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WAYNE & ADELE

MIELLA SARTORI

LILY GREER

Wayne & Adele’s Garden of Eating is as quirky and endearing as its owners. Meet them on P16

Don’t be fooled by her diminutive stature; Miella Sartori packs a big voice and wisdom to boot. P13

More than 80,000 Australians live with Crohn’s disease, among them is news reporter Lily Greer. Read her story. P52

your free copy to take home

The Magazine of The North

twenty20! ISSUE 157

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2020 duomagazine.com.au


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contents 16 56

13 08

The Calendar

30

Wardrobe

47

Scott Morrison

60

Seen

13

Miella Sartori

32

Kelly Isaac

48

Grant Collins

62

Seen

33

5 Minutes With

50

63

Seen

Lily Greer

64

Seen

16

Our top picks

Interview

Wayne + Adele’s Garden of Eating

Some Things I Love

The Donohues’ Team

One of a Kind

20

Sweethearts

Cross My Heart

35

Heatley Secondary College

52

Our Future is Our Focus

Fresh New Media

Clarity Hearing + Balance

Fairfield Central + Townsville Central Medical Practices

Caring for Communities My New Normal

Jewellery by Design VIP Diamond Extravaganza Busby Marou The Great Divide Tour Tiny Mountain Brewery Launch The Mayor’s Christmas Tree Appeal All Stars Concert

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Bec + Bridge

44

Chappel Accounting

54

Home Discoveries

65

Seen

28

Jewellery by Design

46

Karen Quagliata

56

Noosa Valley 3 House

66

Marni Hine

4

Wipeout Resort ’20 Collection Making It Personal

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Count on Us

Accounting & Super

Classic Blues

Sarah Waller Architecture

Townsville City Council Carols by Candlelight Last Word


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TUE 3 + WED 4 MARch SUNSHINE COAST STADIUM SUNSHINE COAST

FINAL EVER AUSTRALIAN SHOWs: OZNZ.ELTONJOHN.COM


welcome DUO Magazine Stacey Morrison Scott Morrison Advertising enquiries Call 0421 084 491

On the cover

Photographer: Matthew Gianoulis Model: Rocci Smit Makeup: Kristin Martin Hair: Troy Thompson

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As I write this in December, I’m listening to a great Spotify playlist for my star sign (the hippie in me never fades) and getting ready to wrap up for the year. As you read this, you’ve already welcomed the new year and no doubt you’ve thought about or have set your goals for the new year. I recently watched an ABC interview with performance coach Andrew May that made me stop and think. He said that psychology studies have found “That the whole obsession with goal setting isn’t making people happy.” Instead, we should adopt the concept of ‘accomplishment focus’. Still setting goals but more importantly, taking time to reflect on and celebrate the things we’ve done and achieved over the past twelve months. Or, indeed, the past decade. There are six core pillars to consider: work / career, money, relationships, health and fitness, learning / development, hobbies, passion and fun. That’s challenging to do, but the thing is, it doesn’t need to mean we’ve accomplished some fantastic feat. I thought to myself, what have I done differently? I can celebrate starting my veggie patch. I can celebrate my strong relationships with my family, friends and colleagues. I can celebrate my personal development in many new areas of my career. I can celebrate the fact that we evolved DUO’s look and frequency and continue to introduce you to exciting and (sometimes) larger-than-life local characters. And now I can think more clearly about what’s important to me and the goals I’m likely to set. Welcome to the new decade! I hope it’s a happy one for you and your loved ones. Stacey Morrison Editor-in-Chief

Editorial enquiries editor@duomagazine.com.au Writers Kylie Davis Tamara Hogan Sarah Mathiesen Lily Greer Photographers Matthew Gianoulis Josephine Carter Sarah Joy Photography Caitlin Dobson Pierre Toussaint Telephone +61 7 4771 2933 www.duomagazine.com.au DUO Magazine is published bi-monthly by Intrepid (NQ) Pty Ltd ACN 107 308 538 PO Box 1928 Townsville Qld 4810

COPYRIGHT Contents of DUO Magazine are subject to copyright. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information in this publication, the publisher accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences including any loss or damage arising from reliance on information in this publication. Expressed or implied authors’ and advertisers’ opinions are not necessarily those of the editor and/or publisher.


Every Opportunity. TOWNSVILLE GRAMMAR SCHOOL

OPEN DAYS Work hard, be kind, and amazing things will happen.

NORTH WARD YEARS 7-12 + BOARDING (CO-ED) Thursday, 12 March | 3:30-6:30pm ANNANDALE & NORTH SHORE EEC + PREP - YEAR 6 (CO-ED) Saturday, 14 March | 9:00-11:00am Townsville Grammar


Our top picks for what’s happening in The North.

Photo: Ben Gibson

Photo: Kane Hibberd

The Calendar

Elton John - Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour

If you’re near Townsville 25th - 27th January Charters Towers Goldfield Ashes Goldfields Sporting Complex The Charters Towers Goldfield Ashes is the largest amateur cricket carnival in the southern hemisphere and is conducted by the Charters Towers Cricket Association Incorporated. The event was recently given the status of being a Queensland Iconic Event. www.goldfieldashes.com.au

26th January Australia Day Community Events Jezzine Barracks and Strand Park Townsville City Council will host Australia Day celebrations starting at 7am at Jezzine Barracks followed

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The Wolfe Brothers

by the Great Australian Bites event from 12pm to 5pm at Strand Park. The 2020 Australia Day Flag Raising Ceremony and 2020 Great Australian Bites are presented by the Townsville City Council in partnership with the Queensland Government. www.whatson.townsville.qld.gov.au

30th January - 8th February MAMMA MIA! Townsville Civic Theatre Presented by Townsville Choral Society. ABBA’s hits tell the hilarious story of a young woman’s search for her birth father. On the eve of her wedding, a daughter’s quest to discover the identity of her father brings three men from her mother’s past back to the island they last visited 20 years ago. www.tcs.org.au

C.W. Stoneking

1st February

29th February

The Wolfe Brothers No Sad Song Tour Dalrymple Hotel

Elton John Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour Queensland Country Bank Stadium

Australia’s favourite country-rock band is heading back to Queensland for some more headline shows. Every show is a party so book your tickets early and join the party with The Wolfe Brothers. www.tickets.oztix.com.au

Music icon Elton John, will deliver his famed songbook to spellbound audiences, on his very last tour, Farewell Yellow Brick Road that has already been hailed as one of his most “energetic, dazzlingly-original and joyful celebrations”. Elton’s legendary catalogue, including beloved songs ‘Bennie and the Jets’, ‘Rocket Man’, ‘Tiny Dancer’, ‘Crocodile Rock’, ‘Philadelphia Freedom’ and more, are showcased in a musical masterpiece that is a reflective and stunning tribute to a great artist’s career. This will be your last ever chance to catch Elton live in concert. Don’t miss out. www.ticketmaster.com.au

22nd -23rd February Taylors Beach Family Fishing Tournament Progress Park, Taylor Beach A family friendly fishing tournament provided by Taylors Beach Progress Association. www.whatson.townsville.qld.gov.au


NT! FREE EVE

D AY SU ND AY 26 JA NU AR Y

JEZZINE BARRACKS 6:45am Aussie Fun Run 8am Free Aussie Breakfast

(first 500 people)

8:30am Australia Day Awards Ceremony 10am Flag Raising Ceremony 11am Citizenship Ceremony

GREAT AUSTRALIAN BITES Strand Park 12-5pm Multicultural food stalls | Kite display Live entertainment with local bands whatson.townsville.qld.gov.au #australiadayqld #greataustralianbites

Presented by

In partnership with

The 2020 Australia Day Flag Raising Ceremony and 2020 Great Australian Bites are presented by Townsville City Council in partnership with the Queensland Government. The Australia Day Flag Raising Ceremony and Great Australian Bites are assisted by the Australian Government through the National Australia Day Council.


Our top picks for what’s happening in The North.

The Calendar

Anh Do – The Happiest Refugee

Northlane

If you’re in Cairns 25th January Northlane Tanks Arts Centre, Edge Hill Off the back of a huge sold-out national headline tour, Australia’s elite metal-rockers Northlane are coming to Cairns as part of their 4D regional tour. www.ticketlink.com.au

26th January Great Australian Bites on the Esplanade Esplanade Eastern Event Lawns Cairns Regional Council in partnership with the Queensland Government are hosting a Great Australian Bites event this Australia Day. Local restaurants providing bite size tasting plates featuring local ingredients, and a program of local performers. Prizes, giveaways and free entertainment for the kids from 10am - 2pm www.cairns.qld.gov.au/whats-on

8th February Marty Sheargold CPAC Theatre Marty Sheargold tours his stand up show around Australia for a night of must see comedy. Don’t miss the opportunity to laugh live with the star of Star FM’s Kate, Tim

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and Marty show, as he delivers a load of jokes and stories he can’t do between 4 and 6pm. If you’ve seen him on Have You Been Paying Attention? and want more, book now! www.ticketlink.com.au

8th February The Beautiful Girls Tanks Arts Centre, Edge Hill So, what do you do when you release an album like Seaside Highlife, Greatest Hits Volume I? You take it to the people, large as life and twice as much fun. Playing the album – four sides, double vinyl – all of it, with an expanded six-piece lineup – guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, horn section. www.ticketlink.com.au

28th February C.W. Stoneking Tanks Arts Centre, Edge Hill For C.W. Stoneking, the road continues to call, and rumour has it he is on his way to Cairns for an intimate solo performance at Tanks. www.ticketlink.com.au

Marty Sheargold

The Beautiful Girls

29th February

15th February

The Necks Cairns Performing Arts Centre, Studio

Anh Do – The Happiest Refugee MECC Auditorium

After a remarkable year in which The Necks got a symphony orchestra improvising behind them in a concert hall down a Polish salt mine, performed a double bill with the Art Ensemble of Chicago, received the Richard Gill Award for Distinguished Services to Australian Music, played on album releases by Underworld and Swans, and performed in a Finnish church carved out of solid rock. www.ticketlink.com.au

If you’re in Mackay 26th January Australia Day Community Events Mackay Region Celebrate Australia Day at one of 11 Aussie themed events council supported events at a range of locations from Sarina to the Mackay City Centre, north to Seaforth and west to Kinchant Dam. From lamington and pie eating competitions to water slides and sailing, there’s something for everyone. www.mackay.qld.gov.au/ ausdayevents

Anh Do’s bestselling book The Happiest Refugee has made readers laugh and cry, and was described by Russell Crowe as “the most surprising and inspiring read I have had in years.” Anh’s stage show takes it a step further, combining stand-up comedy with real life stories, photos and filmed pieces to retell his amazing story. www.themecc.com.au

28th February Up, Up & Away MECC Plenary Hall Travel with Up, Up & Away! in this riotous cabaret on a razzle-dazzle world-tour featuring a crew of sassy stewardesses as your LIVE In-Flight Entertainment System! www.themecc.com.au


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miella DON’T BE FOOLED BY HER DIMINUTIVE STATURE AND YOUTHFUL GLOW; MIELLA SARTORI PACKS A BIG VOICE AND WISDOM TO BOOT. WORDS SARAH MATHIESEN | PHOTOGRAPHY MATTHEW GIANOULIS

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miella The 17-year-old songstress, who you’ll frequently find serenading crowds at some of Townsville’s trendiest haunts, has already lived multiple lives. Before choosing to pursue a career in music, Miella was on track to become a professional dancer, having moved from Townsville to the Sunshine Coast to attend a full-time dance school and work her way through development programs offered by Queensland Ballet and Australian Ballet. “It came to a point where I had to choose whether to go professional as a dancer or not,” says Miella. “I was so torn because I love dancing, but I didn’t want to give up my singing, and my school, and everything else for one thing. “I was only 13, so it was a big decision for little me – it almost feels like a completely different life.” For Miella, the appeal of music comes from its ability to help her express herself in ways that nothing else does. “The feeling you get when you release a song that you’ve written, and people start listening and reacting to it, is really special. “I kind of got addicted to it: the songwriting process, hitting the studio, recording – it’s all very motivating.” To date, Miella has released two singles, which she’d penned herself: Real Love in 2018 and To Whom It May Concern in 2019. Both tracks wonderfully demonstrate Miella’s powerful vocals and a maturity that some songwriters twice her age fail to achieve. It’s that same maturity that makes Miella such a promising musician. Yet to finish high school, she has no grand illusions about what life as a professional performer may require. “My goal is to keep writing music,” she says. “That’s the main goal for artists - to keep writing and keep putting things out there to keep the momentum flowing.

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I WANT TO START INTEGRATING DIFFERENT ELEMENTS .. SO THAT I CAN KEEP EVOLVING. MIELLA SARTORI “I’m trying to keep expanding my performance, too. I want to start integrating different elements into my gigs this year so that I can keep evolving and changing.” Miella said she’s open to trying different things as a performer and that, while in time she may have to leave North Queensland, Townsville is the best place for her right now. “The work here in Townsville and the support for local music is incredible. Musicians in Townsville get so much work, the pay is amazing and the exposure is really good too. “In Brisbane and the bigger cities, it’s so hard to get work like that and be able to make a living as a musician because there’s so much competition. But here in Townsville, the community’s so supportive and the artists are so friendly to each other. It’s a really good place to be.” www.miellasartori.com.au


Every Opportunity. TOWNSVILLE GRAMMAR SCHOOL

OPEN DAYS Work hard, be kind, and amazing things will happen.

NORTH WARD YEARS 7-12 + BOARDING (CO-ED) Thursday, 12 March | 3:30-6:30pm ANNANDALE & NORTH SHORE EEC + PREP - YEAR 6 (CO-ED) Saturday, 14 March | 9:00-11:00am Townsville Grammar


INTERVIEW

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ONE OF A KIND KNOWN FOR ITS DARING DISHES AND ROMANTIC COURTYARD, WAYNE & ADELE’S GARDEN OF EATING IS AS QUIRKY AND ENDEARING AS ITS OWNERS. WORDS KYLIE DAVIS | PHOTOGRAPHY MATTHEW GIANOULIS

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INTERVIEW

“

WE ATTRIBUTE OUR SUCCESS TO JUST BEING DIFFERENT AND GIVING DINERS SOMETHING UNIQUE.

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WAYNE GILRAY


Wayne Gilray and Adele Scott, of Wayne and Adele’s Garden of Eating fame, have been living their restaurant dream for 26 years. “We’d both been in the restaurant trade for years, so we jumped at the chance to open our own small place,” says Adele, recalling the moment she and Wayne saw a newspaper ad for the closed pizza shop that would become Wayne & Adele’s Garden of Eating. “It was only a five-minute walk from our South Townsville home and we could see its potential.” Wayne set about renovating, Adele added her decorating flair and soon what might have been described as an ugly duckling was transformed into a swan. A garden courtyard, complete with a flowerfilled fountain and fairy lights, now beckons restaurant-goers searching for a romantic retreat. “Wayne’s the chef and I’m front of house,” Adele says. “Wayne really delves into creating a lot of different flavour combinations but we both design the menu and then I come up with the quirky dish names.” Those partial to seafood may wish to try The Grape Gatsby – oven steambaked salmon with sliced grapes, red wine sauce and sweet corn mash – or those looking for a fair dinkum Aussie experience might opt for Hopping Mad – kangaroo fillet medallions, and juniper and Madagascan vanilla sauce with bacon mash. Even renowned food critic Matt Preston, who doesn’t normally go in for kitsch dish names, admitted in his book CravatA-Licious that it works for Wayne and Adele. And joining him in giving the couple high praise is Lonely Planet, which regularly lists the Garden of Eating as a “must visit” when in Townsville.

With 40 years of experience in the restaurant trade between them, it’s no wonder Wayne and Adele have what it takes to keep diners coming back. The couple even met while on the job… “We’re both originally from Christchurch and met in 1978 while working at the Christchurch Town Hall Conference Centre,” Adele says. Wayne adds: “It’s a bit like a mini Sydney Opera House but with restaurants and theatres in it!” The couple moved to Australia in the early 80s, eventually settling in Townsville and buying their home in South Townsville. But every year they make the journey back to New Zealand. “We always go to areas known for their wine and food and have a special place in our hearts for Amisfield, a restaurant with a top chef that’s in a beautiful building just by a lake,” Adele says. “We were married in Christchurch in 1998 and planned the wedding for a whole year!” The Tudor-style wedding was even televised, with Wayne wearing a King Henry outfit and Adele dressed in a beautiful claret-coloured dress and gold veil. The pair punted (rode a boat propelled by a person with a pole) through the centre of Christchurch and had their ceremony in a beautiful old medievalstyle stone building, complete with knights in armour and singing minstrels. “I picked fresh ivy from my Aunty’s place the night before and draped it over the candelabras,” Wayne says. “The wedding was one of the highlights of our lives.” Wayne & Adele’s Garden of Eating has also played host to many (smaller and more intimate) weddings over the years and is a popular place to propose.

“We attribute our success to just being different and giving diners something unique,” Wayne says. “The common thing diners will say is that you give us so many choices, we have to come back!” To maximise the number of courses they try, many diners order multiple entreesized dishes to share. And it’s not just a particular age group doing this. From young couples on dates, through to people in their 70s and 80s, sharing entree-sized dishes is proving popular with all ages. “Dietary requirements are also playing a big part in the menu designing,” Wayne adds. “Over 10 years ago we began doing a lot of gluten-free dishes and now also have many dairy-free and vegan dishes on the menu.” But that doesn’t mean the dishes aren’t tasty or interesting. On the contrary, many of the vegan dishes, such as seaweed tacos and sesame-marinated tofu, are a hit with non-vegans. And meat-lovers are spoiled for choice with New Zealand wild venison, kangaroo and crocodile just a few of the many options available on the menu. With Wayne and Adele turning 60 last year, coupled with the fact they have land in Lombok, a few customers are nervous that their favourite restaurant may soon close its doors. They needn’t be… “We love it here in Townsville and we’re as passionate about our restaurant as ever,” Adele says. “We’d love to build something on our land in Lombok, and have it as a bit of a retreat, but our hearts are here.”

gardenofeating.com.au

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PROMOTION

SWEETHEARTS THE ADULT SHOP REOPENS AFTER THE 2019 FLOODS IN ANOTHER CHAPTER OF A LONG SAGA OF LOVE AND WAR. WORDS TAMARA HOGAN PHOTOGRAPHY JOSEPHINE CARTER

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CROSS MY HEART For more than 35 years, Colin Edwards has been agitating for change and advocating for love from within the heady parlours of his renowned adult shop, Sweethearts. Yet, as Edwards and his team ready for a grand re-opening post the January 2019 floods, many of Sweethearts’ fans will be unaware that this rebirth is but one story of survival in the face of adversity. The legend of Sweethearts is woven with equal parts passion and hope, tyranny and conflict. Though, in meeting Colin, one can’t help but think there’s been no better man for the job. Edwards is plus grand que la vie, larger than life himself, with his journey to this point also describing his character. He is bombastic change-maker, scandalous risk-taker, tender philosophiser, and most enduringly, an activist for love. Like all grand tales, Edwards journey began at sea. “I joined the Navy as a young man. I loved the sea and Australia, and I wanted to serve my country. But I made the mistake of answering a question honestly. I hadn’t done anything wrong, but yes, I was a gay man. So I was kicked out. I was very bruised by that.” Edwards returned to his home town of Rockhampton, seeking solace through the Pentecostal church. “They admitted me through what was known as ‘conversion therapy.’” Colin’s face turns retrospective, pinched with old pain. “I won’t describe what they put me through, but suffice to say that it has an acidic effect on a person’s mind, body and soul.” “One Sunday afternoon, they called me out; they made everyone in the congregation face the wall, turn their back to me, and asked me to leave.”

On that fateful day, Colin made his way out of the Pentecostal faith, and indeed, organised religion, through a faceless aisle of condemnation. “That moment? That killed me.” “My sexuality was my ‘minority.’ I began to understand persecution. Whether it’s our race, gender, culture, age, class, ethnicity, we all understand what it’s like to be rejected.” Yet Edward’s ostracism led him to open a business underpinned by acceptance, connection and an abiding human drive for love. “Because doesn’t everybody have the right to intimacy and relationship?” “So that was my grounding, and that’s why I came to Townsville and opened Sweethearts.” Sweethearts launched in 1986, however, Colin’s battle against persecution had only just begun. While over 70% of Australian society at the time still believed homosexuality to be ‘a mortal sin,’ Edwards championed Townsville’s very first ‘sex’ shop in a microcosm of conservative, regional Australia. “When I opened, I had no idea what I was starting. I had the media, the courts and the law come down on top of me.” “In the first year, the local newspaper ran an article proclaiming ‘homosexuals deserved to be lined up against a wall and shot.’ Then they began the raids. In those first six years, they raided my store every three weeks. I appeared in court 23 times. They confiscated half of what I had in the shop, and then all the products would disappear.” “I felt I was a good person, with dignity and honesty, and I was doing the right thing, so I defended that. No matter how many times they took me to court, I kept winning.” >>

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PROMOTION

“The shop gave me a platform to represent minorities; the LGBTI community, people with HIV Aids, sex workers and the transgender community. Funeral directors wouldn’t bury people with HIV. The Queensland AIDS office in Townsville was even bombed at the time!” With his publicity and evolution into activism, Edwards found himself running for State Parliament in 1992 and then for Federal in 1998. He also became a founder and eventual part-owner of Queensland Pride, the first Gay and Lesbian newspaper, along with having a regular segment on 4TTT with Saturday Night LGBTI. So, is Edward’s advocacy for marginalised groups the only customers reflected in Sweethearts patronage? “Interestingly, over 70 per cent of our customers are women or couples, who are seeking to improve how they connect with their partner.” “A huge part of what we do here is offer guidance and direction. We focus on helping people feel comfortable, not selling them a product.” What differences can customers expect of the refurbished store? Building Designer David Townsend explains, “It’s much more technologically advanced, with everything in LED and leaning toward a high-end retail layout like you’re walking into a jewellery shop.” Colin expands further, “One of the first corners in the shop is the Community Service Area with information about sexual health. A contingent of the medical community refers patients to Sweethearts for this reason.”

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“We help older couples reconnect, men with erectile dysfunction issues, people recovering from trauma or managing a physical disability. No question or need is silly or stupid here. We’ve heard it all before.” “The majority of staff are in our 50s and 60s; we find that life experience counts for the issues people seek assistance for.” The shop itself is a far cry from the gaudiness associated with the likes of Kings Cross. “We don’t have ‘secret rooms’ here! Our store is comfortable, clean and accessible. It always smells good, our staff are expertly trained, and we put a smile on your face.” When it comes to confidentiality, Edwards is direct, “Our reputation lies in our discretion.” As Colin looks to the future, how does he reconcile the role Townsville has played in his past? “Sweethearts has been an important part of Townsville maturing into a young adult, proving itself prepared to deal with it and have a go. At the end of the day, that’s what I’m so proud of about Townsville. The city finds a way to put its best foot forward, and come out liking itself and finding its place in the world.” As to his activism, Colin declares with a cross-my-heart quality, “I will continue to persist until we finally end up with a community where everyone is respected, valued, and lives with dignity.” www.sweethearts.sh @sweetheartstownsville sweethearts206


BECAUSE DOESN’T EVERYBODY HAVE THE RIGHT TO INTIMACY AND RELATIONSHIP? COLIN EDWARDS

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STYLE

Inspired by the glassy swells of SoCal’s legendary beaches and the backdrop of their local Sydney shores, the Wipe Out collection pays homage to a freewheeling paradise, throwing back to the myth and magic of the iconic

wipeout late 60’s and early

Nixie Dress $500

70’s surf culture.

Bec + Bridge Resort ’20 Collection

www.becandbridge.com.au

Model Jasmyn Palombo | Styling Freddie Fredricks | Photographer Pierre Toussaint | Production/Creative Direction Jordana Sexton | Hair Luana Coscia | Makeup Carol Mackie for MAC Australia

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Eden Top $160 Wax On Mini Skirt $220

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STYLE

Babelini Mini Dress $280

Hali Shirt $300 Coco Loco Top $95 Eden Midi Skirt $200

Barrier Reef Top $240 Coco Loco High Bottom $100

www.becandbridge.com.au

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Satin Maxi Dress $340

Babellini Skirt $180

Surfari Midi Dress $370

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IT’S THE EMOTIONAL VALUE, NOT THE DOLLAR VALUE, THAT’S IMPORTANT.

MAKING IT PERSONAL

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PROMOTION

For JBD’s Business Manager Bevan Hill and Design Manager Angelo Catalano, there is no sweeter reward than helping their customers design and create the perfect piece. The team at JBD has recently shaved weeks off the process of designing and manufacturing custom pieces of jewellery, by increasing their in-house team. Angelo says the process always begins with the customer and their own dream design. “Usually people will show us their ideas and then it’s our job here to expand on that,” he says. “I might translate their initial concept into a couple of old-fashioned sketches, so they can then pick and choose whatever one they’d like to make their piece. “From there, our jewellers will create a 3D image so we can show people our designs on the computer, and now – if the customer really wants to touch it and feel it - we can print the design into a plastic, so they can see where the stones go in and how it feels,” says Angelo. “At this point, they usually get pretty excited because they can see how it all sits together, and then they trust me to make the best piece for them.” Bevan, Angelo and the team always hope their custom pieces will be passed through generations of clients; and they treat their customers’ sentimental jewellery with the same love and respect. Bevan says the JBD team is honoured when asked to restore or redesign family heirlooms. “When you see that kind of jewellery, it’s the emotional value, not the dollar value, that’s important,” he says.

“Generally there are two options with those kinds of heirloom pieces - we can restore the item for occasional wear; or, if you want to wear it every day, it might be time for us to remodel or redesign it. If you want it to be redesigned exactly as it was, Angelo and the team can do that.” A big part of ensuring your jewellery is kept in good condition, is having it regularly inspected for signs of wear and tear. “Jewellery is just like a car in that we need to service your pieces regularly to keep them in good condition,” Bevan says. “Many people put their jewellery on and never take it off, but if they just visit us in-store once a month, we can inspect their items and advise them of any little concerns before they become a problem.” That is the ethos that the JBD team tries to instil in all their clients – that once they’ve purchased a piece, they are part of the JBD family for life. “Our dream is that when anybody thinks of jewellery – whether it’s a custom design, restoration, watch repair, or a quick gift – they think Jewellery By Design,” says Angelo. “We want to see our customers, more than less.” Castletown www.jbd.net.au

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Lele Sadoughi X Stoney Clover Lane Headbands from $71 Case with Mirror from $113 www.lelesadoughi.com

Briony Marsh The Karina Dress $495 www.st-barts.com.au


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STYLE

some things i love 4.

8.

11.

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2.

I’m Kelly Isaac, hairdresser, entrepreneur, loving wife and Mum of three beautiful children. This year we celebrate 15 years in business at Podium Hair. I’m incredibly proud of what our team has achieved. When not playing mum, my closest friend and I host, Her Success on Purpose. We’re passionate about bringing women together to take control of their wellbeing and financial independence. There is nothing more rewarding than empowering others to achieve their dream life.

1. My favourite destination An ocean location. Bora Bora or the Maldives, over the water bungalow. 2. The drink I love I do like Belvedere Vodka and when a good night kicks on I always go to the espresso martini. 3. A fashion designer whose style suits me is... I don’t have a favourite designer. I’m all for shopping local and supporting our local boutique stores. We wear a uniform to work which makes dressing during the week easy. 4. My favourite shoes I always invest in good quality shoes, after all our feet carry us everywhere, right? I do admire a gorgeous pair of stiletto heels.

5. Most treasured possession? My pearl ring from my husband. I don’t wear it that much, only for special occasions but it’s something that I treasure. 6. A music genre I love I enjoy most kinds of music, however, if I had to choose it would be the ‘80s. All good things came from the ‘80s, haha including me. 7. A movie that affected me... I love romance but also enjoy empowering films as well. Dirty Dancing was a favourite growing up, and Gladiator gives all the emotions, but I love the strength and power of the movie. 8. A car that I wish I owned? I do like black cars, and once the kids are out, I would like to own a Mercedes-Benz GLE. 9. If I wore a hat, this is it… I only wear two styles of hats, a visor for exercise, and when out watching our son play soccer, a knit Panama hat. 10. The lingerie label I love is… Depends on the occasion... I like all kinds of lingerie, and I have a different style for all times. 11. My favourite perfume is… Coco Mademoiselle Chanel. It was my wedding perfume and every time I wear it I get complimented.

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5 minutes with...

clockwise above: Lissa Thomson Cherrone Fuller Brittany Maloney Sarah Bulfin

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INTERVIEW

5 minutes with... the Donohues team

Lissa Thomson

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Cherrone Fuller

Sarah Bulfin

Brittany Maloney

Lissa Thomson A funny thing that happened to me was… Working on Hayman Island, I was on a site visit with a bride who asked if I could arrange to bottle every shade of blue from the ocean for her. While trying not to burst out laughing, I left it to my colleague to explain that water isn’t actually blue! Your favourite or dream destination? Croatia. My grandparents live there. I’d love to them to meet my partner and daughter and do some exploring! If you changed your name, what would it be? I hate how my name is spelt because I’m always saying I’m Lissa with 2 S’s, Thomson with no P. Maybe I would just change it to Lisa Thompson. Most embarrassing moment from high school? Year 8 Art I always tried to stay under the radar but one day the boys were putting ‘Kick Me’ signs on each other’s backs. One sign fell on the floor so the teacher picked it up and, trying to get in on the fun, put it on my back. Being an awkward pubescent teen, my reaction didn’t go as well as he hoped and I ran out of the room crying.

Cherrone Fuller What’s one thing that surprises people about you: I come across quite confident in myself, but I am actually uncomfortable in front of big groups of people. I have a tattoo on my foot that sums me up perfectly: I’m strong in the outside, not all the way through. What’s your hidden talent: I manage to make what I call ‘toilet friends’ whenever I go out. The ladies us girls meet in the toilets while waiting in lineup haha. A funny thing that happened to me: I was in a pub in Ravenswood and the girls on shift had a rather big night and were a little under the weather. I jumped behind the bar and kept the place going for the day while they caught up on some much-needed sleep. A veteran bikie group came through that day and complimented me on doing such a great job! If you had to change your name, what would it be? And why would you choose it? Sarah! With a name like mine, I use Sarah quite regularly when ordering food/drinks etc. otherwise I’m forever spelling and pronouncing it.

Sarah Bulfin What was your first job? My first job was at an abattoir as a NILS operator, which is removing and scanning the ear tags to identify where that particular animal comes from. What’s one thing about you that surprises people? I come across as a really self-confident, outgoing person. But I actually suffer from anxiety and panic attacks. I recently came out to my workplace peers about this as it was getting too hard to hide and not many of them had any idea of what was going on inside. What’s your hidden talent? I can win ANY argument with Telstra and Optus. A funny thing that happened to me: When I was about 13, I was riding a moped around our front yard. I went to reach for the brake but my hand slipped and I ended up accelerating so hard that it went airborne, throwing me up and landing on top of me. My 70-year-old neighbour had to come to get it off of me while I laid there stuck... I also once asked for a crumbed steak at a schnitzel house! What is your most embarrassing moment from high school? I find it embarrassing that during high school, I felt the need to look like the tough chick so that I didn’t get picked on for being the chick with freckles and red hair.

Brittany Maloney What’s one thing about you that surprises people? I have a pet snake. A lot of people don’t like snakes so when I mention that I have a pet snake, they are pretty shocked. What’s your hidden talent? I’m not super talented but if you need ‘Mary Had A Little Lamb’ played on the violin, I’m your girl. Have you met anyone famous? The Nitro Circus crew. In 2017 my partner and I went to the show in Townsville and ran into some friends that had backstage tickets and snuck us into the change rooms and we got to meet them. A funny thing that happened to me was… When I went to Bali on a family holiday, I ended up falling off the sidewalk and rolling one of my ankles. It was so swollen, and I couldn’t walk, so I spent most of the time at the beach bar. Lucky Bintang is so cheap, or it would’ve been a crap holiday. What is your most embarrassing moment from high school? The weekend before I started high school, a friend and I had spent the weekend at Tinaroo Dam skiing and tubing out in the boat all weekend. We obviously hadn’t put enough sunscreen on and got super sunburnt so I started Year 8 looking like a tomato. My lips had blisters and I remember it taking so long to go down.

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Heatley Secondary College Our Future is Our Focus

Townsville | Queensland | Australia


Heatley Secondary College Executive Team - Murray James Principal; Janine Cooke Deputy Principal; Gwen Nowak Deputy Principal; Paula Adams-Thompson Deputy Principal

Welcome Exciting times for the College are ahead, with work commencing on $12 million dollars’ worth of upgrades.

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hanks to Queensland Government’s ‘Renewing Our Schools’ funding, Heatley Secondary College, established in 1968, is currently undergoing significant facilities improvements that will enable the College to deliver our diverse and distinctive programs in a world class learning environment. By the end of 2020, a long list of works will be completed, ready for the 2021 school year. Key among these is a new Performing Arts Centre that will allow a renewed focus on the Arts. Another initiative in 2020 is the introduction of the Heatley Pride Sports Academy, with students able to take part in rugby league, soccer, volleyball and general fitness academies. These additions, together with the already cutting-edge Townsville Creative Technologies Centre, will give the College enhanced capacity to deliver outstanding training for 21st-century careers. Enjoy this feature, further detailing the diversity of pathways and programs to engage our students as learners and enhance their sense of belonging. Murray James Principal

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tctc

Townsville Creative Technologies Centre

Through the Townsville Creative Technologies Centre, Heatley Secondary College is directly addressing 21st-century skills shortages in the rapidly growing Australian freelance/gig economy.


Opened on July 25, 2011, the TCTC runs top-notch software and hardware systems, including an extensive multi-track recording studio. Enrolments close at the end of February.

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nique in North Queensland, the Townsville Creative Technologies Centre (TCTC) offers Vocational Education and Training qualification courses supporting careers in game design, 2D and 3D animation, digital photography, film and video, graphic design and digital audio and music production. Current and post-graduate students from all regional independent, Catholic Education and state high schools access the specialised training courses and day and evening delivery options are available. “We have students ranging from 16 to 60-something, so that’s a satisfying part of what we do,” says TCTC Head of Department, Bjarne Ohlin. “TCTC is an opportunity for people to value-add to their skills.” Since opening in 2011, more than 600 students have graduated with a Certificate II or III qualification, with many students completing more than one course. The TCTC is a purpose-built training facility of nearly 600 square metres, running industry-standard software and hardware systems. “Course outcomes merge seamlessly with freelance work opportunities or further study,” says Bjarne. Training partnerships have been developed with JCU Townsville Fire, Townsville Basketball and international sports broadcasting service NEP, providing direct access to employment opportunities for students such as 2019 Heatley Secondary College and TCTC graduate, Zac Walker.”

Visionary

Zac working alongside NRL legend Darren Lockyer

Zac on the job at the Cairns Basketball Stadium the day after he graduated!

Course outcomes merge seamlessly with freelance work opportunities or further study.

TCTC students work on projects that build the digital skills required in current and emerging creative industries.

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ac Walker graduated from the TCTC last year with a Certificate III in Music Industry. During his time at TCTC, Zac participated in the sports broadcast training program with TCTC industry partners Townsville Basketball, JCU Townsville Fire, NEP/Fox Sports and the NQ Cowboys. The 2019 V8 Supercars also invited Zac to assist at the event in July.

“Studying at TCTC has given me access to industry-standard training, equipment and software that you just can’t get anywhere else,” Zac says.

Living the Dream

“At 17, I’m the youngest person to be given the title of Head Audio Tech at the Cairns Basketball Stadium. “And I also really enjoyed the opportunity TCTC gave me to bounce ideas off other creatives.” Already well on his way to Industry-ready Graduates becoming a freelance professional Since graduating from TCTC, specialising in live broadcast 17-year-old Zac has been flown camera and audio systems regularly to Cairns by international management, Zac couldn’t be sports broadcasters IMG/NEP happier. to assist their crew with NBL “The sporting industry is fun to game broadcasts from the Cairns work in, and it’s a bonus that I also Basketball Stadium. play all of the sports I cover!”

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Developments

Performing F Arts Centre Students with their sights set on a career in the Arts will soon be able to hone their craft in a purpose-built facility.

rom the start of 2021, Heatley Secondary College will have its own Performing Arts Centre. The performing arts hub will include a music classroom plus four rehearsal/practice rooms, a media lab/classroom, recording studio and learning space, drama classroom, dance studio, theatre and sound stage with dressing rooms and a props/scenery store that will all connect to an outdoor stage area.

Connecting Community NIDA graduate and Head of The Arts Department, Bjarne Ohlin, says the Performing Arts Centre

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Rehearsal, performance and recording spaces accessible to the community

Purpose-built facility to showcase artistic programs

Dance joins the HSC performance line-up for the first time

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The Performing Arts Centre will add another learning stream that will boost school engagement and foster belonging.

will not only provide Heatley Secondary College (HSC) students with high-level learning and performance facilities in Dance, Drama and Music but also the Townsville community with muchneeded rehearsal, performance, recording and production spaces. The theatre/sound stage and recording studio will enable the establishment of a valuable community partnership which allows students to be involved in an incubator program where they will act as house engineers and technical assistants supporting the venue hire program. Another aspiration for the new space is to establish a community radio station. Broadcasting beyond

the school grounds, the station would provide an opportunity to connect with the community. “Our aim is to have recording artists come in so students are able to tap into their expertise,” says Heatley Secondary College Principal Murray James. “To have visiting artists of the calibre of Busby Marou, for example, would be a wonderful opportunity for our learners.” “Likewise, having a purposebuilt facility where the school can showcase our Arts programs to students’ families and our industry partners is an exciting prospect.”

Constructing the Performing Arts Centre creates a new set of opportunities for our leaners to diversify. Our artistic students will have the arts hub to connect to, our sports students will be able to attach to the new sports academies and students attracted to digital technologies have the Townsville Creative Technologies Centre.” Murray James, Principal

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State-wide competitions set to build confidence Academy students will have the opportunity to compete in a number of carnivals across Queensland.

Sports Academy programs will develop physical fitness, sports psychology, sports nutrition and skills while undertaking sports they enjoy.

Heatley Secondary College HPE teacher/Rugby League Academy Coach Krys Freeman and his colleagues excited about delivering a wide range of sporting programs to students.

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hanks to the new Heatley Pride Sports Academy, Heatley Secondary College students will be able to choose from a range of sports programs including Football (Soccer), Rugby League, Volleyball and a General Academy for students to develop their physical fitness. “Our aim is to give passionate sporting students the opportunity to engage in something they love and improve their performance in their chosen sport,” says Heatley HPE teacher Krys Freeman, who also plays dummy half or lock for the Mendi Blackhawks. “Sport provides students with the skills that transfer to all parts of their lives. They learn about commitment, hard work, resilience and the importance of belonging to and working

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We’re going to give students all the necessary skills to take their careers as far as they want to.

Heatley Secondary College · Our Future is Our Focus

Krys brings his experience playing dummy half and lock for the Mendi Blackhawks to his teaching role.

as a team. We’re going to give students all the necessary skills to take their careers as far as they want to. ”

will be the Matthew Bowen 9s,” Krys says. “From there we’ll be competing in competitions all across Queensland.”

Healthy Competition

Expert Coaches

Students will also have the opportunity to compete in a number of sporting carnivals. “One of the first to get us started in the Rugby League program

Krys came to Townsville and the Mendi Blackhawks from another Queensland Cup club, the Central Queensland Capras, three years ago. “We’ve done well over the past few years – we’ve made the finals since we started as a club,” Krys says. “I’m proud to be part of a really successful team with a great culture.” As part of the Heatley Pride Sports Academy, students will have access to state and national scouts and talent development groups. Krys will be part of an expert coaching team that will develop students sporting potential.

Photo Alix Sweeney

The Heatley Pride Sports Academy kicks off in Term 1, enabling students in Years 7 through 12 to realise their sporting potential.

Photo Blackhawks Media

Sports Academy


Bring on the 21st Century The College offers a range of industrystandard programs so students can take advantage of the freelance/gig economy.

Creating a career

Secondary College Offering a traditional high school as well as an Adult Learning Centre and the Townsville Creative Technologies Centre, Heatley Secondary College caters for a diverse array of learners.

H A wide range of hands-on activities keeps students engaged in learning.

eatley Secondary College (HSC) is dedicated to helping students prepare for the 21st-century. “We offer a range of programs to ensure our students are well-preprared for their future,” says Heatley Secondary College Principal Murray James. “These learners will have many more jobs throughout their lifetime than someone of my era and we are preparing them to take advantage of that fact.”

HSC continues to achieve outstanding academic results and adds to its vocational line-up of programs every year. “We have a new Certificate III in Fitness and are currently building a catering block that will enable us to deliver a Certificate II or III in Hospitality,” Principal James says. “Many students will study for an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR), ready for university, while others will choose a pathway that prepares them to enter the workforce directly. “We are committed to ensuring

Adult Learning Centre Heatley’s Adult Learning Centre offers people of all ages a second chance to complete their schooling.

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he Heatley Adult Learning Centre offers a range of Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority subjects to support adult learners to gain access to university, the Defence force, the public service or gain job advancement. Students can attain their Senior qualifications within a

year rather than completing the traditional Year 11 and 12. Careerchangers are able to undertake university prerequisite subjects to broaden their horizons, and those keen to pick up a particular subject, such as nurses needing Chemistry for their Midwifery course, can do so too.

Making it Happen The Adult Learning Centre produces many success stories,

they all succeed, including our mature-age students who are making the most of the many programs offered by our Adult Learning Centre and the Townsville Creative Technologies Centre.” As a College we provide a safe, welcoming and inclusive environment that empowers students to excel as the leaders of tomorrow. We develop a community of compassionate, resilient and proud learners that embrace diversity and are responsible and active global citizens.

The Adult Learning Centre offers day and night classes for Year 10 to 12 studies.

including a single mum who completed five subjects to attain her Queensland Certificate of Education and is now at university studying to be a teacher. In addition to Year 12 completion, the Adult Learning Centre also caters for those students requiring an alternate pathway to completing their Year 10 studies. The Adult Learning Centre caters for learners aged 14 or 15 years to mature age.

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The Townsville secondary school delegation is one of only two Australian delegations to make the trip to Shanghai for a mock United Nations conference this January.

World view

International Connections A secondary school delegation from Townsville is headed to Shanghai for a mock United Nations conference.

Mock United Nations Conference Heatley Secondary College CISSMUN students Madison Campbell and Ross-Leigh McIntosh, along with Head of Teaching and Learning & International Education, Rachael Pearson, are headed overseas this January. Together they will travel to Shanghai as part of a Townsville secondary school delegation to participate in the Concordia International School’s Mock United Nations Conference (CISSMUN). The trio will join representatives from Pimlico, Kirwan and William Ross State High Schools. The aim of a mock United Nations conference is to emulate the processes of the real UN, so each delegation will take on the role of a nation.

The Townsville delegation has been assigned to Chile and must consider this country’s values as they debate world issues. Upon their return to school for 2020, the students will host their own mock United Nations conference for Townsville students.

Heatley Secondary College representative Gabrielle Wright (left) at the 2019 CISSMUN.

Global Citizenship

Homestay Program

Heatley Secondary AWARDED College has recently been awarded provisional accreditation with Department of Education International (DEi) and aims to build international mindedness and global citizenship at the College through engaging with and hosting international students from around the world.

Are you interested in HOSTING hosting an international student? Heatley Secondary College is seeking host families to take in international students. If you are interested or would like more information, please contact International Homestay Coordinator Meagan Wood by calling 4726 8333 or emailing mhami0@eq.edu.au.

How to change your future: heatleysc.eq.edu.au Use these contact details to find out more about Heatley Secondary College courses and enrolment including the Adult learning Centre and Townsville Creative Technologies Centre.

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Heatley Secondary College · Our Future is Our Focus

www.facebook.com/HeatleySecondaryCollege/ Heatley Secondary College Corner Fulham Road & Hanlon Street, Heatley Phone 4726 8333 admin@heatleysc.eq.edu.au


Coralee O’Rourke MP Member for Mundingburra

Working with our Community Mundingburra Electorate Office Shop 3/198 Nathan Street Aitkenvale Qld 4814 Phone: 4766 8100 Email: Mundingburra@parliament.qld.gov.au Authorised by S. Fabbro, Shop 3/198 Nathan Street Aitkenvale


PROMOTION

Count On Us The team at Chappel Accounting are dedicated to helping clients take their businesses from strength to strength.

From operating as a sole trader to managing a threepartner business, Mary Anne Chappel of Chappel Accounting knows how to help other businesses thrive too. For the first five years of Chappel Accounting’s 22-year history, Mary Anne worked from home. “I started out in 1997 as a sole trader after working with one of the bigger chartered firms in Townsville,” Mary Anne recalls. “In 2002, I moved the business into commercial offices so that I could take on a bookkeeper and administration staff. Then we restructured into a corporate entity in 2014 before moving to our current premises at Industry Park in Mount Louisa in 2016.” “I enjoy being able to help people understand their business and the success and growth that can be achieved,” Mary Anne says.

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above: Sally Williams Jeff Pringle Mary Anne Chappel


left: Sally Williams Mary Anne Chappel Jeff Pringle Adeline Wong Kylie Anidjar

Jeff agrees: “Some accountants won’t return your phone calls or reply to your emails and only contact you when they want your work in or they have bad news. With my clients I am in regular contact checking how they are going, what’s happening with their family, talking about their business and what’s the next step.” Mary Anne and her team love having a small boutique accounting firm where they can assist clients’ needs as they arise. “We have a genuine interest in our clients’ operations, and it’s part of our role as their trusted advisor that we are honest with them particularly when dealing with the good, bad and ugly of being in business,” she says. “Not everyone has all of the skills required to run a business, so we help out with many aspects of the client’s progression through their business activities.”

right: Maureen Watkin Hanna Burton Vanessa Cooper Kylie Anidjar Adeline Wong

This includes assisting families to transition their business structures through the generations. “We offer a range of services from business set-ups and day-to-day bookkeeping, budgeting, cashflows and forecasting, through to updating business structures, and taxation and capital gains advice.” While Mary Anne has always been the principal accountant and owner, today she has a team of eight supporting her. Sally Williams, who has been Mary Anne’s Business & Finance Manager for the past six years, has now completed her accounting and public practice qualifications and has accepted an appointment as a director of the company. Having also accepted an equity position in the company, Jeff Pringle came on board in January and brought with him over 19 years of experience and a fresh perspective. Jeff has always dreamed of being an accountant with his own practice.

“No-one likes deaths and taxes, but it’s an important part of our society,” Mary Anne adds. “Estate and succession planning are both aspects that need to be addressed in our personal and business lives.” Mary Anne understands this firsthand as she’s been handing over some responsibilities in the lead-up to retirement. “Our main goal over the next five years is to ensure our clients are comfortable with our firm as I ease slowly into retirement,” she says. “Now our firm has three partners, and we are working together with a broad scope of experience to take our firm confidently into the future.”

“We are happy to include him and help him realise his dream,” Mary Anne says. “We’ve also had the privilege of Kylie Anidjar and Adeline Wong joining our team as Senior Accountants and now have over 85 years of collective experience. The wealth of knowledge and expertise we have available to our clients is varied and vast. Knowing our clients have the ability to pick up the phone and talk to anyone of us can make all the difference.”

Chappel Accounting Pty Ltd Unit 2, 547 Industry Park 547 Woolcock Street Mount Louisa 4789 4770 www.chappelaccounting.com.au

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Presented by Accounting & Super

Karen Quagliata Director The name, ‘Accounting and Super’ defines exactly what we do. Our firm is boutique style, meaning we only deal in a specific space, and that is small to medium enterprise and self-managed superannuation.

We are a highly experienced team of accountants and aim to deliver quality, personalised service to our clients. Accounting & Super Townsville Office Level 1, Suite 3, 54 Denham Street Ayr Office 132A Young Street www.accountingandsuper.com

We are protecting our income. It is just another expense, so why should we bother?

Insurance is just one of those things. If you have it, you may feel it’s a waste as it’s unlikely you will ever make a claim, but if you don’t have it, you wish you did when an unfortunate event occurs. As any financial, taxation or insurance professional would say, it is always in your best interest to consider protecting yourself from as much risk as possible. Most of us insure our health, our vehicles, our boats, our pets, and our houses (despite the excessive costs), but should we be insuring our income? More the question, why would we not insure our income? You never know what is around the corner, so the best course of action is to plan. Especially where you have debt, dependants, and little to no surplus cash set aside for a rainy day, you have even more reason to review your situation and consider income protection insurance. This type of insurance, in the event of a claim, provides monthly income regularly while you are unable to work due to an accident or illness. Income protection is one of the few personal insurances that you can generally declare as a personal tax deduction.

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Meaning it is an expense you can claim to offset against your assessable income, which in turn reduces your taxable income, and overall tax payable amount. However, if you paid your income protection insurance via your superannuation fund, you are unable to claim this amount as a tax deduction personally (the fund has this luxury instead). There are other aspects of consideration for this type of insurance inside or outside superannuation. Income protection policies usually provide a comprehensive cover, including additional features that the policy inside super may not offer. Superannuation held policies, because they are an expense to your fund, reduce your member balances frequently, and usually restricted to the option of indemnity with limited optional extras. Policies outside of super can also be based on the income of the individual at the time of the application. In the event of a claim, the payment is assessed on that income. It is especially helpful if that person’s income had reduced at the time of the claim.

So check your policy. Talk to your advisor or insurance company directly. Know what you cover you have, and what you don’t. It also doesn’t hurt to seek a second opinion and check whether it is more appropriate to have this protection outside versus inside superannuation. It is better to be on the safe side. It might cost a bit more in the long run, but if and when you face an adverse situation, and your income earning capacity is affected, you will be glad you had a policy in place, for that rainy day. Just like this city of ours might be ‘Brownsville’ now, I can guarantee, it will rain. I just don’t know when!

DISCLAIMER: The information provided is general advice only. We have not considered your financial circumstances, needs or objectives and you should seek the assistance of a qualified advisor before you make any decision regarding any products mentioned. Whilst all care has been taken in the preparation of this material, no warranty is given in respect of the information provided and accordingly Accounting & Super Pty Ltd employees or agents shall not be liable on any ground whatsoever with respect to decisions or actions taken as a result of you acting upon such information.


Presented by Fresh New Media

Scott Morrison As the CEO and Creative Director of the branding agency Fresh New Media and the Owner and Publisher of DUO Magazine, Scott has expertise in strategy development and in producing effective and innovative marketing solutions for many North Queensland companies and organisations.

Fresh New Media has managed the advertising and marketing for many major local businesses including car dealerships, property developers, charities, real estate, shopping centres and hospitality. Fresh New Media 0418 746 470 www.freshnewmedia.com.au

Logo vs Branding. What’s the difference and why you need both.

Over the years of working with local businesses, I’ve created many logos but much more goes into the final result than you probably see at first viewing. When appointed to the job, my mind is always considering and evaluating a wide range of influences and potential outcomes. It requires research, pressure, analysis and mental visualisation. The logo must be unique, innovative, and reflect the brand’s identity (later). It must be professional. It must differentiate the client’s business from the competition. But creating the logo is just the first step in the total branding solution the client, and I want to achieve for the company. What is a logo design? The logo is the easily recognisable graphic symbol that identifies your company and distinguishes your brand as it competes with all the visual elements that attract our attention every day. It’s usually the first thing people see that identifies your business, and it’s the one that helps them remember it. Your logo is what most people will know because you will use it on all of your marketing materials, website, signage and advertising. The goal, when I design a logo, is to create a positive emotional connection in the viewer with the business.

What is branding? Branding is the image people have in mind when they think about your business, in both a practical and emotional way. It’s the combination of all the tangible and intangible aspects that represent your business or organisation. It’s also the combination of physical and emotional cues triggered by all the touchpoints between a person and a specific brand. These can be the brand name, logo, products, visual identity, staff, or advertising – amongst others. Like many thriving local businesses have shown, a well-designed logo combined with an effective branding strategy will help your business effectively reach your customers while also creating a unique, relationship building brand. If you’re a business owner or manager looking to build a new brand and increase awareness, don’t underestimate the importance of a well-designed logo aligned to your overall branding strategy. It will be an investment for your brand and organisation that will reward you now and in the long term.

Next Issue: What’s In A Name? And why you should never use a TLA.

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Presented by Clarity Hearing + Balance

A World With Bluetooth New hearing devices connect you direct to a world of services, including Siri Bluetooth, whether we like to admit it or not, has become a very common, almost essential part of our day to day lives. This also extends to hearing aid users. It is almost standard now for most hearing aids to have Bluetooth capability in them, including entry-level devices fully subsidised through the Government Hearing Services Program or from around $845 per ear those without a pension card. These devices not only assist being able to hear much clearer on the phone without the need for any neck loops or clips, but they have a lot of additional functions to not only assist with day to day hearing but also make access to your phone more accessible. A great example is that you can now use Siri or Google to give voice commands to your phone such as requesting to dial a certain contact in your phone, they will be phoned without the need for dialling and be heard as clearly as possible direct to the hearing aids. This is perfect for those patients with poor dexterity who cannot manage to dial. Android and iPhone also have a voice to text function, which allows the speech of the person talking to you on the phone to come up on your phone screen as text if you have trouble hearing. Another voice activated function available is google maps which can we used to find a location and use the direct streaming of your hearing aids to tell you where to go, so if you want to go to the library all you need to say to your phone is “hey google direct me to the nearest library” and you will be directed straight there with voice commands. Let’s say you are travelling overseas and having navigated your way around the streets with google maps guiding

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you through your hearing aids and you want to order lunch and do not speak the native language. This is not a problem, just use google or other translate apps on your phone and your phone or hearing aid microphone will pick up the foreign voice and translate it to you direct to your hearing aids in very close to real time! Done a bit of walking and wondering how many steps you have taken? Well rest assured your hearing aids now have biofeedback functions which can track your steps more accurately then any fit bit, due to the location of the accelerometer on the head it is accurately able to distinguish between walking, running, cycling and any other linear motion. They can also measure your temperature and heart rate very accurately and should you

have a fall they can detect a falling motion and send a text alert to a nominated person to advise you have had a fall. Been a long day, you have taken off your hearing aids and can’t remember where you put them? No problem, all direct to smart phone hearing aids have a ‘find my hearing aid’ function, allowing you to use google maps to locate and pinpoint exactly where your hearing aid is and guide you to where their location. The possibilities that have been created through this direct to smart phone hearing aid technology really does mean the world is now your oyster by opening up a world of auditory functionality to all those hard of hearing, not to mention finally making hearing aids a hip accessory to have!

Grant Collins Principal Audiologist/Owner Grant is a passionate and tireless advocate for ethical and evidence-based hearing health assessment and treatment. Grant and his wife Sara started Clarity in 2008 in north Queensland and have now grown it to 35 clinics throughout the state. Clarity

prides itself on ensuring you get the right, expert diagnosis and the best advice and recommendations to suit your hearing loss, lifestyle and budget. Clarity Hearing + Balance Call 1300 clarity (1300 252 748) www.clarityhearingsolutions.com.au


For more than just hearing loss Local specialised audiology expertise Thousands of Queenslanders have trusted Clarity for the best advice and treatment options for hearing loss. When it comes to complex audiology conditions, Clarity are also the trusted local experts.

Talk to Clarity about:

Clarity offers a complete range of specialist expertise right here in Mackay and Townsville. Seeing you specialist locally provides you with a better health outcome sooner.

+ Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)

If you have any concerns, from hearing loss to more complex audiological issues, contact Clarity today.

+ Vestibular Migraine + Balance/Vestibular Disorders + MÊniere’s Disease

Call 1300 CLARITY or Mackay 4957 2000 Townsville 4779 1566 Clinics also in: Ayr | Bowen | Charters Towers Collinsville | Hughenden | Ingham | Mt Isa | Proserpine Richmond | Sarina and more

+ Tinnitus + Hearing Implant Technology + Central Auditory Processing Disorders + Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss + Industrial Deafness

Independent Hearing Loss Experts and Audiology Specialists

www.clarityhearingsolutions.com.au


PROMOTION

Caring for Communities Owner-operator of the Fairfield Central and Townsville Central Medical Practices, Dr Michael Clements is also committed to rural care. He has travelled the world and lived in many locations with the Royal Australian Air Force, but when Dr Clements and his wife discovered Townsville, they knew it’s where they wanted to settle down. “We set up the practices to support the Townsville community but also to serve as a base for running rural and remote clinics in underserved populations,” Dr Clements says. “From the very start of the first practice, one of the goals was to venture out to the rural clinics and communities to provide visiting services, and we’ve been able to achieve that.” Dr Clements and his team conduct the rural and remote medical clinics to North West Queensland under newly created entity NQ Aeromedical Services. His other roles include Deputy Chair of Northern Australia Primary Health Ltd and Deputy Chair of the RACGP Rural Council. The Fairfield and Townsville Central Medical Practices offer the full range of traditional GP services.

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These include everything from pregnancy and newborn immunisations, to skin cancer checks, WorkCover consultations, and mental health and palliative care. “Being a veteran myself, both our practices have a particular focus on providing veterans with assistance in navigating the DVA minefield of paperwork and resettlement into their new civilian life,” Dr Clements says. “Every interaction with every staff member is important, and our staff make the extra effort to get to know the patients and assist them with their needs as they navigate the health system. We make the process as smooth as possible by using everything from online appointments and repeat script/referral requests, to text reminders and results. “Both practices use the same doctors, same front office staff and the same database so patients can seamlessly use both services as appointment availability changes.” While the floods were tough on the Fairfield Central


right: Simone Ryan (Practice Manager) Dr Sadheesh Rathnayake Dr Michael Clements Diane Robertson Meredith Ward

Medical Practice, they were committed from the start to re-open, ready to serve the locals in Idalia. “We were overwhelmed by the community support and enthusiasm as a patient after patient would pop into the practice just to say hi and thanks for opening,� Dr Clements says. “My first few days of consults were filled with patients coming to check on me and how I was doing, which was quite the turnaround from how my consults normally go!� The Fairfield Central and Townsville Central Medical Practices are also committed to training the future generations of health staff, including medical students, physician assistants and junior doctors. “We want to be known for the quality of our practitioners and our care, particularly in chronic disease management and veteran’s health,� Dr Clements says. “We understand that the patient experience starts from the point of booking all the way through to how you receive your results and we’re committed to quality care throughout.�

above: Simone Ryan (Practice Manager), Maggie Davey, Emily Vagulans, Dr Jessica Eltherington, Dr Olaf RusokeDierich, Dr Michael Clements, Shannon Clements, Jolene Bonehill opposite page: Dr Clements and his team conduct rural and remote medical clinics to North West Queensland with NQ Aeromedical Services; Dr Michael Clements and Shannon Clements; Dr Michael Khong

 Fairfield Central Medical Practice Fairfield Central Shopping Centre 2-30 Lakeside Drive, Idalia 4778 2211 www.fcmedical.com.au

Townsville Central Medical Practice City Arcade 385 Flinders Street, Townsville 4447 1700 www.tcmedical.com.au

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HEALTH

MY NEW NORMAL BY NINE NEWS TOWNSVILLE REPORTER LILY GREER

MORE THAN 80,000 AUSTRALIANS ARE LIVING WITH CROHN’S DISEASE – A CHRONIC ILLNESS THAT AFFECTS THE BOWEL. AMONG THEM ARE NEWS REPORTER LILY GREER. THIS IS HER STORY.

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As I waited in the day surgery clinic to ‘go under’ for testing that would reveal the cause of my crippling stomach pain, a brief phone call from one of my bosses. “You’ve got the Nine News Townsville job if you want it.” Words that made me turn to my mum and smile, taking my mind off the imminent procedure. Words that also added a lot of weight to the diagnosis I was to receive a few hours later. It was June and the last six months had been spent working for Nine News in Darwin, a fantastic interstate work stint marred by a mystery illness GPs couldn’t seem to help with. After weight-loss and some difficult days working in a deadline-driven environment, I decided to phone home. My Brisbane GP set in motion a week of testing and appointments with specialists that would see me diagnosed with an incurable chronic disease. All this unfolded on the same day I was offered a job I so wanted to take on. Crohn’s Disease isn’t pretty. In fact, I preface most conversations with a ‘too much information’ warning label. A doctor once said to me, it’s like gravel rash in your gut and that’s certainly what it feels like. Crohn’s is an inflammatory bowel disease that causes your body to punish you when

you eat certain foods like vegetables, fruits and nuts. Alcohol, coffee and stress can also exacerbate the pain. This was not great news for a coffee-drinking, vegetarian journalist who loves wine at the end of the working week. Crohn’s Disease presents differently in different people. It can depend on age and health, for instance. For me, it involved bursts of intense abdominal pain that would render me useless at work and would see me stay in bed for entire weekends. Anything bigger than a biscuit or half a piece of Vegemite toast could send me spiralling. I’d been enduring a Crohn’s flare-up for months, without seeking help. That was because I was scared a diagnosis might reveal something even more sinister. I’d lost a lot of weight and was tired, all the time. Little did I know, the move to North Queensland would be the catalyst for my recovery. A local gastroenterologist took me on as a patient. I adore her. She worked with me to find a medication that worked, and she arranged a series of drug infusions that would help me feel the best I’d felt in months. The day surgery that administers the infusions is right next door to where I work. It couldn’t be more convenient. From my dietician and the nurses at the day surgery to the ladies who take my

blood each week, I’ve been truly amazed by the expertise and the kindness of Townsville’s health professionals. It’s too early to say definitively but I believe I’m on my way to a period of Crohn’s remission. It’s new territory for me, having to closely monitor my health. It’s also an experience that has opened my eyes to what it’s like being a young working woman, hungry to kick goals while being chronically ill. Everything I have experienced so far has made me think about other women who, publicly or privately, are living with similar balancing acts; juggling chronic diseases like endometriosis or diabetes with the demands of work. When you’re learning how to manage an illness while navigating a new job in a new city, it makes a world of difference to have doctors who are invested in your recovery, and an employer like Nine Regional News that understands your needs. Can I add that while breathing in the ocean air during a walk along The Strand isn’t a prescribed therapy, I know it has helped? Thank you, Townsville. cssanz.org crohnsandcolitis.com.au iconnect.crohnsandcolitis.com.au

I’D BEEN ENDURING A CROHN’S FLARE-UP FOR MONTHS, WITHOUT SEEKING HELP. LILY GREER

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ON ND IN N A EE CK BLE ! S AS BLOAILA ILLE E V V TH W A NS W NO TO

HOME DISCOVERIES

Across Floors has the largest range of Vinyl Plank at the best prices in town.

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At Across Floors we’ve got you covered.

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1. Noritake Hanabi 12 piece dinneware set in fine white porcelain $340 www.noritake.com.au 2. Noritake IVV Speedy tumblers $151 and 3. Noritake IVV Speedy goblets $261, handmade in Italy, giftboxed set of 6 assorted colours www.noritake.com.au 4. Wattyl I.D Advanced Ultra Low VOC interior paint, Space Odyssey, from $71.90 for 4L can. www.wattyl.com.au 5. GlobeWest Gus Margot 3 Seat Sofa $3685 www.globewest.com.au 6. Pantone Limited Edition Journal, Pantone Color of the Year 2020 Classic Blue $14US www.pantone.com 7. OZ Design Furniture Giselle Designer Chair in Lattice Sapphire Fabric $1549 www.ozdesignfurniture.com.au 8. Lilly & Lolly Sailor Wall Clock $79 www.lillyandlolly.com.au 9. GlobeWest Gus Margot 1 Seater Sofa $2300 www.globewest.com.au 10. Georgie Wilson Danger Hydrangea Limited Edition Print from $395 www.georgiewilson.com.au 11. Shakiraaz Homewares Indigo Chevron Pom Pom Throw $110 www.shakiraazhomewares.com.au

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HOME

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Noosa Valley 3 House Noosa Queensland Australia

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Noosa Valley 3 House

Located in the Noosa Hinterland in Doonan, the design of this house is to take in the far-reaching hinterland views across the pool area and outdoor living which allows the owners to enjoy their rural property and the natural setting. Having made a sea change to the Sunshine Coast, the owners have embraced the rural lifestyle of their acreage property and enjoy the privacy achieved through the U-shaped design of the house. This architectural home is set over a single level and uses an arrangement of nooks and levels to create separate areas, while still retaining an effortless inside-outside flow. An abundance of glass, and continuous indoor to outdoor living spaces, keep the space light and open, while the separate master suite and guest bedroom wings afford internal privacy and lush bushland views. A simple white and grey palette throughout provides a sense of calmness to the interior and allows the timber highlights and natural stone entry wall to stand out as features. These elements result in a home which feels like a retreat and enables the occupants to unwind and recharge when they are at home. Noosa Valley 3 House stands out as a statement piece of modernist architecture against the natural backdrop of the rural site. The clean, crisp lines of the timeless architectural style is a signature aesthetic of Sarah Waller Architecture and will suit the clients well into the future. Architect Sarah Waller Architecture

Noosa, Australia Boutique Architectural studio sarahwallerdesign.com.au www.instagram.com/Sarahwallerarchitecture

Photographer Bam Bam Creative www.bam-bam.com.au

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Seen

Jewellery By Design VIP Diamond Extravaganza

Showcasing a Cerrone Jewellers $3million tiara, and exclusive ranges of jewellery, gemstones and rare coloured Argyle diamonds, it was a sparkling night to remember when guests enjoyed canapes and drinks at JBD’s VIP Diamond Extravaganza.

Jewellery By Design Castletown Townsville Sarah Joy Photography

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1. Crystal Vass, Brady Ellis 2. William, Bethany and Colleen Doble 3. John and Jose Fichera, Renae Catalano 4. Paul and Therese Ellems 5. Ourania Paul, Belinda Jennings 6. Ron and Lisa Chang 7. David and Meryline Roderick 8. LInda Rogers, Gailley Burt 9. Rick and Helen Guerra 10. Rob Eckersley, Stan Gibson

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BREAKFAST, LUNCH + DINNER ONLY CLOSED FROM 29 JANUARY UNTIL 13 FEBRUARY. VALENTINE’S DAY BOOKINGS NOW OPEN.

Inspired by fresh, local, seasonal produce PALMER STREE T SOUTH TOWNSVILLE 4721 490 0 BOOK ONLINE AT JAMCORNER .COM. AU


Seen

Busby Marou The Great Divide Tour Kirwan Tavern Townsville Sarah Joy Photography

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Much loved Australian blues and roots band Busby Marou took their new album The Great Divide on the road. They completed their Australian tour in Townsville with a great vibe and turnout. Byron Bay musician Bobby Alu accompanied the pair nationally.

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1. Sharryn and Wayne Sheehy 2. Andrea Bliss, Catherine Frew 3. Tammy Beattie, Cassie King 4. Steven and Catherine Postma 5. Shaun and Ally McLaren 6. Lisa Saxby, Buen Turingan-Adams 7. Faith Matters, Cath Duffy 8. Chris and Danielle Farmer 9. Paul Beri, Krystal Huff 10. Julie Owen, Robyn O’Shea

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Seen

Tiny Mountain Brewery Launch Palmer Street Townsville Sarah Joy Photography

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Tiny Mountain Brewery in Palmer Street launched big with cold beer, good company and good times. Tap room hospitality with a bar, outdoor beer garden, even a games area called the ‘Tiny Arena’ where patrons can play a range of games such as giant jenga and bocce.

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1. Mark Rugg, Sam Lloyd 2. Mark and Naomi Hampton 3. Chris Sheehan, Haydon Morgan 4. David and Sarah Mullins 5. Paul Venturato, Ailleen Greatrex 6. Anthony Armstrong, Patrick Donohue, Chris Haddad 7. Paul Rogash, Adam Keane, Bradley McDonald 8. Cathlene Webb, Dale Novelli 9. Andrew White, Francis Chung 10. Sue Entwistle, Barb Ahern 11. Brent Tate, Katie Brennocks duoma ga zine.com . au

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Seen

The Mayor’s Christmas Tree Appeal All-Stars Concert

The All-Stars Concert presented by The Mayor’s Christmas Tree Appeal, showcased some of the city’s most talented performers in a variety style concert in a cause to promote community resilience. 100% of proceeds purchased Christmas hampers for people doing it tough.

Townsville Civic Theatre Townsville Photography Caitlin Dobson TCC

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8 1. Emily Zarza, Katrina Appleton, Lauren Filbee 2. Brent Lammas , Kevin Wright 3. Hayley McNamara, Shari Lazzaroni, Jarrad Trevorrow 4. David Lee and Toni Jackson-Lee 5. Andrea Shackell, Margaret McPhail 6. Stephen Willdin, Felipe Valini, Ron Malpas 7. Jennifer and Holly Bosworth 8. Bradley and Andrea Mann 9. Elleigh Western, Sam Stewart 64

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Seen

Townsville City Council Carols By Candlelight

Townsville got together and celebrated with song and dance at Carol’s by Candlelight! The end of the year event saw the return of the big top tent to showcase headline act Justine Clarke, the 1RAR Band, local performers and even a special visit from Santa!

Riverway Oval Townsville Photography Caitlin Dobson TCC

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1. Lynda Tamma, Estelle Mooney, Hamish Mooney, Candice Bell 2. Tern Irvine, Ben Golled 3. Brooke and Jamie Hunt, Amelia Onslow 4. Taran Smits, Vanessa Dunbar 5. Sid, Joshua and Jasmine Stafford, Aniara Turama 6. Andrew Foreman, Ruby Butler, Natasha Butler-Foreman 7. Kirsten and Mike Darton 8. Angela and Natalie Bellocchi 9. Tammi Golinelli, Ali Hogue duoma ga zine.com . au

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LAST WORD

For Marni, growing up in the Burdekin was much as you’d expect. Her childhood was spent riding horses; exploring with canine pal, Dino; and staring out the classroom window, dreaming of bigger adventures.

HAULING CANE IS JUST ANOTHER HORSE TO RIDE. MARNI HINE

Marni’s life took its first unexpected turn when she was thrown into the world of modelling. “My sister signed me up to participate in ‘Model of the Eighties’ which was immensely terrifying, and that I somehow managed to win,” says Marni. The win lead Marni to Japan and Hong Kong where she modelled for several years before moving to New York with her boyfriend at the time. There, Marni enrolled at the Parsons School of Design, learning all she could about photography and art, beginning with still life photography. “Later I began assisting fashion photographers, which was a lot faster paced and very exciting, with different kinds of whacky people, all of whom were beautifully talented in their fields.” Still, Marni would make an annual pilgrimage home to the Burdekin to visit family; and she would draw many similarities between the two vastly different places. “New York is similar in that I got to be free and run around in it with some

great people having fun and working hard,” says Marni. “But it is also a great place to be a loner, to develop as an individual in creative ways, also like the Burdekin. There are a lot of very creative and talented people that come from my town and it’s a vital source of community spirit that fosters this development.” In 2010, Marni and her Canadian husband came home to Australia with plans to travel the country in a van. Eventually, they ran out of money and returned to the Burdekin to work another sugar hauling season, before ultimately parting ways. Marni settled back into life in Ayr, driving cane haul-out trucks. “I think that life is generally like horse riding,” she says.

“It can throw you, so the saying ‘you get back up on the horse that threw you’ is absolutely a wise piece of advice. Hauling cane is just another horse to ride. In fact, those trucks can move similarly to riding a horse. You can actually feel the truck undulating from side to side in some cases and it moves your body like a horse does.” Marni had planned to sail to the Caribbean to clean plastic from the ocean, but life decided to throw her another surprise, in the form of her childhood friend, Deb. “I found that this person was magic to be with and I just wanted to be with her, all the time,” says Marni. “So I stole her away from Ayr and we moved to Rita Island with her cats and dog, into an old cottage made for returning soldiers from WWII and I am only just beginning to live happily ever after with another human being.” From the cane fields of the Burdekin to Japan, New York, and back again; Marni says an open mind has helped her stay resilient in the face of her ever-changing set of circumstances. “Unfortunately, the only way to gain wisdom is to confront your individual relationship with fear, pain and avoidance: all the heavy stuff that needs to be lightened so you can ride your horse lovingly, without it throwing you.”

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AN ORDINARY NORTH QUEENSLAND UPBRINGING LEAD TO AN EXTRAORDINARY LIFE FOR MODELTURNED-PHOTOGRAPHER-TURNED CANE HAUL-OUT DRIVER, MARNI HINE. WORDS SARAH MATHIESEN

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Profile for DUO Magazine

DUO Issue 157 January | February 2020  

The Magazine of the North DUO is an elegant, intelligent publication highlighting style, home, fashion, food, travel, culture and exclusive...

DUO Issue 157 January | February 2020  

The Magazine of the North DUO is an elegant, intelligent publication highlighting style, home, fashion, food, travel, culture and exclusive...