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T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

A C O L L E C T I O N O F J E D U N N C O N S T R U C T I O N H I S T O R I C B U I L D I N G R E N O VAT I O N S


T R A N S F O R M AT I O N A COLLECTION OF JE DUNN CONSTRUCTION HISTORIC B U I L D I N G R E N O VAT I O N S

INVEST IN THE FUTURE P R E S E R V E T H E PA S T


I N T RO DU C T I ON | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 4

I N T RO D U C T I O N As a society, we often study the past to learn, understand and appreciate our heritage. We visit the buildings where histor y itself is embodied in the architecture and artifacts those structures house. As JE Dunn Construction moves into its 96th year, we celebrate the craftsmanship of these buildings, and the renovation projects that have elevated these historic structures to the next level. Over the years, we've had the opportunity to develop and build relationships with America's finest artisans and craftsmen as we renovate, re-use, or re-purpose some of our countr y's most beautiful structures and landmarks. JE Dunn Construction has worked on hundreds of historically-significant structures. This is a tribute to our clients who chose to invest in their future by preser ving the past as they demonstrate an appreciation for historical design and construction. Renovation is rarely the easy choice. Historic renovations take time, patience, skill and perseverance to preser ve and create works of art that will continue to stand the test of time.


H I STO R I C

KAN SAS

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CA P I TO L | TO P E K A ,

KS


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ta b l e o f c o n t en ts

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N O TA B L E

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ABOUT

CA P I TO L

JE

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C o u rt s

H i sto r i ca l

Dunn

P ROJ E C TS

P ROJ E C TS

Con st ru c t ion


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HISTORIC KANSAS STATE CAPITOL | TOPEKA, KS HISTORIC MINNESOTA STATE CAPITOL RENOVATION | MINNEAPOLIS, MN HISTORIC GSA PIONEER U.S. FEDERAL COURTHOUSE | PORTLAND, OR HISTORIC NORTH DAKOTA STATE CAPITOL RENOVATION | BISMARK, ND HISTORIC WYOMING STATE CAPITOL RENOVATION | CHEYENNE, WY HISTORIC OKLAHOMA STATE CAPITOL RENOVATION | OKLAHOMA CITY, OK CHRISTOPHER S. BOND U.S. FEDERAL COURTHOUSE | JEFFERSON CITY, MO GSA EARLE CABELL FEDERAL BUILDING & COURTHOUSE | DALLAS, TX GSA ROBERT S. DOLE U.S. FEDERAL COURTHOUSE | KANSAS CITY, MO GSA THOMAS F. EAGLETON U.S. COURTHOUSE | ST. LOUIS, MO GSA WAYNE L. MORSE U.S. FEDERAL COURTHOUSE | EUGENE, OR


CA PI TO L S TAT E KANSAS h i sto r i c | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 10

H I S TO R I C K A N S A S S TAT E CA P I TO L To pe k a , Ka ns a s Located in the heart of Topeka, the historic Kansas Statehouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and required coordination with the State Historic Preser vation Office. Specialty designers and artisans were involved during all phases of design and construction.

COST

This project was designed as a 10-year, 6-phase project, which allowed for staggered completion dates of the interior restoration of the east, west, north, and south wings. Much of the interior space was restored to its earlier grandeur and included the restoration of the Governor's office to its earlier circa 1900s design. The Senate Chamber also received notable restoration including the return of the wild Kansas cherr y wood desks dating back to 1885.

1,326,790 SF

Additional projects consisted of the construction of a new 2-level, 561-car underground parking garage situated below the north lawn of the Capitol, new underground vaults for additional office space and new mechanical systems, a new Visitor Center with a U-shaped drive, and an exterior plaza to the north. With restoration comes monumental upgrades, including heating/cooling systems and state-of-the-art mechanical/electrical systems.

$330 million size

a rch it ec t Treanor Architects de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


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a n E lu s ive R ecor d A safety record is nothing to scoff at when it comes to a $330 million project, especially when four years of exterior work is performed at a height range of 10 to 300 feet above ground level. But, that is exactly what our team achieved on the Kansas Statehouse. Workers performed circuswire feats while safely scaling exterior walls as well as the 300-foot high dome. By implementing stringent safety measures, we achieved 3,000 days without a lost-time incident.


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Awa r d s & Ac c o l a d e s American Institute of Architects Central States Design Awards – Architecture Preservation Honor Award American Institute of Architects Kansas Design Awards – Excellence in Renovation/Preservation Award American Contractors Association of Kansas – Renovation of the Year American General Contractors of Kansas – Award of Excellence in Restoration American General Contractors of Kansas – Award of Honor American General Contractors of Kansas – Award of Honor, South Wing – Best Project Copper Alliance – North American – Copper in Architecture Awards – Winner Restoration Kansas Preservation Alliance – Honor Award for Exterior Masonry Preservation Kansas Preservation Alliance – Medallion Award for Excellence in Rehabilitation Kan-Struct Awards – Historic Renovation Award for Excellence Mason Contractors Association of America – TEAM Award Natural Stone Institute – Tucker Design Award


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A D E AD R I NG E R The best imitations are often the hardest to detect, especially when you are using the scagliola technique with origins from 17th centur y Italy. This process, widely used throughout histor y, allowed craftsmen working on the original Kansas Statehouse to replicate the look and feel of marble without the exorbitant cost. The pink columns surrounding the House of Representatives Hall are the only examples of simulated marble throughout the entire Statehouse.


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CA PI TO L S TAT E TRAN TS RF AO NR SM FO AT R IMOANT I |O Nt a|b lhei s t oo frc i co nMti n ent e s o ta 22

H I S TO R I C M i n n e s ota S TAT E CA P I TO L St. Pa u l , M i nn es o ta When the Minnesota State Capitol opened in 1905, it was heralded as one of America’s great modern structures, evoking pride from all Minnesotans as it quickly became the State’s most famous landmark. The building includes over 300,000 SF of highly decorative and ceremonial space, with marble exterior and a large marble dome. The dome was designed after the unsupported dome at Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome. The Minnesota State Capitol’s unsupported marble dome is still the second largest in the world, after Saint Peter’s. Separated into multiple carefully planned phases, a comprehensive restoration of the interior and exterior addressed the needs of restoration, life-safety, accessibility, asset preser vation and long-term functionality. Key design features included reclaiming public spaces, raised ceiling heights, restoration of the vast decorative painting and fine art murals, new skylights/lay lights, and new historically-appropriate elevators. The work also included a complete overhaul of the mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems. The exterior work included exterior stone restoration, window replacement, and new roofing systems. The ornate stone work required several master car vers on site for several years. Unique aspects of the work involved finely-detailed copper roof detailing and restoration of the gold leaf gilded elements like the dome lantern finial and the famously large “Prosperity Charioteer,” which sits above the main entr y.

COST $300 million size 302,093 SF a rch it ec t HGA Architects & Engineers de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


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TRAN TS RF AO NR SM FO AT R IMOANT I |O Nt a|b lhei s t oo frc i co nMti n ent e s o ta S TAT E

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CA PI TO L S TAT E M i n n e s o ta h i sto r i c | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 26

a vi rt u ou s e n de avor The Minnesota State Capitol includes many exquisite works of art designed to represent the hopes and dreams of Minnesotans. One such piece is the stunning 23-arat gold leafed copper statue of a horse-drawn carriage called, The Progress of the State. Showcased under this iconic piece are six white marble statues depicting the classic virtues: Bounty, Courage, Integrity, Prudence, Truth, and Wisdom.


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awa r d s & ac c o l a d e s American Institute of Architects — National Architecture Award American Institute of Architects Minnesota – Honor Award American Public Works – Project of the Year American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers – Regional Technology Award, Existing Commercial Buildings Association of the Wall and Ceiling Industry – Excellence in Construction Quality Interior Plaster Award Engineering News Record, Midwest – Best Project Award Finance & Commerce – Top Project Marble Institute of America – Grand Pinnacle Award Preservation Alliance of Minnesota – Project of the Year Honor Award


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a unique observation During its historic renovation, the doors remained open at the Minnesota State Capitol, with work coordinated around legislative sessions and State events. The chandelier in the rotunda, originally hung in 1904, was lowered for the first time in 25 years. It was then moved to a temporar y windowcased galler y for restoration and cleaning. What was traditionally done behind closed doors was visible to visitors and staff. When it came time to raise the chandelier again, the event provided a rare chance to see it fully lit, which is normally reser ved for special occasions like inaugurations.


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c o u rt h o u s e pioneer h i sto r i c | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 36

H I S TO R I C p i o n e e r c o u rt h o u s e Por tla nd , O re g o n Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Pioneer Courthouse was originally built in 1875, long before seismic building codes. To update the building and make it seismically sound, JE Dunn Construction installed a friction pendulum base isolation system. At the time of construction, it was the first in Oregon and one of only 50 in the entire countr y. The interior renovation focused on adaptive re-use. Original features, including scrolled lighting fixtures, were protected in-place during construction and later retrofitted with energy-conser ving bulbs. Existing areas were recycled into new spaces, which required the removal of vinyl asbestos tile flooring and an acoustical drop ceiling. Historic photographs and specialty artisans were utilized to revive the original color schemes and detail work throughout the building. In most cases, the extensive woodwork was restored to its original grandeur without replacement. The interior was given a 21st centur y security and communications upgrade. Sur veillance cameras were placed throughout various spaces including courtrooms, judges offices, and administrative spaces. Updated communications allow for video and teleconferencing capabilities throughout the building.

COST $20 million size 57,000 SF a rch it ec t SERA Architects de l ive ry Construction Manager


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bracing for the future Pioneer Courthouse was constructed before seismic building codes were a consideration for municipal buildings. To update the building and ensure it could withstand a seismic event, a friction pendulum base isolation system was installed underneath the existing building. A dr y moat was created detaching the building from the ground at its perimeter.


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Awa r d s & Ac c o l a d e s American Institute of Architects Portland Award for Craftsmanship Architectural Heritage Center Preservation in Action – Platinum Award Building Design and Construction Renovation Awards – Platinum Award Daily Journal of Commerce Top Projects Society for History in the Federal Government – John Wesley Powell Prize for Historic Preservation


c o u rt h o u s e pioneer h i sto r i c | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

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Because a large portion of the budget was allocated to the seismic upgrades, the remaining modernization efforts became a challenge for adaptive re-use. Such was the case in the main courtroom where carpet had been installed many years before. Upon removal of the carpet, beautiful original wood flooring was found, and after minor repairs, they became a focal point for the building.


ca pi to l s tat e W yo m i n g h i sto r i c | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 46

H i sto r i c W yo m i n g stat e ca p i to l Chey enn e, Wyo mi ng Listed as a National Historic Landmark, the Wyoming State Capitol Square recently underwent a major restoration. JE Dunn Construction served as the Construction Manager for the 130,000 SF Historic State Capitol, the 360,800 SF Herschler Office Building, a new central utility plant, and an underground connector that houses hearing rooms, an auditorium, and serves as a seamless connection for the Capitol and Herschler buildings. A new central utility plant accommodates all new mechanical, electrical, plumbing, life safety, and ADA upgrades. The original building was constructed in 1886 and was restored to keep its original appearance and historical features while reconfiguring the space to accommodate modern offices, state-of-the-art technology, improved circulation and six meeting rooms that seat 75 – 250 people. The exterior renovation includes stone restoration using newly quarried stone from the original Rawlins, WY sandstone quarry. A complete roof replacement, new parapets, and energy efficient windows protect new HVAC systems. Historic elements throughout the Capitol interior underwent artful restoration. An ornate stained-glass laylight in the ceiling adorns the space, and ceilings were removed to recapture the original monumental ceiling heights. Coffered ceilings, cornices, ornate columns and architect doorways were brought back to their original glory. Ornate plaster and trim were refurbished to its original condition. The Dome received structural reinforcing, and gold leaf repairs and replacement. One of the most impressive features is the decorative ceiling in the rotunda restored to its 1888 design. The entire Capitol Square integrates new parking and landscaped promenades throughout the square.

COST $241.6 million size 490,400 SF a rch it ec t HDR Architecture de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


ca pi to l n o rt h

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COST $1.6 million

Given that the capitol was constructed in 1934 and had many years of exposure to the harsh North Dakota winters, the building was in need of cleaning and repair. The “Skyscraper of the Prairie� stands proud at 17 stories faced with Indiana lime stone. A roof-top, swing stage was designed so that craftsmen could scale the building and acid wash the stone in the evenings and on weekends. When not in use, the stage was safely stored on the roof. Throughout the tower, asbestos caulking was removed from stone, panel and windows and replaced with new product. The lower portions of the building are faced with large granite panels that required a similar cleaning process. Where necessary, stone and panels were repaired or replaced due to cracks, broken or missing pieces. Inside the building, the lobbies and restrooms had terrazzo flooring repaired, replaced, polished and sealed back to their original grandeur.

a rch it ec t Al Fitterer Architect de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


ca pi to l s tat e Oklahoma h i sto r i c

In Pro g re s s i n O k l a h om a C i t y , O k l ahom a

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COST $60.1 million

JE Dunn Construction is currently leading the renovation, repair, and remodel of the exterior of the Oklahoma State Capitol. The scope of work includes repointing of mortar joints, a painstaking and time-consuming process to protect the building from water infiltration; repair of cracked and damaged stone using the Dutchman repair process; stone cleaning using a micro abrasive process or laser cleaning; scaffolding to allow the stone masons to get close to all areas of the building’s exterior; refurbishing and replacing all 477 windows that surround the building, and finally, fully replacing all four wings of the existing copper roofing.

A rch it ec t ADG Architecture and TreanorHL Architects De l ive ry Design-Build


design

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gsa wayne l. morse u.s. federal courthouse


gsa robert s. dole u.s. federal courthouse

christopher s. bond u.s federal courthouse

thomas f. eagleton u.s. courthouse


proj ec ts h i sto r i c n o ta b l e | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

N ota b l e H i s to r i c p ro je c t s

Base Camp at Historic Fort Snelling, Boy Scouts of America Catholic Diocese of Savannah City and County of Denver Cheesman Park Pavilion Renovation Cosmopolitan Apartments GSA Earle Cabell Federal Building and Courthouse Interior Renovation GSA Historic Pioneer US Federal Courthouse Seismic Upgrade and Rehabilitation

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GSA Historic National Archives and Records Administration at Historic Union Station, Addition and Remodel Harry S. Truman Presidential Library Historic Bethel Park Renovation, City of Houston Historic Boley Bonfils Jenkins & Harzfelds Building Historic Building 465 Renovation, Fort Leavenworth Historic Centerre Bank Boley Building


Historic Civilian Education System Remodel, Fort Leavenworth

Historic South Carolina Governor’s Mansion Addition and Remodel

Historic Corinthian Hall Renovation, Kansas City Museum

Historic St. Benedict The Moor Church Renovations,

Historic Commerce Trust Building

Historic Union Station Science City Complex Renovation

Historic DA Morr Transfer Building Kansas City Public Library - Central Resource Library Historic First Presbyterian Church Addition and Renovation Historic Hamm Building Renovation and Restoration Historic Hilton President Hotel Renovation Historic Hollywood Theater Exterior Skin Restoration Historic JAG Building 244 and Building 55 Renovations, Fort Leavenworth

Historic U.S. Air Force A cademy Cadet Chapel Renovation Historic Wyoming State Capitol Renovation/Restoration KC Museum Leonel J Castillo Community Center Renovation McNichols Building Arts Pavilion The Museum of Russian Art Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Historic Kansas State Capitol

Oregon State Capitol Renovation Preconstruction

National World War I Museum & Memorial

Savannah City Market

Historic Minneapolis Institute of Arts

St Gregory’s University Building Repair

Historic Minnesota State Capitol Restoration

The Skirvin Hilton

Historic New York Life Building Renovation and Interiors

University of Minnesota Education Sciences Building

Historic North Dakota State Capitol Exterior and Interior Improvements Historic Oklahoma State Capitol Exterior Renovation Historic Poindexter Building Historic Portland City Hall Renovation Historic Printer’s Alley Hotel

University of Minnesota Tate Hall for Physics University of Minnesota Jones Hall University of Minnesota Northrop Auditorium Renovation University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Gimbel Building Remodel


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When the museum opened its doors in 1933, William Rockhill Nelson could not have envisioned that his namesake galler y of art would one day become a world-renowned treasure. The neoclassical design of the original building featured an understated elegance that encapsulated the architectural landscape of Kansas City. In 2007, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art once again forged ahead with a new chapter. For the first time in its 70+ histor y, renovations were planned throughout the existing structure. Concurrently, a new modern structure was conceived by renowned architect, Steven Holl. The glass-lensed structure allows visitors to meander through galler y spaces and reflect on interpretative exhibitions, while ultimately walking the height of a 67-stor y building. The journey begins with a 2-level, below-grade, 457-car garage with a precast “wave” effect and 34 recessed circular glass “moons” giving way to the One Sun/34 Moons sculpture on the reflecting pool located above the garage. Upon entering the new 162,579 SF Henr y W. and Marion H. Bloch Galler y of Art Museum, visitors are visually transported through several galleries, each designed with glass lenses allowing a computer-adjustable light source. With art collections ranging from 1,000 A.D. to the present, temperature requirements were critical. To maintain the correct humidity level, an interactive HVAC system was installed, allowing the system to accommodate changes in the humidity levels throughout the museum.

COST $365 million size 500,000 SF 162,579 SF (Bloch Building) a rch it ec t Steven Holl Architects BNIM Architects de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


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art for al l Space for art classrooms and studios was greatly expanded, tripling in size, allowing the museum to strengthen its leadership in education and community outreach. Approximately 160,000 SF of additional renovation occurred throughout the project.


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awa r d s & ac c o l a d e s Concrete Promotional Group – Excellence in Concrete for Bloch Building American Institute of Architects Central States – Award of Excellence American Institute of Architects Kansas City – Honor Award American Institute of Architects Kansas City – Honor Award, Architecture American Institute of Architects Kansas City Allied Arts and Craftsmanship Awards – Honor Award, One Sun/34 American Institute of Architects National Honor Award – Architecture Allied Arts and Craftsmanship, Board Formed Concrete, Glass, Handrails, Plaster, Visitors, Desk, Coat – Honor Award American Architecture Awards – Best New Building Design Architectural lighting Magazine, AIL Light and Architecture Design Awards – Outstanding Achievement Award Banco Bilbao Viscaya Argentaria Frontiers of Knowledge – Award for the Arts Buildings Magazine Project Innovations – Citation of Excellence Modernization Community Christian Church – Community Treasure Award Concrete Promotional Group – Excellence in Concrete for Bloch Building Illuminating Engineering Society, New York City Chapter Lumen Award – Exterior Lighting International Parking Institute – Award of Excellence International Parking Institute Award of Excellence – Honorable Mention Kansas City Business Journal – Capstone Award Time Magazine – Best New Building of the Year Urban Land Institute Kansas City – Development of Distinction


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This book is dedicated to our mentor and guide, William Dunn, Sr. and his dear friend and client, the late Henry Bloch. Both supported renovation and community transformation their entire lives by constantly contributing their talent, time and treasure in appreciation of lasting design and construction.


h ot e l president H i lt o n | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 66

H i s to r i c H i lto n p r e s i d e n t h ot e l Kans a s Ci ty, M i s s o uri COST Located in the heart of downtown Kansas City’s Power & Light Entertainment District, the President Hotel is a historic 1920s building, featuring an upscale 16-stor y hotel with 211 rooms and two suites, aptly named the Reagan and the Presidential. Features include beautifully refurbished guest rooms, a spa/fitness center, guest valet and laundr y, six meeting rooms and a business center. There are two kitchens each ser ving a separate restaurant; one for the world famous Drum Room and the other for the hotel restaurant. Due to its status on the National Register of Historic Places, it was imperative that the historic and original character be preser ved while also allowing for the necessar y modernization of the infrastructure and interior finishes. Seeking to recreate the original design intent, designers and craftsmen applied cutting edge technology to the hotel. Layers of paint were removed and analyzed by a laborator y to identify the original period-color used. When mixed, the color was applied to full-size mock-ups to replicate the look and feel of what once was throughout the building.

$26.6 million size 195,255 SF a rch it ec t GastingerWalker& de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


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Dancing the night away The grand ballroom had once been the highlight of the hotel, having hosted a variety of parties and celebrations. Over time, the flooring had endured extensive damage; however, through the review of existing black and white photos, craftsmen were able to restore the opulent flooring that once again ser ves as a beacon for social events.


s tat i o n union h i sto r i c | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 70

H i s to r i c u n i o n S tat i o n Kans a s Ci ty, M i s s o uri COST $241 million When Kansas City’s Union Station opened in October of 1914, it was heralded by President Woodrow Wilson as the “Great Gate to the West.” The magnificent beaux-arts structure, designed by Chicago architect Jar vis Hunt, was constructed for an astounding $6 million. In 1999, when extensive renovations began to this neglected building, the historic preser vation and restoration followed the original design as much as possible. To ensure the appropriateness of the design, a team of nationally and locally recognized preser vation and design experts were brought together to restore the building to its original grandeur. The result was a modern building celebrating the histor y of a vibrant past. Visitors can imagine families reuniting under the Grand Hall clock, trains delivering soldiers back from World War II, newspapers rustling as travelers perused the local news, or even the sordid gunshots from the 1933 FBI Massacre.

size 770,840 SF a rch it ec t HNTB Corporation BNIM Architects HOK Rafael Architects Mark Cufman Architects de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


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an architectural dig The preser vation of Union Station was a feat unparalleled by modern standards. The team organized a 400-page book that outlined ever y aspect of the restoration, including 25,000 photos. Door knobs and paint colors took on as much significance as the painstakingly restored chandelier and ceiling tiles.


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awa r d s & ac c o l a d e s American Institute of Architects – Special Commendation Design Award American Public Works Association – Preservation Project of the Year Building Design & Construction Magazine – Reconstruction Project of the Year Economic Development Council – Cornerstone Award National Trust for Historic Preservation – National Preservation Honor


Chapel Ca de t aca d e m y Forc e Air U.S. h i sto r i c | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 78

H i s to r i c U . S . A i r F o r c e ac a d e m y Ca d e t C h a p e l In pro g res s i n Co l orado S p ri n g s, C ol orado COST $158 million JE Dunn Construction is renovating the U.S. Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel in Colorado Springs. Considered one of the most recognized icons in the United States and most visited Colorado landmark, the U.S. Air Force Cadet Chapel was built in 1963 and designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill of Chicago. The Cadet Chapel was awarded the American Institute of Architects’ National Twenty-five Year Award in 1996 and was named a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 2004. The 52,000 SF building is home to six worship spaces, a 1,950-pipe organ and a 4,518-pipe organ. The Chapel is 150 feet tall and is most known for its 17 metal spires or tetrahedrons, enclosed with aluminum panels and Dalles de Verre Glass. The building includes a Protestant chapel, a Catholic chapel, a Jewish synagogue, a Muslim mosque, a Buddhist temple, a Falcon Circle, and All Faiths rooms. JE Dunn Construction will construct an enclosed super structure over the chapel to protect the building from weather as they disassemble the structure for refurbishing.

size 52,000 SF a rch it ec ts AECOM Wiss, Janey Elster Associates de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


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memorial & museum 1 wa r wo r l d n at i o n a l | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 82

N at i o n a l wo r l d wa r I m u s e u m & memorial Kans a s Ci ty, M i s s o uri Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the National World War I Museum & Memorial was built in 1926 and is the nation’s only memorial dedicated solely to World War I. It is situated on the top of a hill overlooking downtown Kansas City, Union Station and the surrounding business and cultural districts. The Memorial was closed to the public in 1994 due to structural and material deterioration and re-opened after the renovation in March 2000. The Memorial Tower rises 217 feet above the surrounding obser vation deck and 268 feet above the north lawn. Two buildings on the obser vation deck house Memor y Hall and Exhibition Hall. Flames and steam come from the top of the tower, which symbolizes a gun barrel. The site plan is oriented 11-degrees off true north, to honor the time and date the armistice was signed. Restoration and adaptive reconstruction of the Memorial was designed to update the facilities to current code and accessibility requirements, provide modern security, lighting and environmental controls. The renovated facility also houses an expanded Liberty Memorial Museum, which is the largest and most important collection of World War I artifacts in the United States.

COST $57. 4 million size 232,783 SF a rch it ec t PGAV Architects de l ive ry Lump-Sum


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memorial


awa r d s & ac c o l a d e s American Institute of Architects KC Chapter – Allied Arts and Craftsmanship Award - Mural and Map Restoration and Ornamental Plaster Bronze Award – Best Museum or Art Gallery, Ingram’s Magazine Cornerstone Award – Economic Development Council of Kansas City Community Christian Church – Community Treasures Awards Design Awards/Merit – American Institute of Architects Kansas City International Concrete Repair Institute – Award of Merit Institute Honor Award – American Institute of Architects Kansas City Historic Preservationist of the Year – Kansas City American Institute of Architects Preservation Award – Historic Kansas City


r e sou rc e central l i b r a ry public city Kansas | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 88

K a n sas c i ty p u b l i c l i b r a ry - c e n t r a l r e s o u rc e Kans a s Ci ty, M i s s o uri COST $26.3 million

The Kansas City Public Librar y has been quietly nestled in the heart of downtown Kansas City since its opening in 1904. It has proudly offered its ser vices as a bank, university law school, and most recently, as the newly restored central public librar y. While several of its neighboring buildings have come and gone, the grandiose marble structure has been restored into a modern gem that houses archive materials and artwork. The renovation efforts were as much about preser ving the rich heritage as providing structural upgrades for the copious volumes of books. Original features such as the teller windows, marble flooring, and chandeliers were restored and blend well with modern elements.

size 194,392 SF a rch it ec t HNTB Corporation de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


90 T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

| Kansas

city

public

l i b r a ry

-

central

r e sou rc e


92 T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

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l i b r a ry

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central

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au d i to r i u m N o rt h ro p M i n n e s o ta of university | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 94

U N I V E RS I TY O F M I N N E S OTA N O RT H RO P A U D I TO R I U M Minn ea po l i s , M i nn e sot a COST Since 1929, historic Northrop Auditorium has ser ved as the University of Minnesota’s primar y gathering place for celebrations, ceremonies, education, entertainment and performing arts. The University transformed Northrop into a bustling, dynamic 21st centur y cultural and academic center of distinction, teaming with activity throughout the day as a vital gathering place for students, faculty, and the community-at-large. The project consisted of a two-phased effort to completely restore and renovate Northrop Auditorium. Phase I included a complete exterior restoration, code upgrades and auditorium enhancements. Phase II consisted of a 150,000 SF renovation and a 20,000 SF addition. The majority of Northrop’s interior was carefully reconfigured with a smaller auditorium (2,800 seats versus 4,800 seats), producing superior acoustics and sight lines, comfortable seating, state-of-the art technology, and a complete replacement of antiquated building systems. Space was allocated to house academic programs, an innovation design lab, and the Institute for Advanced Study, further situating Northrop at the center of student and faculty life on campus, as well as the crossroads of pioneering scholarship, creativity, and learning.

$87 million size 345,000 SF a rch it ec t RSP Architects HGA Architects de l ive ry Construction Manager-at-Risk


96 T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

| university

of

M i n n e s o ta

N o rt h ro p

au d i to r i u m


98 T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

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of

M i n n e s o ta

N o rt h ro p

au d i to r i u m


100 T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

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of

M i n n e s o ta

N o rt h ro p

au d i to r i u m


102 T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

| about

JE

Dunn

Const ruc t ion


about JE Dun n Co n st ru c t i o n With more than 3,500 employees, JE Dunn Construction is ranked nationally as a top contractor by Engineering News-Record, providing best value, design-build, construction management, general construction and preconstruction services to clients throughout the country. With 22 offices throughout the United States, JE Dunn focuses on delivering the best client experience and bringing invaluable expertise and innovation to every project we build. Our vision is to be an indispensable business partner for our clients by first understanding their purpose, goals and customers and then delivering transformational solutions with certainty of results.


104

ADDITIONAL H I S TO R I C

p ro je c t s

T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

| about

JE

Dunn

Const ruc t ion


historic new york life building Kan sas City, M iss o u r i


106 T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

| about

JE

Dunn

Const ruc t ion


historic commerce trust building Kan sas City, M iss o u r i


Const ruc t ion Dunn JE about | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 108

historic FORT LEAVENWORTH BUILDING 465 Leav enworth , K a n s a s


Richard bolling federal building Kan sas City, M is s o u r i


Const ruc t ion Dunn JE about | T R A N S F O R M AT I O N 110

Richard bolling federal building K an sas C i ty , M is s o u r i


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Profile for JE Dunn Construction

JE Dunn Construction Historical Qualifications  

JE Dunn Construction has worked on hundreds of historically-significant structures. This is a tribute to our clients who chose to invest in...

JE Dunn Construction Historical Qualifications  

JE Dunn Construction has worked on hundreds of historically-significant structures. This is a tribute to our clients who chose to invest in...

Profile for dunn