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A local legacy

Fun times ahead

Peake’s progress

The Farmer family’s much-loved business

Dulwich Festival rides into town

A new chapter for Chener Books

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NEWS | 3

Welcome to issue 19 of The Dulwich Diverter Thanks for picking up the May/June edition of The Dulwich Diverter, your free local paper for East, West, North Dulwich and the Village. With the 2019 Dulwich Festival set to begin on May 10, read our guide to all the key events from this year’s programme on page six. The festival coverage continues with a photo-essay on three local artists who are taking part in Artists’ Open House on page 16, followed by a feature on cycling theatre company the HandleBards on page 19. Their high-energy performance of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing at JAGS Sports Club promises to be a festival highlight.

One of the best things about Dulwich is the number of independent shops and restaurants that are based in the area. For this issue we spoke to longstanding local Dalavan Crawford, whose Caribbean takeaway Rice & Peas on Grove Vale turns 25 this year. Read our interview on page 23. We also caught up with Sophie Farmer, owner of brilliant shop AJ Farmer on Lordship Lane, which was founded by Sophie’s dad in 1964. She tells us more about the family business on page eight. Last month we were pleased to see the return of another local favourite when Munir Hassan, owner of Tandoori Nights on Lordship Lane, reopened

his excellent restaurant following an eight-month closure. The refurbished space looks fantastic and the food is as delicious as ever. In addition to The Dulwich Diverter, we publish The Peckham Peculiar – a newspaper for Peckham and Nunhead that recently celebrated five years in print – and The Lewisham Ledger, which covers the whole borough of Lewisham including Forest Hill, Honor Oak, Brockley, Blackheath, Hither Green, Catford, Ladywell, New Cross, Deptford, Telegraph Hill, Sydenham and Crofton Park. The papers are distributed by the two of us to a combined total of almost

400 stockists across the boroughs of Southwark and Lewisham. Together they have a following of almost 60,000 on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. The next edition of The Dulwich Diverter will be the July/August issue, which is published in early July. If you run a business or organisation and are interested in advertising in the Diverter and/or our other two titles, please drop us a line via dulwichdiverter@gmail.com to find out how we can promote what you do across south-east London. We hope you enjoy the issue! Mark McGinlay and Kate White

North Dulwich school pledges to scrap single-use plastic A local school has pledged to eliminate single-use plastic by 2021. The Charter School North Dulwich on Red Post Hill has already taken significant steps to reduce its plastic waste, with the school’s caterers now using compostable packaging for almost everything. However, bottled water is the main exception. Around 600 plastic bottles are purchased at the school every day, adding up to more than 100,000 every year. The next step is to stop selling bottled water and replace single-use plastic water bottles with reusable bottles that students can fill from new water stations providing fresh, chilled water. Currently the school only has a small number of water fountains, which are in need of upgrading. The pipework that serves them is old and rusty, leaving the water tainted with a metallic taste. The Friends of the Charter School North Dulwich are campaigning to raise funds for the new water stations and to provide reusable bottles so all pupils can go plasticbottle free. Headteacher Christian Hicks said: “As a school we are constantly looking at ways to reduce our environmental impact and this is something that is important to both staff and students. “We are also keen to do everything we can to help our pupils stay hydrated, as this has been proven to improve concentration and mental performance, as well as being essential for students’ overall health.” Lucy Hamer, chair of the Friends, said: “Some pupils buy a bottle of water every day. By using a refillable bottle, filled for free at the refill stations, they will be saving

£5 a week, or £190 a year, or £1,350 over seven years at the school.” Meanwhile East Dulwich is well on the way to becoming one of London’s first plastic-free postcodes. It’s part of an initiative by the charity Surfers against Sewage, which is aiming to establish 125 plastic-free communities in the UK and Ireland by 2020. So far 61 areas have achieved plastic-free status, with hundreds more working towards the goal. To become a certified plastic-free area, they must hit five key targets: engaging

businesses, speaking in schools, organising events, setting up a steering committee and gaining support from the local council. Ric Baldock, founder of Plastic Free East Dulwich, has achieved four of these objectives. Nine businesses – including Rye Books, Karavan, the South East Cakery, The Lordship pub and Moxons – are now plastic-free champions, meaning they have removed or replaced at least three items of single-use plastic in their operations. Ric has spoken in nine schools and has organised several successful community

clean-ups. Most recently 50 volunteers removed 22 big sacks of rubbish from the hedgerows on Dawson’s Hill. “We had old car batteries, baseball bats, bits of wood and lots of plastic obviously – stuff that had been in the hedges for God knows how long,” Ric said. “It was a really nice community event and our best turnout yet.” Ric has set up a steering group and is now waiting to hear whether Southwark Council’s pledge to act after declaring a climate emergency in March ticks the final box. If it does then East Dulwich will become a certified plastic-free community. “It will be nice to get the certificate, but to be honest it’s just a bit of paper – and what we really want to do is continue to change people’s opinions and make them think about their actions and how even small changes can make a difference,” Ric said. Plastic Free East Dulwich has inspired neighbouring areas to launch similar campaigns too. “Laura Ford has started up Plastic Free Peckham and I think there’s been interest in Nunhead as well,” he said. Now Ric is keen to do more in local schools. “That’s the most rewarding thing – talking to kids who are really engaged in this topic. It’s the younger generations who are going to be affected by the behaviour and decisions that we’re making now.” Join Plastic Free East Dulwich’s next community clean-up on June 23 at 11.30am. The location is TBC – follow @PlasticFreeEastDulwich on Instagram and Facebook and @PlasticFreeED on Twitter for updates. To view the Charter School’s crowdfunding campaign, please visit justgiving.com/campaign/plasticfreeCharter

The Dulwich Diverter

Editors Mark McGinlay, Kate White | Designer Mingo Mingo Studio | Cover designer Jake Tilson Photographer Lima Charlie | Sub-editor Jack Aston | Illustrators Jessica Kendrew, Peter Rhodes Contributors Katie Allen, Jessica Gulliver, Seamus Hasson, Miranda Knox, Jane Merrick, Elizabeth Rust, Luke G Williams, John Yabrifa Marketing and social media Mark McGinlay For editorial and advertising enquiries, please email dulwichdiverter@gmail.com Blog dulwichdiverter.tumblr.com | @dulwichdiverter | @dulwichdiverter | @dulwichdiverter

MAY/JUNE 2019

THE DULWICH DIVERTER


4 | NEWS

Welcome to the Colour Palace The grounds of Dulwich Picture Gallery are set to fill with colour and culture this summer as an eye-catching installation opens to the public. The Colour Palace is a lively and celebratory fusion of European and African cultural traditions designed by Pricegore and Yinka Ilori. It was chosen from 150 entries to become the second Dulwich Pavilion and is set to open in June during the London Festival of Architecture. It will host a full programme of events and activities throughout the summer, including performances, workshops, supper clubs, podcast recordings and yoga. The Colour Palace was selected by a panel of judges in a design competition that was co-hosted by the London Festival of Architecture and Dulwich Picture Gallery.

The vivid structure is a celebration of colour, pattern and light, reflecting a broad range of cultural traditions to create a design that is representative of multicultural London. The bold geometric pattern of the pavilion is inspired by the wax prints that are sold in the markets of Lagos and the shops of nearby Peckham. It will create a powerful contrast alongside the sedate, grade-II-star listed gallery building designed by Sir John Soane. It is hoped that the pavilion will have a future life after its summer at the gallery, as its modular design means it is possible to reconfigure the parts to create a structure of different proportions. The Colour Palace follows the first Dulwich Pavilion in 2017, After Image by If_Do, which won multiple awards.

Free films for all Free films will be screened across Herne Hill this May for the Herne Hill Free Film Festival. The annual event, now in its seventh year, will feature more than 20 films both old and new, beginning with Oscar-winning superhero flick Black Panther. Other screenings will include Italian neorealist classic Bicycle Thieves at Herne

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Hill Velodrome and Bohemian Rhapsody at Judith Kerr Primary School. This year all profits from the festival will be donated to the Maudsley Charity, which helps promote positive change in the world of mental health. The festival runs until June 1. For full listings, please visit freefilmfestivals.org/hernehill


NEWS | 5

Remembering Terry Lifelong East Dulwich resident Terence Percy Garrett has sadly passed away at the age of 84. Terence, who was known to family and friends as Terry, was born in 1934 in the family home on Shawbury Road, just off Lordship Lane, and lived there for the rest of his life. He went to school in East Dulwich, attending St John’s and St Clement’s, which was then based on North Cross Road, just around the corner from his home. In 1952, when he was 18 years old, he started his National Service. “One of the guys he worked with, a friend of his called Albert, introduced him to my mum’s friend Iris, and that’s how Mum and Dad met,” said Terry’s daughter Lesley Rochester, who now lives in nearby Peckham. “They went on to get married on March 2, 1957 at the Camberwell register office and Mum moved in with Dad into the house on Shawbury Road. “My dad’s mum had the house back then and Dad managed to buy it.” Terry worked in a variety of jobs throughout his life. “He was a window cleaner, he was a car salesman, he was a greengrocer in Dulwich – he did all sorts of different things,” Lesley said. He later went to work on Fleet Street, joining the Evening Standard first before moving on to national newspaper the Daily Express.

Terry worked on the printing side as a compositor – a skilled job that involved working with sub-editors and production to fit the news stories on to each page and ensuring that all the letters and punctuation marks were in the correct place ready for print. “He really enjoyed working for the Express,” Lesley said. “You know what they were like back in the day – they spent most

of their time in the pub! He was there for a number of years and then he finally retired when he was in his early 50s.” Rita and Terry had three children – their first son Grant, born in 1962, Lesley in 1964 and their youngest son Lee, who was born in 1967. In 2017 the couple celebrated their diamond wedding anniversary after 60 years of marriage.

Having lived in East Dulwich his whole life, Terry, who had five grandchildren and one great-grandchild, was a familiar face to many people in the area. Together with Rita, he greatly enjoyed local life in SE22 and had a lot of friends here. “Dad loved living in East Dulwich,” Lesley said. “He used to drink in the CIU club, the working men’s club, which used to be opposite Johnny Farmer’s [AJ Farmer] on Lordship Lane. My dad’s dad used to be on the door there. “When they closed the CIU club down they all started drinking at the Constitutional club on East Dulwich Grove, where my dad was always one of the last men standing, as they said at the funeral.” Terry passed away on March 8 and his funeral took place at Brenchley Gardens crematorium on April 2. “I didn’t imagine there would be so many people at the funeral because of Dad’s age, but he was really well-known in East Dulwich,” said Lesley. “There were so many people there showing their respects – it was really nice.” Terry will be greatly missed by his wife Rita, his family, friends and all who knew him. Pictured above left: Terry and Rita on their wedding day in March 1957. Above right: the couple, who were married for over six decades, in more recent times.

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6 | NEWS

Culture and community at this year’s Dulwich Festival The Dulwich Festival is back this May, promising a celebration of art, music, theatre, literature and history for all. In these uncertain times, this year’s theme is “belonging” and as ever, the community event has plenty to appeal to people of all ages and tastes. The festival will celebrate the local artistic community with the perennially popular Artists’ Open House event, which sees hundreds of artists open their doors to the public. For more on this, turn to page 16. Music lovers will enjoy this year’s programme, which features a wide range of sounds and styles. The ever-popular festival ceilidh and the Dulwich Festival choir night will both return. The Harlem Meer Cats are also back by popular demand. The group will recreate the music heard at the Cotton Club in the 1920s and 30s, playing the hits of Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway among others. Renowned blues singer-songwriter Adam Norsworthy will also return this year after two sold-out shows. He will perform with London Symphony Orchestra violinist Tom Norris and with his blues band The Mustangs.

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Dulwich’s beautiful Christ’s Chapel will be hosting a chapel organ open afternoon and acclaimed ensemble Onyx Brass will play at the 400-year-old venue. One of our top picks from this year’s programme is a performance by the brilliant Caleb Femi, former young people’s laureate for London. Caleb draws upon childhood memories of Nigeria and Peckham in his powerful poetry. He will be joined by another Peckham voice, writer and poet Yomi Sode, who explores Nigerian and British culture through work that can be humorous, loving, self-reflective and uncomfortable. Eighty years ago 10,000 children arrived in Britain as unaccompanied refugees on the Kindertransport from Germany, Austria and Czechoslovakia to escape the Nazis. A screening and panel discussion with two former kinder will explore how they adapted to life in Britain. At Bell House, catch a discussion with Jocelyn Catty and Trevor Moore, editors of Words in Pain, with readings from their embellished centenary edition of the collected letters of writer, thinker and rationalist Olga Jacoby.

For youngsters the children’s art competition will return, and the Kingsdale Foundation School will play host to a youth concert, where local schools and music groups will showcase their talented young musicians. Award-winning children’s theatre will be on offer at St Barnabas Parish Hall with the fantastical tale of Tommy Foggo – Superhero, a magical multimedia story of a life saved by music, composed by awardwinning Stephen Deazley and cellist, baritone and actor Matthew Sharp. The Dulwich Festival Fair on Goose Green will provide further fun for all the family with a range of stalls and activities, including the colourful community chain of pom-poms and donkey rides. The Love West Dulwich and Dulwich Park fairs will take place on the final weekend of the festival, with a host of entertainments for children and grandparents alike. Another family-friendly outing will see the London Wildlife Trust lead a spring orchard tree-care event and picnic. The orchard is being developed by the Dulwich Estate to mark 400 years since Edward Alleyn founded a school, chapel and

almshouse in Dulwich. The day promises nature-themed activities for all. Meanwhile to mark the 400th anniversary of Burbage Road’s namesake, Richard Burbage, artist Lionel Stanhope will be creating a mural to celebrate the actor, who famously founded the Globe theatre. The HandleBards will perform an original take on Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing (for more on this, turn to page 19), while Tim Crouch will present his oneman show I, Malvolio, which reimagines Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night from the point of view of its abused steward. It’s a charged, amusing and sometimes unsettling show, which sees Malvolio ask the audience to confront some uncomfortable truths. The popular walks programme will feature a street-art walk that will take visitors on a tour of the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery. Ian McInnes will lead a walk giving an insight into Dulwich’s Georgian heritage, Lette Jones will give a tree walk and Brian Green will lead a walk on local history. The Dulwich Festival runs from May 10-19. For full listings and to book tickets for events, please visit dulwichfestival.co.uk

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8 | DULWICH PEOPLE

Variety is the spice of life AJ FARMER HAS BEEN SERVING SHOPPERS ON LORDSHIP LANE FOR 55 YEARS. SOPHIE FARMER TELLS US MORE ABOUT THE FAMILY-RUN BUSINESS BY SEAMUS HASSON

For decades Britain’s high streets have been fighting against an onslaught from ubiquitous fast-food brands and faceless corporate chains. All too often the consequence of this invasion has seen town centres lose their identity to a multitude of Starbucks and Tesco Express stores. Thankfully, East Dulwich has never really bowed to the trend, maintaining its personality with a plethora of independent shops and restaurants. Nowhere epitomises this defiance quite like AJ Farmer, the family-run variety store on Lordship Lane. The shop’s traditional style sits comfortably alongside some of the more recent retail offerings in modern East Dulwich. Where else can you go for essential cleaning products, party accessories, stationery needs, hardware, toys, electrical appliances and novelty gift ideas all under one roof? “I think people around here really do have a lot of loyalty to the

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independent stores in the area,” owner Sophie Farmer tells me in the flat above the shop where she lives with her two young children. “I think they appreciate that a lot of us [Dulwich shopkeepers] work hard and while we’re not necessarily the cheapest, we offer something that large stores can’t and that’s the personal treatment. “It’s knowing that they’ve been on holiday or knowing that they’ve been in hospital or that a loved one has died and having the time to chat with them. People like the human interaction and I think that’s why they like coming to Lordship Lane as a whole. “People are really ethical and have a good set of morals and don’t want to live in a society that’s just sterile and bland and that’s why they’re willing to support local businesses.” Sophie’s father Albert John Farmer, known as John, first opened the store in 1964. It was originally called the Minimart, a name that many older East Dulwich residents still use when

referring to the shop. John, who is originally from Peckham, is still involved in the business and helps out in the shop at weekends. “My dad is 81, nearly 82, but he still comes up and works on Saturdays and Sunday mornings,” Sophie says. “He still likes to be involved.” Naturally, the family business has been a part of Sophie’s life for as long as she can remember. “My earliest memories of Lordship Lane are when I used to come up here to visit the shop with Dad when I was a child in the 1970s,” she says. “This property was bomb-damaged by a V2 during the Second World War and my dad was the first tenant to move into the building in the 1960s after it was refurbished.” Sophie’s association with the shop and with Lordship Lane has been forged over many years. While she grew up in the Kent countryside in what she describes as an “idyllic childhood with horses and stables”, she started working in the shop fulltime when she was 17 years old.

ABOVE: SOPHIE FARMER Photo by Lima Charlie

“As soon as I could drive up I started working here,” she says. “I worked with my dad for many years and over time he gradually took a step back, giving me more responsibility. I came back to live in East Dulwich as soon as I reached adulthood really. I was about 18. “I was a very independent person, so my dad suggested that I rent the residential part of the building, which I did. It had always been used for storage before that.” That was in 1989 and 30 years and several extensions later, she’s still here. Sophie’s years as a retailer and resident of Lordship Lane give her a unique authority into its changing fortunes. She speaks with affection and a lot of knowledge about some of its old haunts – the working men’s club that used to be across the road and the Thomas More Irish club, which was “always bustling on a Sunday night”. “I’ve seen lots of little changes in the area throughout the years,” she says.

MAY/JUNE 2019


DULWICH PEOPLE | 9 “Back then [in the late 1980s] there were so many different stores and independent businesses around here. Then in the early 90s it all went a bit downhill, it was really on its uppers. “The Sainsbury’s superstore had opened on Dog Kennel Hill and lots of the shops gradually closed down. You lost things like the butchers and the bakers and the greengrocers. The offering down here became quite poor with lots of boarded-up shops. “But because of that, with empty premises and relatively low rents, opportunities opened up for people to start their own businesses. “People started taking a chance on East Dulwich, whether that was buying homes or starting up a business. North Cross Road started to revive. I mean most of that had shut – I think pretty much every shop in fact on North Cross Road had shut down. “So, you had these new younger people moving into the area and then you had people taking a chance on opening a business and it has kind of evolved really naturally into what it is now. “It’s a really interesting high street and pretty unique I would have thought across London. We’ve got all these lovely little independent shops. It’s the envy of a lot of people I know who don’t live in London.” While Lordship Lane has been enjoying a resurgence for many years, Sophie is not oblivious to the potential threats the area faces. Southwark Council’s proposal for a

controlled parking zone (CPZ) in East Dulwich has raised concern among local traders. Then there’s the uncertainty surrounding the nation’s most talkedabout subject – Brexit. “There’s very little production in the UK,” Sophie says, “so most of us will be depending on things being imported from across the world. “The concern is about how much our money is going to buy and if our customers will stomach any increases in prices.” AJ Farmer’s continued presence on Lordship Lane throughout the good times and the bad is no accident. Sophie spends a lot of her time visiting wholesalers, assiduously picking out products that will appeal to the area’s evolving aspirations. Her many years of experience and close relationships with her customers mean that she has a keen sense for what works. “One of the keys to running a successful retail business is that you have to adapt and change along with current trends and your customer base, otherwise you just won’t survive,” she explains. “Some of the offering that we had from years ago you couldn’t even attempt to sell anymore. Things like Vaseline hair tonic or Reckitt’s blue bags [a hand-cleaning solution used for enhancing whites]. Sometimes products go off the market because they just haven’t captured the next audience.

“At the moment customers are very mindful of the products they use and the chemicals that are in them. On the whole people are much more concerned about picking environmentally friendly products. “For instance, things like disposable plastics have just dropped away, people don’t want them anymore. They are thinking much more about the things that they buy and they’re thinking about the long-term future of the planet.” Sophie says that while some products from yesteryear have vanished completely there has been renewed demand for others, thanks to Instagram stars like cleaning guru Mrs Hinch. “She’s appealing to a whole new group of people who think they’ve discovered things like soda crystals and bicarbs. “They really haven’t, they’ve always been around – it’s just that these more natural remedies and natural cleaning products have come back into fashion again.” Away from the shop, Sophie’s life as a resident on Lordship Lane is one filled with family and friendship. Aside from an enviably short commute to work she finds herself at the hub of an incredibly tight-knit community. Her two children, Eva aged nine and Stanley aged six are already showing an interest in the family business. “They come down and hang around in the shop before I walk them up

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to school,” Sophie says, “and they sometimes get under people’s feet. “It’s a bit like having a shop cat,” she laughs, “a couple of kids who happen to be hanging around in AJ Farmer’s all the time. “That’s the nice thing as well – my kids just sort of potter around outside the shop, but the other shopkeepers and people who work in the shops on Lordship Lane know them, so it makes it really safe. “There are some amazing people who work along this road and some real characters. For example, Peter who sweeps the road is one of the most amazing people you could ever meet.” It’s fair to say that AJ Farmer’s longevity on Lordship Lane has ensured it has become a reassuringly familiar presence to local residents. The shop’s staff all have long-term affiliations with the place. Pat and Julie have worked in the business for a combined total of more than 30 years, while Holly and Glen are also longtime employees. “I really enjoy coming to work,” Sophie says. “There’s something about retailing, seeing your choices that you’ve made being appreciated or wanted by others. I really enjoy the company of the people I work with. Most of them have been here many, many years. “It really isn’t just about running a business. For me it’s about being part of something a lot bigger, and this area is really special.”


10 | DULWICH HAMLET

A living legend DULWICH HAMLET SUPER FAN MISHI MORATH EXPLAINS WHY HE’S SO PASSIONATE ABOUT THE TEAM HE HAS SUPPORTED HIS WHOLE LIFE BY MARK MCGINLAY WITH LUKE MAGGS

There’s a much-loved Bill Shankly quote that goes, “Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I don’t like that attitude. I can assure them it is much more serious than that.” For Mishi Morath, football has been a passion for nearly all of his 52 years, but earlier this year it almost was a case of life and death. Thankfully he was able to recover and we caught up with him to talk about his lifelong love of the beautiful game. The Morath family moved to south London from Belsize Park when Mishi was about five years old. His father had worked in a bakery in Hampstead – “a lah-di-dah area”, he says, “but we weren’t lah-di-dah.” He was the youngest of four children, with one brother and two older sisters and they lived very near to Dulwich Hamlet. “My brother had gone to a few games and eventually – because I was nagging – when I was seven, he took me down to the ground, so it was his fault really. This was the old ground and from my balcony, I could see the training pitch and the back of the old terrace.” His brother supported Leeds but that was his team, not Mishi’s. Mishi decided to choose a club much, much closer to home. “Once you pick your team, that’s just it really and I’ve been supporting Dulwich Hamlet all my life. I’ve been going home and away since I was about 11. In the old days, there was always a supporters’ coach to away games. It becomes part of your life.” Mishi has been a huge fan of the club, its managers and players ever since. It’s evident that his memory is second to none as he talks about events of more than 40 years ago as if they happened yesterday. “When we got relegated in 1977, we came straight back up,” he recalls. “That was Alan Smith’s first managerial job in football. He was a coach at Wimbledon and he came to Dulwich to manage us. He took us up as champions and the star at the time – and he’s a legend now – was Ossie Bayram. He could play on both wings but he was really a left winger. He still comes down occasionally.” Mishi still remembers Alan Smith fondly. “He’s one of my heroes. He always cared about the fans. For the away games, not every game, in those days the supporters’ coaches left straight after the final whistle. “He’d often come on to the coach and quickly thank the supporters before he went off to the changing room – he was a man with a heart. That’s the thing about non-league – you get to know the players. You mix in their circles, you’re in the bar with them.”

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It’s not just the stars of yesteryear either – the current manager and players are also highly rated by Mishi. “I’m not entirely sure – this is my interpretation – that the players understand that like Man U or whoever are everyone’s heroes, that they are my heroes. If we’re going to an away game and the team coach might be an hour before the supporters’ coach, we’ll see the players in Sainsbury’s buying their snacks. I’m like, ‘Oh, my goodness!’ It doesn’t matter what your team is.” Along the way Mishi changed his middle name to Dulwich, which means it appears on official documents like his passport and bank statements. “There was one year I was going to Poland to watch England and I’d forgotten to renew my passport and it was going to run out halfway through. I queued up to get a new one and the woman – very snooty she was – asked me, ‘Is that Dulwich as in the place?’ I said, ‘No, as in the football club!’” Mishi comes across as a very modest man but many fans think he has been crucial to the current success of the club. Before recent events, he was known for selling ‘50/50’ tickets at every home game when he wasn’t working. He founded and played for the Dulwich Hamlet

supporters’ team and instigated their first foreign trips from 2002. He was key in fostering the relationship with the Hamlet’s Hamburg cousins Altona and put a lot of work into ensuring the 125-year anniversary tour to the German city happened last summer. With the support of manager Gavin Rose he has organised charity and awareness games, including London’s Stonewall FC – “the world’s most successful gay football team” – playing Hamlet in the UK’s first mainstream anti-homophobia friendly match in 2015. Mishi believes that the club as a whole have done a lot in recent years to foster relationships that have led to impressive increases in attendances for home games. He remembers Gavin Rose’s first season, when the average home crowd was 180. “Now we take more than that to some away games. The regular attendance at the moment is just under 2,000.” The conversation inevitably leads to what happened to him earlier this year. He had gone to visit a good friend of his, who lives in Chatham, the garrison town near to where the Royal Engineers are based. “He’s about a 10-minute walk to their football ground – and the army league plays about once a month on a Friday morning,” Mishi says.

ABOVE: MISHI MORATH Photo by Lima Charlie

ONCE YOU PICK YOUR TEAM, THAT’S JUST IT REALLY. IT BECOMES PART OF YOUR LIFE

“I went to the game and I was sitting in a small stand behind the goal. I keeled over and my friend thought I was joking. He realised it was serious and rushed over to a couple of off-duty soldiers. They gave me CPR which saved my life until the ambulance came as I’d had a massive heart-attack. I don’t remember anything about it and I was in intensive care for just under a week.” What followed was a huge amount of love and appreciation for Mishi. A lot of the reaction took place on Twitter, which he didn’t see until a few weeks later. “It’s very hard to describe but it was humbling, embarrassing, call it what you like. I was really surprised. The funny thing is, it was almost like reading your own obituaries before you are dead. People didn’t know if I was going to croak it or not and usually they only say nice things – as is the custom – once you’re brown bread. “The players had a banner on the pitch and one of the fans behind the goal got a framed photo. I’m no longer on the football committee but the last few games of the season the club are letting me sit in the boardroom bit. Basically, it’s because of the size of the crowds we get nowadays and the fact I’m still a bit unsteady on my feet. I’m very lucky.”

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BOOKS | 13

A new chapter MIRANDA PEAKE TALKS TAKING THE HELM AT CHENER BOOKS AND WHY THE SHOP’S FAMOUS “NO CARDS, NO WRAPPING PAPER” POLICY STILL STANDS BY KATIE ALLEN

Taking over a much-loved business can be tricky. It’s even more daunting when the business in question was run by one man for 40 years. But that was the challenge that Miranda Peake – poet, artist and bookseller – grasped with both hands just seven months ago. She is the relatively new owner of independent bookshop Chener Books, which was founded and run by local bookselling hero John Kennedy since 1978. It moved to its current location on Lordship Lane in 1983. “At points I had doubts and thought, ‘Am I taking on too much?’ but it was good to think that John had made this work for 40 years and it would be so brilliant to carry that on,” says Miranda. “And also people have so much affection for the shop. People in East Dulwich and the wider community really wanted it to continue.” She took the helm in October last year. “It went well from the word go, which is really fortunate. I was really lucky to take over before Christmas, which is the busiest time for bookselling, and that made a huge difference.” Long-term residents of East Dulwich might have known Miranda from Chener anyway. A resident of East Dulwich and Camberwell since she graduated in the late Nineties, she first worked in the shop for two years in the early 2000s. Previously she had studied fine art and then for an MA, while working in other bookshops including Waterstone’s and the now-closed Borders on Oxford Street. She balanced working part-time at Chener with her career as an artist. “I really loved it, especially after working in such large bookshops in town, and John was so generous,” she says. “He kind of completely gave over responsibility for ordering and day-today management to the people who worked in the shop.” Eventually Miranda moved careers into arts administration, but it seemed that Chener Books had not yet forgotten her. She had already started experimenting with writing, and eventually decided to leave her job to dedicate her time to it. She began an MA in creative writing a couple of years ago, “and that’s when books came back in the picture”, she recalls. Miranda had popped into Chener to pay John a visit – and fortuitously he was looking for part-time staff. “I came full circle really!” John was set to retire in summer 2018, but sadly passed away before he got a chance to enjoy his retirement. John and Miranda had already discussed her taking on the bookshop, and after he died, she began talking to

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his family about the possibility. The sense of continuity was inspiring. “I think that was part of why I really wanted to do it, because John had done this amazing thing of keeping it running for 40 years,” she says. “I knew that he very much wanted the shop to continue.” Over the past six months, Miranda has been digging through the – often surprising – books that are already on the shelves. “You realise how much independent bookshops are shaped by the people who own them,” she says. “One of the things I love about the shop is that it is full of oddities that people have ordered through the 40 years of its life. Weird pockets of stuff like women murderers, all these books about torture. Somebody who worked here once must have loved these bizarre subjects. So it still has a lot of eccentricities in the stock.” She adds: “[I love] working out what sells best and what people are interested in. It’s so enjoyable choosing stock, choosing things you hope will sell, and if they do it’s really wonderful.” As a poet and member of the Hornet Press poetry collective, she

has a particular passion for poetry. She has moved the poetry titles to a more prominent section, which has really boosted sales and attracted poetry-lovers to the shop. Other top sellers have included the Michelle Obama memoir at Christmas, and less mainstream hits such as titles by independent press Fitzcarraldo Editions. “It makes me happy when we sell things from a small press, or you’re able to give a small press space in the shop. I think that’s really important.” She has swapped the large central table for more moveable furniture to enable Chener to put on events, the most recent of which was with Christopher Mallory, a diplomat during the Cold War. But one thing that has remained the same is the dedicated room for children’s books, and also – vitally – John’s “no cards, no wrapping paper” policy. She laughs when I ask about her comment in a previous edition of this paper that she would not be selling anything other than books. Mentioning her support for nearby card shops, she adds: “[If I did that] I think John would probably come down and tell me off in person. I think

ABOVE: MIRANDA PEAKE Photo by Lima Charlie

IT MAKES ME HAPPY WHEN WE SELL THINGS FROM A SMALL PRESS – I THINK THAT’S REALLY IMPORTANT

it would be really out of character with the shop and everything that John built the shop to be.” It’s testament to south-east London that there are a number of wellsupported indie bookshops. “A lot of people come in and say, ‘I’d rather order a book through you than through Amazon’,” she says. She feels similarly positive about ebooks. “People do still use Kindles of course, but I think the novelty has worn off, and my sense is that people use them when they have to, when they’re convenient, but the default is that people would buy a book. On both of those counts I feel like it’s a relatively good moment for bookshops.” At first she found the switch from full-time office work to being on her own in the shop five days a week (it is also open at the weekends) “a bit lonely, but once you get to know people, now I’m just chatting away all day! One of the nicest things is that people come in and chat. It’s really nice that mums and dads bring their kids in.” She adds: “I feel really at home here, even more so now I have this shop. I feel really embedded in the area.”

THE DULWICH DIVERTER


14 | PHOTOGRAPHY

Shooting stars MARK ALLAN HAS PHOTOGRAPHED A MULTITUDE OF MUSIC LEGENDS – AND HIS ICONIC IMAGES ARE CURRENTLY ON DISPLAY IN A FREE EXHIBITION BY NIKKI SPENCER

Think of any major musician from the last 30 years and the chances are that Mark Allan has taken a picture of them. Now he is sharing some of his most striking shots in his music photography exhibition – It’s (not) Only Rock ’n’ Roll – at the Barbican. The free show of 76 images spans Mark’s career, which began with him capturing an iconic image of Freddie Mercury at Live Aid and led to him travelling the world to take pictures of everyone from George Michael and Madonna to The Rolling Stones. They say that every picture tells a story and Mark certainly has plenty of tales to tell when we meet at Cafe G, just around the corner from his home in East Dulwich – where he has lived ever since he moved from Derbyshire to London to study for a diploma in photography at Goldsmiths. He says he got into photography because “it wasn’t writing”. “I am dyslexic but in the 1960s no one really knew what dyslexia was and I struggled,” he says. “I loved music and going to gigs and taking photos and gradually it dawned on me that I could do it and be paid for it. I can’t think of anything better.” In the summer of 1985 Mark says he was determined to go to Live Aid and queued from 5am to buy tickets at Piccadilly Records in Manchester. On the day of the concert he drove down to London at the crack of dawn with a friend. “When the doors opened we raced in so we were right at the front,” he recalls. “We then waited and waited and waited. It was a really hot day and they kept throwing water on the audience to cool us down. I had to cover my camera with my T-shirt to make sure it didn’t get soaked. “I took loads of photos that day but it was Freddie Mercury who stole the show. He was the one person everyone talked about. Queen took that gig very seriously. They rehearsed the most and it showed. “As I was in the audience I managed to get a shot of Freddie with the Live Aid logo in the background, which the event photographers who were higher up didn’t get. It was that photo that got me into Goldsmiths.” While studying at Goldsmiths Mark took photos at gigs across the capital for the student newspaper, London Student, and he built up a portfolio of work that he showed to John Blake, who was then pop music editor at the Daily Mirror. “George Michael was touring his first solo show, Faith, in Tokyo in 1988 and John asked me to cover it,” Mark says. “The photo I took back then of George kneeling on stage in an iconic BSA leather jacket is in the exhibition because it means something very special to me. I hadn’t been in the

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business that long and yet John gave me this chance.” Mark went on to cover more tours including Madonna’s Blond Ambition tour at Wembley and The Rolling Stones’ Urban Jungle tour in Rotterdam in 1990. “The Stones are always very professional and Mick Jagger and Keith Richards always make sure that photographers get a great shot of them together on the first day,” Mark says. “The raunchy image of Madonna in a John-Paul Gaultier basque is a classic one and years later when I was photographing Gaultier I got him to sign a copy.” Mark photographed Prince a number of times and two images feature in the exhibition. “One, which was taken in Belgium on his Diamonds and Pearls tour in 1992, is in silhouette but it is so clearly him with his guitar and his quiff. There’s also a side shot taken at Wembley in 1995 where you can see he has written

‘slave’ on his cheek as a protest to his record company.” In the mid 90s Mark saw that David Bowie was doing a tour in the US and so he rang his publicist Alan Edwards to ask if he had a photographer lined up. Alan suggested Mark come and meet David for lunch. “I loved Hunky Dory and had grown up listening to Bowie’s music, so this was a huge thing for me,” he says. “My first son had just been born and we were away in the Lake District at the time, but there was no way I was going to miss it. “I got a train down to London, raced home to Dulwich to grab my portfolio and then to Primrose Hill for lunch before getting back on the train and carrying on with our holiday. David and I got on well and I worked with him a number of times.” Mark chose a photo he took of Bowie sitting in a deckchair backstage at the Roskilde Festival in Denmark as the poster for his exhibition.

ABOVE: FREDDIE MERCURY AT LIVE AID Photo by Mark Allan

QUEEN REHEARSED THE MOST [AT LIVE AID] AND IT SHOWED

“I’m always looking for something that makes a different shot so when I saw a bucket and spade I asked David if he would hold them. He never stopped smoking so it’s not surprising that he has a cigarette hanging out of his mouth in the photo.” In 1996 Mark became the official photographer for Top of the Pops until it finished 10 years later. The exhibition includes an image of Robbie Williams when he stripped down to his “tiger pants” while singing Rock DJ in 2000. “It was the most complained about moment on the show”, Mark recalls. Over the years Mark has worked for magazines including Mixmag, Q and Select, and music shows on the BBC, Channel 4 and MTV. For the last decade he has documented performances for the BBC at Maida Vale studios, where recent subjects have included Dulwich’s Tom Misch and Christine and the Queens. The exhibition’s title, It’s (not) Only Rock ’n’ Roll reflects the fact that it also features images of some of the world’s greatest conductors, such as Riccardo Chailly, Bernard Haitink and Sir Simon Rattle. Mark has worked for the Barbican for a number of years and loves photographing classical concerts. “There is as much drama and excitement at a classical music performance at the Barbican as there is at a rock concert at Wembley”, he says. It dawned on Mark that he had built up a substantial collection of images, which others might like to see, when he got chatting to DJ Trevor Nelson. “Years ago I took some photos of Trevor interviewing Jay Z in New York and whenever I bumped into him he would remind me that he wanted copies. When we finally sat down and I started spooling through all my back photos his immediate reaction was, ‘Wow, you have enough for a book here.’ When the Barbican suggested a free exhibition of my music photographs I jumped at the idea.” Mark says it was hard narrowing down a lifetime’s work to just 76 images. “I have chosen ones that mean something special or say something about the time,” he says. “One I particularly like is of the Sex Pistols taken outside the 100 Club when they reformed for their Filthy Lucre tour in 1996. They were just doing it for the money and the laughs. “It’s a real contrast to a photo of the Spice Girls reforming in 2007 when they were all immaculate and everything was heavily branded. What has changed is that you can’t be that shambolic anymore. If you are doing a string of nights at the O2 it all has to be very polished now.” It’s (not) Only Rock ’n’ Roll is on display at the Barbican Music Library, Silk Street, until June 29. Admission is free.

MAY/JUNE 2019


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16 | DULWICH IN PICTURES

Studio surprises

PHOTOS BY LIMA CHARLIE

More than 250 artists from Dulwich and its neighbouring areas will throw open their doors to the public this month for the Dulwich Festival’s Artists’ Open House. They will give visitors a behindthe-scenes glimpse into their artistic process at more than 150 venues, welcoming them into their homes and studios for a rare opportunity to view their work in a unique and intimate setting. Artists taking part will present a wide range of work, including paintings, drawings, illustrations, prints, design, portraits, sculpture, ceramics, fine art, jewellery, mixedmedia collages, photography and more. They are located in East, West, North Dulwich and the Village, as well as Peckham, Camberwell, Herne Hill, Gipsy Hill, Forest Hill and Sydenham. Pictured on these pages are three of the artists taking part in this year’s event. Mark Pearson (above) specialises in contemporary figurative painting, primarily documenting the changing nature of Peckham in oils, acrylics and ink. He will also be showing paintings from his travels abroad and a selection of limited-edition prints.

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“Peckham is an inexhaustible subject,” Mark said in a previous interview with our sister title The Peckham Peculiar. “What I want to do is paint these streets. There’s a great amount of material and it really suits my style.” He added: “Peckham is a bit like an onion – there’s always another layer to peel back and explore.” Suzie Patrick (opposite page, left) creates her own range of tableware, making plates and bowls as well as mugs, teapots, cake stands and egg cups that all feature illustrated cats. Suzie, a trained illustrator, works with potteries in Stoke-on-Trent to manufacture the range. “It’s amazing up in Stoke, they’ve got so many facilities,” she said. The East Dulwich resident has also been experimenting with acrylics, going on artists’ forums and delving deeper into all the various mediums and different brushstroke techniques. “I’ve enjoyed taking on that challenge artistically,” she said. Suzie will be exhibiting at her home alongside her mother Emma Patrick, who will display still-life oil paintings that celebrate everyday objects. “I love Artists’ Open House,” Suzie said. “East Dulwich is such a creative place and I’m really pleased to be taking part in it.”

MAY/JUNE 2019


DULWICH IN PICTURES | 17

Frequenters of Franklins on Lordship Lane will be familiar with the work of Rian Hotton (right), which is on display there. For Artists’ Open House he will be exhibiting oils, acrylics and limited-edition prints. Rian, who lives in East Dulwich, mainly works in acrylics because he likes to layer the paint and work fast. His art is inspired by the built and natural environment, and he often includes references to current affairs. “It’s my way of putting my narrative of the world as it is now into the paintings,” he said. “In that way it’s almost viewed as a storybook.

MAY/JUNE 2019

“There’s a lot of material to draw on. I’m doing a painting at the moment actually that was inspired by the Extinction Rebellion [climate change protest] at Waterloo Bridge. I’ve been listening to and reading quite a bit about it, so I felt compelled to paint something to mark the event.” The Dulwich Festival’s Artists’ Open House takes place on May 11-12 and 18-19 from 11am-6pm. Some artists open for one weekend only and others are open for both. For full listings, timings and location details, visit dulwichfestival. co.uk

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DULWICH FESTIVAL | 19

Bikes and the Bard THE HANDLEBARDS ARE BRINGING SHAKESPEARE’S MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING TO DULWICH – AND IT’S A PERFORMANCE THAT’S NOT TO BE MISSED BY ELIZABETH RUST

Expect a fast-paced, slapstick and very lively rendition of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing when the HandleBards roll up to Dulwich in May. An all-male acting troupe of four will perform the comedy in the grounds of the Copper Beech Cafe at JAGS Sports Club, as part of this year’s Dulwich Festival. The audience will hear them recite some of the play’s most famous lines – like “speak low if you speak love” – while running around the stage, through the audience and perhaps even stealing food and drink from a picnic basket or two along the way. Dubbed the “world’s first cycling theatre company”, the HandleBards specialise in outdoor performances and are renowned for their “extremely energetic, charmingly chaotic and environmentally sustainable” production style. This summer, the company has two troupes – one all-male, the other all-female – cycling across the UK to bring their unique brand of the Bard to all corners of the country, before taking the tour overseas. While the men are performing Much Ado, the female troupe are touring with The Tempest. “We like to think of ourselves performing as Shakespeare would have done it: four men playing both male and female characters in the Shakespearean touring tradition,” says producer Paul Moss of the Much Ado performance. Paul founded the HandleBards in 2013 and they have cycled around the world to share their lively interpretations with audiences, this year travelling so far as the USA – to Virginia and New York – while carrying all their belongings, costumes, props and sets in two large trailers that fit on the back of their bicycles. “Shakespeare would have had a small touring cast, like ours, where not every role was played by an individual actor,” Paul says. In the HandleBards’ production, each actor plays at least five roles, while they run around the stage in a farcical manner reciting Shakespeare’s poetic text, and at the same time hopefully making the play relatable for a 21st-century Dulwich crowd. In other words, this is not Shakespeare like you’ve ever seen or heard before, so expect to be shocked, surprised and hugely entertained along the way. Much Ado About Nothing tells the story of a group of soldiers returning from war to the home of Leonato. One of the soldiers, Claudio, falls in love with Leonato’s daughter Hero, and the two decide to wed. At the same time, a long-running war of words between Benedick and

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Beatrice, who is Leonato’s niece, starts up again. In the run-up to the wedding Claudio and Hero decide to make Benedick and Beatrice fall in love too, by playing a series of pranks on them. Meanwhile, another one of the returning soldiers, Don John, concocts a plan to make it seem like Hero has cheated on Claudio before the nuptials. Melodrama, mayhem and mirth ensue. The production will take place outdoors come rain or shine – the troupe have only cancelled one show in six years and that was due to a red weather warning. But British audiences are a hardy bunch in their experience, says Paul. They wrap up warm, wear their wellies and protect themselves from the elements. “It’s normally quite nice. It rains less than we realise and we’ve only had a few rainy shows in the past,” Paul says. However, he advises that a poncho is always a good item to have on hand – just in case. What audiences can also do is bring a picnic basket full of food for themselves and the actors. Picnics become props for the cast and almost always get eaten, so bringing a few extra cakes might be necessary if you too want to eat.

Alcohol is also well received. In the past they’ve been known to do a full sweep of the audience, stealing all their beer, wine and gin. With that in mind, it might not be the time to crack open that expensive bottle of wine you’ve been saving for a special occasion. The aforementioned poncho in case of rain might also come in handy if chocolate cake or something else particularly messy does become a prop. When the actors performed Macbeth they threw “bloody” baked beans at each other and some members of the audience were caught in the crossfire. Those watching the performance can expect to get involved in the action in other ways too. This is very much a production that aims to include the viewers, which means that every performance is unique. “There really is no difference between the stage and the audience,” Paul explains. “It’s a shared gig. How the audience reacts is a big part of the play. It keeps the actors on their toes, and you’ll never see the same show twice.” A particularly memorable example was the HandleBards’ performance of Twelfth Night. During the production they asked an audience member to hold a bike pump on the stage.

HOW THE AUDIENCE REACTS IS A BIG PART OF THE PLAY

Then one of the actors pretended to charge at them with another bike pump, the idea being that the other cast members would stop him before he reached them. But during one performance which went slightly off-piste, the audience member decided to charge back. It was a real shock for everyone, with the possibility of a real fight happening on stage. Unsurprisingly the troupe’s entertaining and high-energy style has won them some high-profile fans – Sir Ian McKellen is quoted as saying the HandleBards are “uproariously funny” in a YouTube video. So even if it’s been a couple of years since you studied Shakespeare at school, rest assured that the actors intend to make the story as accessible as possible. It’s for families of all ages, after all, but even if you lose the plot, the HandleBards guarantee it’ll still be fun enough watching them run around throwing food at each other with, in the words of Leonato, a “skirmish of wit between them”. Much Ado About Nothing will be performed on May 18 from 4-6pm at the Copper Beech Cafe, JAGS Sports Club, Red Post Hill. For full details and tickets, visit dulwichfestival.co.uk/events

THE DULWICH DIVERTER


20 | SPORT

Anyone for tennis? THE NORTH DULWICH LAWN TENNIS CLUB PRIDES ITSELF ON ITS FRIENDLY AND INCLUSIVE ATMOSPHERE – AND NEW MEMBERS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME BY LUKE G WILLIAMS

Tucked away down a narrow, green pathway off East Dulwich Grove that it’s easy to pass by without noticing, the North Dulwich Lawn Tennis Club (NDLTC) possesses a touch of magic on the chilly and crisp April evening when I pay a visit to chat to committee member Ian Hirst. Emerging from the pathway into the club is like stumbling into a hidden world – NDLTC is a tree-lined oasis of calm overlooking the platforms of North Dulwich Station, with the permanent soundtrack of tennis balls pinging off rackets forming a reassuring backdrop. The club comprises four wellmaintained hard tennis courts – replete with floodlights to allow for evening matches during the dark days of a British winter – a homely clubhouse and a “practice wall”. Above all else though, it’s the club’s friendly and informal ethos that makes a deep impression, turning on its head the frequent stereotype that tennis clubs are socially exclusive and snotty enclaves. “It’s very informal and relaxed, and while there are lots of opportunities for competitive matches and we have some great players, our main focus is on inclusivity and social play,” Ian explains. “There’s no dress code or anything like that, and everyone mixes together. “However, we can’t rely on or take anything for granted. We are always thinking of ways to make sure the club is accessible and welcoming. “For example, we recently introduced a buddy system, so that we match any new members with existing members to help them get settled in. “People seem to join for one of two reasons: they want to keep fit or they’ve moved to the area and want to make friends. That was the case for me when I joined the club a couple of years ago. “It can be quite daunting joining a new club so we’re constantly trying to make it easier for people who want to get involved. We always make sure we are friendly and welcoming when new people join up.” NDLTC currently has around 250 adult members and 100-plus junior members, and runs a series of annual tournaments in addition to the regular teams who compete in senior and junior leagues. It’s thought that NDLTC has been in existence for several decades, but the exact date of its inception is currently unclear. “One of our members has been looking into the origins of the club for about six months,” Ian reveals. “So watch this space! “The club has certainly been here for longer than any of our members

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can remember – and we have one member who turned 90 last year and still comes along on Sundays to hit the ball against the wall and occasionally also has a game with us.” It’s an anecdote that perfectly sums up the club’s emphasis on tennis as a social and fun activity. “We have a lot of social tennis, where you don’t need to book a court, you just show up,” Ian says. Young players and members are also encouraged. “Every Saturday morning we run back-to-back coaching sessions for kids, while a group of us take it in turns to run the canteen and cafe. Our juniors start really young – just six years old.” Each year the club also arranges a host of social events, with the recent inaugural NDLTC Mixed Davis Cup having proved particularly successful. The cup took place on March 30 and supported the fundraising efforts of club members Ian Poole and Lucy Pickles, who are running the London Marathon to raise money for VICTA and Leukaemia UK. The event saw 40 competitors split into eight teams of five players and randomly assigned to one of eight nations: France, Australia, Serbia, Brazil, South Africa, USA, Spain and India. The players were encouraged to sport attire relevant to their adopted nation and also brought along homemade food to share, including spinach pie from Serbia, tapas from

Spain, biltong from South Africa and feijoada (a black bean stew) from Brazil. “We hope to make it an annual event, supporting a different local charity each year,” Ian says. “It was a really fun and successful event. We had people wandering in from the streets to see what was going on because they saw all the flags. “We raised over £2,200 for VICTA and Leukaemia UK through entry fees, a barbecue, raffle and a cake sale with generous donations from competitors, guests and local businesses. It was brilliant how many local businesses in Dulwich sponsored or donated items for the raffle for the event. We were overwhelmed by the response we had.” Local links are important to the club, which is seeking to expand its already impressive work supporting and facilitating wider access to tennis within the local community. “We are absolutely committed to our community work,” Ian says. “We host the Southwark schools’ tennis finals day each year. The Charter School uses our club on a Thursday afternoon for tennis coaching that we organise. We also host sessions for the University of the Third Age on Fridays as well. And we’d like to do even more in the future.” The club is also looking at ways to increase female participation. “We are very keen on encouraging more

ABOVE: THE WINNING TEAM AT THIS YEAR’S INAUGURAL NORTH DULWICH LAWN TENNIS CLUB MIXED DAVIS CUP Photo by Mark Rusher

PEOPLE JOIN TO KEEP FIT OR BECAUSE THEY’VE MOVED TO THE AREA AND WANT TO MAKE FRIENDS

female tennis players,” Ian says, “particularly girls, who sometimes seem to give up playing at around the age of 10 or 11. A couple of our female members are also acting as great role models to encourage our thriving junior section.” A further challenge for the future is continuing to redevelop and improve the club’s facilities. “We recently successfully funded a new roof, and now we want to replace our toilet and changing block with something more modern and comfortable for people, especially schools and [also have] better disabled access,” Ian explains. “We’re in the process of meeting with architects about that and then we will look at getting funding together. That’s one of our next steps as a club and will probably take a few years.” Of course, none of these events, or the club itself, would be possible without the countless hours of work and commitment that members of the club’s active committee devote to NDLTC. “Being involved with the club is a real labour of love,” Ian emphasises, sentiments which are clear from leafing through the handsome and glossy 32-page club newsletter that is produced every six months. “No one is paid for their work or anything like that, but thanks to a lot of volunteering we make the club work.”

MAY/JUNE 2019


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FOOD | 23

Jamaican jubilee RICE & PEAS IS CELEBRATING 25 YEARS IN EAST DULWICH THIS YEAR. OWNER DALAVAN CRAWFORD TELLS US MORE ABOUT HIS MUCH-LOVED BUSINESS BY MIRANDA KNOX

While plenty of businesses come and go in Dulwich, some have been around for so long they’ve almost become part of the furniture – and consequently it’s hard to imagine the place without them. Rice & Peas Caribbean Takeaway in East Dulwich is one of those important businesses. Here for as long as most people can remember, the distinguished shop has become an integral part of the area, serving traditional Jamaican and other Caribbean dishes in a friendly environment. It’s a place where customers are likely to have a chat and a catch-up while queuing for a hearty portion of jerk chicken, curry goat or ackee and saltfish in the lunchtime rush. Situated on Grove Vale, the shop – which opens six days a week, shutting only on Sundays – is located in a prime position, sitting opposite the Cherry Tree pub and just minutes away from bustling East Dulwich Station. Beyond the bold, eye-catching bright green exterior, it’s simply decorated – letting the food and friendly atmosphere do the talking, with nods to Jamaica adorning the walls inside. It is the type of shop that is sometimes perhaps taken for granted – people are so used to seeing it, even if they don’t necessarily eat there often, that it would still be a shock if it ever went. Owner Dalavan Crawford, 76, is originally from Jamaica, and set up Rice & Peas 25 years ago, alongside head chef Yvonne Suckoo, who has also worked there ever since. Dalavan – or Crawford as he is known to many – has lived in Dulwich for more than 30 years, and initially moved to the UK when he was 22 to join his brother who already lived here, working in the building industry to begin with. But his main passion has always been cooking, having helped out at his mum’s Caribbean cuisine restaurant when growing up in Jamaica. “I was born into cooking, it was a family passion,” he says. “I’m from the Caribbean and growing up my mother had a shop like this and I would help out. We would make similar dishes to here – curry goat, jerk chicken and oxtail. They’re dishes that bring back memories of my childhood.” Crawford still regularly goes back to Jamaica. “It’s a completely different way of life and environment,” he says. “The sun is always shining, and it’s more relaxed and easy-going. Here, you need to be focused. “The best thing about the shop for me is that every day I get to meet different people. It’s a sociable place.”

MAY/JUNE 2019

The shop, which is takeaway only, is run by a small, loyal, staff team of five, with head chef Yvonne leading the kitchen. Their most loyal customers have been popping in for years, often for the excellent lunchtime deal – £6 for stew chicken, curry chicken or fried chicken and a drink, between midday and 2pm. All dishes are served with rice and peas, plain rice or boiled food and salad. When speaking to Yvonne – who also grew up in Jamaica before moving to south London in 1994

– it’s immediately obvious just how passionate she is about her job and cooking. She says: “I just love cooking, my whole family does and they can all cook. “Growing up we had to be in the kitchen – watching and helping my mum, and learning from her and my family. “Most of the people who work here have been around since the beginning, it’s a good environment to work in and we have really nice customers – some have been coming to see us for 25 years.

ABOVE: DALAVAN CRAWFORD Photo by John Yabrifa

IT’S A FAMILYRUN PLACE

“I come in every day at nine and start preparing the food, and the weekends are our busiest times. I work six days a week but we used to work seven in the beginning – that was too much! “I get a lot of compliments about the food, about the jerk chicken especially, and curry goat is another one of my specialities.” Understandably, Yvonne likes to keep her cooking secrets quiet. “People always ask how I make my food, but it’s a secret,” she says. “I add my own spin to dishes, with the seasoning and spices – I make it special. “I’m proud of what we’ve achieved, and it still feels so good when someone comes in and tells me they love the food.” In fact, the dishes Yvonne serves have proved so popular, that the menu has never changed. Yvonne explains: “We’re consistent. People always come back because that’s what they like.” Further classic dishes on the muchloved menu include oxtail and rice, callaloo and saltfish, festivals, patties, fried plantain, hardough bread and banana fritters. But the popularity of Rice & Peas is down to more than just the delicious food – the shop’s regular customers also appreciate its enduring presence in a city that is forever changing. One customer wrote in an online review: “R&P deserves a plaque on its storefront. It’s a constant, a focal point, a rock of reassurance in a tsunami of gentrification. “The place is famous for its rice and peas – hot, startlingly spicy and moist... [Rice & Peas serves] delicious, fresh, hot food from a small menu that has been tested to death over the years and never fails to meet expectations.” Even when you’re scoring rave reviews online, running a business for a quarter of a century does of course come with challenges. Crawford says: “When we first set up there was a big demand for Caribbean food. There’s a lot more Caribbean outlets now, so it’s more competitive – we have to work hard to maintain our standard. “There are other [Caribbean shops] nearby, in Camberwell and Peckham. From time to time, customers will go to them too, but I still have a lot of regular customers.” Perhaps it’s because of this loyal customer base, the dedicated staff and family members who all pitch in, that make the business so well-loved within the area. Crawford adds: “My granddaughter Chesianie also helps out when she’s not at college, and so does my son Daniel when he can. “It’s a family run, family-orientated business.”

THE DULWICH DIVERTER


24 | TEA

Give it a chai EAST DULWICH RESIDENT LAUREN WINSOR IS LAUNCHING A NEW TEA COMPANY THIS MONTH. WE MET HER FOR A CUPPA TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT IT BY KATIE ALLEN

At The Dulwich Diverter, we’re not averse to a pun or two. So when we heard the story of new tea company Caraway & Peel, we couldn’t help but think: “If at first you don’t succeed, chai, chai again.” For founder and CEO Lauren Winsor, creating her new brand of handcrafted chai concentrates was a case of “trial and error”. She began by “looking up some basic recipes online”, and admits: “I very quickly realised that that’s not necessarily the best way to do it. It was a bit hit and miss.” But she used those initial recipes as a basis to start experimenting with. “I became a bit of a mad professor for a time,” she says, “trying different balances of the spices, different lengths of time steeping.” Once she had perfected her recipes at home, she “came across the issue that I could only make a certain amount on my hob”. And after searching various commercial kitchens, she eventually discovered a brewery in Bermondsey that had the giant liquid containers she needed to upscale production of her chais. While Caraway & Peel is now nearly ready to launch, the idea has been brewing at the back of Lauren’s mind for a long time. She drank her first chai – a hot drink with a base of black tea, blended with one or more spices, and traditionally very popular in India – about nine years ago. “One of my colleagues introduced me to it,” she recalls. “I’d never heard of it before, so I quizzed her about it. A couple of days later I tried it myself, and got a bit hooked. [Chai] is a bit more exciting than a peppermint tea.” At the time Lauren’s career was focused in a very different area. She had studied for a degree and master’s in photography, and went on to work as a commercial photographer, shooting still lifes for a while – a skill that can be observed in Caraway & Peel’s beautiful Instagram feed. She then taught photography at a foundation level before going on to teach degree students in the subject. Always a fan of cooking and baking, Lauren had been fitting in her chai experimentation around her day job, but after about 14 years in the industry she found herself in need of a new direction. “I had to ‘retire’ if you like due to health reasons, and I needed a line of work that I could fit around me,” she says. “I wanted to do something that I loved.” It occurred to her that she could turn her chais into a product that could be sold. Unlike the syrups and powders that are commercially available, Lauren’s chais draw on traditional methods, slowly steeping

THE DULWICH DIVERTER

loose-leaf black tea and spices for a long time to release all their flavours. All of the spices she has chosen have been purposefully picked for their Ayurvedic properties too, to help heal body and mind. The result is four delicious chai concentrates, which only need to be mixed with milk (dairy or dairy alternatives), and then heated or poured over ice. Lauren also recommends using them to perk up hot chocolate or coffee, or to spice up cocktails or a hot toddy. If baking’s more your thing, the chais also work well in recipes like

muffins, blondies, rice puddings and fruit crumbles. The four launch flavours are St Clements, a citrus-infused chai that combines the zestiness of oranges and lemons with cinnamon and cardamom and a touch of pepperiness. Ozinda’s, named after London’s decadent 17th-century chocolate house, is a cocoa-infused chai. Rye Chai blends warming fresh ginger with freshly ground cinnamon, green cardamom, black peppercorns and cloves. And finally, for those needing a little pick me up, there’s

WHEN I TRIED CHAI FOR THE FIRST TIME I WAS HOOKED

the Dirty Rye, which adds cold-brew coffee to the Rye Chai. Provenance is fundamental to Caraway & Peel. The tea is sourced from an Ethical Tea Partnership supplier, and the rest of the ingredients Lauren chooses herself from New Covent Garden Market. Meanwhile, the bottles she uses are all made from recycled glass, and she is planning to run a “refill and return system” with cafes. Starting a business has been a “steep learning curve”, although Lauren has managed to get her head around the tax returns aspect due to her experience as a freelance photographer. “In terms of everything else that’s been thrown at me through this process, it’s been a real eye-opener,” she says. “From social media, marketing, organising where you get shelf-life testing done, thinking about how to manage the finances, prioritising things… Every day is another challenge but in an exciting way.” Much of her inspiration in taking the plunge to start her own business has come from the entrepreneurial nature of the East Dulwich area and its surrounds. “There are so many brilliant small local brands at the moment,” she says. “And I love going for wanders in farmers’ markets and things at the weekend. “Franklins on Lordship Lane has lots of local produce. [The encouragement came] from seeing things around and being inspired: ‘Maybe I could do that as well!’” She also says that there’s a tendency in the area to “support local business”. Lauren grew up in Crystal Palace and has lived around the East Dulwich and Peckham Rye area for about five years. “It feels like proper London to me,” she says. “So much of London is getting cleaned up at the moment, but it seems like [here has] retained its vibrancy and it’s got an energy still, it’s got a hustle and a bustle. “There’s always something going on around this area: you’ve got the little pop-up markets, the nightlife. And there’s still a community here.” It took her “two or three months” to formulate the liquid chai concentrates that matched the exacting standard she wanted. “I got a bit sick of chai in the end!” she laughs. But all that hard work was worth it – Caraway & Peel is finally set to launch around the beginning of May. “If you’ve always wanted to do something, [this is] the time to do it,” says Lauren, to any other young entrepreneurs thinking of taking the plunge. “As time goes on and you get settled down, it’s not always as easy to do. But it’s now or never.”

MAY/JUNE 2019


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26 | DIVERSIONS TO THE GARDEN 1

TO THE KITCHEN 1

Kedgeree PATRICK BELTON FROM ROMEO JONES SHARES HIS RECIPE FOR THE CLASSIC DISH INGREDIENTS

On the allotment BY JANE MERRICK

A fox has taken up residence on our allotment. We’ve had many foxes exploring the plots over the years, but they tend to make their dens in the ditch alongside Cox’s Walk and make themselves scarce when there are people around. But this winter the new visitor has been bold enough to make a home on our site – and it’s a bit of a hoarder. Plotholders have reported the fox making off with possessions right under their noses, including a glove, a shoe, a pair of glasses and even an entire fish someone had bought from Borough Market. I just hope it doesn’t start digging up my veg. This spring I have broad beans and lettuce growing that should be ready to harvest at the end of June, and now it’s May I start sowing more tender crops like courgettes and French beans. As the prospects of a no-deal Brexit have faded, so have fears about soaring costs of fresh fruit and veg. Even with an active, well-tended allotment, it would be difficult to be completely selfsufficient anyway. However, growing crops that are relatively expensive in the shops – like French beans, courgettes, asparagus, artichokes and soft fruit – is one of the advantages of having a plot. If you don’t have an allotment and a small space like a patio or balcony, you can grow French beans in a large pot, either a dwarf variety or several growing up a wigwam of canes. The flavour is incomparable to supermarketbought beans. I sow French bean seeds in roottrainers, to encourage long root growth, and plant them out when

THE DULWICH DIVERTER

140g basmati rice 2 tsp dried vegetable stock 1 tsp turmeric ½ medium white onion, finely chopped 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped 1 knob of butter 3 tsp medium curry powder 250g fresh smoked haddock 100ml single cream 1 cup of frozen peas 2 poached eggs Fresh chives, finely chopped Salt and pepper Illustration by Jessica Kendrew

A firm favourite with the locals, and a destination for visitors to leafy Dulwich Village, Romeo Jones is both a deli and cafe that has been trading for 11 years and is still independently owned and run by founder Patrick Belton. Its menu draws from the seasonally relevant produce from the deli and tries not to pander to fads and the whims of modern eating. It delivers on quality and passion, taste and excitement, real flavours and real food. The dog-friendly cafe is known for its all-day brunches. One of the most popular dishes on the menu is kedgeree, which has its roots in India. The recipe is widely thought to have arrived in Britain during the Victorian era, when it was introduced as a breakfast dish at a time when AngloIndian food was considered to be the height of fashion. It’s very tasty, so nutritious and a fantastic way to soak up the excesses of the night before on a Sunday morning. The following recipe serves two people.

METHOD

Cook the rice according to the instructions on the packet, adding the vegetable stock and turmeric. Once cooked, set aside. Finely chop the onions and garlic. Melt the butter in a large non-stick frying pan, stir in the curry powder for a minute, then add the onion and garlic to gently soften, stirring occasionally. Break the haddock roughly into half-inch chunks and add to the pan along with the cream and peas, then lightly simmer for two minutes or until the peas are cooked. Add the rice to the pan and stir with the other ingredients until everything is piping hot. For the poached eggs, bring a small pan of water to the boil (with a dash of vinegar), put the eggs into the water and reduce the heat right down to under a simmer for three minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon. Turn out onto two warm plates, top with a poached egg, season with salt and black pepper and garnish with the chopped chives.

the seedlings are 10cm tall, when they’re robust enough to withstand most slugs – although they might need to be netted from foxes. Delinel is a good stringless dwarf variety that keeps producing over weeks if you keep harvesting, from the end of July after a May sowing. Some courgette varieties are suitable for pots too – as long as the container is larger than 45cm diameter. Patio Star works well, or a variety like Black Forest that can climb up a trellis. Both French beans and courgettes need lots of water. We will be selling French bean, courgette, tomato and plenty of other fruit and veg plants, as well as freshly picked rhubarb, jams and cakes, at our Dulwich Horticultural and Chrysanthemum Society stall at the Nunhead Cemetery open day on May 18 from 11am-5pm. When she’s not on her allotment in East Dulwich, Jane Merrick is a freelance journalist for the Independent, the Guardian, the Telegraph and the Times. Follow her on Twitter @janemerrick23, Instagram @jane.merrick and read her blog at heroutdoors.uk

MAY/JUNE 2019


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© Alys Tomlinson

Tickets allow unlimited re-entry for a year and includes a new multimedia guide, live talks and tours throughout the day, hands-on exhibits and free kids activities


UPCOMING



10-19 MAY 2019

B

EVENTS

PERFORMANCES • FAIRS MUSIC • ART • TALKS WORKSHOPS • WALKS

Sabrina Ghayour

(Food demo & tasting) with the best-selling author of Persiana. Tuesday May 7th 7.30pm The MCT at Alleyn’s

Stephanie Calman Confessions of a Bad Mother – the Teenage Years. How to survive with teenagers. Wednesday 15th May 7.30pm Bell House, College Road

Anna Pasternak Untitled: The Real Wallis Simpson. A look into the life of one of the most mis-judged women in British history. Thursday 16th May 7.30pm Alleyn’s School

dulwichfestival.co.uk Some highlights of the 2019 Festival; for other events, venue and ticket information please pick up a copy of the Events Guide from Dulwich Library or visit our website.

Behind the Law

Tommy Foggo – Superhero

I, Malvolio by Tim Crouch

SATURDAY 11 MAY / 2.30PM

WEDNESDAY 15 MAY / 7.30PM

ST BARNABAS PARISH HALL

DULWICH COLLEGE

Much Ado About Nothing with The Handlebards

The Power of Poetry: Caleb Femi, Yomi Sode & Guests

SATURDAY 18 MAY / 4PM

SUNDAY 19 MAY / 3PM

JAGS FIELDS

DULWICH COLLEGE

Tom Grant QC with stories of Court Number One, and William Clegg QC on his intriguing trials. Wednesday 5th June 7.30pm The MCT at Alleyn’s Photos: Preye Dontai

Elizabeth Macneal author of The Doll Factory, a highly anticipated debut novel set in London in 1850. Tuesday 11th June 7.30pm Bell House, College Road Dulwich Festival is kindly supported by

ALL EVENTS ARE TICKETED – for full details visit our website

w w w.village-books.co.uk or call 020 8693 2808


DIVERSIONS | 29 TO THE GALLERY 1

TO THE BOOKSHOP 1

The Thames from Somerset House

Murder Mile BY JESSICA GULLIVER

Cornelis Bol

Flemish artist Cornelis Bol’s vista of the Thames is one of a series of similar views that he painted for the diarist John Evelyn. In the foreground is Old Somerset House, a palatial residence commissioned by the Duke of Somerset in 1547. When the building was almost finished the duke was

overthrown and executed, and the property passed into the possession of the crown. The future Queen Elizabeth I lived there during the reign of her half-sister Queen Mary I. In the 1600s it was home to Anne of Denmark during the reign of her husband King James I and was renamed Denmark House. Anne commissioned a

number of additions, some to the designs of Inigo Jones. Royal occupation of Somerset House was interrupted by the English Civil War and in 1649 – around the time Bol painted this picture – parliament tried to sell it but failed to find a buyer. Instead it served as an army headquarters and Oliver Cromwell’s body lay in state

success but grew homesick and returned to England, where he continued to act but struggled to make ends meet. In the 1950s his wife encouraged him to look for roles in the new medium of television, which was growing in popularity in Britain. He went on to become one of the biggest small-screen stars of the era. In 1957 he was cast as the lead in The Curse of Frankenstein, which was the first of 22 films he made for Hammer Film Productions and was an overnight success. Cushing acted in more than 100 films, as well as TV, stage and radio roles throughout his career, and received an OBE in 1989. He died in 1994 aged 81.

Illustration by Peter Rhodes

TO THE PAST 1 Peter Cushing is best known for his roles in the Hammer horror films, including Baron Frankenstein and Professor Van Helsing in Dracula. Cushing was born in Surrey in 1913. His family lived in Dulwich during the First World War, where Cushing began his early education. They moved to Purley in 1918. Keen to act from a young age, Cushing applied to the Guildhall School of Music & Drama but was rejected. However, he continued to pursue the idea, writing 21 letters to the school until he finally won a place. After several years working in theatre, in 1939 he moved to Hollywood with just £50 to his name. He enjoyed some

MAY/JUNE 2019

there after his death in 1658. In the late 1600s the building entered a long period of decline and was later demolished. Following growing criticism that London had no great public buildings, work to construct the new Somerset House began in the 1770s. dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk

From the very first page of Murder Mile we’re brought smack bang into SE22 – Jane Tennison is bombing down East Dulwich Road in a police car, responding to a nefarious crime. Perhaps the most famous ma’am since Juliet Bravo, Tennison is a no-nonsense, straight-talking crime buster, forever synonymous with the TV show Prime Suspect. But what of the younger Jane? How and where did she cut her detective teeth? I bet no one suspected Peckham. Murder Mile is set in the bitterly cold winter of 1979. James Callaghan is coming towards the end of his time as prime minister, and it is the winter of discontent – there are widespread strikes by public service unions across the country and it is the coldest winter for 16 years. Snow and ice have frozen Britain to a standstill, including our corner of this great metropolis. Peckham Rye is iced solid, and there are hundreds of bin bags dumped there due to rubbish collectors in London striking, the dispute rumbling on. When a dead woman is found in Bussey Alley, just off Rye Lane, young DC Tennison – recently posted to Peckham CID – is one of the first on the scene. Questioning a hapless market stall owner, it soon becomes apparent that the unidentified woman is a murder victim. Soon afterwards another dead woman turns up mere metres away, and a grisly pattern is emerging. The method of murders is different, but there is no such thing as a coincidence when two women are killed in the same locale in the same time frame. And it’s not the end of the dead bodies in Peckham – there follows another disturbingly macabre discovery: a third dead woman. And then a severed arm is found in a bin bag on the Rye, followed closely by a decapitated head. Darkness upon darkness. The twists and turns in Murder Mile keep the pace intense and the reader hooked. The cast of characters also helps keep us turning the pages. There’s a homeless, drug-addicted rent boy, a disarmingly charming Harley Street dentist, and a retrograde culture of homophobia and casual sexism in the police room. The backdrop to the drama is detailed and authentic, and as you’d expect from a TV writing professional such as Lynda La Plante, Murder Mile is compelling in as much as Prime Suspect ever is – all those loose ends, a couple of red herrings, and all set in our area. £7.99, Bonnier Zaffre.

THE DULWICH DIVERTER


30 | DIVERSIONS 1 Across 8 Across is a regular local Saturday event.

TO THE PUZZLE 1

ALDHELM

ACROSS 1 CHNOORRSST (ANAGRAM) (5, 5) 8 AADEKMORRT (ANAGRAM) (4, 6) 9 REMOVE FROM POWER (4) 10 DRIVE BACKWARDS (7) 11 WORKER IN CLAY (6) 14 ESPIONAGE (6) 16 HAVE FAITH IN (5) 17 CONTENTED (5) 19 BIG CAT (6) 22 AMUSING QUALITY (6) 24 REAP (7) 27 STRINGED INSTRUMENT (4) 28 BROKEN INTO PIECES (10) 29 DAYS GONE BY (10)

ACROSS: 1 North Cross, 8 Road Market, 9 Oust, 10 Reverse, 11 Potter, 14 Spying, 16 Trust, 17 Happy, 19 Cougar, 22 Humour, 24 Harvest, 27 Harp, 28 Fragmented, 29 Yesteryear. DOWN: 1 No one, 2 Redress, 3 Hearsay, 4 Rake, 5 Set up, 6 Dyspepsia, 7 Porter, 12 Ingot, 13 Coagulate, 15 Pay, 16 Tea, 18 Prompt, 20 Grammar, 21 Revenge, 23 Rifle, 25 Sheer, 26 Pact.

SOLUTION

TO THE HAMLET 1

DOWN 1 NOBODY (2, 3) 2 COMPENSATE FOR (7) 3 RUMOUR (7) 4 GARDEN IMPLEMENT (4) 5 ESTABLISH, FOUND (3, 2) 6 INDIGESTION (9) 7 DARK BEER (6) 12 BLOCK OF GOLD (5) 13 CLOT, THICKEN (9) 15 GIVE MONEY TO (3) 16 HOT BEVERAGE (3) 18 ON TIME (6) 20 CORRECT USE OF LANGUAGE (7) 21 RETALIATION (7) 23 FIREARM (5) 25 PRECIPITOUS (5) 26 PEACE AGREEMENT (4)

TO THE PUB 1

The Palmerston on Lordship Lane

Illustration by Jessica Kendrew

TO THE STREETS 1

Ishmail Kamara Position Forward Sierra Leonean striker Ishmail Kamara has played for teams all over the world, in countries such as Sweden, Thailand, the USA and the Ivory Coast. In August 2010 he joined Margate FC, and signed for Dulwich Hamlet the following year, making his debut in November 2011 against Walton & Hersham. With the Swans 1-0 up well into the second half, Kamara headed in an equaliser, and DHFC went on to win 2-1. Kamara finished the season at Champion Hill with 15 goals in 23 league games. In autumn 2012 he signed for then League Two side Barnet, and has since played for clubs including Dartford, VCD Athletic, Bishop’s Stortford and Canvey Island. He now plays for Haringey

THE DULWICH DIVERTER

Illustration by Peter Rhodes

Born 1987

Borough, who are currently sitting second in the Isthmian League premier division. Read about the history of the Hamlet at thehamlethistorian.blogspot.co.uk

Grove Vale Library recently moved to a new space at 18-22 Grove Vale, which is almost twice the size of its former home. The owner

of the old site at 27 Grove Vale (above) was granted permission in April to change its use to retail, professional or public services.

MAY/JUNE 2019


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19 Jun – 8 Sep

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Modernist British Printmaking

le ry

CUTTING EDGE

THE COLOUR PALACE Dulwich Pavilion 2019 Opening June

Dulwich Pavilion, in partnership with

Official Paint Partner

Principal Pavilion Supporters

Summer Programme supporters

engineersHRW Michael Marks Charitable Trust

Cyril Power, The Sunshine Roof, c.1934 © The Estate of Cyril Power. All Rights Bridgeman Images/ photo Osborne Samuel Gallery, London/ The Colour Palace in context © Pricegore x Yinka Ilori


The Villa

pre-prep & nursery

SUCCESSFUL CLIMBERS,

HIGH ACHIEVERS

54 Lyndhurst Grove London SE15 5AH 0207 703 6216 thevillaschoolandnursery.com school@thevillaschoolandnursery.com Dulwich_Diverter_Villa_Ad_Feb_2019.indd 1

22/02/2019 14:59

Profile for Dulwich Diverter

Issue 19 of The Dulwich Diverter  

Issue 19 of The Dulwich Diverter  

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