a cult classic, and this sister product— a decadent moisturizer infused with the same floral superstar—is equally deserving of fanfare. It combines multiple types of black rose extract for skin-plumping benefits, and the soft formula has an invigorating scent. SisleyParis Black Rose Skin Infusion Cream, $195; sisley-paris.com.

Jury Notes: “The incredible texture is refreshing and leaves skin feeling bouncy.” “The cream leaves skin velvety, smooth, and plumped, thanks to the black rose.” “The delightfully fragranced formula leaves skin dewy and supple.” May 2018

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GLOBAL BEAUTY PRIX D’EXCELLENCE

Special Jury Winner Dior

The skincare and makeup products Dior launched this year are worthy of real estate on your vanity—or in your medicine cabinet and makeup bag. The lip stain won’t quit, the lipstick lays down intense pigment in one swipe, and the mascara goes the extra mile. On the skincare front, the novel textures of the Hydra Life (a sorbet-like gel-cream) and La MicroHuile de Rose (a jelly-like serum with micro pearls of oil) are almost as exciting as their hydrating results. Instant classics, all around. Dior Addict Lip Tattoo, $30, Rouge Dior Double Rouge Lipstick, $37, Diorshow Pump’N’Volume, $30, Prestige La Micro-Huile de Rose, $260, Hydra Life Fresh Hydration Sorbet Crème, $69; dior.com.

Jury Notes: “Dior scores this year with a mascara in a flexible tube that makes it easy to pump, a hightech micro-oil, and the chic, gorgeous Hydra Life moisturizer.” “These luxurious products are extraordinary: the lipcolors, the texture of the skincare, and an oil with rose extracts from the garden of Mr. Christian Dior.” 56

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PRODUCTS PHOTOGRAPHER: THIERRY LEGAY. SWEATER: TIBI

Addict Lip Tattoo Rouge Dior Double Rouge Lipstick Diorshow Pump’N’Volume Prestige La Micro-Huile de Rose Hydra Life Fresh Hydration Sorbet Crème


PRODUCTS PHOTOGRAPHER: THIERRY LEGAY. CLOTHES: ESTEBAN CORTAZAR

Must-Have Makeup Clinique High Impact Lash Elevating Mascara Think of this as an eyelash curler in a bottle: The mousse-like formula lifts up strands with curling polymers so it holds the shape throughout the day.

clinique.com.

Jury Notes:

curled. It’s my new go-to!”

Texture Award Biotherm Skin Fitness Firming & Recovery Body Emulsion Life Plankton Sensitive Emulsion Aquasource Everplump Night Blue Therapy Cream-in-Oil When it comes to head-to-toe results, the Biotherm range delivers. The lightweight Life Plankton emulsion refreshes skin with a nutrient-rich plankton infusion; Blue Therapy cream-oil nourishes with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids; and the night cream replenishes skin while you sleep. For body, a post-workout massage with Skin Fitness leaves limbs firmed and hydrated. Biotherm Skin Fitness Firming & Recovery Body Emulsion, $42, Life Plankton Sensitive Emulsion, $55, Aquasource Everplump Night, $56, Blue Therapy Cream-in-Oil, $72; biotherm-usa.com.

Jury Notes: “Biotherm’s magic is its use of thermal water and a proprietary thermal plankton to improve skin.” “The line offers a variety of very effective, invigorating treatments for skin.”

May 2018

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GLOBAL BEAUTY PRIX D’EXCELLENCE

Best Foundation Giorgio Armani

There’s a lot to live up to when a product name starts with power, but this foundation does the job. The silky, oil-infused base slips over skin, and the formula’s “pigment suspension” technology provides coverage that lasts without feeling heavy. On top of all that, there’s UVA and UVB protection with SPF 25. Powerful stuff, indeed. Giorgio Armani Power Fabric Longwear High Cover Foundation SPF 25, $64; giorgioarmanibeauty-usa.com.

Jury Notes: “It gives you just the right amount of coverage but still looks invisible. I’m in love!” “The liquid formula feels lightweight on skin and is natural looking.” “Giorgio Armani is the foundation expert. This one covers redness and blemishes, and leaves a longlasting matte finish. I’ll use it to the last drop.”

Healthiest Hair Day Kérastase Paris Aura Botanica line A haircare line free of silicones, sulfates, and parabens; formulated with sustainably sourced ingredients; and presented in such beautiful, luxe packaging is something to celebrate. Responsibly harvested Samoan coconut oil and Moroccan argan oil soften strands and prevent frizz. Plus, it is all produced in the company’s carbon-neutral plant. The result: a good hair day for everyone. Kérastase Paris Aura Botanica Essence d’Éclat, $43, Concentré Essentiel, $58, Bain Micellaire, $43; kerastase-usa.com.

Jury Notes: “The products won’t destroy your hair or the planet. I love the gorgeous, woodsy scent and the clean feel my hair has after I use these.” “It’s great that these ingredients are 96 percent natural. The shampoo lathers well and rinses easily, leaving behind shiny, healthy strands.”

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PRODUCTS PHOTOGRAPHER: THIERRY LEGAY. DRESS: SPORTMAX

Power Fabric Longwear High Cover Foundation SPF 25


HAIR: BÉNÉDICTE CAZAUBEYRET/ARTLIST PARIS MAKEUP: LILI CHOI/CALLISTE MANICURE: BÉATRICE ENI/ AGENCE SAINT GERMAIN PARIS MODEL: MARIE GEERAERT/ SUPREME MANAGEMENT CASTING: EMILIE LE GOFF PRODUCTION: SARAH YDOUX

Freshest Skincare Shiseido

PRODUCTS PHOTOGRAPHER: THIERRY LEGAY. TOP: CARMEN MARCH

Waso line It’s a Millennially minded collection: chic minimalistic packaging, innovative textures, and lots of natural ingredients. And there’s serious science behind these formulas. The Clear Mega-Hydrating Cream is not only moisturizing, but uses peony-root extract and peptides to minimize the look of pores and imperfections; the Color-Smart Day Moisturizer adapts to and enhances your natural skin tone; and oil absorbers and loquat extract in the Quick Matte Moisturizer help reduce sebum production. So Instagram-worthy. Shiseido Waso Quick Matte Moisturizer Oil-Free, $38, ColorSmart Day Moisturizer, $38, Clear MegaHydrating Cream, $38; shiseido.com.

Jury Notes: “No-fuss with a luxurious feel.” “These simple and playful products are a major success: Refined formulas and sleek packaging make this a modern approach to skincare.” May 2018

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GLOBAL BEAUTY PRIX D’EXCELLENCE

U.S. Winners

Getting separation, length, and volume in one swipe is the mascara holy grail—this more than succeeds. The formula has a velvety glide, and the bristle-loaded brush coats each strand evenly. L’Oréal Paris Voluminous Lash Paradise Mascara, $10; lorealparisusa.com.

Trendsetting Lipcolor Estée Lauder Pure Color Envy Metallic Matte Sculpting Lipstick Two of the major looks in makeup right now are 62

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matte lips and metallics. This lipstick hits both with its brushed-metal finish. (Here’s how: The mattified formula is gilded with a very subtle shimmer.) And the creamy stick glides on for an effortless application. Estée Lauder Pure Color Envy Metallic Matte Sculpting Lipstick in Sizzling Metal, $32; esteelauder.com.

High-Tech Hydrator AmorePacific The Essential Creme Fluid If you want heavy-duty moisture sans the thicker finish of a rich cream, this milky-light emulsion is your new best friend. On top of the hydration boost, you also get protection

from environmental damage: Each bottle is loaded with 150 green-tea leaves’ worth of antioxidants. AmorePacific The Essential Creme Fluid, $98; us.amorepacific.com.

Most Moisturizing Makeup Neutrogena Hydro Boost Hydrating Tint Hyaluronic acid—the wonder moisturizer of the beauty world—is a perfect addition to foundation: It plumps your complexion so the pigment is less likely to creep into fine lines, and it treats the skin underneath for all-day hydration. Neutrogena Hydro Boost Hydrating Tint, $17; neutrogena.com.

JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D

Major Lash Maker L’Oréal Paris Voluminous Lash Paradise Mascara


REDEFINING STYLE Transform your hair with the power of silk

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Erin Flaherty

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The American Jury Alexandra Engler Ning Chao BEAUTY JOURNALIST

ASSOCIATE BEAUTY EDITOR AT MARIE CLAIRE USA

Gina Way Felicia Walker Benson FOUNDER OF THISTHAT BEAUT Y.COM

PRODUCER OF MY BEAUT Y CHAT, BEAUT Y JOURNALIST

BEHIND THE SCENES OF THE PRIZE Prix d’Excellence winners must demonstrate excellence in innovation, efficiency, texture, and design. Only face, body, hair, makeup, and sun products launched in the past year are eligible for consideration. Winning products receive a majority of the votes from our jury of 22 beauty journalists from 11 countries. U.S. winners are based on the same criteria but selected by a local jury. Results are independently validated, and the regulations are filed with SCP-Louvion Plumel.

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PORTRAITS: FRÉDÉRIC BARON-MORIN; EGOBOX.FR; PHILIP FRIEDMAN; CRESSEAUX; PRESSE (X 18). AMERICAN JURY PORTRAITS, FROM LEFT: JANE HOULE; GUNNAR LILLEHAMMER; @THEPRMOMMY; PETER ROSA

Prix d’Excellence de la Beauté International Jury


GLOBAL BEAUTY

INTERNATIONAL

EDITORS’ GUIDE

Here, Marie Claire staffers from around the world share their must-have products, expert advice, and the best trends in their cities By ALEXANDRA ENGLER Hong Kong at night

HONG KONG Eri Chu DIGITAL BEAUTY EDITOR

1. CLEAN CRAZE

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“In Hong Kong, we go for healthy, organic, and often vegan products. We will even go through the items on the ingredient list one by one to see if there’s anything harmful. Lush makes great options, like its collection of jelly face masks.”

Nan Lian Garden

2. FUN ACTIVITY “To escape the hustle of the city, people go hiking just to be in a green space. Plus, it’s an opportunity to wear the sporty looks and highfashion sneakers that are popular.”

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3. IT GIRL HAIR

Actress Nana Komatsu

“Lots of women like short bangs to make them appear younger and liven up their look. My celebrity muse, [actress] Nana Komatsu, has a great cut.” GHD Platinum Styler, $249.

4. COOL NAILS “Nailed It By H.T (@nailedithk) is the best spot in the city for manicures. They experiment with different patterns, colors, and graphics.”

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PUBLIC SCHOOL

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OPI Nail Lacquer in Chills Are Multiplying!, $11.

5. MAKEUP TRICKS “I want to enhance my bone structure, so I pay attention to highlighting and shading. And a good cheek color is a must!” NARS Blush in Orgasm, $30.

6. THE LOOK “The matte-nude lipstick fad is waning; this spring, juicy finishes will be big. Pastel shades are key.” DIOR Lip Glow in Lilac, $34.

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STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: NIKADA/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF CHU; HUAD262/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF @NAILEDITHK; DANIELVFUNG/GETTY IMAGES; VICTOR VIRGILE/GAMMA-RAPHO/GETTY IMAGES; ZACHARIE SCHEURER/AP/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

LUSH Birth of Venus Jelly Face Mask, $14.


Gentle IS THE NEW STRONG The modern way to gently cleanse and condition. Lightweight Micellar formula, now paired with the power of Pro-V Nutrient Blends to transform fragile hair into strands of strength.

Š2018 P&G


GLOBAL BEAUTY INTERNATIONAL EDITORS’ GUIDE 1 things more interesting. I combine these two because I like the contrasting crisp and sweet notes.”

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JO MALONE LONDON Wood Sage & Sea Salt Cologne, $135; CHANEL Chance Eau de Toilette, $102.

NETHERLANDS

Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Red Square, Moscow

Marjolein Vermeij BEAUTY EDITOR

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“The Akasha spa at the Conservatorium Hotel (conservatoriumhotel.com) is beautiful. They take a holistic approach to treatments by offering chakra-balancing massages and hammam detox wraps.”

2. DAILY COMMUTE “Believe it or not, there are more bikes than people in the Netherlands. We love to bike everywhere, but it also rains quite a bit, so a good waterproof mascara is essential.” COVERGIRL Total Tease Waterproof Mascara, $10.

3. FRAGRANCE FAVE “Mixing fragrances makes

Ivan Bezuglyi BEAUTY EDITOR

1. WHERE TO STAY “The Hotel National (national. ru). It has impressive architecture, charming interiors, and spectacular views of the Kremlin and Red Square.”

2. FUN ACTIVITY “Young women like to relax with their friends in a bathhouse—or banya—on their day off. There’s lots of laughing, detoxing, drinking tea, and gossiping.”

3. COOL NAILS “Short manicured nails are in fashion. Of course, any new shade from Chanel is always welcome, too.” CHANEL Le Vernis in Halo, $28.

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“We covet super-polished, après-salon hair. The Bely Sad salon in the Metropol Hotel (metropol-moscow.ru/en) is where editors, local celebs, and TV stars go for a blowout.”

“Women here view makeup very practically: It’s a tool to enhance our features or cover up something when we need to. There’s nothing the YSL Touche Éclat line can’t fix.” YVES SAINT LAURENT Touche Éclat All-In-One Glow Foundation, $48

5. CLEAN CRAZE “Sustainability is an important issue, and it’s carrying over to beauty. Many of the new Dutch brands, like SMPL Skin and Naïf, focus on using high-quality, consciously resourced ingredients.” NAÏF Purifying Body Scrub, $19.

6. FASHION TAKE “Dutch women have a casual, down-to-earth style. All the denim looks from Dior’s spring 2018 collection fit right in.”

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4. IT GIRL HAIR

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DYSON Supersonic Hair Dryer, $399.

5. SPLURGE “Russians are willing to pay for results and love luxe skincare brands like La Mer, Evidens de Beauté, Valmont, and 3LAB.”

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LA MER The Replenishing Oil Exfoliator, $125.

6. THE LOOK “Right now, it’s all about an impeccable nude look, with beaming skin, groomed eyebrows, a touch of mascara, and rose-beige lip gloss.”

A canal in Amsterdam

L’ORÉAL PARIS True Match Lumi Glotion Natural Glow Enhancer, $15.

MA R IE C L A I R E .COM May 2018

DIOR

RUSSIA

4. THE LOOK

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STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. NAIL POLISH SPILL: JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THEENDUP/GETTY IMAGES; FIRATGOCMEN/ GETTY IMAGES; BOP MULDER; CONSERVATORIUM; UGURHAN/GETTY IMAGES; VICTOR VIRGILE/GAMMA-RAPHO/GETTY IMAVES; GLEB KORDOVSKIY; MLENNY/GETTY IMAGES

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GLOBAL BEAUTY INTERNATIONAL EDITORS’ GUIDE

3. SKIN REGIMEN

Cris Castany BEAUTY AND WEB DIRECTOR

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1. SPLURGE “There’s so many new, cool masks on the market: AloCalm Gel Mask by Dr. Med. Christine Schrammek Kosmetik, Replenish Glow Mask by APoEM, Glow Recharge by Sepai. I use Tata Harper’s overnight mask a couple of times a week.”

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TATA HARPER Moisturizing Mask, $115.

2. IT GIRL HAIR

SOUTH AFRICA

embracing diversity and changing up their hairstyles by going natural, wearing wigs, or even getting perms. And hairstylist Tina Wiklund and the team at Mmuja Healthy Hair (@mmujahair) have brought back the art of intricate braiding.”

“Right now, it’s more about haircare rather than hairstyling. So you’ll find detox treatments or products to nourish the scalp. The best is the new line by SisleyParis: Every time I use it, people ask me if I’ve been to the salon!”

SHEAMOISTURE Jojoba Oil & Ucuuba Butter Braid-Up Conditioning Gel, $12.

HAIR RITUEL BY SISLEY-PARIS Revitalizing Fortifying Serum, $195.

Ncumisa Makhonjwa

4. THE LOOK

BEAUTY EDITOR

1. SKIN REGIMEN “I keep my skincare routine simple: I cleanse with Avène’s micellar water, use a Klairs toner, and finish with a moisturizer from Skoon, a South African natural line.” KLAIRS Supple Preparation Facial Toner, $22.

2. FUN ACTIVITY

5. NIGHT OUT

“Going to the beach in the summer is a must. One of my favorites is Boulders Beach because it’s quaint—and you’re surrounded by penguins!”

“Take in the sunset from a rooftop bar, like at the Silo Hotel (theroyalportfolio.com/ the-silo). It’s beautiful.”

ELTAMD UV Clear Broad Spectrum SPF 46, $27.

3. IT GIRL HAIR “Women here are all about

“Spanish women diet during the week, but on the weekend, they break all the rules. Going out with friends to a local bar and having a glass of wine is the mandatory way to relax!”

5. FUN ACTIVITY “Malavana (malavana.es) is a cute salon—it even has a wall garden!—where you can drink a beer and chat with friends during your haircut and blowout.”

6. CELEBRITY MUSES “Blanca Suárez and Elsa Pataky are actresses of the moment known for their hair and glowing skin.” IT’S A 10 HAIRCARE Five Minute Hair Repair for Blondes, $21. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

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6. CELEBRITY MUSES “I love everything about Tracee Ellis Ross and Solange—from their hair to their style and personality.”

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Flip to See Our

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4. NIGHT OUT

A town square in Madrid

“Many girls like to go to makeup master classes or watch YouTube tutorials so they can learn techniques like contouring. Bright lips—in blues, purples, and greens—are very popular, too.” MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Color Sensational Powder Matte Lipstick in Smoky Jade, $8.

DARPHIN The Revitalizing Oil, $50.

FRESH FACES ISSUE

Actress Elsa Pataky

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BRYTTA/GETTY IMAGES; AART VERRIPS; COURTESY OF CASTANY; STARCEVIC/ GETTY IMAGES; PIOLA666/GETTY IMAGES; FRANCISCO BENITEZ; EUROPAPRESS/GETTY IMAGES; FRANCES MARAIS; DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES; MARK WILLIAMS

SPAIN

“The Revitalizing Oil by Darphin is like juice for my skin. The smell and texture instantly make me feel better when I apply it.”


Instagram @lorealhair ©2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc.

Earn rewards. Join now at: lorealparisusa.com/worthitrewards

ALWAYS ON SET. Elnett Satin hairspray is the secret of celebrity hairstylists. It holds strong but brushes out effortlessly. So you can style and restyle—on set and everywhere. Elnett. It’s pure gold.

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