Northern Sounds Magazine | Winter 2021-22

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VOLUME 2

2021/2022 SEASON

Northern Sounds THE MAGAZINE OF THE DULUTH SUPERIOR SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Photos: Steven R. Mattson Zenith City Photgraphy


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DSSO 2021-22 SEASON

TABLE OF CONTENTS 08

WELCOME LETTER

12

MEET THE ORCHESTRA

16

POPS 2: HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR

8 Music Director Dirk Meyer 11 Board of Director 11 Staff and Administration

12-13 Meet the Orchestra

17 Strikepoint Biography

18

MASTERWORKS 3: TO BE BOLD

19 Marika Bournaki Biography 20-23 Masterworks 3 Program Notes

26

MASTERWORKS 4: TO CELEBRATE

27 Erin Aldridge Biography 28-33 Masterworks 4 Program Notes

34

WAYS TO SUPPORT THE DSSO 34 How to Donate 35-41 DSSO Contributors

OUR MISSION Our mission is to enhance our community through the performance of symphonic music that engages and inspires.

OUR VISION

We envision a stronger community through the power of music and musicians’ arertistry.

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COME TOGETHER

2021-22 SEASON

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MUSIC DIRECTOR

From the Minnesota premiere of our season opener Rush by American composer Jonathan Leshnoff to the final sounds of the season, celebrating our ability to sing together again, this season invites us all to find ourselves in music.

DIRK MEYER G E R M A N C O N D U C T O R D I R K M E Y E R IS M U S I C D I R E C T O R OF D U L U T H SUPERIOR SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ( D S S O ) IN M I N N E S O T A A N D A U G U S T A S Y M P H O N Y IN G E O R G I A .

Welcome to the Symphony! It is good to see you! This sentence never rang so true: It is good to see you! After the turbulent events of the past year, we are finally ready to enjoy life, together, once more. What better way to do so, than to experience the power of orchestral music and share this experience – in person – with our friends and fellow music lovers here at Symphony Hall. The DSSO’s 2021/22 season celebrates our return to togetherness. We celebrate our friendships and companionship. We celebrate the shared experience of music! In doing so, our new season bursts with breathtaking compositions – from the classics to the unknown. Each concert encompasses a wide range of emotions that let us celebrate, but also reflect, find peace, and learn something new.

Our year begins with two Sinfoniettas that couldn’t be more different. Poulenc’s colorful music gives us a wonderful taste of French harmonies, while Astor Piazzolla leads us into the passionate realm of the Argentinian Tango. Starting with the new year, we are finally able to continue the DSSO’s Beethoven Project: Symphony No.3 and No.5 are on the docket for this season, bringing our project close to its completion. Concerto highlights of the season include Tchaikovsky’s iconic Piano Concerto No.1, featuring internationally renown pianist Marika Bournaki, as well as Brahms’ Violin Concerto with the up and coming superstar Geneva Lewis. Geneva’s appearance is even more thrilling, as she will perform on the original Stradivarius violin on which this concerto was premiered in 1879. Finally, I’m excited to welcome our wonderful concertmaster Erin Aldridge to the soloist spot with the unknown, yet dazzling, Violin Concerto by José White, an Afro-Cuban composer of the late 19th century. I, personally, am very excited for the last two performances of the season: Bruckner’s absolutely amazing Symphony No.4 is on the program together with Poulenc’s wonderful Concerto for Two Pianos. And for our final concert of the season we created a real showstopper! Williams Dawson was one of the leading black American composers of the 20th century. His Negro Folk Symphony is based on spirituals and when you hear this incredible music, you truly hear the orchestra “sing” these emotional tunes. For the second half of the performance our beloved DSSO Chorus finally takes the stage again. And, because we haven’t been able to sing together for so long, we simply enjoy our reunification with some of the greatest chorus numbers ever written! There is much to celebrate in our lives and there is much to celebrate in music. We invite you to be a part of it: Real experiences, real emotions, real friendship. Best enjoyed in person!

Dirk Meyer, Music Director Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra

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BOARD AND STAFF

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2021-2022:

STAFF AND ADMINISTRATION:

Mark Monson, Board President Christabel Grant, Vice Chair John Berchild, Past Chair Robert T. Bennett, Treasurer Sandra Barkley, Secretary

ADMINISTRATION

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

William Alexander Sandra Barkley Robert T. Bennett John Berchild Linda Boben Ruth Ann Eaton Beth Gilbert Christabel Grant Jeremy Hoglund Tina Koecher James McLeod Michael Mollerus Mark Monson William “Buzz” Palmer Branden Robinson Kathleen Sanders James Sebastian Nairi Stack Rajiv Vaidyanathan Christopher Virta Roberta Vose

Brandon VanWaeyenberghe, Executive Director Kelly Katzmarek, Marketing Director Jean Larson, Patron Service Manager Audrey Beyer, Development Assistant ARTISTIC STAFF

Dirk Meyer, The Charles A. & Carolyn M. Russell Music Director Andrew Kim, Assistant Conductor Heidi Lord, Director of Artistic Operations Maureen Breemeersch, Stage Manager Kristin Sande, Music Librarian CHORUS

Richard Robbins, Chorus Master Nikki Norland, Chorus Adminstrator Beth Sobczak, Chorus Accompanist YOUTH ORCHESTRAS

Melanie Sever, Administrative Director and Concert Orchestra Conductor Kristin Sande, DSSYO Administrative Assistant Andrew Kim, Youth Symphony Conductor Kevin Hoeschen, Sinfonia Coordinator Ronald Kari, Youth Orchestras Coordinator

HONORARY LIFE DIRECTORS

LAYOUT OF NORTHERN SOUNDS

Elaine Killen Dexter Larsen Elisabeth Mason Nancy Melander James Zastrow

Kelly Katzmarek

MUSIC DIRECTORS Dirk Meyer (2012 – present) Markand Thakar (2001 – 2012) Yong-yan Hu (1995 – 2000) Taavo Virkhaus (1977-1994) Joseph Hawthorne (1967-1977) Hermann Herz (1950-1967) Joseph Wagner (1947-1950) Tauno Hannikainen (1942 – 1947) Paul Lemay (1932 – 1942)

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PRINTING OF NORTHERN SOUNDS

Arrowhead Printing, Inc NORTHERN SOUNDS PROGRAM NOTES

Vincent Osborn, Program Notes Writer Ronald Kari, Performance Historian, now in his 60th Season. DULUTH SUPERIOR SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

130 West Superior Street, LL2-120 Duluth, MN 55802 TICKETS

218–623–3776 tickets@dsso.com | www.dsso.com


MEET THE ORCHESTRA COMING TO YOU FROM THE ALLETE STAGE

DIRK MEYER, THE CHARLES A. & CAROLYN M. RUSSELL MUSIC DIRECTOR Sponsors: Harris & Diane Balko; Elisabeth C. Mason; The Charles A. & Carolyn M. Russell Foundation

FIRST VIOLIN: Erin Aldridge, Concertmaster Sponsor: Arend & Verna Sandbulte in support of the concertmaster chair through the Sandbulte Orchestra Leadership Fund Mary Alice Hutton, Associate Concertmaster Angela Waterman-Hanson, Assistant Concertmaster Colin McGuire, Associate Concertmaster (On Leave 21-22) Sponsor: The Northern Mechanical/Plumbing Contractors Association Nicole Craycraft Sponsor: Glen Holt Kathleen Sanders Sponsor: Terry & Vicki Anderson Nairi Stack Sponsor: Stack Brothers Mechanical Contractors; Tom & Mimi Stender Joan Halquist Sponsor: James & Elizabeth Prest Amanda Wirta Sponsor: James & June Farkas Lindsey Bordner (On Leave 21-22) Sponsor: Joel & Catherine Koemptgen Daniel Radosevich Sponsor: Robert & Angelica Fryberger Steve Highland Sponsor: Thomas & Barbara Elliott

SECOND VIOLIN: Laurie Bastian, Principal Sponsor: Jacquie & James Sebastian Jean Leibfried, Assistant Principal Sponsor: Sandra Barkley; Marcia & Gary Doty Amy Eichers Sponsor: Thomas & Alice McCabe Michael Husby Sponsor: Brad Schmugge, CPA (On Leave 21-22) Olga Chernyshev Sponsor: Kay & Walt Gower Kina Ono Sponsor: Rose & Lester Drewes Michael Zellgert Sponsor: Vern & May Nordling Sarah Warner Sponsor: Kathy & James Sanders

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Kristen Anderson Sponsor: James Seitz & Diane Kolquist Mary Negus Sponsor: Anonymous Friend of the DSSO Stephen Baillie Sponsor: Henry & Terry Roberts

VIOLA: Kevin Hoeschen, Principal Sponsor: Ruth R. Johnson in memory of Dr. Ted Johnson Ronald Kari, Assistant Principal Sponsor: Stephen & Lauri Cushing; Ruth Ann Eaton Clare Chopp Sponsor: Martha Aas Jonathan Kresha Sponsor: Nancy Odden & Doug Britton Kevin Peterson Sponsor: Robert T. & Barbara K. Bennett; Linda & Mark Boben; Ruth Frederick Kirsti Petraborg (On Leave 21-22) Sponsor: Anonymous Friend of the DSSO Judy MacGibbon Sponsor: J. Clark & Jean A. Laundergan in memory of Warren & Viola Askeland J. David Arnott Sponsor: Sylvia Jamar

CELLO: Betsy Husby, Principal Sponsor: Christabel & James Grant Lucia Magney, Assistant Principal Sponsor: Ann Mars Julia Morehouse Sponsor: Nancy Melander; Nancy & Mark Melhus Eric Graf Sponsor: Dean Peterson and Deb Rausch Rebecca M. Peterson Sponsor: Robert T. & Barbara K. Bennett Darin Anderson Sponsor: Dr. Michael and Sharon Mollerus Jesse Nummelin Sponsor: Anonymous Friend of the DSSO Elena Denny (On Leave 21-22) Sponsor: Anonymous Friend of the DSSO Scott Lykins Sponsor: Anonymous Friend of the DSSO


MEET THE ORCHESTRA

DOUBLE BASS:

HORN:

Cassidy Morgan, Principal Vincent Osborn, Assistant Principal Sponsor: Lane Smith; Andrea Wahman & Lee Zimmerman Anthony Lischalk Sponsor: John Ivey Thomas & Mary Rees Thomas Family Fund James McLeod Sponsor: Branden Robinson Irving G. Steinberg Sponsor: Lurene Buhrmann Blake Bonde Sponsor: Carolyn Sundquist

James Pospisil, Principal Sponsor: James & Mary Zastrow Erika Hammerschmidt, Horn 2 Sponsor: Roger and Elaine Engle; Robert & Mary Evans Gwendolyn Hoberg, Horn 4 Sponsor: Susan Meyer

FLUTE: Claudia White, Principal Sponsor: Thomas & Janice Shuey Hannah Peterson, Piccolo/Flute 3 Sponsor: Anonymous Friend of the DSSO

OBOE: Michael Dayton, Principal Sponsor: Gary Foley Darci Griffith Gamerl, Oboe 2 Sponsor: Dr. Dennis & Donna Soukup Sarah Carmack, English Horn/Oboe 3 Sponsor: Anonymous Friend of the DSSO

CLARINET: Jennifer Gerth, Principal Sponsor: William & Saundra Palmer Kristine Peterson, Clarinet 2 Sponsor: Kay & William Slack Theodore Schoen, Bass Clarinet/Clarinet 3 Sponsor: Karl Diekman

BASSOON: Michael Roemhildt, Principal Sponsor: Janet Sklaris in memory of Frank Sklaris Jefferson Campbell, Contrabassoon/Bassoon 3 Sponsor: Timothy Sandor

SAXOPHONE: Gregory Kehl Moore, Principal Sponsor: Anonymous Friend of the DSSO

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TRUMPET: Earl Salemink, Principal Sponsor: Sharon & Robert Wahman Charles Leibfried, Trumpet 2 Sponsor: Jeff & Vickie Cadwell; Marcia & Gary Doty; David and Patricia Mast Thomas Pfotenhauer, Trumpet 3 Sponsor: Mark & Grace Monson

TROMBONE: Larry Zimmerman, Principal Sponsor: Gale and Jeri Kerns; Roberta Vose James Erickson, Acting Trombone 2/Bass Trombone Sponsor: Mark Danielson & Theresa Smith

TUBA: Steve Grove, Principal Sponsor: Helena Jackson & Doug Dunham

TIMPANI: Fred Morgan, Principal (On Leave 21-22) Sponsor: Ellen Marsden Henry Eichman, Acting Principal Sponsor: Happy Sleeper

PERCUSSION: Gene Koshinski, Principal Sponsor: Susan J. Relf

HARP: Janell Kokkonen Lemire, Principal Sponsor: Elaine Killen

KEYBOARD: Beth Gilbert, Principal (On Leave 21-22) Sponsor: John & Kathy Berchild


Proud to Support DSSO Shops

A Place For Fido Duluth Kitchen Co. Fitger’s Brewhouse Beer Store Fitger’s Wine Cellars Gourmet Market Lotus on the Lake The Bookstore at Fitger’s The Snow Goose Trailfitters Whimsy

Restaurants Fitger’s Brewhouse Mexico Lindo The Boat Club

Nightclubs The Barrel Room Rex Bar

Services

Fitger’s Salon & Spa

Duluth’s Historic Fitger’s Inn ~ Proud sponsors of the featured artist! * FREE covered parking with validation!

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POPS 2

HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR

Casual Concert Sponsored by

Main Concert Sponsored by

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2021 2 & 7 PM DECC SYMPHONY HALL, ALLETE STAGE DIRK MEYER, MUSIC DIRECTOR DSSO CHORUS RICHARD ROBBINS, CHORUS MASTER STRIKEPOINT, HANDBELL ENSEMBLE BILL ALEXANDER, STRIKEPOINT DIRECTOR

2PM PROGRAM Silvestri: Polar Express Traditional: Celtic Nativity Traditional: Around the World at Christmastime Tiomkin: It’s a Wonderful Life Richman: The Hanukkah Story Anderson: Sleigh Ride Williams: Two Songs from Home Alone Anderson: Christmas Festival

55’

7PM PROGRAM Silvestri: Polar Express Traditional: Celtic Nativity STRIKEPOINT

Carol of the Bells

Christmas Medley

Traditional: Around the World at Christmastime Richman: The Hanukkah Story Tiomkin: It’s a Wonderful Life

42’

INTERMISSION 20’ STRIKEPOINT

Bell Carol/In dulci jubilo

Christmas Medley

Torme: Christmas Song Anderson: Sleigh Ride Anderson: Christmas Festival 36’

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Colin McGuire, violin; Bentleyville

Williams: Three Songs from Home Alone


MUSICIAN PROFILE

STRIKEPOINT A STRIKEPOINT CONCERT IS GUARANTEED TO PROVIDE A FAST-PACED, HIGH ENERGY, ROLLICKING GOOD TIME!

Strikepoint, from Duluth, Minnesota, is a church-based, community/professional handbell ensemble. Led by artistic director Bill Alexander, this eleven-member group performs in a directorless ensemble setting. College students and community members have joined with selected ringers from the four bell ensembles at Duluth’s First United Methodist Church to provide a consistently high level of musicianship since Strikepoint began in 1984. Strikepointers are often high school students, and sometimes as young as 13. Annual summer tours have taken the group throughout the continental U.S. as well as to England, Scotland, Wales, Japan, Canada, Hong Kong, Sweden, and Hawaii. Strikepoint has been the featured performer at numerous Area and National Handbell Festival Conferences, as well as five National Handbell Directors’ Seminars. Strikepoint rings six-plus octaves of bronze Schulmerich handbells, seven octaves of handchimes, two octaves of Silver Melody Bells, and three octaves of Petit and Fritzen handbells, along with a range of other instruments as needed. Noted for capturing the enthusiasm of audiences with a dynamic style and accessible music, Strikepoint’s concert selections can range from Bach to Lady Gaga and include music both familiar and new. Strikepoint’s most recent recording, “Reflections,” is simply “music to calm the mind and restore the spirit.” It has been used by thousands for meditation, yoga, and music therapy. Other available recordings include “Top Rung,” a combination DVD with bonus CD, and four additional titles on CD. Strikepoint recordings have been featured on local, national, and international broadcasts, and their social media posts have a large following.

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MASTERWORKS 3

TO BE BOLD SATURDAY, J A N U A R Y 15, 2022 7 PM DECC SYMPHONY HALL, ALLETE STAGE DIRK MEYER, MUSIC DIRECTOR MARIKA BOURNAKI, PIANO

PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY Piano Concerto No. 1 32’ Allegro non troppo e maestoso – Allegro con spirito Andantino semplice – Prestissimo Allegro con fuoco Marika Bournaki INTERMISSION 20’

47’

Hannah Peterson, flute; Minnesota Northwoods

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Symphony No.3, op.55, Eroica Allegro con brio Marcia funebre – Adagio assai Scherzo – Allegro vivace Finale – Allegro molto

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MUSICIAN PROFILE

MARIKA BOURNAKI THE AWARD-WINNING DOCUMENTARY “I AM NOT A ROCK STAR,” FEATURING MARIKA BOUNAKI AND DIRECTED BY BOBBI JO HART, HAS CAPTIVATED INTERNATIONAL AUDIENCES OF ALL AGES.

Described as “the Celine Dion of classical” by The Huffington Post, MARIKA BOURNAKI is at once a worldclass performer, dazzling pianist, vivacious young woman and one of the freshest faces on the classical music scene. Ms. Bournaki not only brings distinctive interpretations to favorite standards, but extends her passion for music by commissioning works from younger composers and collaborating with artists from various fields.

Marika Bournaki’s current season includes returns to Florida’s The SYMPHONIA and Michigan’s Jackson Symphony Orchestra, her debuts with Minnesota’s Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra and California’s Modesto Symphony Orchestra and a chamber music program with San Antonio’s Olmos Ensemble. Marika Bournaki has appeared as guest soloist with the symphony orchestras of Bozeman, Springfield (MO), Topeka, Montréal and St. Petersburg (Russia), along with Maryland’s Chesapeake Orchestra, The SYMPHONIA (FL), Romania’s Timisoara Filharmonica, Switzerland’s Verbier Chamber Orchestra and Canada’s Orchestre Métropolitain and Sinfonia Toronto. In addition to a benefit recital for the Glenn Gould Foundation at New York City’s Carnegie Hall, she has been presented in solo recitals and chamber music collaborations throughout the United States, Canada and the world, including Belgium, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, Romania, Switzerland and South Korea. Of special note was her survey of Beethoven’s complete 32-work piano sonata cycle, presented by the distinguished Bargemusic in Brooklyn. Marika Bournaki’s innovative approach to her art and performance is reflected in a number of multimedia projects intended to reach out to new audiences. Additionally, her role as Ambassador to the Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal’s summer event, “A Cool Classical Journey,” afforded new and stimulating ways to share her music with the public. Marika Bournaki holds both Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from The Juilliard School, where her principal teachers were Yoheved Kaplinsky and Matti Raekallio. She and her husband, the renowned cellist Julian Schwarz, make their home in Virginia.

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MASTERWORKS 3

PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor, Op. 23 PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY: BORN: May 7, 1840, in Kamsko-Votkinsk, Vyatka province, Russia DIED: November 6, 1893, in Saint Petersburg WORK COMPOSED: 1874-75, revisions 1879, 1888 WORLD PREMIERE: October 25, 1875, in Boston, Massachusetts, Harvard Musical Association, Hans von Bülow, piano; Benjamin Johnson Lang conducting PERFORMANCE HISTORY: This evening’s concert is the twelfth featuring this concerto on the DSSO’s Masterworks Series. Soloists for the previous performances were Duluth pianist Miriam Blair (in 1934 and 1944), Jesús Maria Sanromá (1949), Byron Janis (1963), Van Cliburn (on a pair of sold-out nonsubscription concerts in 1970), Andre-Michel Schub (1977, led by DSSO Music Director candidate Andrew Schenck), Natalia Trull (1990), Horacio Gutiérrez (1992), John Browning (on a 1998 all-Tchaikovsky Gala concert), Antonio Pompa-Baldi (2005), and Katherine Chi (September 17, 2011, led by Music Director candidate Rei Hotoda). At the New Year’s Eve Concert in 1988, the first movement was played by Beth Gilbert, the Orchestra’s Principal Keyboardist. In 1942 duopianists Jacques Fray and Mario Braggiotti played an arrangement of excerpts from the first movement with the DSSO. INSTRUMENTATION: Two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, strings and solo piano. 20 D U L U T H S U P E R I O R S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A

DURATION: 32 minutes. It’s hard to believe that one of the world’s most beautiful and recognizable works of music had such a turbulent birth. Such was the case with Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1. In November 1874, Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoly, “I am now immersed in the composition of a piano concerto. I definitely want [Nikolai] Rubinstein to play it at his concert; it’s going with much difficulty…” At this time, at age 34, Tchaikovsky was a professor at the new Moscow Conservatory while Nikolai Rubinstein was the director of the conservatory from its founding until his death in 1881. He was a younger brother of Tchaikovsky’s teacher Anton Rubinstein, who was then quite well known as a composer. The two brothers thought very highly of Tchaikovsky and Nikolai conducted the premieres of a significant number of his works, which makes even more curious Nikolai’s reaction to hearing the concerto on Christmas Eve of 1874. Tchaikovsky took the manuscript to Rubinstein to ask about some technical details in the solo part. “I played the first movement,” Tchaikovsky recalled. “Not a word, not an observation! […] Rubinstein was preparing his thunder.” After Tchaikovsky finished, Rubinstein declared that the concerto “was worthless, that it was impossible to play it, that its passages were clumsy, awkward, so awkward that they could not be corrected, that as a composition it was bad, that I stole from here and there, that there are only two or three pages worth preserving […]” This may be the censored version as it elicited Tchaikovsky’s response, “I was not just astounded but outraged by the whole scene. I am no longer a boy trying his hand at composition and I no longer need lessons from anyone, especially when they are offered so harshly and in such a spirit of hostility.” Rubinstein said he would perform it, only if Tchaikovsky would make the alterations he demanded. The composer responded, “I shall not alter a single note; I shall publish the work exactly as it is.” He changed the dedication and asked Hans von Bülow, the distinguished pianist and conductor, if he would accept the dedication and perform the premiere. Von Bülow happily accepted it and, according to the composer’s wish, premiered it as far from Russia as possible - just in case it failed miserably. The premiere was held in Boston with a pick-up orchestra of the Harvard Musical Association (before the founding of the Boston Symphony Orchestra this organization performed regular orchestra concerts). The American audience loved it and demanded an immediate encore of the finale! The 20-year-old George W. Chadwick, who would become one of America’s leading composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, recalled the premiere


MASTERWORKS 3

performance in his memoirs: “They had not rehearsed much and the trombones got in [sic] wrong in the ‘tutti’ in the middle of the first movement, whereupon Bülow sang out in a perfectly audible voice, ‘The brass may go to hell.’ This was the first Tchaikovsky piece I ever heard and I thought it the greatest ever, but it rather mystified some of our local scribes [the critics], who could not have dreamed how many times they would have to hear it in the future.” Von Bülow declared that the concerto “displays such brilliance, and is such a remarkable achievement among your musical works, that you have without doubt enriched the world of music as never before. There is such unsurpassed originality, such nobility, such strength, and there are so many arresting moments throughout this unique conception; there is such a maturity of form, such style—its design and execution, with such consonant harmonies, that I could weary you by listing all the memorable moments which caused me to thank the author—not to mention the pleasure from performing it all. In a word, this true gem shall earn you the gratitude of all pianists.” Tchaikovsky did make a few revisions and the version we most frequently hear today was prepared in collaboration with pianist Alexander Siloti (a cousin of Rachmaninoff) during the winter of 1888-89. In a letter to Siloti, the composer wrote that he left the concerto’s “fate to your discretion regarding everything except form [in other words, no cuts and no reordering sections of the piece]. You can edit the piano part as you like, change the markings (but leave my new markings, please), and I will be incredibly grateful to you for proofreading.” Rubinstein came around as well; a few years after the premiere he performed it himself and became a champion of it, which pleased Tchaikovsky very much. The massive block chords and soaring tunes that open Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 are famous and deservedly so; their majestic announcement demands attention. From the beginning the orchestra and soloist act in collaboration, with the strings playing the most famous melody accompanied by the piano in arpeggiated block chords. It isn’t until over four minutes into the concerto when the piano takes over as the soloist, but almost always sharing the spotlight with this or that section of the orchestra. The main theme is derived from the Ukrainian folk song Oi, kriache, kriache, ta y chornenkyi voron… that Tchaikovsky heard performed by a blind musician at a market near Kiev (Kyiv). The second movement opens with the solo flute introducing the main theme, followed by the strings and pia-

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no. The prestissimo middle section melody is derived from the French chansonette, Il faut s'amuser, danser et rire (One must have fun, dance and laugh), a staple of soprano Désirée Artôt’s repertoire. Artôt (1835-1907) was a Belgian soprano who was famed in German and Italian opera. In 1868 she was engaged briefly with Tchaikovsky; some say this may have been Tchaikovsky’s first serious attempt to conquer his homosexuality. Although one can almost imagine the two dancing to its cheerful melody, the underlying piano solo adds a touch of discomfort to the joy. The finale opens with a Ukrainian vesnianka (a type of spring dance song that has been performed for thousands of years in what is now Ukraine) Vyidy, Vyidy, Ivanku (Come to us, Ivanku). The second theme has a motivic bond with the Russian folk song Poydu, poydu, vo TsarGorod (I’m Coming to the Capital). After Russia was banned from all major sporting competitions from 2021-23 by the World Anti-Doping Agency, individuals cleared to compete were allowed to represent the Russian Olympic Committee or Russian Paralympic Committee at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Paralympics. Instead of the Russian national anthem, a fragment of the concerto was used when these competing athletes were awarded a gold medal. Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 has become one of the world’s most loved and recognized works in the entire orchestral repertoire. Its enduring beauty transcends us as only Tchaikovsky’s unmatched melodic talent can do.

“…YOU SEE, MY DEAR FRIEND, I AM MADE UP O F C O N T R A D I C T I O N S , A N D I H AV E R E A C H E D A V E R Y M AT U R E A G E W I T H O U T R E S T I N G U P O N A N Y T H I N G P O S I T I V E , W I T H O U T H AV I N G CALMED MY RESTLESS SPIRIT EITHER BY R E L I G I O N O R P H I L O S O P H Y . U N D O U B T E D LY I S H O U L D H AV E G O N E M A D B U T F O R M U S I C . MUSIC IS INDEED THE MOST BEAUTIFUL O F A L L H E AV E N ’ S G I F T S T O H U M A N I T Y WA N D E R I N G I N T H E D A R K N E S S . A LO N E IT CALMS, ENLIGHTENS, AND STILLS OUR SOULS. IT IS NOT THE STRAW TO WHICH THE DROWNING MAN CLINGS; BUT A TRUE FRIEND, REFUGE, AND COMFORTER, FOR WHOSE SAKE LIFE IS WORTH LIVING”

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky


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large symphony and the only living individual in Europe who Beethoven thought of as a benefactor of humanity was Napoleon Bonaparte. Napoleon, at that time, embodied Beethoven’s ideals of aesthetics, humanity and freedom. Beethoven was also inspired by the writings of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) and Friedrich Schiller (1759-1805), and he found that the image of the mythical Prometheus from the ballet he composed in 1801 represented Schiller’s “most perfectly appropriate symbol of assertion of one’s own freedom and regard for the freedom of others.”

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, Op. 55 Eroica LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN BAPTIZED: December 17, 1770, in Bonn, Germany DIED: March 26, 1827, in Vienna, Austria WORK COMPOSED: 1803 WORLD PREMIERE: April 7, 1805, in Vienna, Beethoven conducting PERFORMANCE HISTORY: Tonight marks the DSSO’s tenth performance of this symphony. The previous performances were in 1942 (Tauno Hannikainen conductor), 1957 (with Hermann Herz), 1968 and 1974 (with Joseph Hawthorne), 1985 and 1992 (Taavo Virkhaus), 2001 and 2005 (Markand Thakar), and on January 23, 2016 with Dirk Meyer. The 1992 performance was repated at Thorpe Langley Auditorium at UW-S and broadcast on Wisconsin Public Radio. The 2001 performance was on Markand Thakar’s first concert as DSSO’s Music Director. INSTRUMENTATION: Two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, three horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. DURATION: 47 minutes.

After his return from Heiligenstadt in late 1802 Beethoven admitted that he was “not satisfied with the work I have done so far” and according to Carl Czerny he also said “from now on I intend to take a new way.” He decided to create an epic work and with his hearing deteriorating, he felt a sense of urgency to complete it. He chose a Promethean figure as the theme for this

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Beethoven began his most concentrated work on Symphony No. 3 in May 1803 and it was his priority for that summer. This symphony would become a turning point not only in Beethoven’s career, but also in the history of music. He originally entitled the symphony Bonaparte, but by the following year Beethoven was so enraged when Napoleon proclaimed himself Emperor that he went to his completed score and tore the title page in half. He took the first page of the score and so violently scratched out the title that he wore a hole through the paper. He changed the title to Eroica (heroic), which is appropriate as it is bigger and longer than any previous symphony. It is also confrontational as it challenges us to explore the realm of the unconscious, and its scale is so unprecedented that it is still daunting for the first-time listener. Very few works, such as Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro, Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde, and Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, share this remarkable impact on music history. Eroica is important not only for the new directions in music Beethoven was taking; it was a tool to make a political commentary on the state of the times. In it we begin to notice that there was a growing sense brewing in the populace of self-awareness and concern for the public good. At the 1805 premiere the reception was mixed. The listeners were not quite sure what to make of this new symphony. Some thought it too long or couldn’t understand its structure, while others felt it was a masterpiece. Eroica ushered in Beethoven’s middle period, also known as his ‘heroic’ period (roughly 1803-12), and it is likely that we would not have the works of Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Mahler, Shostakovich and others had Eroica not been composed. Beethoven’s ability to improvise on themes of his own and others made him famous among the nobility in Vienna. His performances could go on for nearly an hour and they covered a wide range of emotions. In the first movement of Eroica Beethoven takes his listeners on a wild journey expressing life, wrong turns, confusion,


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helplessness and despair, using only a few simple themes. The second movement takes on the most emotional extreme in life: Grief. Beethoven’s deepest crisis was the realization that he was going deaf. He described in his Heiligenstadt Testament the despondency he felt at the time. The fear that he was being cut off from people, losing the possibility of intimate conversations and becoming isolated filled him with terror. The Heiligenstadt Testament reveals Beethoven’s state of mind, which he inserts into the very fabric of his music. The third movement scherzo represents a complete change from the darkness of the funeral march; despondency and fear is replaced with his hope for the future and exploring the joy of music. He has become very confident in his imagination, creating new musical worlds and personally communicating this optimism to the listener. Beethoven had become obsessed with the last dance movement he composed for The Creatures of Prometheus in 1801:

This simple theme becomes the foundation for the last movement of the symphony. Beethoven again returns to what made him popular: theme and variations. He initially sought a Promethean character to whom he could dedicate this work and was crushed when Napoleon failed to be the person Beethoven thought he was. The tenderness and simplicity of this last movement challenges the listener to reconsider what it is that really defines greatness. On its publication in 1806 Symphony No. 3, Eroica, was dedicated to Prince Lobkowitz and “Composed to celebrate the death of a hero.” As we think of Beethoven overcoming the depths of despair and through sheer self-determination triumphing over his own adversity, this autobiographical symphony makes us wonder if Beethoven is the true hero.

“SO HE IS NO MORE THAN A COMMON MORTAL! NOW, TOO, HE WILL TREAD UNDER FOOT ALL T H E R I G H T S O F M A N , I N D U L G E O N LY H I S AMBITION; NOW HE WILL THINK HIMSELF SUPERIOR TO ALL MEN, BECOME A TYRANT!”

Ludwig Van Beethoven

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TO CELEBRATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2022 7 PM DECC SYMPHONY HALL, ALLETE STAGE DIRK MEYER, MUSIC DIRECTOR ERIN ALDRIDGE, VIOLIN

JOHANNES BRAHMS Academic Festival Overture

10’

JOSÉ WHITE Violin Concerto 22’ Allegro Adagio ma non troppo Allegro moderato Erin Aldridge INTERMISSION 20’ EDWARD KENNEDY “DUKE” ELLINGTON The River 20’ Spring Meander Lake Giggling Rapids

Erin Aldridge, Concertmaster; Hawks Ridge

OTTORINO RESPIGHI Roman Festivals 25’ Circus Games The Jubilee October Festival The Epiphany

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MUSICIAN PROFILE In the spring of 2005, Dr. Erin Aldridge was named Concertmaster of the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra. But, her story began long before that---back when her parents discovered that their daughter possessed a sense of perfect pitch. Hoping to develop and harness that potential, they sent Erin to conservatory, at three years of age, at the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music. What developed from there has evolved into a lifetime career and exceptional ability. Dr. Aldridge attended Indiana University where she received her Bachelor’s degree in Violin Performance. She then went on to receive her Master’s degree and Performer’s Certificate in Chamber Music Performance from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where she was also a member of the Leonard Sorkin Institute of Chamber Music under the direction of the Fine Arts Quartet. She continued her studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she received her Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Violin Performance. Her primary teachers include Mimi Zweig, Josef Gingold, Nellie Shkolnikova, Rostaslav Dubinsky, Efim Boico, and Vartan Manoogian. Her conducting instructors include Margery

ERIN ALDRIDGE DR. ALDRIDGE HAS WON NUMEROUS AWARDS AS BOTH SOLOIST AND CHAMBER MUSICIAN AND HAS BEEN FEATURED THROUGHOUT EUROPE, SOUTH AMERICA, AND THE UNITED STATES. SHE IS A WELL SOUGHT AFTER PERFORMER AND PEDAGOGUE, AND HAS BEEN PUBLISHED IN STRINGS MAGAZINE.

Deutsch and David Becker. In 2003, Dr. Aldridge joined the music faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Superior. She serves as Professor of Violin, Director of Orchestras, and is a member of the faculty piano trio Trillium. She is also on faculty of the Indiana University Summer String Academy. Dr. Aldridge has won numerous awards as both soloist and chamber musician and has been featured throughout Europe, South America, and the United States. She is a well sought after performer and pedagogue, and has been published in Strings Magazine. Dr. Aldridge maintains an active performance schedule as a soloist and chamber musician. She has been a soloist with the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra, the Lake Superior Chamber Orchestra, the Long Prairie Chamber Orchestra, and the Itasca Symphony Orchestra. She has been a guest artist at the Indiana University Summer Music Festival, Arizona State University, DePaul University Contemporary Concert Series, Madeline Island Music Camp, Ashland Chamber Music Series with Trillium Piano Trio, National String Workshop, “Live at the Chazen” Concert Series, and has been broadcast on the BBC and Wisconsin Public Radio. Erin is also a lover of rock and metal music and has been known from time to time, to lend her musical talents, adapting her abilities with the violin, to local bands and events that allow her to express the awesome versatility of her instrument. These include collaborations with The Three Altos, Sara Thomsen and Ryan Van Slooten.

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Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80 JOHANNES BRAHMS BORN: May 7, 1833, in Hamburg, Germany DIED: April 3, 1897, in Vienna, Austria WORK COMPOSED: 1880 WORLD PREMIERE: January 4, 1881, in Breslau, Brahms conducting PERFORMANCE HISTORY: There have been seven previous DSSO Masterworks Series performances of this work: in 1934, 1947 (the first piece of the three-season tenure of Joseph Wagner, the Orchestra’s third Music Director), 1962, 1967, 1977 (Robert Walton Cole, guest conductor), 1987, and on September 27, 2003. INSTRUMENTATION: Two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion (bass drum, cymbals, triangle) and strings. DURATION: 10 minutes. Although Johannes Brahms never attended college, at the age of 20 he was introduced to violinist-composer Joseph Joachim who invited Brahms to join him at Göttingen where he would be taking summer courses in philosophy and history at the local university. Brahms hung out with Joachim for two months that summer enjoying reading, debates, beer-drinking sessions and general student camaraderie. As I read this I realized that not much has changed in university life over the past 150-plus years. This reminded me of a band trip when I was stationed with the United States Air Force in Germany in the early 1980s. We went to Groningen in the north of the Netherlands to play at the University of Groningen (founded in 1614!) in the student union. That might sound like a normal performance, except that we didn’t start playing until about 10:00pm and we did three sets, ending around 1:00am! The place was packed with screaming students and beer was flowing generously. After we finished playing I thought that would be the end of the night. Foolish me - I quickly learned that the student union would stay open as long as there were at least two customers still buying drinks. I made it until 4:30 or so before I gave up the night (morning?). I was a little older than Brahms at that time, but I can certainly imagine his life over those two months! In 1879 Brahms was informed that he was to be given an honorary Doctorate of Philosophy by the Univer28 D U L U T H S U P E R I O R S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A

JOHANNES BRAHMS sity of Breslau (now Wrocław, Poland). This wasn’t the first such honor offered to Brahms; in 1876 Cambridge University offered him an honorary Doctorate of Music, which required his presence at the ceremony. Brahms was paralyzed at the thought of sea travel and then he learned that Londoners were planning lavish celebrations to honor him. Brahms also had a deep fear of public attention. It was too much for him and he chose to relinquish the honor and stayed home. He was flattered by the honor proposed by the University of Breslau and sent a postcard thanking the faculty. However, he couldn’t get away with it a second time; his friend Bernhard Scholz, Director of Music in Breslau, sent him a letter making it clear that the university was expecting gratitude in musical form. During the summer of 1880, while vacationing in Bad Ischl, Brahms composed his musical Danke schön, the Academic Festival Overture. Instead of a solemn work that might be expected on such an auspicious occasion, Brahms produced what he called “a very boisterous potpourri of student drinking songs a lá Suppé.” (Franz von Suppé (1819-1895) was one of the best known writers of light music of the period, particularly known for his operettas and comic operas.) The result was an enjoyable and delightful spoof on academia and its gravitas. Brahms employed his largest orchestral forces ever and the work sparkles with some of the finest virtues of his orchestral technique. Harkening back to his adventures in Göttingen, Brahms included some of the drinking songs he may have heard (and probably sang) during his evenings with Joachim and his fellow students. The first song is


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Wir hatten gebauet ein stattliches Haus (We had Built a Stately House), followed by Hochfeierlicher Landesvater (Most Solemn Song to the Founder of the Country). The bassoons are featured in the freshman hazing song, Fuchensritt (Fox-Ride), which English musicologist Sir David Francis Tovey called the “Great Bassoon Joke.” The finale is a full orchestral treatment of Gaudeamus igitur (So Let Us Rejoice), which characterized carefree student life since the late Middle Ages. Brahms conducted the premiere at Breslau in 1881 at a ceremony full of academic pomp and circumstance. One report has it that the dignity of the occasion was interrupted as students spontaneously burst into song when they heard the familiar songs, most likely adding some of their own irreverent words. Academic Festival Overture remains one of Brahms’ most often performed works.

JOSÉ WHITE Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in F-sharp Minor JOSEPH WHITE BORN: January 17, 1836, in Mantanzas, Cuba DIED: March 15, 1918, in Paris, France WORK COMPOSED: 1864 WORLD PREMIERE: 1867, in Paris, composer as soloist PERFORMANCE HISTORY: Tonight’s performance of this concerto is the first piece by José White to be played by the DSSO INSTRUMENTATION: Two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. DURATION: 22 minutes. 29 D U L U T H S U P E R I O R S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A

José Silvestre de Los Dolores White y Lafitte (Joseph White) was one of the greatest violinists you’ve never heard of, until now. White was born in Mantanzas, Cuba to Don Carlos White, a French businessman, and an Afro-Cuban mother. His father was an amateur violinist and gave young José his early musical training. On March 21, 1854, White gave his first concert in Mantanzas accompanied by the celebrated pianist, Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829-1869). Gottschalk encouraged White to pursue training in Paris and raised the money he needed. At the Paris Conservatoire there were sixty applicants vying for a chance to study with Jean-Delphin Alard, the pre-eminent master of the French school of violin playing; White overcame the competition and won the coveted spot. In 1856, he won the Prix de Rome in Violin and two years later began touring Europe, the Caribbean, South America and Mexico. In a letter dated November 28, 1858, Gioacchino Rossini wrote a letter of praise to White: “The warmth of your execution, the feeling, the elegance, the brilliance of the school to which you belong, show qualities in you as an artist of which the French school may be proud.” White taught at the Paris Conservatoire from 186465 as a temporary replacement for Alard and his first book of Six Etudes for Violin was accepted by the Conservatoire in 1868 as part of its official curriculum. He was awarded the Order of Isabella la Catòlica by the Spanish court in 1863 while he was living in Madrid. In 1870 White became a French citizen and would return to Paris later in life. From 1877 to 1889 he was the director of the Imperial Concservatory in Rio de Janeiro, where he served as court musician for the Emperor Pedro II. White returned to the Paris Conservatoire as professor in 1889 where his most famous pupil was Georges Enescu (1881-1955), who is considered the greatest Romanian musician of all time. Enescu went on to teach the great violinist Yehudi Menuhin (19161999). In 1876 White performed with the New York Philharmonic and the Theodore Thomas Orchestra (which later became the Chicago Symphony Orchestra); he was the only musician of color to do so at that time. One music critic called him “The best violinist who has visited this country…” During his performing career he held many benefit concerts for various social causes of the day. His concerts were often attended by Cuban expatriates and emigrates who were supportive of the Cuban war for independence from Spain and concert proceeds would often go to support Cuban insurgents fighting in his homeland. White also gave charity concerts for hospitals, children and various churches. One


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particular church he had an association with was the Plymouth Church, which during the American Civil War and all throughout the 19th century was an abolitionist center and defender of the rights of people of African descent. White’s purchase of Stradivari’s last violin, the 1737 Swan Song, for $3,000 made the New York Times in an October 10, 1886, issue. Although White is not listed as the purchaser, another source corroborated White as the next owner of the aptly named violin. White’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in F-sharp Minor was composed at the beginning of his touring career. It follows the standard three-movement format of the period: Allegro, Adagio ma non troppo, and Allegro moderato. His choice of key is curious, rare but not an unheard of key for violin concertos. In Mark Clague’s notes for Rachel Barton Pine’s recording he suggests that White may have done it as “a competitive stance” against two contemporary composers who also chose that key in the early 1850s: Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst (1814-1865) and Henryk Wieniawski (18351880). Following in the footsteps of the great Niccolò Paganini (1782-1840), White produced a highly virtuosic work that demands an enormous amount of technical prowess from the soloist. First impressions might leave the listener thinking it is similar to many other concertos of the time, but it certainly is a unique work that utilizes an operatic style in the second movement with recitative and rhythmic passages reminiscent of music from his homeland. In 1867 White performed the premiere of his concerto in Paris. A critic described the work as “one of the best modern works of its kind… The fabric is excellent, the basic thematic ideas are carefully distinguished, the harmonies are elegant and clear, and the orchestration is written by a secure hand, free from error. One feels the presence of a strong and individual nature from the start. Not a single note exists for mere virtuosity, although the performance difficulties are enormous.” White’s Violin Concerto did not have a premiere in America until 1974, when Ruggiero Ricci performed it in Avery Fisher Hall with the Symphony of the New World. According to a New York Times article from March 3, 1974, it was with the persistent efforts of Paul Glass, who was a professor at Brooklyn College, that he discovered White’s concerto. Glass procured a microfilm of the work from the national library in Paris and approached Ricci and Kermit Moore, who then later conducted its American premiere in a concert featuring music by black composers, honoring Black History Month. As Dr. Glass stated, “there is still considerable work to be done restoring to their rightful 30 D U L U T H S U P E R I O R S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A

stature other works not only by White… but also by the many other black artists who have recently come to light or who are yet to be traced.” Just imagine all the music we don’t know…

DUKE ELLINGTON The River EDWARD KENNEDY “DUKE” ELLINGTON BORN: April 29, 1899, in Washington, District of Columbia DIED: May 24, 1974, in New York City, New York WORK COMPOSED: 1970 (arr. Ron Collier) WORLD PREMIERE: June 25, 1970, at New York State Theater, New York City PERFORMANCE HISTORY: While Duke Ellington’s music has been heard on various DSSO Pops concerts in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, only one of his pieces has previously been played on the Masterworks Series: Three Black Kings, on October 26, 2002 led by Markand Thakar. INSTRUMENTATION: Two flutes, two oboes (one doubling English horn), two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, harp, piano and strings. DURATION: 20 minutes.

In the history of 20th century American music, Duke Ellington ranks with Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, George Gershwin and other greats. Although he was a pivotal figure in the history of jazz, and in the opinion of Gunther Schuller and Barry Kernfeld, “the most significant composer of the genre,” Ellington embraced the phrase that his music was ‘beyond cat-


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egory’ which he considered a liberating principle. He would later classify music into two simple categories: good and bad, and he referred to his own music as ‘American Music.’ President Richard Nixon presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Ellington, celebrating his 70th birthday on April 29, 1969, and in 1999 he was awarded a posthumous Pulitzer Prize Special Award for Music. Ellington’s parents were both pianists. His mother Daisy, daughter of two former slaves, primarily played parlor songs and his father, James, who made blueprints for the United States Navy, preferred operatic arias. The Ellington family showed racial pride and support in their home and similar to many other families at the time, worked to protect their children from the era’s Jim Crow laws. At age seven, Edward began piano lessons with Marietta Clinkscales. His mother surrounded him with dignified women to reinforce his manners and teach him elegance. Ellington discusses in his autobiography, Music is My Mistress (1973), that his childhood friends took notice that his casual, offhand manner and dapper dress gave him the bearing of a young nobleman. He credits his friend Edgar McEntree for the nickname Duke: “I think he felt that in order for me to be eligible for his constant companionship, I should have a title. So he called me Duke.” Although he loved baseball, the tug from music was much stronger. In the summer of 1914, while working as a soda jerk at the Poodle Dog Café, Ellington ‘wrote’ his first composition, Soda Fountain Rag (also known as the Poodle Dog Rag). He could not read or write music at this time and created the work completely by ear. He recalled that he would play it in a variety of styles and the listeners never knew it was always the same piece. By the late 1920s, Duke Ellington was becoming a household name with over a half-dozen hit records. His gig at Harlem’s famed Cotton Club, which was featured on a weekly radio show, brought Ellington and his band national and eventually international attention. By the end of the 1940s, he and his band had over 70 hit records, many being of his own compositions. Jazz historian Gunther Schuller wrote that his “musical vision went way beyond the standard view of jazz.” With Billy Strayhorn, Ellington wrote the film score for Otto Preminger’s Anatomy of a Murder (1959), for which he won three Grammy Awards. Late in his career Ellington pondered writing a ballet and Lucia Chase, director of the American Ballet Theatre, commissioned him and dancer/choreographer Alvin Ailey to create a work for her company’s thirtieth anniversary in 1970. Ellington showed Ailey his

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concept of using a river as a metaphor for the passage from birth to death. Because of Ellington’s grueling tour schedule, which he maintained from the 1940s, he completed the score only a month before the premiere. Ailey wasn’t able to choreograph all the scenes in time and Seven Dances from a Work in Progress Entitled The River was premiered on June 25, 1970, at Lincoln Center. Ellington’s friend and collaborator Ron Collier created the orchestral arrangement for that performance. Ailey later added choreography and The River became a staple of the American Ballet Theatre. The River begins with Spring, described by Ellington as “a newborn baby in his crib . . . wiggling, gurgling, squirming, squealing . . .” Meander blossoms out of a bluesy opening riff, followed by an extended flute solo. The movement meanders into a 12/8 feel, then to a waltz and then returns to the bluesy opening riff and back to the flute solo. Ellington described it as a “baby finding an open door to the outside world.” The baby continues to explore the world and grows through life throughout the remaining movements: Giggling Rapids, Lake, Vortex, Falls, Two Cities, and Riba, until finally ending in a boisterous shout chorus. Duke Ellington died on May 24, 1974, a few weeks after his 75th birthday. His funeral, at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, was attended by over 12,000 people. Ella Fitzgerald summed up the somber occasion: “It’s a very sad day. A genius has passed.” Ellington’s gift of melody and his mastery of sonic textures, rhythms, and compositional forms translated his often subtle, often complex perceptions into a body of music unequaled in jazz history.


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OTTORINO RESPIGHI Feste Romane (Roman Festivals) OTTORINO RESPIGHI BORN: July 9, 1879, in Bologna, Italy DIED: April 18, 1936, in Rome WORK COMPOSED: 1928 WORLD PREMIERE: February 21, 1929, New York Philharmonic, Arturo Toscanini conducting PERFORMANCE HISTORY: The only previous DSSO performance of this work was on January 16, 1982. It was a bitterly cold, windy night. There was an extended intermission so audience members could warm-up their cars, and most returned to the concert. Taavo Virkhaus lead the concert which also included Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto with Barry Snyder as soloist and Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony, dedicated to the memory of the recently deceased Hermann Herz, the Orchestra’s fourth Music Director. INSTRUMENTATION: Three flutes (3rd doubling piccolo), two oboes and English horn, two clarinets, piccolo clarinet and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, four trumpets (+three soprano buccine), three trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion (bells, glockenspiel, cymbals, bass drum, field drum, snare drum, ratchet, sleigh bells, tambourine, tam-tam, triangle, wood blocks, xylophone), piano (four hands), organ, mandolin and strings. DURATION: 25 minutes.

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Respighi celebrated Rome with his popular Roman Tryptich, a set of three programmatic tone poems: Fountains of Rome (1916), Pines of Rome (1924) and Roman Festivals (1928). Roman Festivals is the longest and most demanding of the trilogy, and it is performed less frequently than its companion pieces. In 1913, Respighi accepted an appointment as professor of composition at Rome’s most famous conservatory, the Saint Cecilia Academy. In 1918, Toscanini planned a series of twelve concerts in Milan for the following year and asked Respighi for one of his compositions to perform. Respighi reluctantly gave him Fountains of Rome, which had received a very lukewarm reception at its premiere in 1917. This time the concert was a huge success and placed Respighi as one of the leading Italian composers of the early 20th century. His second tone poem of the trilogy, Pines of Rome, premiered in Rome in December 1924. It went on to be his most widely known and recorded works. Respighi composed Roman Festivals in nine days at the end of 1928. After its premiere in New York Respighi felt that he had incorporated the “maximum of orchestral sonority and colour” from the orchestra and could no longer write such large scale pieces. He then started to prefer composing for smaller ensembles.


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The opening of Roman Festivals takes us to ancient Rome at the Circus Maximus, the largest stadium in its day with an audience capacity of 150,000 (in comparison the largest stadium in the United States is Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor with a capacity of 107,601; Green Bay Packers’ Lambeau Field holds 81,441 and U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the Minnesota Vikings, seats 66,655)! Imagine the gladiators battling followed by the condemned Christian martyrs chanting as they are pitted against hungry, angry wild beasts. Respighi describes each movement: •

CIRCUS GAMES - A threatening sky hangs over the Massimo Circus, but it is the peoples holiday: “Ave Nero!”. The iron doors are unlocked, the strains of a religious song and the howling of wild beasts float on the air. The crowd rises in agitation: unperturbed, the song of the martyrs develops, conquers and then is lost in the tumult.

THE JUBILEE - The pilgrims trail along the highway, praying. Finally appears from the summit of Monte Mario, to ardent eyes and gasping souls, the holy city: “Rome! Rome!”. A hymn of praise bursts forth, the churches ring out their reply.

OCTOBER FESTIVAL - The October festival in the Roman “Castelli” covered with vines: hunting echoes, tinkling of bells, songs of love. Then in the tender even - fall arises a romantic serenade.

THE EPIPHANY - The night before Epiphany in the Piazza Navona: a characteristic rhythm of trumpets dominates the frantic clamour: above the swelling noise float, from time to time, rustic motives, saltarello cadenzas, the strains of a barrel-organ of a booth and the call of a barker, the harsh song of the intoxicated and the lively stornello in which is expressed the popular feelings. “Lassàtece passà, semo Romani!” (“We are Romans, let us pass!”).

Like all great program music, Respighi’s Roman Festivals lets us create the imagery, as if it is the soundtrack to a great movie in our mind.

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HOW TO DONATE

WAYS TO SUPPORT THE DULUTH SUPERIOR SYMPHONY ORCHESRA

Just as it takes an ensemble to perform the great works of Beethoven, so it takes a collection of individuals to support the work of the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra. When you give to the DSSO, you are supporting an organization that is a cultural cornerstone of the Twin Ports region, bringing together the best of our local musicians to entertain, educate and enrich the lives of more than 20,000 individuals each year. Your ticket purchase tonight was important - but it only covers a quarter of our annual operating expenses. Individual donors play an important part in helping the Symphony bridge that gap. Each season, gifts from individuals provide more than 60% of our contributed income. That means donations of any size make a big difference and support our efforts to share great music with everyone in the community.

MOST COMMON WAYS TO MAKE A GIFT TO DULUTH SUPERIOR SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA In Person - Come say hello to us at the tables in the lobby. We want to hear your stories about concerts you have enjoyed over the years Call the Office - We are happy to process your donation over the phone and love it when people call. Donate Online - Give securely by visiting www.DSSO.com/give Mail Us a Check - We know it can be old-fashioned, but our office loves getting mail. 130 W. Superior St Suite LL2 - 120 Duluth, MN 55802

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ADDITIONAL WAYS TO MAKE A GIFT: Monthly Giving- Sign up for a monthly donation that can be automatically deducted from your credit card or checking account. Stock Donations- You can transfer appreciated stock as a gift that is fully tax-deductible. IRA Distribution- Make a distribution directly from your IRA to the DSSO.

PERPETUAL SUPPORT VIA THE LEGACY SOCIETY: The Legacy Society recognizes and honors the visionary individuals, couples, and families who have included the DSSO in their estate plans, ensuring that the music you care about continues into the future. To join the Legacy Society, you can make a bequest to the DSSO as part of your Will, name the organization as a beneficiary in a policy or retirement fund or provide a direct cash donation into our endowment. To begin, contact your attorney and ask for the DSSO to be included in your Will, Trust or policy. Then contact the DSSO office and we can provide you with a membership form so we can begin recognizing your generosity and including your gift in our future planning. In recognition of their support, Legacy Society members are listed in all concert Program Books and are invited to an exclusive annual benefit event each year.

BUSINESS SUPPORT: The Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra (DSSO) is proud to be a part of the Twin Ports business community. The Symphony is an employer, a downtown tenant, a consumer, an advertiser, and a member of the Chamber of Commerce. We understand that each company has different needs and motivations, from marketing and brand identification to client and employee entertainment and recognition, and more. We welcome the opportunity to discuss your corporate objectives and identify customized ways we can work together for mutual benefits.


DSSO CONTRIBUTORS

THANK YOU TO THE FOLLOWING CORPORATE AND INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTORS WHO HAVE GIVEN IN SUPPORT OF THE DSSO JANUARY 1, 2020 THROUGH NOVEMBER 1, 2021

MAESTRO ($25,000 and up)

GUEST ARTIST ($6,000 to $9,999)

HALF CHAIR ($2,500 to $4,499)

Margaret Dale Ames Lifetime Trust Jeremy & Carol Fryberger McKnight Foundation Minnesota State Arts Board The Charles and Carolyn Russell Family Foundation US Bank The Depot Foundation

Martha Aas Arrowhead Regional Arts Council Duluth News Tribune Adelaide M. Cline Karl Diekman DSSO Young Composers Fund The Estate of Mr. John Elliott Thomas & Barbara Elliott James & Christabel Grant St. Luke’s Hospital Inter City Oil Co., Inc. Mt. Royal Market National Bank of Commerce North Shore Bank Henry & Terry Roberts

Stack Brothers Mechanical Contractors Honorable Judge David & Gloria Bouschor Laura Budd Cecilians Society City of Duluth Marcia & Gary Doty Ruth Ann Eaton Jeremy Hoglund and Andréa Mueller Hoglund Sylvia Jamar Mark & Nancy Melhus Mark & Grace Monson May & Vern Nordling Northern Mechanical Plumbing Contractors Association Jacquie & James Sebastian Jane S. Smith Memorial Fund Carolyn Sundquist Roberta Vose

PRINCIPAL ($10,000 to $24,999) Duluth Superior Area Community Foundation Essentia Health Helena Jackson & Doug Dunham Gary Foley Lloyd K. Johnson Foundation Elisabeth C. Mason Wildey H. Mitchell Family Foundation Sharon & Michael Mollerus Nancy Odden & Doug Britton Pachel Foundation William & Saundra Palmer Verna & Arend Sandbulte in support of the concertmaster chair through the Sandbulte Orchestra Leadership Fund Janet R. Sklaris Robert & Sharon Wahman Muriel Whiteside Charitable Trust Mary & James Zastrow

FULL CHAIR ($4,500 to $5,999) Allete, Inc. Dr. Vicki & Terry Anderson Harris & Diane Balko Robert T. & Barbara K. Bennett John & Kathy Berchild Linda & Mark Boben Elizabeth & Richard Burns Mark Danielson & Theresa M. Smith Mr. & Mrs. Robert Eaton Beth Gilbert Happy Sleeper Mattress Elaine Killen Ellen Marsden Cheryl & Joe Meese James & Kathleen Sanders Brad Schmugge, CPA

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QUARTER CHAIR ($1,200 to $2,499) Anonymous Natascha & Ramin Artang Sandra Barkley Mary Ann & Dell Bernard Jared & Leslie Broadway Lurene Buhrmann Jeffrey & Vickie Cadwell City of Duluth 1200 Fund Alison Jean Clarke Stephen & Lauri Cushing Rose & Lester Drewes Elaine & Roger Engle Rondi Erickson Robert & Mary Evans


CONTRIBUTORS

James & June Farkas Ruth Frederick Robert & Angelica Fryberger Kay & Walt Gower Ron & Kay Gustafson Wayne Holmberg Mary & Glen Holt Pamella Jacobson Ruth R. Johnson in Memory of Dr. Ted Johnson Jeri & Gale Kerns Robert Knighton in Memory of Priscilla Knighton Matthew & Tina Koecher Family Joel & Catherine Koemptgen Diane M. Kolquist & James Seitz Dennis Lamkin J. Clark & Jean Laundergan in Memory of Warren & Viola Askeland Ann Mars David & Patricia Mast Tom & Alice McCabe Nancy Melander Susan Meyer Heather A. Muster Nordling Family Fund Dean Peterson & Deborah Rausch Father Andrew Ricci Timothy & Adeline Sandor in Memory of Joseph A. Sandor Kenneth Schoen Lane Fryberger Smith Donna & Dennis Soukup South Pier Inn Tom & Mimi Stender John Ivey Thomas & Mary Rees Thomas Family Foundation Fund Andrea Wahman & Lee Zimmerman Gudrun & Geoffrey Witrak

ACCELERANDO ($600 to $1,199)

ADAGIO ($200 to $599)

Bill Anderson Jan Biga Karen Crowell Kate Dean Margaret Foss Patricia Gannon Robert Goodin Carlton & Judy Gustafson in Memory of Arlyne and Kalervo Kokkonen Joan & Thomas Hedin Mary Holm-Lund Mr. James Jarocki & Ms. Kristin Blakeslee Taylor Johnson Margaret Joynes Sharon & Jack Kemp Kiwanis Club of Friendly Duluth Mr. & Mrs. Knuti in Memory of Erik G. Knuti and in Honor of James Erickson John, Judith & James Lampi Donn Larson Gary & Darla Meier Dirk & Paula Meyer William & Irene Moser Barbara L. Olson in Honor of Betty A. Melde & in Memory of R. James Melde Gerald & Mary Ann Ostroski David J. Ouse Ben & Jeanne Overman Susan J. Relf Gerald Ruona William & Kay Slack Tobin Sobaski Patrick Spott & Kay Biga Anita Swanson Valentini’s Vicino Lago Elaine Wickstrom

Anonymous Benedictine Sisters of St. Scholastica Monastery Benedictine Health Center Benevity Fund Janet Akervik John & Cathy Ameel Evelyn M. Anderson Richard & Yvonne Anderson Allen Anway in Memory of Dorothy Anway Chuck & Judyth Babst Linda & Glen Backman Leonore Baeumler Judith & James Bailey Susanne & Johan Bakken Lee Ball Connie Barnabee Anthony Barrett Susan Bathory & Donald Lane Daniel & Marjorie Bergeland Anne Bier Dawn Boman Angie Bomier Jean & Tom Brozic Wendy Buczynski Doug & Karen Buell Jean Captain Jan Carey Craig Carlson David Carroll Nancy Carroll Mark & Cathy Casper Terrence Clark John Congdon Marian Congdon Bill & Kathy Croke Dorene Degidio Kathleen Desanto Michael & Carol Donahue R. Craft & Ellie Dryer Julie & Phil Eckman Tom & Joanne Ellison Enbridge Dennis Falk Margaret Fawcett

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CONTRIBUTORS

Martha & Conrad Firling David Flemming Flint Group in Memory of Donn Larson John M. Fochs Kayla & Dan Foley Julie A. Ford Claudia French Diane Dinndorf Friebe & Joseph M. Friebe Donald Gaalaas in Honor of the Youth Orchestras Program Debra Gergen John Gibbs Hilary Godard Richard & Karen Gran James & Christabel Grant in Memory of Laura Budd Barbara & William Gravelle Edwin Hall Hope Heikkinen Rose Heldt Robert & Lois Heller Jim & Shirley Herman Robert & Joyce Hickman Barbara & Bob Hjort Susan Hjort Karen Hoeschen Paul Holm Mary Ann & Oliver Houx Kenneth Jackson Dan Jaeckel in Memory of Mae Peterson Sylvia Jamar in Memory of Charlotte Moyer Jane & Jack Jarnis Austin Jarrow Dr. David Jennings Ellis Johns Dennis Johnson Julie Johnson Barbara Johnson-Kim Linda Jorgenson Ronald Kari in Memory of Mary Donahue, LeAnn House & Jean Klun Danette Kealey John & Beth Kelly

Milka Kleiner Katie & Bob Kuettel Dr. Jerome Kwako Sharon Layon & Neil Nelson Cynthia Ledin Martin Lee, RN, MBA Paul Lee Charlie & Jean Leibfried in Honor of Thomas Donahue & in Memory of Mary Donahue Paul & Nancy Lokken Dr.John & Mrs. Michelle Magdsick Dean McCall Betty Melde Norma Miles Patricia Miller in Memory of David Miller Pam Moore & Jon Stephenson Wende & James Morrell Katherine Munck Dan & Cathy Mundt Susan Nelson Judith A. Newman Noelle Paulson in Honor of Dennis Paulson Kevin & Rebecca Peterson Suzanne & Brian Rauvola Paul Rigstad Branden Robinson Michael & Betsy Rosenzweig Karen & Jon Sande Dr. John Schrock & Mary Berube Helen Sever Mark T. Signorelli Beth Sobczak Cindy S. Spillers James & Judith Stewart Thom & Cindy Storm Thirsty Pagan Brewing Thrivent Financial Kathleen Thibault Sharon L. Torrison in Memory of David Vose & Don Niemi Rajiv Vaidyanathan

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Sharon van Druten Pat Wellberg Claudia & Harry Welty Cathy & Kirby Wood Geiger Yount

TEMPO (up to $199) Anonymous in Honor of Char & Bernie Nem Erin Abramson Gina Ademino Monica Ademino Pete Ademino Cigale Ahlquist John Alexander James J. Amato Ann Anderson Deb Anderson & Ed Herzog in Memory of Charlotte Moyer Bill Anderson Gwendolyn Anderson Jody Anderson Mary Anderson Patricia M. Anderson in Memory of Ralph Andres Paul Anderson Richard & Yvonne Anderson in Memory of Lorraine Johns The Anderson Family Patricia Anscomb Kathy Antilla in Memory of Marge Kuehn Allan Apter Judith Arnold Beth Arnson Jane & Thomas Barthell Lois Bauer Carla Bayerl Barbara Bentz Roy Berg William Berglund in Memory of Ralph Andres Damita Beyer David & Karen Bjorkman Ronald & Terry Blaisdell


CONTRIBUTORS

Joanne M. Blakeslee Charles Block & Kathryn Nettleman David Blomberg Gary Boelhower & Gary Anderson Amity Borden in Memory of Beverly Wipson Shirleyann Brandser Kathleen Bray Elton Brown in Honor of Mark Monson Laura Budd in Memory of Charlotte Moyer Ron Caple Jay Carlsgaard Nathan Carlsgaard Peggy Carlson in Memory of Ray E. Carson Joann Carmack in Memory of Mae Peterson Leah Carr Jeanne Carroll David Carter Timothy & Leslie Churchill Natalie Constance Julia Convissor Kathy Coughlin Ruth Cox in Memory of Ralph Andres Tim Craig Dianna Crandall Jerry Curnow Gwyn Curran Martyn Dahl Thomas Dahlberg Coralee J. Danielson Carolyn & Alan Diamond in Memory of Charlotte Moyer Karen Dingle Tom Donahue in Memory of Anne & Daryl Leibfried Jeanne Doty Mary Dragich Duluth Sister Cities International Nancy Eaton

Duraine Egan Hendershot David Eichman Ronald A. Ellefson Joe Ehlers & Sarah Nelson Jeff Elliott in Memory of Laura Budd Paul Enenbach Gerald Erickson Geraldine Erickson in Memory of Ralph Andres Karen Erickson Russell Erickson Heather Fails Marie Fegley Diane Felde-Finke Sue Fena Peg Ferguson Edward Flenz Elizabeth Gaalaas Michael Galeski Eileen Gannon in Memory of Ralph Andres Geoffrey Gates Sandra Gazdus Mary & Eric Gdula Jane Gilley Neil Glazman Mary Godfrey Kay & Walt Gower in Memory of Mae Peterson Kay & Walt Gower in Memory of Charlotte Moyer Kay & Walt Gower in Memory of Laura Budd Betty Greene Sarah Greer Sarah Grosshuesch Steve Grove Ann Gumpper Paul Gustad Linda Haagensen Joanne Hagen Mary K. Hagen Elizabeth Hall Larry & Jean Hammargren Keith Hamre Martha Han Lynne Harrington Hall

38 D U L U T H S U P E R I O R S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A

Ellen Hedin Vernon A. Harrington David Helf Kathy Heltzer Barbara G. Hemenway Melissa Hendrickson in Memory of Ralph Andres Sandra & Thomas Henning Christine Hensolt Jill Hilliard Jill Hoag Mary Hoberg Lisa Hoch Kevin & Carol Hoeschen Karen B. Holden Patricia Holliday Diane Holliday-Welsh Sara Hollingsworth Sheryl Homan Timothy Horyza Robert D. Howe Rita Hughes Austin Jarrow Jenny Jensen Pat Jirsa Donald & Mary John Charles Johns Barbara Johnson Edna & George Johnson Rev. Mark & Mary Jeahn Johnson Marlene Johnson Mary A. Johnson Matthew Johnson Patricia Johnson Marissa Kari Carol & Bob Kelley Lori Kersey-Dukat Robert Kidd Jane Killough in Memory of Mae Peterson Patti Kleimola Dorothy Knudsen Carol Kondrath Pat Kruschke Damien Kujawa Jean & Steve L’Abbe in Memory of Bradley Bombardier


CONTRIBUTORS

Katie LaBrie Cot Lafond Anne Liable Lake Superior Brewing Co. Devereaux Lalond Barb Lamaster Andre Lamourea Catherine A. Larson Paul Lee Jessica Leibfried Melissa Lentz De Ann Letourneau in Honor of Diane Balko and Erin Aldridge Beth Liljeblad Michael Lillo Ketti Lindberg Bonnie Lloyd Gary Loberg Jean Loushin Michael Lucas Patricia Luder Joyce E. Lund Lai La Lunde Charlie Lydon Judy MacGibbon Ruth MacNutt Joan Mahle Hannah Maki Lisa Mandelin Audrey Markon Sam Marks James Martin Cindy Martinson Rachel Z. Mason Patricia Young Massie Monica Mattila in Memory of Mae Peterson Clinton Mattson Dr. Robert McClellan Susan McKim Karen McManus Nancy McParlan Nancy Melander in Memory of Laura Budd Patty Mester Carol Michealson Joseph & Jodi Milli in Memory of Charlotte Moyer

William Miner Alison Moffat Tom Morehouse Tom & Julie Morgan in Honor of Christabel Grant Catherine Morin Bruce & Nora Moss Jason & Kelly Mraz Sally Munger Janet & John Murphy Bob Myers in Honor of Margaret Myers Joann M. Narhi Molly Negus Nancy Neilson Kristina Niere May & Vern Nordling in Memory of Ralph Andres Ryan & Natasha Nordrum in Memory of Dirk Robert Nordrum Emily Nygren George H. Nylander Nancy Odden & Doug Britton in Memory of Mae Peterson Marlys Olson Terry Olson Margaret Oman Alan Onken Sharon & Vincent Osborn Korrie Osthus Mary Ostman Mark Ostrov Laurie Ostrowski David Ouse William & Saundra Palmer in Memory of Susan Poupore William & Saundra Palmer in Memory of Carl Victor Petersen John Pastor Gerald Patten Barb Pearman Judy G. Pearson Ann Pellman Marylou Perham Greg Pesola Louann Petersen-Noltner Anne Peterson Bauers

39 D U L U T H S U P E R I O R S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A

Barry & Elizabeth Peterson Glenn & Erna Peterson Janet Peterson Richard & Linda Peterson Sharon Picconatto Mary Kay Plank Mary Planten-Krell Antoinette Poupore-Haats Therese Presley James Proudlock Kim Quinones Daniel Radosevich Nancy & Roger Ralston Deborah Ralston-Wolfe Kurt Ramlo Deborah Rasmussen Lance Reasor Frances L. Reed Mary Pat Renaud & Tom Griffin Jack Renick Kathleen Risku Sheryl Robins Delores Rogers Steve & Janet Rosen David Rosetter Geraldine Russo Patty Salo Downs Richard Sandeen Carol Saranpaa in Memory of Joseph A. Sandor Steve Savageau Paul Scaringi Nichole Schaefer Eileen Schantz-Hansen Carrie Scherer Jacalyn Schlies in Honor of Steven Boyd Paul R. Schmitz Theodore Schoen Carl Schroeder Deb Schroeder Linda Schwartz Doug Scott Jack & Cindy Seiler Judy Seliga-Punyko Chris Settle Laurie Severson Dr. Thomas & Alice Shuey Eugene Shull


CONTRIBUTORS

Sheila Shusterich Richard Skogg James Slocum Carrie Slordal in Memory of Ralph Andres Amelia Smith Phyllis Smith Barbara Soufflet Lawrence Spears Carol Spencer Patrick Spott & Kay Biga in Memory of Laura Budd Nadine Srdar Nairi Stack Paul Stein Craig & Sandra Sterle Katie Stevenson Robert & Zabelle Stodola Thom & Cindy Storm in Honor of Laurie Bastian Rebecca Strand Tim Stratton Kay Suffron Nick Susi Claryce Swensen Mary Tennis Barbara Teske Ruth Thorpe in Honor of Vincent Osborn Ruth Thorpe in Honor & Memory of Barbara Rae Amlotte Adrienne Thureen Steve Tomhave Lucas Trea Shelby Trost Donna Trostad Nancy Turchi Brenda Uecker in Memory of Ralph Andres Tiss Underdahl Jeff Urbaniak Sharon van Druten Judith Van Dyne Brandon VanWaeyenberghe Therese Vaughn

Roberta Vose in Memory of Laura Budd Roberta Vose in Memory of Dorothy Anway Roberta Vose in Memory of Thomas Stolee Mary Voss Steve & Jennifer Wabrowetz Mary Wagner Zbaracki for sons Edward, David, & Joseph Dr. Margaret Waisman Dana T. Waldbillig Jori & Chuck Walt Lue Ann Warcholak Sarah Warner Sheldon & Susan Watts Elizabeth Weberg Mark & Carol Weitz James Westman Trevor L. White in Memory of Alberte & Trevor White Whiteman Family Charitable Fund in Memory of Richard Whiteman Margaret Wilson in Memory of Mae Peterson Ruth Winters in Honor of Kathleen Winters Amity Wipson in Honor of Beverly Wipson Mona & Stan Wold Marcia Wolter Britton in Memory of Mae Peterson Georgette Wondolkowski Jay & Helyn Woolf Beva Lee Wunderlich Yasuyo Yamazaki Paul Zahorosky Suzanne Zallar Mary & James Zastrow in Memory of Laura Budd Marion R. Zbaracki in Memory of Mae Peterson

40 D U L U T H S U P E R I O R S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A

IN MEMORY Our hearts go out to the family and friends of the following DSSO patrons and musicians who passed in 2020/2021. *This list represents those we have been made aware of through Memorial Gifts. Ralph Anderson John Hussey LeAnn House Jean (Kelly) Klun Martin Lee William Moser Terrance Rust Janet (McEldowney) Smith Taavo Virkhaus Barbara (Amlotte) Ziehl


DSSYO CONTRIBUTORS

DSSOYO CAMPAIGN Thank you to the generosity of those who gave in support of the youth musicians of the Duluth Superior Symphony Youth Ensembles. Anonymous Martha Aas Janet Akervik John Alexander Mary Anderson Ann Anderson Jody Anderson Allen Anway Allan Apter Leonore Baeumler Lee Ball Sandra Barkley Bob Barnabee Thomas Barthell John Berchild Jan Biga David Bjorkman Jill Blazevic David Blomberg Linda Boben Angie Bomier Jean Brozic Lurene Buhrmann Jeffrey Cadwell Ronald Caple Jay Carlsgaard Craig Carlson Leah Carr Christopher Carroll Cathy Casper Cecilian Society Terrence Clark John Congdon Gwyn Curran Stephen Cushing Landon Dahl Thomas Dahlberg Kate Dean Mary Donahue Jeanne Doty R. Craft Dryer Nancy Eaton Paul Enenbach Sue Fena Peg Ferguson Kayla Foley Elizabeth Gaalaas Donald Gaalaas Michael Galeski

John Gibbs Beth Gilbert Neil Glazman Mary Godfrey Steve Grove Lois Guderian Ann Gumpper Linda Haagensen Mary Hagen Martha Han Lynne Harrington Hall Ellen Hedin Rose Heldt Barbara Hemenway Robert Hickman Luke Hilliard Bob Hjort Jill Hoag Mary Hoberg Lisa Hoch Karen Hoeschen Kevin Hoeschen Robert Howe James Jarocki Jenny Jensen Charles Johns Ellis Johns Mary Johnson Patricia Johnson Barbara Johnson-Kim Carol Kelley John Kemp Gale Kerns Elaine Killen Robert Knighton Dorothy Knudsen Diane Kolquist Carol Kondrath Pat Kruschke Robert Kuettel Andre Lamourea J. Clark Laundergan Sharon Layon Cynthia Ledin Paul Lee Michael Lillo Bonnie Lloyd Gary Loberg Paul Lokken

41 D U L U T H S U P E R I O R S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A

Jean Loushin Lai La Lunde Charlie Lydon John Magdsick Lisa Mandelin Ellen Marsden Cindy Martinson Hannah Mason Clinton Mattson Dean McCall Dr. Robert McClellan Nancy McParlan Nancy Melander Dirk Meyer Norma Miles Pam Moore Wende Morrell William Moser Nora Moss Will Munger Joann Narhi North Shore Bank Nancy Odden Alan Onken Vincent Osborn Korrie Osthus Mark Ostrov Laurie Ostrowski David Ouse Gerald Patten Ann Pellman Marylou Perham Louann Petersen-Noltner Janet Peterson Sharon Picconatto Mary Planten-Krell Therese Presley Elizabeth Prest Daniel Radosevich Lance Reasor Mary Pat Renaud Jack Renick Delores Rogers David Rossetter Gerald Ruona Karen Sande Richard Sandeen Carol Saranpaa Nichole Schaefer

Carrie Scherer John Schrock Deb Schroeder Doug Scott Jack Seiler Judy Seliga-Punyko Helen Sever Tom Shuey Sheila Shusterich Mark Signorelli Daniel Skorich William Slack Amelia Smith Phyllis Smith Nairi Stack Irving Steinberg David Steininger Craig Sterle Rebecca Strand Tim Stratton Carolyn Sundquist Nick Susi Claryce Swensen Mary Tennis Kathleen Thibault Adrienne Thureen Sharon Torrison Lucas Trea Shelby Trost Donna Trostad Jeff Urbaniak Rajiv Vaidyanathan Laurie Van Brunt Therese Vaughn Roberta Vose Mary Voss Jennifer Wabrowetz Sheldon Watts Harry Welty Stan & Mona Wold Georgette Wondolkowski Kirby Wood Sheryl Wood Homan Suzannne Zallar James Zastrow Lee Zimmerman


TAKE A BOW, SPONSORS

We are pleased to offer a big thank you to our sponsors for the 2021-2022 Season. Their generous support makes it possible for the DSSO to bring world-class concerts, educational programs, and community outreach to the Northland. BRAVO!

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