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developing for the future Welcome to Dulwich College Shanghai Junior School

2013-2014

developing for the future


Contents Welcome from the College Headmaster Welcome from the Head of Senior School Staff Information Uniform and Equipment School Routines Curriculum Additional Support Assessment and Reporting Homework Holistic Opportunities Student Welfare Partnering with Parents Health and Safety Communication Calendar

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Welcome from the College Headmaster Welcome to Dulwich College Shanghai. Whether you are reading this as a prospective family, an existing one, or you have joined our College community this year, I do hope that you will find the contents of this Welcome Booklet helpful to you. It contains a wealth of information about our daily school life and will cover many of the questions you may have about your child’s educational journey with us here at Dulwich College Shanghai. I believe that our College is a unique school. Our students are cheerful, balanced, at ease with themselves and each other – yet excited and enthused by the challenges before them. The College succeeds in combining academic excellence with a wealth of cocurricular opportunities, all underpinned by a deep commitment to the individual needs and enthusiasm of each student. As Headmaster, I believe passionately in the importance of the individual. Every student at Dulwich College Shanghai is valued in their own right, and encouraged to develop his/her talents to the full in a community where there are no stereotypes and where every achievement, however small, is celebrated. Our College values are a more specific embodiment of our Philosophy and Objectives and allow us to define our aims in terms of student experience and development. Our students develop a well-rounded appreciation for the Academics and the Arts and they learn to understand and use technology to fulfil their potential. They learn to become inquiring and independent learners who are willing to take risks and use critical thinking as they embrace the concepts of lifelong learning. Through their time at the College, our students learn to express themselves confidently and appropriately through a variety of media and languages, and become principle-centred members of society. They learn how to show respect and to accept responsibility for others and for their environment. They are encouraged to be generous and caring, show humility, challenge social injustice and inequity, and value and respect diversity. Our students are shown that people can make a difference. They learn to inspire, influence, and collaborate with others and learn how to manage conflict. They also learn to become socially aware individuals and to show empathy to individuals, groups and society. They develop self-awareness and learn how to understand their own emotions while recognising their impact on others. Through our values, our students develop a clear sense of identity and self-esteem. They are shown how to control their emotions and impulses and taught how to adapt to changing circumstances. They become resilient and are shown how to be physically healthy. We aim that our students will become effective goal-setters and will have a clear sense of their future. By instilling these values in our students, we also aim to develop well-rounded young people who strive for excellence in all that they do and we make sure that they are well-equipped for future success. Finally, while we enjoy excellent facilities in a prime location of one of the most exciting cities of the world, it is the people in our community who make our College a special place. Our staff embodies a wide range of experience and a wealth of enthusiasm. Our parents are tremendously supportive and contribute a huge amount of time and energy to College events. Our students throughout the College are a real delight to teach, and they have a genuine appetite for learning. Together, we welcome you to Dulwich College Shanghai for the academic year 2013-2014.

Mr. Paul Friend Headmaster

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Welcome from the Head of Junior School We would like to formally welcome you and your family to the Junior School. Your child is special and it is our duty to ensure that they achieve their full potential in all areas of their development. Our aim, therefore, is to provide your child with the very best education and support, within an environment that is welcoming, safe and happy. Along with this, we aim to ensure that you, as a family, feel that you are an integral part of our community. By working in true partnership, we believe that we can create a meaningful experience for everyone connected with us. We believe that all our students are entitled to a well–resourced and rich learning environment that promotes their sense of responsibility and autonomy. This learning environment is developed, used, and nurtured by a committed and professional team of staff that have been recruited from across the globe. The international community in which we work is one that allows us to foster a sense of a global togetherness. It is one in which we can work together to develop an ethos where success and achievement culminate in high attainment. We aspire to create a learning environment in which all students feel valued and respected, and which fosters in them a love of learning and excitement for the learning journey. We believe that it is crucial to our success to create an environment in which mistakes are seen as part of the learning process. We are very excited about welcoming you to our school. Please take the time to read through this booklet and do not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions. The journey begins here.

Mr.Philip Stewart Head of Junior School

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Junior School Staffing Junior School Leadership Team Head of Junior School: Mr. Philip Stewart Email : philip.stewart@dulwich-shanghai.cn Telephone: 021 5899 9910 ext 210

Deputy Head of Junior School: Mrs. Kate Hornshaw Email: kate.hornshaw@dulwich-shanghai.cn Telephone: 021 5899 9910 ext 190

Junior School Class teachers To contact a member of staff, please use the following email structure: firstname.surname@dulwich-shanghai.cn

Year Group

Class teacher

Year 3 Group Leader Year 3 Year 3 Year 3 Year 3 Year 4 Group Leader Year 4 Year 4 Year 4 Year 4 Year 5 Group Leader Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 6 Group Leader Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6

Mrs. Rebekah Harman (UK) Ms. Joanna Forde (UK) Ms. Margaret Dyke (UK), Head of JS House System Mr. James Perry (NZ) Mr. Simon Burgess (UK), Head of Wing House Ms. Ceri Seymour (UK) Mr. Ryan Scott (NZ) Ms. Anna Hansen-Just (UK) Ms. Emily Morgan-Evans (UK) Mrs. Janine Griffiths (UK) Head of English Mrs. Charlene Bowker (UK) Mr. George Pearson (UK), Head of Mathematics & Co-Head of Howard House Mrs. Joanna Thurston (UK) Mrs. Rebecca Greenhough (UK) Mrs. Georgina Gray (UK) Ms. Natalie Cradick (UK) Mrs. Kimberly Bingham (US) Mrs. Shelley Hunt (AUS) Ms. Katie Leese (UK) Co-Head of Howard House Ms. Janine Higgins (UK) Mrs. Philippa Housden (UK) Head of Science

Junior School Learning Assistants Ms. Sam Bi (PRC) Ms. Tracy He (PRC) Ms. Lucy Yu (PRC) Ms. Landy Yang (PRC) Ms. Sue Wang (PRC) Ms. Xiao Min (PRC) Ms. Christina Zhou (PRC) Ms. Sherry Xiao (PRC)

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Ms. Ann Huo (PRC) Ms. Kelly Li (PRC)


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Junior School Specialist Teachers and Assistants PE Art ICT Music Library EAL Learning Support Primary Mandarin Teachers

Ms. Ellenie Coughlan (AUS) Head of Anand House, Mr. Elliot Scrivener (NZ) Ms. Pia Kanaan (UK), Ms. Haze Chen (PRC) Ms. Bobo Yu (PRC) Ms. Polly Osborn (UK), Ms. Lucy Thomas (UK), Mr. Patrick Sabberton (UK) Mrs. Yvonne Baumann (UK), Ms. Salina Xiang (PRC) Mr. Nick Saunders (UK), Ms. Jennifer Chen (PRC) Mrs. Joanna Taylor (UK), Mr. Christopher Harmon (US) Ms. Virginia Zhang (PRC) Ms. Alin Yu (PRC) Ms. Huang Xiaoyan (PRC) Ms. Freya Zhang (PRC) Ms. Natalie Jiang (PRC) Ms. Spring Xing (PRC) Ms. Judy Zhang (PRC) Ms. Mandy Yu (PRC)

Junior School Administrative Staff To contact a member of staff, please use the following email structure: firstname.surname@dulwich-shanghai.cn or telephone 58999910 and use the extension numbers below.

Name

Area of Responsibility

Extension Number

Ms. Joey Chen (PRC)

Junior School Office

623

College Contacts To contact a member of staff, please use the following email structure: firstname.surname@dulwich-shanghai.cn or telephone 58999910 and use the extension numbers below.

Name

Mrs. Lorna Wilson (UK) Mr. Stephen Buckland (UK) Mr. Graham Lyons (UK) Ms. Stella Shi (PRC) Ms. Irene Hu (PRC)

Area of Responsibility

Business Administration College IT Systems College Sport College Bus Service College Catering and Security Passes

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Extension Number

252 115 503 602 222


Uniform and Equipment Uniform The College believes that the school uniform should be worn with pride. It is a symbol of belonging and a statement that students are ready to learn. As such, students are expected to wear the uniform as stated in this publication. Any deviation from this will be questioned. A uniform list is also available from the Uniform Shop, the Admissions Office, or via the College website. Please note that there are some rules that apply specifically to the wearing of school uniform and students’s general appearance: • Shoes should be black leather and have heels that are no more than 4cm; any higher and they are unsafe while running around outside or on the relatively steep stairs. • All uniform must be clearly labelled. • Extreme haircuts or dyed hair are not permitted. Hair is to be tied back if shoulder length or longer. • Jewelry, apart from stud earrings, may not be worn. • Hair accessories must be navy blue. “Fun” hair accessories are not permitted. • Formal uniform is worn for certain College events where the objective is to instill a sense of pride and respect for formal occasions. Parents are asked to fully support these regulations. Girls Summer Uniform White short-sleeved shirt College tie Navy Skort Navy knee high socks Black leather shoes

Boys Summer Uniform White short-sleeved shirt College tie Navy shorts Navy socks Black leather shoes

Girls Winter Uniform White long-sleeved shirt Kilt Navy cardigan with College Crest (or blazer for Formal Uniform) Navy tights or knee high socks School tie Black leather shoes

Boys Winter Uniform White long-sleeved shirt Grey trousers Navy sweater with College Crest (or blazer for Formal Uniform) Navy socks School tie Black leather shoes

There is an optional red fleece with the school crest, which can be worn outdoors and an optional coat with the school crest. The Dulwich College hoodie is for outdoor use only.

PE Kit

Students wear summer and winter PE uniforms with trainers. Students should also buy the House PE kit. Anand: Purple Shackleton: Green

Howard: Wing: 7

Red Blue


developing for the future JUNIOR SCHOOL (Years 3 to 6) GIRLS

Girls Uniform Formal Uniform WINTER

SUMMER

White long-sleeved shirt Tie

White short-sleeved shirt

Daily

Tie

White long-sleeved shirt

Merino cardigan

Tie Blazer

Navy skorts

Cotton cardigan

Checked skirt

OR

Navy knee-high socks or Navy tights Black leather shoes Navy trousers

Navy knee-high socks Black leather shoes

Checked skirt Navy knee-high socks or Navy tights Black leather shoes

Navy short socks

SUMMER

WINTER

PE summer top

PE winter top

PE PE summer shorts

Compulsory

White ankle socks

PE winter trousers White ankle socks

Trainers

Trainers

Optional

OR

JUNIOR SCHOOL (Years 3 to 6) BOYS

Red school bag

School cap

2-in-1 Coat

School hat

Scarf

Boys Uniform Formal Uniform WINTER

SUMMER

White long-sleeved shirt Tie

White short-sleeved shirt

Cotton sweater

Tie

Daily

White long-sleeved shirt

Merino sweater

OR

Navy shorts

Tie Blazer

Navy trousers

Navy trousers

Navy short socks

Navy short socks Black leather shoes

Black leather shoes

Navy trousers Navy short socks Black leather shoes

SUMMER

WINTER

PE summer top

PE winter top

PE PE summer shorts PE winter trousers White short socks

White short socks

Trainers

Trainers

HOUSE KIT (Years 1 to 13)

Compulsory

Optional

OR

Red school bag

School cap

2-in-1 Coat

School hat

House Kit

Howard

Wing

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Shackleton

Anand

Scarf


What Should Students Bring to School? It is vital that students are well prepared for the school day. To support this students are requested to bring the following equipment daily: • Home/school communication books • Reading books • Pencil cases

Water Bottles Each student should have a clearly labelled water bottle with them at all times. Fluids are crucial to a student’s ability to concentrate. Students will have access to these bottles both during class times and during break and lunch. Having their own water bottle is also environmentally friendly.

Security

Staff and students are expected to respect the property of the College and of others, and to take all reasonable measures to safeguard this property and their own personal items they bring to school. The College cannot accept responsibility for personal items brought into the College. Individuals have responsibility for their own belongings. The College provides a safety deposit storage facility to assist in safeguarding personal property. Where lockers are provided, students should make use of these for storage of personal items. Students are responsible for the care of all items in the locker and for providing a suitable padlock to ensure security.

Money

Money must not be brought to school unless for a fund raising event - neither is it to be taken on outings unless specified. All monies that are brought into school should be given to either the class teacher or the Junior School office for safe storage.

Lost and Found

To support students in looking after their personal belongings the College requests that all items of clothing are clearly labelled. Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own items. Should a student lose something during the school day, they should inform the class teacher who will support them in looking for it. If this is not successful, parents should contact the Junior School office and check the lost property box located there. If the item of clothing is not found it may have been placed in the lost property cupboard located in the music corridor. Students should not check the lost property cupboard without an adult present.

Technology Studywiz is a Virtual Learning Environment which enables students to extend their learning beyond the classroom. Given access to resources and websites that have been used in lessons, they are able to re-visit and consolidate their understanding of any topic. Studywiz also allows the students to work collaboratively, share files, partake in discussions, and get involved in online chats about any given topic. They can share their work with friends and family, and offer constructive feedback to their peers. Finally, it is a great tool for sharing useful information including curriculum details and photos of events.

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School Routines Timetable The Junior School timetable has been developed to ensure as much consistency and flow during the day as possible. This allows for more understanding and better learning on the part of students, thus enabling them to maximise their learning opportunities. 8.15am 10.25am – 10.45am 11.55pm – 12.55pm 12.55pm – 1.30pm 3:30pm

School day begins/registration Break time Lunchtime Assembly End of school day

Start of the Day Each day begins promptly at 8.15am.

Lunch and Break Times

The College is acutely aware of the importance of these times of day for student’s health and social development.

Break Time

Break time lasts for 20 minutes from 10.25am until 10.45am. The Junior School has zoned areas for students who wish to take part in a variety of activities. Quiet areas, sporting areas, climbing frames, and an area for traditional games are all available for students to access. Students are encouraged to bring a healthy snack to eat at break time. However, parents are reminded that there is a gap of only 1 hour 10 minutes between break time and lunch time. Students must not have the following items as a snack: • Sweets • Lollipops • Large bags of crisps / biscuits • Chocolate The eating of fruit and vegetables as a healthy snack is encouraged. Please be aware that foods containing nuts are not permitted as the Junior School is a nut free environment and there are several students with nut allergies.

Lunch Times

The Junior School places great emphasis on this time of day for students. It is a time when they socialise and also take in the nutrition required to learn and develop. All students have lunch between 11.55pm and 12.55pm. Students in Years 5 and 6 eat in the Senior School canteen. In addition to giving them more time to eat, this location serves as a good introduction to the transition to the Senior School. Students in Years 3 and 4 eat in the Junior School canteen. All school meals are provided by an external catering company, see page 11 for more details. The menu for the week can be viewed via our College website, in the main entrance and in the Junior and Senior School canteens. 10


Packed Lunch

Students who bring a packed lunch from home will eat in the canteen at the same time as those having school lunch. The College cannot accommodate deliveries from local restaurants for students during lunchtime. If parents are bringing in hot food from home, it should be clearly labelled and left in the designated area at the Main Reception. It will then be delivered to the relevant canteen in time for the students to collect.

Catering Services

The College uses the Sodexo Company to provide staff and student lunches and snacks. Sodexo uses the onsite kitchen in the Senior School to prepare all meals. Meals for students in Years 3 and 4 are then taken the short distance to the Junior school Canteen where everything is kept hot using high quality heating pans. There is a College Nutrition Committee that consists of representatives from DUCKS, Junior School and Senior School staff and students as well as parents of students from all three schools. The Nutrition Committee offers staff students and parents a chance to feedback directly to the Manager of Sodexo any concerns, suggestions or criticisms that they have. Regular surveys are taken and acted upon. Sodexo offers the following services to Junior School students: There is a choice between: • Western or Asian Set Menu: salad bar, one main course dish with meat or fish, vegetables and rice/potatoes, one dessert, one drink, free flow of fresh fruits. • Customised Sandwich Set Menu: salad bar, one sandwich, one dessert, one drink, free flow of fresh fruits. All Sodexo menus are made under the supervision of our Nutritionist.

Payment System

Credit can be added to lunch accounts between 8.00am and 4.00pm in the Senior School canteen area.

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Students leaving before the end of the school day If parents are aware that their child will need to leave school early during a school day, they must inform the class teacher by email or in writing. The class teacher will then inform the Junior School Office. The student must be collected from the Junior School Office. On leaving the site, a permission slip, signed by the class teacher, must be submitted to the Security Guards. The Guards will be instructed to turn back any student who does not have the required permission slip.

End of the School Day The day ends at 3.30pm. The procedures for the end of the day differ depending on the age of the Students.

Years 3/4

Students should be collected from the door of their classroom by an adult who is known to the class teacher. A parent should inform either the class teacher or the Junior School Office if there is to be a change of person picking up the student. Junior School Learning Assistants will take students who go home on the school bus to the buses at the end of the school day. They will then remain in the area to ensure that the students stay on board. Buses leave the College at 3.45pm. Any student who misses the bus should inform the Junior School Office, which will then inform a member of the Junior School Leadership Team and contact parents.

Years 5/6

To help students develop their independence, they are asked to make their own way from the classroom to meet with their designated adult. Students will be taught what to do should the appropriate adult not be present. This will involve returning to the classroom where the class teacher will be present for 10 minutes at the end of the school day. In cases where a student needs to return to the school after this time, they will be directed toward the Junior School Office. To answer any minor questions, a member of the Year 5 and Year 6 teaching team will be in the College Reception area. Students going home on a school bus will make their own way down to the allotted areas. Junior School Learning Assistants will be available to ensure they are safely on board.

School Busses The College offers a bus service in Pudong and Puxi with one-way and return trip options. Services may not be available to distant locations and a bus stop will not be created for fewer than three students. One-way bus riders are charged at a lower rate than round trip bus riders. Bus refunds for students withdrawing from the College are calculated in the same manner as tuition fee refunds for withdrawing students. Bus refunds for students who need to change their bus arrangements during the school year will be handled individually. All bussing arrangements should be made through the Bussing Department via Student Support Services located in the Senior School building. Please contact stella.shi@dulwich-shanghai.cn.

Bicycles

It is important that parents are aware of the regulations regarding bicycles in Shanghai. From the College perspective, the priority is to ensure that students are kept safe and, to this end, parents are encouraged to insist that their sons/daughters wear safety helmets whenever they are riding their bicycles. The College is aware of how dangerous roads in Shanghai can be and regularly receive reports of accidents, many involving fatalities of cyclists. 12


Traffic Arrangements The areas directly outside the College gates are very busy during drop-off and pick-up times. On the advice of the Jin Qiao traffic police, the College operates a drop-off/pick-up routine. In order to create a safe drop-off/pick-up environment for the students outside the College gates, parents are requested to support the College by telling their driver to strictly adhere to the following regulations and listen to instructions given by school staff and school security guards. Parents are asked to drop off and pick up students in the drop off/pick up area and leave straight away. Cars must not double or triple park when dropping off or picking up students on Lan An Road or drive/park against the flow of traffic. Cars must not make a U-turn on Lan An Road or park at the drop off/pick up area or on the zebra crossing. Guards are stationed outside the gates of the main campus in order to assist with drop-off/pick-up. There is a coned- off section of approximately four car lengths directly in front of the main College gates for drop-off/pick-up. Parents should be aware that it is illegal to park anywhere on the College side of the road and traffic police can, and do, fine drivers who disobey this rule. Double parking is never allowed as it hinders the flow of traffic. The guards can only assist with traffic control and require the cooperation of parents/drivers in following their directions. Below is a map detailing the above, which parents are asked to share with their drivers.

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Curriculum The College aims to develop well-rounded young people who strive for excellence in all that they do. It promotes effective learning and communication, and the pursuit of individual academic success, encouraging all students to become principle – centred members of society. The Junior School curriculum is largely based on the English National Curriculum. The objectives are delivered in a creative and exciting cross-curricular manner that incorporates both student interests and the need to cater to differing learning styles. The curriculum also takes into account the China context and the College Philosophy and Objective statements and is adapted to provide localised, real-world connections. It offers students the opportunity to work in depth, giving them the time they need to reflect and consolidate, supporting their natural curiosity and stimulating their creativity. In the Junior School the curriculum content is not set in stone, consequently materials are adapted each year to best meet the needs of the students and also take account of the changing world. In particular current news events often drive learning and teaching. The curriculum allows students, teachers and parents to work together, using a wide range of resources to create a challenging, distinctive and exciting experience. Overleaf, there is a short synopsis of each area of the curriculum. Further details can be obtained from staff within the Junior School. .

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English The aim of English teaching in the Junior School is to continue the language learning that students have already begun and to help them become proficient users of English throughout their lives. The Junior School follows the English National Curriculum objectives, and individual teachers adapt units to create a flourishing working environment, creatively incorporating their topics into their English lessons. Planning is carried out with knowledge of the level that the students are currently working at, and teachers differentiate accordingly. Each year group enjoys a daily hour of dedicated English teaching during which they learn through speaking, listening, reading and writing. These aspects of English are not only interdependent, but mutually enhancing. Language is fundamental to communicating, learning and thinking. The aim is to make students become confident speakers with the ability to listen carefully and critically assess the thoughts of others. They are encouraged to speak clearly, fluently and confidently to different people, and for a range of purposes - to listen to others, to understand, and to respond. These skills are developed with the use of role-play, debating, and class and group discussions. Students are introduced to a wide variety of increasingly challenging literature, as well as non-fiction texts. They develop as enthusiastic, independent readers who can analyse, evaluate and criticise. As they gain full fluency, the forms of teaching will shift to emphasise reading and composition skills at text level. Students write for a range of audiences, which gives them a purpose for their writing. They have frequent opportunities to plan, draft and re-draft their work within group and whole-class teaching. They are taught how to structure their writing and how to interest the reader by using a rich vocabulary. In addition to their timetabled English lessons, the students also have an hour session in the Junior School Library. A Teacher Librarian, who works closely with the classroom teachers to enrich the topics and make crosscurricular links, where appropriate, runs these lessons.

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Mathematics Mathematics is fundamental to students’s learning and one of the core subjects in the English National Curriculum. The Junior School follow the principles of the UK revised Primary Framework for Mathematics, which provides the key skills and objectives that are taught. Each class participates in an hour of Mathematics per day and the teacher adapts the work to suit the needs and interest of the class. Within each class, materials are differentiated to meet the needs of each student. Students are placed into ability groups based on their previous year’s achievement, teacher assessment, or entrance tests. Standards are high as even in the lower sets students work at levels well above national UK averages. Students may move sets during the year as their needs will change over time. To ensure that students feels confident in Mathematics, there is a strong emphasis on the thorough learning of mental arithmetic and core skills. There is also a stress however on developing capabilities to analyse information and solve problems.

ICT ICT plays an important role in the Junior School, the aim being to provide students with the tools needed not only to continue their studies into the Senior School, but also to prepare them for an ever-changing world where technology plays an increasing part. The role of ICT in the Junior School is three-fold. Firstly, each class has a dedicated hour in the iMac lab where they learn the basic skills outlined in the English National Curriculum: These are: • • • •

Finding things out Developing ideas and making things happen Exchanging and sharing information Modifying and reviewing work as it progresses.

Where appropriate, these skills are linked to topics occurring within the year group in other curriculum areas or taught through projects that give students the opportunity to gain knowledge of ICT and to implement these skills. Secondly, the students have access to a range of technologies in the classroom including an interactive Smart Board. Each year group also has access to a bank of Apple laptops, which can be booked by teachers to support work in the classroom as appropriate. This provides the students with a range of learning tools to support their studies and helps them to communicate their ideas in a variety of ways, whether it is through the medium of film, photography, presentations, or simply written reports. Thirdly, the Junior School operates a virtual learning environment, Studywiz, which allows students and teachers to extend their learning beyond the classroom, enabling them to continue school work, discuss ideas with their peers, and complete tasks set by the teacher both at home and at school. The thread that links these areas is a dedication to ensuring that the students learn to use the technology available in a responsible and safe way. Each year, students are given specific lessons on Internet safety and guidance on how to deal with the intricacies of on-line communication. This is also part of the PSHCE curriculum. (See page 21) 16


Science The scientific knowledge and skills that have been taught and fostered in DUCKS are further developed in the Junior School. The comprehensive programme of study covers scientific enquiry, life processes and living things, materials and their properties, and physical processes. A balanced approach is advocated, which teaches students scientific theory and facts alongside hands-on practical experiments. A major emphasis is placed on scientific enquiry so that the students can carry out investigations which further extend their understanding of the units and objectives covered. This is done through initiating classroom discussions, where the students can make new connections, test predictions, draw conclusions, and formulate their own questions. Students are also taught how to use Science equipment to support their investigations.

Mandarin Mandarin is taught in one-hour periods, four days per week by a dedicated Primary Mandarin Team. There are three pathways: • Mandarin as a Foreign Language (MFL) • Mandarin as a Second Language (MSL) • Mandarin as a Native Language (CNL)

MFL

This course is designed for non-native/non-heritage students emphasising oral communication with an element relating to Chinese culture.

MSL

This course is designed for heritage students who have been living out of China (or in other areas where Chinese is not used as an official language), or non-heritage students who have been living in China for a long time and are almost fluent in speaking Mandarin.

CNL

This course is designed for students for whom Chinese is their first language. The learning objectives focus on furthering student knowledge of literature and develop their critical thinking skills. Further information on the Mandarin Curriculum is available on the College Website.

Humanities History and Geography are taught through cross-curricular Humanities topics. The curriculum is skills based, focusing wherever possible on student interest. Students study Geographical language and carry out Geographical enquiry including fieldwork and map work. Whilst studying places and environments the students learn about the locality and compare their lives here with those of people in other parts of the world. They gain insight into different cultures and associated religions and begin to recognise the importance of sustained development for the future of mankind. Students are introduced to chronological understanding, historical enquiry and interpretations of history by studying significant people, events, and places from both the recent and more distant past. Perspectives may be political, economic, technological, scientific, social, religious, cultural, or aesthetic; the students learn about change and continuity. Whole class teaching is combined with enquiry-based research activities during which students are encouraged to present their findings and knowledge in a variety of ways using a wide range of media. 17


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Physical Education (PE) The PE programme is based on the English National Curriculum and takes into consideration the facilities, equipment, climate, student population, travel, and local culture in Shanghai. PE is taught for two hours per week by specialist teachers from across the College. Emphasis is placed upon promoting enjoyment through participation, co-operation, competitive spirit, sportsmanship, etiquette, and safe practice. The aim is to equip the students with the skills and experiences that will enable them to maintain a healthy life style in the years to come. Areas covered include Athletics, Gymnastics, Dance, Games, Swimming, and Outdoor and Adventurous Activities. Each student is provided with a broad range of activities and learns the basic skills relevant to them. This is supported by health education and both peer and self assessment. PE offers a variety of sports under the following headings: • Invasion games – including football, touch rugby, netball, basketball and hockey • Batting and fielding games – including cricket and t–ball • Net/wall games – including badminton and table tennis Opportunities for competition are given through House activities, Sports Day and an additional competitive sports programme that run after school and at weekends. (see Sports Handbook). Students who have a PE lesson in the morning can arrive at school in their PE kit. They must then change into their uniform after their PE lesson. Students who have a PE lesson in the afternoon must arrive at school in their school uniform and change at lunchtime. They can then remain in their PE kit until the end of the day

Library

The Junior School Library contains over 10,000 resources. The collection includes fiction and non-fiction books, audio books, and a comprehensive reference section. Within the library students have access to computers for research and on-line resources. The Library is staffed by a teacher-librarian and a support team. Each class has a weekly, scheduled library lesson, when students borrow and return materials, are taught information literacy skills, how to use the online catalogue and databases as well as literature appreciation. Students can also visit the Library during lunchtime on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, from 12.30 – 12.55pm. The library is open to parents before and after school from 8.00 - 8.30am and 3.30 – 4.00pm daily.

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Art The Junior School has a fully equipped Art room complete with an on-site kiln and access to computers for research purposes. The art and design curriculum focuses on developing a love of art and providing opportunities for self expression and use of the imagination. A variety of media are used including print making, ceramics, construction and textiles. Student art work is displayed throughout the school. The programme is inextricably linked to the topic work in each Year group. It is broken down into five distinctive areas: 1. Artistic perception: processing, analysing and responding to sensory information through the use of language and skills unique to the visual arts. 2. Creative expression: application of processing skills in composing, arranging work and the use of a variety of contexts to communicate meaning. 3. Historical and Cultural context: understanding the historical contributions and cultural dimensions of each topic, thereby developing a sense of their cultural and geographical surroundings. 4. Aesthetic valuing: critical analysis of their own work and that of others. 5. Connections, relations and applications: developing competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication and time management.

Music The Music curriculum is designed to ensure that every student has the best possible opportunity to develop their skills, understanding, appreciation and passion for music at all levels. Aims: • • • •

Students will sing songs and play instruments with increasing confidence, skill, expression and awareness of their own contribution to a group or class performance. Students will improvise and develop their own musical compositions in response to a variety of different stimuli with increasing personal involvement, independence and creativity. Students will explore their thoughts and feelings through responding physically, intellectually and emotionally to a variety of music from different times and cultures. Students will improve their understanding of vocal and instrumental solo and ensemble performance and develop effective theoretical and aural skills.

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Year 3

Year 3 students will be given a string instrument (violin, viola, cello or double bass) and follow an enriched course using “String Essentials”. They will develop: • Performance technique and understanding • Skills using percussion, singing, music software, composition and listening activities.

Year 4

In order to maximise the learning achieved during the Year 3 String Programme, students will be encouraged to continue with their string instrument for use in Year 4 lessons. This is not compulsory. Parents who want their child to continue will need to purchase an instrument. We recommend that individual tuition (paid for by parents) with a specialist teacher takes place as well. The Year 4 curriculum will consist of a class-based ensemble programme where continuing string students will be catered for alongside those students who have chosen not to continue with strings. Those who have chosen not to will develop vocal, instrumental, theoretical, aural, Music ICT skills and music appreciation through enriched schemes of work including Music of the Caribbean, Indian rhythm, The Blues and Music for Cartoon Action. Students who continue strings will also develop skills in each area through combined activities.

Year 5

All students in Year 5 will be given a band instrument and tuition for the year in a programme using the enriched course “Standards of Excellence”. They will develop: • Performance technique and understanding • Skills using percussion, singing, music software, composition and listening activities.

Year 6

Year 6 students will continue to improve instrumental skills through different ensemble and composition programmes. They are encouraged to choose their preferred instrument as part of each programme. If they do not learn a specific instrument they will use keyboard and tuned and untuned percussion within ensemble work. They will improve understanding of musical language, theory and context whilst becoming confident performers and composers. 20


Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education (PSHCE)

This programme plays a vital role in supporting each student’s social and emotional development. As well as specific PSHCE lessons, themes will be supported through assemblies and the general behavioural expectations in the Junior School. Class teachers, who have the most contact with their students, run the PSHCE programme. Staff such as the Head of School, Deputy Head of School, and the College Guidance Counsellor also support the programme.

Service Education

Roots and Shoots:

In past years the College has been involved in The Roots and Shoots planting tree programmes, environmental projects and fundraising around Shanghai. The staff and students of the Junior School have agreed to support this charity once again during the academic year 2013-14

Panda Sanctuary:

The Junior School will again support the Panda sanctuary in Chengdu, Sichuan Province until June 2014. In a change for this academic year a female bear, Wei Wei has been be co-adopted with Dulwich College Beijing.

Animal Asia Rescue Centre - Moon Bears:

The Junior School will again support the plight of the Moon Bears. The aim is to allow us to adopt a rescued Moon Bear, Xuan Xuan at the Animals Asia Rescue centre, in Chengdu.

Shanghai Healing Home:

This charity supports children and babies who need emergency dental and mouth re-structure treatment due to being born with severe cleft palettes. Many of the babies are abandoned to the Shanghai Healing Home, which is conveniently located in Jin Qiao, providing easy access for students. The aim is to fund raise and also look at the concept of service.

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Additional Support Learning Support The Junior School offers individual programmes for students with a diagnosed specific learning difficulty, and provision for students who may require learning support at some point during their academic studies. All provision is aimed at the individual student’s specific learning needs and is cross-curricular wherever possible. Student support is often through individual or small group withdrawal systems, but is also carried out through support teachers by creating effective learning strategies to help remove barriers to learning in mainstream classes.

College Guidance Counsellor The College Guidance Counsellor is available to students, parents and staff to provide counselling and advice as needed. The Counsellor also supports the PSHCE programme and provides guidance throughout the College.

English as an Additional Language (EAL) Learning an entire curriculum and its language of instruction simultaneously is, quite clearly, a considerable undertaking. To help its non-native speakers of English meet this challenge, the Junior School offers a flexible EAL programme. In cases of most obvious need, learners are withdrawn from Mandarin class to receive specialist EAL tuition. Classes are kept small, and work focuses not just on the four language domains of listening, speaking, reading and writing but on the specific aspects of language which students require to understand and use in their normal lessons. In addition, where possible, EAL students will receive in-class support from an EAL specialist. In an approach known as Content and Language Integrated Learning, which is based on research showing that language is best learnt in context, the intention is for the Class teacher and EAL specialist to work collaboratively in helping students learn relevant curriculum topics and the associated language, at word, sentence and text level. Subject to sufficient progress being made in the acquisition of English, as measured by both formal and informal assessment, and in the shared opinion of the classroom and EAL teacher, students will exit the EAL support programme and begin the study of Mandarin. The factors influencing the acquisition of EAL are many and varied, and different students will have different learning trajectories. All, however, will be assisted to achieve their full potential, whether in an EAL withdrawal or mainstream class.

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Assessment and Reporting The College believes that Assessment for Learning (AFL) or formative assessment is the key to effective teaching and learning. It provides an environment in which intercultural understanding can flourish and learners can become inspired. Formative assessment supports on-going learning. The College believes that assessment of learning or summative assessment is also important. Summative assessment is concerned with summarising assessments at particular points in time and supports a range of further purposes, including tracking student progress, reporting, evaluating, planning, and target-setting.

Assessment Techniques

Students have a wide range of abilities and learning styles and the approaches to assessment reflect this. These may include: • Observational assessment: observation of responses to learning activities and unstructured situations • Dynamic assessment: analysis of responses in the context of learning a task • Questioning: judgement about the degree of understanding and an opportunity to dig deeper • Criterion-referenced assessment: measurement of attainment against predetermined criteria • Formal assessment: completion of tests or set tasks Each year group undertakes the following formalised tests / assessments. In addition, class teachers provide verbal feedback to students and informal assessment takes place throughout the teaching of the lesson. Students are assessed in writing throughout the year using APP (Assessing Pupil Progress). This formative assessment highlights the areas of development in each level. From this analysis students are set a writing and reading target for the term. Students will also have a Mathematics target each term, which changes when appropriate.

Year Group

Standardised Testing

Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6

NFER Progress in Maths, Progress in English, Optional Year 3 SAT NFER Progress in Maths, Progress in English, Optional Year 4 SAT NFER Progress in Maths, Progress in English, Optional Year 5 SAT NFER Progress in Maths, Progress in English, KS2 SAT

Reports

Students receive two formal written reports per year. The first report is sent home at the end of Term 1 and the second report at the end of Term 3. Information contained in the reports pertains to a student’s achievement and attainment throughout the year. Reports are also used to support teachers and parents in the development of individual targets. At the beginning of Term 3 students will receive a grade sheet identifying performance and progress in Term 2.

Parent Consultations and ACE Time

Face-to-face contact is crucial in supporting the progress of students. Parent consultations offer an opportunity to discuss strengths, areas for improvement and achievement. Parent consultations officially occur twice per year, however, parents are encouraged to make an appointment when they feel that it is necessary. Due to some of the discussion content, parents are advised not to bring their child to these meetings if possible. ACE (Adult Child Evaluation) time occurs in Term 1 and Term 2. This is a more relaxed opportunity for parents to come into their child’s classroom during the day and discuss their work with them. It is crucial to involve students in their own learning. Feedback from students has shown that they truly value this opportunity. 23


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Academic Honesty Academic honesty refers to the process and the means by which a student produces an original piece of work that acknowledges the thoughts and contributions of others. Rationale The College believes that instruction in academic honesty is a fundamental part of each student’s education. In line with the College Values, students are encouraged to act in a responsible, ethical and honest manner towards intellectual property and authentic authorship. This includes all written work produced by students, essays, scientific research and reports, computer programmes, music, visual arts, film, dance, theatre arts, and photographs. The original authors of these materials have the right to identify such work as their own intellectual property, and the College respects this right. It is expected that each part of the College will create their own specific procedures and practices to put both the aims and objectives of this policy and the spirit of academic honesty into effect. As students progress through the College, they should learn about intellectual property and how it is covered by copyright. The school will follow UK copyright law, particularly with regard to photocopying practices, audiovisual materials, production scripts and scores, and computer programmes. Responsibilities of Teachers • Modeling good practice. All articles or quotes from newspapers, journals, books and websites should be referenced before being presented or put on display. • Educating students about the importance of academic honesty. Teachers will take into account that students are still learning to understand what academic honesty means. • Teaching older students how to cite (reference) sources correctly • Dealing with academic dishonesty when it arises • Clarifying to students whether collaboration on a task is allowed Responsibilities of Parents • Encouraging their children to try to do their homework on their own and write in their own words • Stating clearly in writing when help has been given on the work itself • Informing the school if academic dishonesty is suspected. Responsibilities of Students • Trying to produce their work on their own. If any help is given, it should be acknowledged in writing. • Knowing how to cite (reference) sources and how to create a bibliography • Asking their teacher or the respective librarian for help. Examples of academic dishonesty include: • Copying all or part of another students work • Arranging to have the work completed by someone else • Cheating in tests, by referring to prohibited materials during testing, or gaining knowledge of the test unofficially before hand • Copying homework.

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Homework Homework refers to any work or activities that are asked of students outside of normal lesson times. Tasks are set to support learning and development rather than imposed as extra work. Homework is an essential and important part of the curriculum throughout the Junior School and is usually given on a nightly basis to allow students to preview, practice, and review or expand on material introduced in class. As far as possible, parents should: • Provide a reasonably peaceful and suitable place in which students can do their homework • Support the school in valuing homework • Use the Homework Diary to see that deadlines are being met • Encourage the student to work independently when appropriate • Test learning (e.g. vocabulary) or listen to students read what they have written.

Homework Support

The Library is open Monday to Friday until 4.00pm. If parents feel there is a problem with the amount or difficulty of homework, they should contact the class teacher.

Homework Allocation

Timings may differ from time to time, depending on the topics being studied. In addition to the homework identified below, it is also expected that students undertake the learning of spellings, multiplication tables, instrument practice and reading of books. It is expected that homework will be handed in the next day unless otherwise specified.

Class

English/Topic

Maths

Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6

1x30mins 2x30mins 2x45mins 2x60mins

1x30mins 2x30mins 2x45mins 2x60min

Mandarin Homework Year Group Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6

MFL Group 10 mins 10 mins 15 mins 15 mins

MSL Group 20 mins 10 mins 15 mins 15 mins

Homework Diary

CNL Group 30mins 2 x 30mins 2x45mins 2x60mins

The Diary is used to facilitate communication between the class teacher and the parent. It is a means by which students can organise their homework, spellings and mental maths for each particular week. The class teacher will look at the Diary on a daily basis and respond to parents as appropriate.

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Holistic Opportunities Co-Curricular Activities - CCAs CCAs play an important social and emotional role in the development of students, as well as giving them an opportunity to try something different. In the Junior School the creation of CCAs is based on student interests, ensuring a mix of sporting and non-sporting activities. The Junior School guarantees that languages will constitute part of the core offer. Students select the CCAs with their parents electronically. Parents who do not wish their child to participate in CCAs should inform their class teacher in writing. For the academic year 2013/14, CCAs will take place on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. On these afternoons, the buses will depart from the College at 4.40pm. A programme of staff-supervised recreational sport will be run on Sundays. Students wishing to attend will be required to sign-up as for other CCAs. Parents are responsible for transporting their child to and from the College.

Ensembles The following Ensembles meet for rehearsals once per week; all but the Junior School Rock Band and World Rhythm group require an audition to join. All students in the Junior School will participate in choral singing through both classroom music and choral assemblies. The Year 3 and 4 Lao Zi Choir requires commitment for the whole year and also requires some additional and weekend rehearsals and performances. The Year 5 and 6 Lao Zi Choir requires commitment for the whole year and also requires some additional and weekend rehearsals and performances. The Mei Lang Fan Choir are also invited to perform and tour with the Vienna Boys choir each summer. The Junior Orchestra is for all instruments and all levels are welcome. The Allegro Strings is an ensemble that caters to students who have had at least one year’s tuition on their string instrument. The Boehm Wind ensemble. The Junior School Rock Band is an ensemble for anyone that plays guitar, drums, keyboards or sings. The World Rhythm group is a percussion ensemble. For more information, please see the College Music Handbook.

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College Houses Each student will also be a member of one of the College’s four Houses: Anand, Howard, Shackleton and Wing. Students participate in a variety of sporting, academic, musical and fun activities as members of their House. House Events take place during lunchtimes, House Assemblies and PE lessons at regular intervals throughout the year. Participation in these events is part of the year long House Competition. Each term the winning House is rewarded, with a final special celebration for the overall winner at the end of the academic year. Students in Year 6 have the opportunity to nominate themselves to become Captains of their House. They make a formal speech to their House and are elected by the members of their house. In Term 1, two House Captains are elected by their peers. At the start of Term Two, two more House Captains are elected.

Anand

Anand House is named after Anand Panyarachun, considered the greatest living Old Alleynian (“OA”), as Dulwich old boys are known. Khun Anand has had a distinguished career of service to his country and in business: he is the former Prime Minister of Thailand, Chairman of the Thai Federation of Industries, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Thai Ambassador to the U.S. and Chairman of Saha-Union Group. Born in 1932, Khun Anand is an alumnus of Dulwich College London, where he was School Prefect and captain of the undefeated 1951 School Tennis Team – a truly distinguished OA.

Howard

Charles Howard, 2nd Baron Howard of Effingham and 1st earl of Nottingham (c. 1536-1624) took advantage of his high birth to sustain a long and distinguished career. He served Queen Mary as Lord High Admiral and Queen Elizabeth as Lord Chamberlain. Charles Howard was the patron of Lord Howard’s Men, later known as The Admiral’s Men, a theatre company in the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras. Lord Howard’s Men were generally considered one of the most important acting troupes of English Renaissance theatre. Edward Alleyn, the founder of Dulwich College London is considered one of the greatest actors of Shakespeare’s time was the principal actor for the troupe.

Charles Howard held supreme command of Naval Forces when the Armada was destroyed in 1588. In 1596, with Lord Essex, he stormed Cadiz to forestall another Armada. The following year he was created Earl of Nottingham and served as Lord High Steward until 1615.

Shackleton

One of the greatest explorers of the 20th century, Ernest Shackleton was an inspiring leader who demonstrated selfless regard for those he led. His hairraising expedition to Antarctica in 1915 made this Old Alleynian a legend in his own time. When his ship, the Endurance, was trapped in the polar ice, he led his men to shelter and then sailed out in an open boat (now on display at Dulwich College London) to seek help. He returned to save his comrades two weeks later – a happy ending to a harrowing experience, achieved through sheer grit, ingenuity and determination. 27


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Wing

Yung Wing was a dedicated educator, a scholar and an ancestor of one of the founding members of Dulwich College Shanghai. Born in Guangdong Province in 1828, he was the first Chinese to receive a university education in America, graduating from Yale University in 1854. Yung entered the Qing Imperial Government service in 1864, and proposed that the government subsidise the education of young Chinese in the west. Between 1874 and 1881, several hundred Chinese youths were sent to U.S. universities. He was also instrumental in establishing one of China’s first modern companies, the China Merchants Steamship Navigation Company – whose 1901 headquarters still stands on Shanghai’s Bund.

School Events Throughout the year the Junior School will hold a number of school events designed to promote the curriculum, team building, the community, and the love of school. Many school events are scheduled at the beginning of the academic year. These events include UN Day, residential visits, sports days, book week and the D’Oscars. Other events may occur during the year triggered by specific learning that happens within the classroom. This is derived from the principle that the curriculum follows the student’s interests. Parental ideas for school events are welcomed.

Assemblies

Assemblies are crucial in helping the College develop a positive ethos as well as helping students create a sense of belonging and togetherness. To support the flow of the day, Junior School assemblies from Mondays to Friday will take place in the 35 minutes immediately after lunchtimes. Monday assemblies will be led by the Head of Junior School and will be an opportunity to develop an understanding of the College Values as well as to give some guidance on upcoming events. These assemblies will be used to celebrate achievements both in and out of school. Students will also take part in year group assemblies where the Junior School ethos and expectations are reiterated and developed within an age-appropriate setting. These assemblies will also be used to give awards and presentations. (See section on awards and certificates). Students will also participate in a choral assembly led by the Head of Junior School Music. A number of classroom teachers will also be in this assembly to support them. Friday assemblies will take place from 12.55pm-1.30pm. These will take the form of a short class assembly. Parents will be invited to these assemblies. The purpose is to develop the confidence and public speaking skills of students, whilst giving them an opportunity to share with the rest of the school what they have been learning about in their lessons. It is not intended that these assemblies are lavish productions that get in the way of the day-to-day delivery of the curriculum.

Award Assemblies These are held twice per term, one will have an academic focus and the other will focus on a College Value. Parents are invited to attend these assemblies which will be held in the Theatre.

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Speech Day Speech Day, held towards the end of Term 3, is a celebration of all the successes of the academic year to which every member of the community has contributed. The following awards are presented at Speech Day: • • • • •

Two Personal Achievement prizes in each class for Years 3 – 6 Three prizes for achievement in Mandarin per year group, one for each strand. Two prizes each for PE, Art and Music in Years 3-5, one for achievement and one for effort. Two prizes in each class of Year 6 for overall achievement as well as a cup each for excellence in Maths, English, Humanities, ICT, Science, Mandarin, Music, Art, Drama, and PE across the Year level A Head’s Award for Outstanding Contribution to the school and a Head’s Award for Sportsmanship are also awarded in Year 6.

Please be aware that prizes will not be awarded in advance of speech day for students who will not be present on the day. Parents are encouraged to support school functions whether or not their child has a key role to play or is receiving an award as their presence will be appreciated by their child and the College. Parents are asked to behave in accordance with the particular occasion. Students are put in a difficult position when waved at by parents. Care should also be taken to avoid cameras flashing in students’ faces.

Productions The Junior School values the importance of productions as an opportunity to develop self-confidence and take risks, in line with the College Values. . This year the Junior School has changed their approach to productions. Students will be able to sign up for productions on Tuesdays after school and sessions will run until approximately 5.00pm therefore busses will not be available to take students home after the rehearsal. Near to performance dates students may be requested to attend later rehearsals or indeed a weekend rehearsal. Students who choose not to sign up for the production will still have opportunities to be on stage through class assemblies, Christmas carol concerts and Lunar New Year performances.

Musical Performances Parents will be invited to watch the progress of students in an extensive music programme that lasts throughout the year.

Non-Uniform Days The College has stated that non-uniform days will not be held more than once per term. The reason for a non-uniform day will be clear and purposeful. Non-uniform days will not be used to raise money for charity other than in exceptional circumstances agreed by the College Leadership Team.

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Instrumental Lessons The Music Department Instrument Tuition Programme is an extra-curricular programme offering one-to-one music tuition for Year 1 to Year 13. Qualified instrument teachers set individual courses of study and may recommend students to sit ABRSM examinations. Entry to these exams is arranged by the College Music Department. www.abrsm.org/en/regions/south-east-asia/china Instruments taught: Double Bass Piano

Erhu Flute

Clarinet

Saxophone

Trumpet

Trombone

Cello

Voice

Drum-kit

Violin

Viola

Classical Guitar

Percussion

Tuba

Electric Guitar Oboe

Basoon

French Horn

Tuba

Fees: RMB200 per 30 minute lesson, paid in advance to the College Finance Office. Lessons: students need to have their own instrument and their own insurance. Monday-Friday: 30 minute lessons once a week* Years 3 to 6: lessons in class time** * For more advanced students, 60-minute lessons out of class time can be arranged (fee RMB400 / 60 minute lesson). ** Lesson times are rotated (changed) each week so that the same classroom time is not missed. To enrol your child, please visit the Music section of the College website, which can be found under ‘The Arts’ link: www.dulwich-shanghai.cn.

Educational Visits Residential visits are planned for all students in the Junior School and serve a number of purposes including team building, social development, and developing independence. In some instances, they are also related to the curriculum. Currently, the residentials include: • • • •

Year 3 - overnight in the school’s upper gym. Year 4 - overnight at the Shanghai Aquarium Year 5 - two nights and three days in Nanbeihu Year 6 - two nights and three days in Nanbeihu

The Years 5 and 6 events include a different range of expectations and outcomes for each year group, despite being held at the same venue. Day trips which are directly related to the curriculum also take place throughout the year

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Competitive Sport The College offers a wide range of competitive sporting opportunities and competes in events as part of its membership of FOBISSEA, ACAMIS, SISAC, CISSA and also takes part in the annual DCA Games. High quality coaching is offered to students to support them in reaching their full sporting potential. The programme seeks to promote the fundamental characteristics of commitment, loyalty, cooperation, leadership and an appreciation of the role and value of the individual within a team framework. The College recognises that teams and individuals contribute significantly to the development of character and school spirit. Sportsmanship and fair play is an integral part of this experience. It is expected that students, coaches, parents and supporters represent the College in a manner that is respectful to others. It is the College’s responsibility to help develop and practice the highest standards of courtesy, discipline and sportsmanship as both hosts and guests. The College is a member of the following organisations: CISSA, SISAC, ACAMIS, FOBISSEA and SSL This membership provides opportunities for competitive sport against other schools. Each organisation sets its own sporting seasons, rules and regulations on competitions. As local opportunities for competitive sport are limited membership of these organisations is vital to establishing a quality sports programme.

China International Schools Sports Association (CISSA)

CISSA is an organisation that provides over twenty Shanghai and surrounding city international schools with a comprehensive sports programme for 12 and under and 14 and under, in four distinct seasons; for touch rugby, football, volleyball and basketball. Most teams will have a league-based tournament with a game being scheduled on a Tuesday or Thursday each week and culminating in the “Cross River Event” at the end of the season.

Rugby and netball for Under 9 - Under 15 is catered for through the DCS convened Shanghai Junior Division.

Federation of British International Schools in South East Asia (FOBISSEA)

FOBISSEA is an overseas conference providing high quality competition against other major British International Schools across South and South East Asia in a 3-day competition involving 4 distinct sports. Teams selected from the Junior School compete annually in the FOBISSEA U11 Games (athletics, football, t-ball and swimming) which takes place in May/June

Shanghai Swim League (SSL)

SSL is a sports conference specifically for swimming within Shanghai and surrounding city international schools. Various swimming galas are held throughout the year within and outside Shanghai. As well as the above affiliated federations and their regular sporting provision, the College also enters a number of invitational tournaments and events throughout the year. For further information and the Seasonal Calendar, please see the Sports handbook on the College website. www.dulwich-shanghai.cn

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Student Welfare All of our students have the right to: 1. Learn 2. Feel safe and happy 3. Be treated with respect and kindness 4. Freedom of expression and independent thought. All of our students have a responsibility to: 1. Have input into their learning and aim to reach their full potential 2. Accept responsibility for their actions and property 3. Care for themselves, others, and the environment. The College aims to provide a framework that ensures that systems, procedures, and policies are in place to safeguard the welfare of students, thereby providing an environment in which each individual student can maximize their potential in becoming a well-rounded young person who strives for excellence and, in doing so, embraces the College Values.

Pastoral Care

Pastoral care brings together the many experiences of the student as a member of the College community – academic, social, personal, and co-curricular. All staff have a role in pastoral care and any student experiencing challenges or difficulties should feel free to approach any staff member for assistance. In the Junior School, the class teacher plays a pivotal role in the management of pastoral care and is responsible for exercising ‘duty of care’ and coordinating access to specialist staff. Parents with concerns about their child’s progress or development should contact the child’s class teacher. The Junior School actively trains students as ‘peer supporters’, to act as good social models for younger students, and to help support cooperative and collaborative behaviours inside and outside of the classroom.

Student Voice: Student Voice promotes the perspectives and actions of young people throughout the College. It gives students the ability to influence their own learning and learning environment and have greater ownership of their learning journey. In the Junior School, student voice has representation through class meetings and forums, School Captains, House Captains, The School Council and articles in the College magazine. Student voice also has a role to play in the recruitment of senior College personnel such as the Head of Junior School. The Junior School is constantly encouraging students to voice their thoughts on day-to-day school life, the curriculum, or indeed the world around them. With guidance and support, students can help further the development of the College.

Positive Behaviour The College aims to develop positive self-esteem in students as part of a welcoming and caring environment where relationships are based on respect. The Junior School staff are committed to maintaining high expectations of good behaviour as an essential part of the College Values. This ensures the happiness and well-being of the students while they are at school and develops key social skills that will stand them in good stead throughout their lives.

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Rules and Responsibilities It is the responsibility of students to follow the rules. If they break them, they must understand that they have chosen to do so and must accept the consequences of their actions. Examples of unacceptable behaviour: • Lack of respect • Deliberate disobedience • Violence • Threatening/bullying • Discrimination • Deliberate vandalism • Stealing • Inappropriate use of the internet Acceptable behaviour is praised and rewarded with stickers and house points. Examples of acceptable behaviour: • Kindness • Courtesy • Respect and consideration for others • Looking after their possessions and the possessions/property of others in the school Minor incidents of unacceptable behaviour in the classroom are dealt with immediately, initially by reminding the student of the rules or task. If the same behaviour continues, the student will be isolated from the group. Parents will not yet be informed. If the behaviour continues over time and is affecting the cohesion or work ethic of the class, parents will then be informed and asked to come into school. Overtly unacceptable behaviour will be reported directly to the Deputy Head of School and finally to the Head of School, depending on the seriousness of the case. Students are taught what is considered unacceptable behaviour and are made aware of the consequences of breaking the rules. Every student has a card that contains the ‘Code of Courtesy’. It is also printed in their Homework Diary. Parents may like to use opportunities to reinforce it. Acquiring social skills is a vital part of education and will stand students in good stead for the rest of their lives. Ultimately, students learn by example and all teachers are therefore expected to model good behaviour.

Bullying Bullying is the persistent desire to hurt others and can be verbal, psychological, or physical. It is a term that must be used advisedly as bullying specifically occurs over time. The College is keen to identify early any signs of bullying and students are encouraged to tell a teacher, parent or friend. All incidents are taken seriously and appropriate action is taken to help both the perpetrator and the victim.

Absence If a student is going to be absent from school due to illness, parents should contact their child’s class teacher via email, or telephone the Junior School Office on 58999910 ext 623 or the absence answering machine service on 33821805 before 9.00am. If parents know in advance that their child will be away from school, they must contact their child’s class teacher beforehand.

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Partnering with Parents The College believes that parents play a crucial part in supporting good behaviour in school and welcomes and values their support in setting high expectations. The following expectations will help parents in their efforts to best support their child’s development in the Junior School.

Safe Surroundings Parents are asked to: • Be safe and considerate to others when dropping off/picking up students. • Share lifts when possible. • Not obstruct the entrance/exit by stopping in zoned areas or abuse any other parking restrictions around the College. Failure to follow this advice may lead to a serious accident.

Pastoral Environment Parents are asked to: • Ensure that their child understands the standards of behaviour expected of them. • Always report any concerns about their child’s well-being and work cooperatively with the class teacher to resolve matters satisfactorily. • Encourage excellent attendance and punctuality. • Not organise family holidays during term time. • Provide a suitable distraction-free environment for homework to be completed on time. • Ensure that home routines support school life by ensuring that their child adopts appropriate sleep habits. • Ensure that their child engages in age-appropriate activities in the evenings and at weekends.

Academic Environment Parents are asked to: • Observe progress as detailed in their child’s Report and let the class teacher know of any concerns or suggestions. • Make themselves aware of the meaning of the assessment criteria and curriculum requirements and ask the class teacher to explain if necessary. • Show a particular interest in their child’s development by asking them about what they have been learning at school. A copy of the College Parent Charter is available on the College website in the Community section.

Security

Everyone, except for students in uniform, coming on to the College grounds is required to wear an official security card. These cards have photos of each individual printed on them and are issued to new families as part of the admissions process. Visitors without security cards may need to provide photo identification, such as a driver’s licence, passport, or a Chinese residency document, to the guards to gain entrance. The photo identification documents will be kept securely by the guards for the duration of the visit and returned when the visitor leaves the site. For any questions regarding security cards, please contact joanne.brooke@dulwich-shanghai.cn.

Library Services for Parents

The Senior School Library attempts to cater to the needs of the entire Dulwich community, and parents are warmly encouraged to register there and borrow books.

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Parent Forums

Forums are carefully positioned throughout the year to address a variety of pertinent topics including: assessment, Mathematics and English. Other forums may be added throughout the year as the need arises.

Systematic Training for Effective Parenting Programmes

In order to provide support for the parent body the College runs STEP (Systematic Training for Effective Parenting Programs) in each of the schools. (http://www.ciccparenting.org/StepPrograms. aspx#3) • Early Childhood STEP – for parents of children under six, • STEP: Systematic Training for Effective Parenting – for parents of children six to twelve years of age. • STEP/Teen – for parents of children 13-19 years of age. All versions of the programme teach positive approaches to understanding and raising children. The STEP approaches include appreciating that children’s behaviours are motivated by a variety of goals, that encouragement for children becoming the best that they can be is extremely important, and that family councils for making decisions for and with children are highly valued.

FoD

Friends of Dulwich (FoD) is a volunteer parent organisation that provides a focal point for the school community. It serves as a fund raising vehicle for agreed charities, in addition to fund raising for selected school community events and projects. Through class representatives they facilitate the communication between the class teachers and parents in relation to volunteers for classroom or special events. The class representatives also facilitate the social interaction among families in the school community. A parent of Dulwich is automatically a member. Activities include Parent-Teacher Socials, Daddy-Daughter Dance, Father-Son sporting events, The Winter Fair, The International Food Fair, Teacher appreciation activities, Health and Nutrition Committee, Scholastic Books, Farmers markets, flea markets. In addition FoD collaborates with the school to support productions and assist with sporting events. Monthly Coffee Mornings feature guest speakers and vendors. The FoD weekly newsletter provides up to date information on upcoming activities as well as a link to the College local events board and community forum, on the College website, which allows parents an opportunity to exchange information. FoD offers support for new families to assist them in having a smooth transition to both DCS and Shanghai. The FoD committee meets monthly. If parents are interested in getting more involved or have any questions they should email fod@dulwich-shanghai.cn.

Committees and Working Parties

The College is committed to working in partnership with the parent body to foster a sense of community spirit. It recognises that input from representative samples of parents alongside that of students and staff on key issues will help to ensure that communication is open and transparent and that decisions have been made following due stakeholder representation. To this end interested parents may be invited to join College working parties or committees as appropriate and upon approval of the Headmaster.

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developing for the future

Health and Safety Air Quality Rationale:

Based on research, experts on air quality strongly suggest schools take precautions to protect the safety of students on days when the quality of air is poor. The air quality in Shanghai fluctuates but there are clearly days when the air conditions are poor enough to put students at risk. Air quality is monitored on a daily basis and the figure posted throughout the College. Decisions on whether activities will be affected are then taken based on the following table:

Dulwich College Shanghai Air Quality Response Plan: API 0-50 51-100

Air Quality Description Excellent Good

Grade 1 2

Color Green Green

101-150

Slight pollution

3A

Yellow

151-200

Light pollution

3B

Orange

201-250

Moderate pollution

4A

Orange

251-300

Moderate-heavy pollution

4B

Red

> 300

Heavy pollution

5

Purple

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Measure to be Taken Daily activities not affected Daily activities not affected Daily activities not affected. Students with respiratory problems can, with parent permission, be ‘excluded’ from active participation in PE and/or remain indoors during break. Teachers report any signs of respiratory unwellness in students to the nurse immediately. Daily activities not affected. Students with respiratory problems can, with parent permission, be ‘excluded’ from active participation in PE and/or remain indoors during break. Teachers report any signs of respiratory unwellness in students to the nurse immediately. 1) All PE lessons will be modified and carried out indoors. 2) Older students will be allowed outside to play during breaks but will not undertake strenuous activities. These students will also have the option of staying indoors, especially students with respiratory problems. 3) All CCAs will be modified so that students do not partake in strenuous activity. 4) Any DCS outdoor community event will be modified. 5) Teachers report any signs of respiratory unwellness in students to the nurse immediately. 6) Outdoor DCS sport school based activities held in Shanghai will be modified. 1) All PE lessons will be modified and carried out indoors. 2) Students will remain indoors during break time in line with the inclement weather procedures. 3) All field trips that involve any sort of physical activity will be postponed. 4) All outdoor CCAs will be cancelled. 5) Any DCS outdoor community event will be cancelled. 6) Teachers report any signs of respiratory unwellness in students to the nurse immediately


First Aid and Medical Care

The Main Campus Clinic is situated in room 1142 near the Main College Reception. The College has a contract with International SOS to provide a medical consultancy service and there are also four registered nurses. The nurses are bilingual and are trained to provide emergency first aid and primary nursing care in accordance with relevant local laws. They will also assist with transfer and referral to appropriate outside clinics for anything more complicated. The College also has 24-hour access to the International SOS Expatriate Physician and Alarm Centre Network. Any student who falls ill during the day and has been instructed to go home by the Nurse will present the Nurse Referral Form to the Junior School Office. The Office will contact the student’s parents to gain permission for their early departure. Students may not carry any form of medication with them at the College. Authorised medicines must be handed to the school nurse who will be responsible for the storage and administration.

Fire Drill

The Fire Drill evacuation plan is displayed on all of the classroom walls. In the event of a fire alarm, students will be escorted from their classrooms or play areas with their teachers to the central assembly point at the front of the College where registers will be taken.

Closure of School Procedures

On some occasions, it may be necessary to close or cancel school. The following procedures will be followed whenever it is necessary to cancel or close school due to inclement weather, fire, important Government events, etc. The health and safety of students shall be the primary consideration in all decisions or actions taken at times of inclement weather or other emergencies. Prior to the school day • In the case of important Government events, such as the APEC convention, the College is usually given prior warning via the Education Commission. • The Headmaster will ensure that all parents and staff are notified via an SMS message and a message will also be placed on the College website. Procedures for closing school while in session If an emergency necessitates the closure of the College during school hours, the subsequent guidelines will be followed: • The Headmaster will ensure that all parents and staff are notified via an SMS message, and a message will be placed on the College website. • At all times when the College buildings must be evacuated, all students and staff will exit the buildings in an orderly fashion as rehearsed. Students will be kept at the designated meeting place or other suitable location until parents can arrange to pick them up. • The Headmaster will inform teachers when students may be released. Junior School students must be collected from the classroom by a parent or nominated guardian as soon as possible after the phone call. • The Headmaster will determine whether school buses are able to run. If deemed safe, students will be dismissed to their buses. All other students will remain at school under teacher supervision until a parent or nominated guardian arrives to take them home. Delayed Closing of School If conditions exist that make it unsafe for students to travel home on foot (severe weather, civil disturbances, etc.) students will remain at school under teacher supervision. When travel on foot has been deemed safe, the school will be closed and the students sent home following the procedures listed above. Parental Decisions Although the College will take every precaution to ensure the safety of all students during an emergency, there may be times when parents would prefer to collect their children earlier. If they choose to do this, parents must inform the Junior School Office to ensure that all students are accounted for. During a typhoon, it may be unsafe to travel. As such, parents are encouraged to wait until the severe conditions abate before coming to the College. 37


developing for the future

Communication The College understands the importance of timely and effective communication, allowing parents to plan and support their child’s activities. In the Junior School, a number of communication techniques are used to support this.

Newsletter/College Magazine

The College produces a weekly newsletter for each school every Friday during term-time. Parents are emailed the Newsletter directly via the College website. The weekly Newsletter, along with past Newsletters, are also available on the website. The Newsletter contains key dates for the forthcoming week along with a link to the full Parent Calendar. College news can be found at the top, followed by a round up of the individual school news for the week. Links to the other schools Newsletters, lunch menus and news items are also included. The College magazine is produced three times per year and published at the end of each term. It contains College news, stories, photos and more in-depth features from each of the three schools. A hardcopy magazine is sent home with students at the end of each term. Extra copies are available in the Main College Reception area and is also available to download via the College website in PDF format.

Website

The College has its own website where information, including the calendar, is accessible. The website has information relating to College activities and descriptions of the individual schools. There is also a media section where regular news items are posted.

SMS System

The College has an SMS system in place for event reminders and to communicate with parents in the event of an issue or crisis whereby rapid communication is of the utmost importance. For example, if an important announcement regarding an unexpected closure of the College takes place, the College will send an SMS message notification to the mobile phone number that parents have provided advising them to review the website for further details. Parents are asked to let the school Offices know of any changes in contact details so that they can ensure parents receive all messages from the College.

Yearbook

The College produces an annual Yearbook at the end of every school year as a keepsake for the students and staff. It is an optional purchase through the Dulwich College Shop at the Main College Reception.

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School Calendar The College uses an online calendar system. This allows parents, students and staff to be able to subscribe to school events via iCal, or RSS feeds. Apple iPhone users are also able to subscribe. The parent calendar is broken down into the following event categories: • DUCKS Events • JS Events • SS Events • Performing Arts Events • Sports Events • University Guidance Events This allows parents and staff the ability to subscribe to event information relevant to them. Subscription links can be found on the calendar section of the College website.

Sports Events Subscription University Events Subscription

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developing for the future 

Dulwich College  Shanghai

SCHOOL YEAR  CALENDAR  2013-­‐‑2014 Month

M

T

W

5 Aug               12 19 26

6 13 20 27

2 9 16 23 30

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan 2014

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

7 14 21 28

Th 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sat 3 10 17 24 31

Sun 4 11 18 25

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22

2 9 16 23

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

28th March-4th April: Spring Break (5th April Tomb Sweeping Day)

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

1st May: May Day Holiday

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

Event

20th August: New Families Orientation Day (including all Y7 and Y12 Students) 21st August: First Day of School - Term 1

19th September: Mid-Autumn Festival

30th September - 4th October: October National Holidays

7th to 8th November: November Break/Staff PD Day- No Students

16th December-3rd January: Winter Holidays

6th January: First Day of Term 2

30th January-7th February: Chinese New Year Holidays (CNY Day 31st January )

28th March: Staff PD Day- No Students

7th April: First Day of Term 3

2nd June: Dragon Boat Festival 20th June: Last day of School

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Dulwich College Shanghai Junior School Welcome Booklet 2013-14  

Parent Information Booklet for Dulwich College Shanghai Junior School

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