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Dustin Toothman p.304.777.8305 e. johndustintoothman@gmail.com w.dustintoothman.com


About Me // I am a designer currently based in Knoxville, Tn, a recent graduate from the Master of Architecture program at the University of Tennessee, and currently a candidate for a Master of Landscape Architecture at the University of Tennessee. I grew up in rural West Virginia with a very supportive family. I was not always interested in architecture or landscape architecture, but had a great love for art and making. Both my dad and granddad were carpenters and I was introduced to this amazing craft at an early age. I contribute my interest in architecture to these experiences as a child. Through my education I have gained an interest in architecture within academia and its influence on the practice. I am interested in the cultural effects that architecture has as well as expanding the scope of the fields of architecture and landscape architecture.


Selected Works // The following work is a product of my continued interest to understand the context of architecture, landscape architecture, design, photography, etc. This work ranges from practical design tactics to speculative design theories all in the name of architecture and landscape architecture. Please enjoy.


Table of Contents // Power Hub

S16 // James Rose // with Kendra Whitaker and Summer Abston

Urban Canyon

S16 // James Rose

Civilia 1.4

F16 // Darius Ammon // with Andrew Russell

Library as System

S17 // Tricia Stuth

Prototype 37764 Dolly Parton Partnership F17 // Micah Rutenburg

Ecology and Physiology of the Tennessee River F18 // Brad Collett // with Daniel Rose


Power Hub // Serving the community as a network of high capacity power hubs at the local level as providing interactive bus route viewing and options, local weather, community digital bullitin board, phone, car, and bus charging station as well as generating enough energy to provide power back to the grid in time of need.


solar panels oriented in optimal direction with DIVA

transparent additive manufacturing

structural poles

LCD interactive panel

transparent additive manufacturing bench seating _glows blue and blinks to indicate bus arrival _glows green when charging _glows red when low on battery

battery storage


Urban Canyon // This project is the result of the Governs Chair Studio focusing on urban development and the technology of 3d Printing. The urban environment, with it’s skyscrapers that reach the clouds and buildings that seem to lack all human scale. But isn’t the city for humans? These skyscrapers create the “urban canyon” within the city making all the people below look and feel like ants. How can one bring the idea of this urban canyon to a human scale allowing a tranquil escape from the urban life in which they live?


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01 Solar Panel Insert 02 Rooftop Social Patio 03 Green Panel Insert 04 Cross-Ventilation Windows 05 Additive Manufactured Envelope 06 Light-Weight Aluminum Canyon Structure


The Site// Located across the street from the University of Tennessee’s FAB LAB, is the new graduate architecture and visiting faculty apartment complex. Through evaluating walk-ability, bikeability, and public transportation this site was chosen as the perfect place to locate this new facility.


The Canyon// Constructed out of an aluminum scaffolding that is made up of multilayer inserts that can be moved around depending on the time of year. There are currently three types of inserts one is the solar power inserts which have two layout patterns one for the summer months and one for the winter months to ensure the most energy harvesting out of the system. The next is the living wall inserts, each of the living wall inserts are made up of various types of plants which take in the rain water and filter it through to the cistern system. The final insert is the, rain screen inserts , these inserts are meant for screening the rain from the shelters and similar to the living wall inserts filtering most of the water down to the cisterns on site.


Civilia 1.4 // A city conceived from natural disaster, adapted to live with catastrophic earthquakes. Located on the San Andreas fault line this city is an algorithmic city. The algorithm is based on the garden city concept and then allowed itself to evolve to the landscape. This method allowed for one of the most dense cities in the world. The algorithm ensure that every citizen has what they need within a 1.5 mile radius of their residence, creating a true walkable garden city.


Civilia 1.4 // Through a series of site investigations, sketches, and natural disaster simulations Andrew Russell and I were able to develop an algorithm to simulate growth around the sites effected by the disaster in turn allowing us to create a city plan that was responsive to natural disaster over time. The goal of the project was to use the Garden City concept as well as Frank Lloyd Wrights Broadacre City to create a plan that was not reliant on the grid but rather could adapt to the seemingly unpredictable destruction of natural disaster in order to create a walkable city in a post disaster world over 100 years.


Library As System // The Result of an Integrations studio, where the project was part of the 2017 Lyceum Competition to design a library in Manhattan. My project focused on creating a system that could transform any building into a library by dropping in the “book bot�. A system integrated with drone book delivery system, a mechanical sorting process, as well as the buildings hvac system.


connection


+90 01 rooftop community area 02 drone/heli landing pad +70 01 archive 02 offices 03 book circulation mechanical 04 drone book delivery +50 01 reading room 02 community space 03 bathrooms +30 01 terrace 02 circulation ramp

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Prototype 37764 Dolly Parton Partnership // The Result of a studio named “Database Natures�, this project focuses on the over-saturation that we have with the database and the idea that in the future we could live in a series of miniature cities known as micro database cities. This project serves as the prototype of this city and is located on Dolly Parton Parkway in what is currently an RV Park.


Prototype: 37764 Dolly Parton Partnership [a micro database city] Year: 2100 For years we have used the database and the database has used us, and yet we are still strangers. However, a new city has materialized and it is claiming to be the database and a select few have chosen / been chosen to become citizens. This city is the first of many, just as the virtual database is a network collecting information and image of the spectacle, the physical seeks to locate itself near the subjects in which it collects from. No longer limiting itself to a virtual collection but rather the potential to collect the physical. The Site: Two Rivers Landing RV Resort: The RV, once a symbol for family vacations to visit sites of spectacle, gaining popularity in the 1960s, began to fade out with the loss the generation that popularized them. Leaving a mass network of physical artifacts known as RV parks. As the database searched for a home, it found these miniature cities. Pre-Zoned, existing infrastructure, located near major database subjects, separate from any existing city, it was the perfect fit.


The City and its Collectives// The Citizens: The database could not create or obtain physical space on its own, it must gain citizenship. Just as people become addicted to a substance, people have become addicted to the database, virtual substance. This collective craves the over saturation of the database and is no longer satisfied with life outside of the database. They had chosen the database, and in turn the database had chosen them. They desire to arrive.

The Welcome Center: The database is continually growing as is its new city. The welcome center is the entrance to the city. For a database to exist in the material world it must have an interface. The welcome center is the interface between the citizens and the city. In the welcome center you are met by a kiosk where you choose the level of participation within the city. The city then responds to your input by miniaturizing the data and then repackaging back to us in physical space, allowing the city to adapt to each citizen.


The City and its Collectives// The Utility Board: This is where the database processes the information to give back to the city to ensure its growth. Taking the inputs from the welcome center and using its knowledge to populate the city with the spaces that are desired by the citizens. The city quickly becomes a network of overlapping spaces creating a diverse collective city.

The Fulfillment Center: Each level of participation creates a space within the city. The fulfillment center is the space of augmentation. Each citizen can interact based on their participation desires in the welcome center. This place blurs the boundary between physical and digital space allowing for a scaler shift in this miniature city through augmentation.

Inhabitation: With citizens comes the need for inhabitation. The site is pre-zoned for living, each citizen chooses / is assigned a plot to construct their place. They are restricted to the size of the physical lot, however based on their chosen participation level are given an amount of digital space to exist and build their lives in the microdata base city. The Welcome Center allows each citizen to take part in the hyperindividualism that the database allows. The Future: ‌


Ecology and Physiology of the Tennessee River // This is the first portion of a larger project investigating human intervention and ecological spectacle along the Tennessee River. The project is part of the Masters of Landscape Architecture River Studio and Tennessee RiverLine, a vision for a 652-mi multi-modal trail along the Tennessee River. The drawings and maps produced are research in order to produce a series of field guides to the physiographic regions along the Tennessee River focusing on the physical geography, ecology, and culture of the Tennessee River.


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Physiographic Sections Tennessee River Basin

(Tennessee) LOCATED TO THE WEST OF THE APPALACHIAN RIDGE AND VALLEY REGION IS THE APPALACHIAN PLATEAU. IT IS ALSO REFERRED TO AS THE CUMBERLAND PLATEAU. IT IS COVERED WITH FLAT-TOPPED

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The Tennessee River begins at the confluence of the French Broad and the Holston near Knoxville, Tn. From there the river travels southwest gathering additional resources from its tributaries before reaching Chattanooga, Tn. The river then flows into what is known as the Tennessee River Gorge, where is makes its way around the Cumberland Plateau reaching down into the Sequatchie Valley where it begins its travels through Northern Alabama. After flowing through Northern Alabama and forming a natural border between there and Mississippi it flows into Paducah, KY where it meets the Ohio River. Over this course the Tennessee River traverses many different landscapes from the mountains in the East through the lowlands of West Tennessee. These landscapes are made up of the 4 different Physiographic sections that the Tennessee River flows through. These sections are the Valley and Ridge (Tennessee Section), Cumberland Plateau, Highland Rim, and East Gulf Coastal Plain. These physiographic conditions are what defines the path of the Tennessee River.

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MOUNTAINS AND IS SEPARATED BY SHARP VALLEYS. IT RISES FROM 1,500 FEET TO 1,800 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL. SOUTHWEST OF CHATTANOOGA AND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF THE APPALACHIAN PLATEAU IS LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN AND PROVIDES VIEWS OF SEVEN STATES

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TABLELANDS AND OPEN LOW MOUNTAINS; ABOUT 1000 FEET HIGHER THAN THE EASTERN HIGHLAND RIM; SLIGHTLY HIGHER LEVELS OF PRECIPITATION THAN NEIGHBORING REGIONS; INCLUDES THE CRAB ORCHARD MOUNTAINS 00F

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Highland Rim HIGHLAND RIM LIES WEST OF THE APPALACHIAN PLATEAU. IT IS AN

ELEVATED PLAIN THAT SURROUNDS THE NASHVILLE BASIN. THE PENNYROYAL REGION IS LOCATED IN THE NORTHERN SECTION OF THE HIGHLAND RIM.(08) THE HIGHLAND RIM IS RATHER CONTINUOUS AND ANY DIVISION OF IT, INCLUDING THE ONES MADE BELOW, ARE SOMEWHAT ARBITRARY. THE TERM "HIGHLAND" HERE IS RELATIVE: IT IS CERTAINLY HIGHER THAN THE BASIN IT SURROUNDS, BUT IT NONETHELESS IS SELDOM AT AN ELEVATION ABOVE 1,100 FEET (340 M) ABOVE SEA LEVEL AND NEVER MORE THAN ABOUT 1,400 FEET (430 M) ABOVE SEA LEVEL EXCEPT WHERE INTERRUPTED, PRIMARILY TO THE SOUTHEAST, BY OUTLIERS OF THE CUMBERLAND PLATEAU. WITH THE EXCEPTION OF A FEW BROAD STREAM BOTTOMS, THE LAND IS CHARACTERIZED BY RIDGES AND VALLEYS WITH A FEW FAIRLY LOW HILLS.

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Nashville Basin THE NASHVILLE BASIN, ALSO KNOWN AS THE CENTRAL BASIN, IS A TERM OFTEN USED TO DESCRIBE THE AREA SURROUNDING NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE. THE CENTRAL BASIN WAS CAUSED BY AN UPLIFTING WHICH PRODUCED A DOME KNOWN AS THE NASHVILLE DOME. THE NASHVILLE DOME IS EVIDENCED BY THE UNDERLYING ROCK STRATA THAT ALL DIP DOWNWARDS AWAY FROM NASHVILLE. THE UPLIFTING OF THE NASHVILLE DOME FRACTURED OVERLYING STRATA, MAKING IT MORE EASILY ERODED AND THUS THE "DOME" RESULTED IN A "BASIN".

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THE EAST GULF COASTAL PLAIN LIES WEST OF THE HIGHLAND RIM AND NASHVILLE BASIN. IT IS THE LARGEST LAND REGION IN TERMS OF AREA IN TENNESSEE. THIS AREA BEGINS AT THE GULF OF MEXICO AND EXTENDS NORTH INTO SOUTHERN ILLINOIS. THE GULF COASTAL PLAIN (IN TENNESSEE) IS DIVIDED INTO THREE SECTIONS THAT EXTEND FROM THE TENNESSEE RIVER, IN THE EAST, TO THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER IN THE WEST. THE WESTERN BANK OF THE TENNESSEE RIVER IS HILLY LAND THAT IS THE EASTERNMOST SECTION. THIS SECTION IS ONLY ABOUT 10 MILES WIDE. AN AREA CALLED THE TENNESSEE BOTTOMS OR THE BOTTOM LAND IS TO THE WEST OF THIS NARROW STRIP OF LAND. IT IS A WIDE AREA OF ROLLING HILLS AND STREAMS THAT STRETCHES ALL THE WAY TO MEMPHIS IN WESTERN TENNESSEE. THE TENNESSEE BOTTOMS END IN STEEP BLUFFS OVERLOOKING THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER IN MEMPHIS. THE MISSISSIPPI ALLUVIAL PLAIN (SOMETIMES CALLED THE DELTA REGION) IS TO THE WEST OF THE TENNESSEE BOTTOMS IS LESS THAN 300 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL. THIS IS AN AREA OF LOWLANDS, FLOOD PLAINS AND SWAMP LAND.

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Southern Blue Ridge ON THE BORDER OF NORTH CAROLINA ON THE EASTERN EDGE OF TENNESSEE IS THE BLUE RIDGE. HIGH MOUNTAINS IN THIS AREA ARE THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS, THE CHILHOWEE MOUNTAINS AND THE SNOWBIRD MOUNTAINS. 5,000

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FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL IS THE AVERAGE ELEVATION OF THE BLUE RIDGE AREA. CLINGMAN'S DOME (6,643 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL) IS THE HIGHEST POINT IN THE STATE AND IS FOUND IN THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS.

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LOCATED TO THE WEST OF THE APPALACHIAN RIDGE AND VALLEY REGION IS THE APPALACHIAN PLATEAU. IT IS ALSO REFERRED TO AS THE CUMBERLAND PLATEAU. IT IS COVERED WITH FLAT-TOPPED

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MOUNTAINS AND IS SEPARATED BY SHARP VALLEYS. IT RISES FROM 1,500 FEET TO 1,800 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL. SOUTHWEST OF CHATTANOOGA AND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF THE APPALACHIAN PLATEAU IS LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN AND PROVIDES VIEWS OF SEVEN STATES.

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Physiographic Sections of the Tennessee River Basin// The Tennessee River begins at the confluence of the French Broad and the Holston near Knoxville, Tn. From there the river travels southwest gathering additional resources from its tributaries before reaching Chattanooga, Tn. The river then flows into what is known as the Tennessee River Gorge, where is makes its way around the Cumberland Plateau reaching down into the Sequatchie Valley where it begins its travels through Northern Alabama. After flowing through Northern Alabama and forming a natural border between there and Mississippi it flows into Paducah, KY where it meets the Ohio River. Over this course the Tennessee River traverses many different landscapes from the mountains in the East through the lowlands of West Tennessee. These landscapes are made up of the 4 different Physiographic sections that the Tennessee River flows through. These sections are the Valley and Ridge (Tennessee Section), Cumberland Plateau, Highland Rim, and East Gulf Coastal Plain. These physiographic conditions are what defines the path of the Tennessee River.


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Biodiversity Tennessee RiverLine

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The Southeastern United States is known as a global hotspot for freshwater bio-diversity. This region has “almost two-thirds of the country’s fish species, over 90% of the US total species of mussels and nearly half of the global total for crayfish species. More than a quarter of this region’s species are found nowhere else in the world.”

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Biodiversity of the Tennessee RiverLine // The Southeastern United States is known as a global hotspot for freshwater bio-diversity. This region has “almost two-thirds of the country’s fish species, over 90% of the US total species of mussels and nearly half of the global total for crayfish species. More than a quarter of this region’s species are found nowhere else in the world.”


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00A Habitat Opportunities Because the sloughs are not always with water ys filled w te it allows ow forr the extension te oof the riparian p edge bringingg in many animals, aquatic, ti semi-aquatic, and terrestrial. r

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Recreation / Spectacle Sloughs refer to side channels that run along a main channel. These filled he areas a are typically y fi with water year round but provide an opportunity when they are for canoes, paddle boards too n kayaks, a pa bo exploree low waters a where h larger g boats cannot travel.

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Hiwassee H e Islandd havingg Woodland, Mississippian, andd Native American A ca occupation o at at different d t points in history has been an archaeological spectacle h since s the he late 1800s. 8

SSandhill Cranes Sandhill nd cranes a aree magnificent creatures that stand approximately 4’’ tall withh a wingg span of 6’. These beautiful birds make their way to Hiwassee Island n in late te fall, which h they ey call home for most of winter. TThe island provides a perfect fe feeding d andd rroostingg habitat at for thiss spectacle.

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Recreation / Spectacle Sandhill cranes are only part of what the th islandd offers. no fe Although h n longer e in operation, the Tennessee T Aquarium r rann a boatt tour along o the Tennessee T s River er Gorge, to explore the various us sites and an spectacles. pe s The shallow h water that flows inland makes the island perfect f for canoe, an kayak, y andd paddlee board adventures in the summer.

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Islands (Hiwassee Island)

Sloughs are side channels that run along the main channel of the river. They are not typically filled with water year round which allows them to be considered a type of wetland. Sloughs are typically formed when a meander gets cut off from the main river creating what is known as an “oxbow lake”. The “oxbow lake” continues to collect sediment from the flow of the main channel which creates a wetland, this continued flow is what then creates the slough. Sloughs allow for the riparian edge to be extended for some portion of the year creating plant growth in the fertile sediment allowing for many habitats for several different species.

Typically when one thinks of islands they often think of a tropical oasis in the middle of the ocean. However, any sub-continental land surrounded by water is considered to be an island. Typically river islands, also known as aits or eyots, are the resultant of a change in the course of a river such as a confluence where a tributary enters in or ,in the case of the Tennessee river, the alterations by the TVA could also contribute. Islands can be found all along the Tennessee River and also on TVA reservoirs. While the history of some of these islands are rich, Hiwassee Island having Woodland, Mississippian, and Native American occupation at different points in history, they have become territories of wildlife habitats, spectacle, recreation and at times all three.

Sloughs (Garth Slough)


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00E 7 Historic is R Bank Ba Conditions o on River 09.07.18 e bank Some recall the eastern river condition as being similar to the western side, having the ability to a as kids. It walk ddown too the water as beenn said that over o oone has e has lifetimee moree than 20 feet ee eroded o a been away from this particular area. This can be attributed to severall factors :

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i Flooding 8 Recreational 09.18.10 e on Boating a Over development of edge d p o the ed

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h picture series shows a range This b coo on over of thee river bank condition 2 thee past 21.

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Armored Condition

The Cumberland Plateau is a deeply dissected plateau with an average topographic relief of approximately 400’ with the largest relief being over 2500’ in Eastern Kentucky. This area is known as an escarpment, which is a steep slope or cliff which is the effect of faulting separating two relatively leveled areas. This portion is a 1.25 mi x 1.25mi section of the Cumberland Plateau, within this section lies Snoopers Rock, which is a point overlooking the Tennessee River located within Prentice Cooper State Forest, and the Wildlife Management Area on Signal Mountain.

River banks are an extremely dynamic condition. When river bank erosion occurs naturally it generally produces positive outcomes such as “the formation of productive floodplains and alluvial terraces.”(01) However, in rivers such as the Tennessee River where most of the natural conditions have been altered. This alteration causes unstable conditions that must be repaired using shorline stabilization methods. One of those methods is the armored condition or hard armoring. This method has a variety of techniques but the general ideas remains the same. This method involves grading the banks to a lower slope and then using rock riprap ( large stones) and / or gabions along the streambank to stablize the bank. This method is typically used where bioengineering is not a stable


Profile for Dustin Toothman

Selected Graduate Works 2018  

A short selection of works throughout my Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture degrees

Selected Graduate Works 2018  

A short selection of works throughout my Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture degrees

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