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Dulcimer Players News Volume 20, Number 3 August - October 1994 ©1994 • All rights reserved

Contents

Networking DPN Customer Support BBS

2

Music Exchange Letters to Us

2 2

Musical Reviews • Carrie Crompton

6

Madeline MacNeil, Publisher/Editor Tabby Finch, Editorial Assistant Post Office Box 2164 Winchester, Virginia 22604 703/678-1305 703/955-3856, Fax

8

Columnists

" Ross s Reel "Frere Jacques

9 12 15 17 18 19 19

Interview • Ken Kolodner

22

" The Kalevala (Land of Heros) • arr. by Ken Kolodner

24

" Lithuanian Piece • arr. by Ken Kolodner

Mountain Dulcimer Tales & 1taditions • Ralph Lee Smith

25 26 27 28 29 30 34

Technical Dulcimer Sam Rizzetta Dulcimer Clubs Judy Ireton Fretted Dulcimer Lorraine Lee Hanunond Hammer Dulcimer Unda Lowe Thompson Mountain Dulcimer History Ralph Lee Smith What's New/Musical Reviews Carrie Crompton Euro Tunes David Moore Profiles Rosamond Campbell Jean Lewis Sandy Conatser Ken Longfield Office Management Clare Ellis

Eurotunes • David r Moore

36

" The Star Spangled Banner • arr. and tab. by David r Moore

37

" Beauty In Tears • arr. by Madeline MacNeil

42

Dulcimer Clubs • Judy Ireton Technical Dulcimer· Sam Rizzetta Festival Profiles Events A Remembrance: Walter Miller Hammered Dulcimer • Linda Lowe Thompson

Performer Profile • Irish Aire " Ninety Three • Margaret Davis " Christophers • Joe Healey Performer Profile: 10m Baehr "An Inhabited Garden • Tom Baehr

Whats New • Carrie Crompton

43

Classifieds

44

• Design, Typeseming & Production Walnut Springs Design Subscriptions Joan Nauer

Founded in 1975 by Phillip Mason

The Dulcimer Players News is published four times each year. Issues are mailed (via 3rd class) to subscribers in January, April, July and October. Subscriptions in the United States are $15 per year, $27 for two years. Canada: $17 per year (US funds). Other countries (surface mail): $17, (air mail/Europe): $19, (air mail/Asia): $21. In the United States a reduced price of $11 (suggested) is available for people who are unable to pay the full subscription price because of financial difficulties. Recent back issues are usually available. Cost per back issue is $5.00 in the US (includes postage).

Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.


Summer 1994 • 1

Dear Readers

My letters to you often originate from various places during my road trips. This time, I am in Door County, Wisconsin, overlooking Green Bay. In the background my friend Diane is playing beautiful hammered dulcimer music. I assume J anita and Jackie are out walking, as I was a few hours ago. It is the days following the First Great Plains Folk Festival in Illinois and we are winding down. This scenario will be familiar to many of you as you attend the many workshops and festivals offered for dulcimer players this summer. Somehow we can't let the experience go, let the friends go, let the music go. I hope it is shaping up to be that kind of summer for you. Back home, things are changing dramatically and quickly. A few months ago I realized that my performing trips were more numerous and I was running out of hours in which to get everything done. All of us working with DPN have other jobs, so it is hard to shove other things around in order to carve out more time for the journal. Soon after I spread the word and started looking, Clare Ellis and I found each other. She is now assisting with both Dulcimer Players News and Roots & Branches Music. I must admit she was slightly shocked to see our 6 x12 Corporate Headquarters, but that, too, is changing. The psychologist from whom I rent the "office u needed his filing room back. So, DPN is moving to a room - a real room - in his building. The only down side to that is my having to walk a few more feet when I need Joan's services during tough DPN deadline times! On top of all of this is my move at the end of May to a new home. I didn't expect to find one so quickly, just the one I wanted. It was one of those "being in the right place at the right time" things, too. My new place is 18 miles from the office, as opposed to 28, in the beautiful Virginia countryside. The man selling the home spent years planting fruit trees, crab apple, flowering cherry, lilacs, mimosa and other delights on the 1.9 acres. To top things off, my land adjoins part of the 1,200 acres belonging to a Trappist monastery. It, of course, is a bird and wildlife sanctuary, and the critters tired of the serenity there wander over to my place to investigate the dulcimer music and new gardens. These are pretty incredible times. With that, it is time for a bit more laziness before my performing trip continues. Proposed tonight is a trip into Sturgeon Bay for dinner and more friendship celebrations. May I be just as contented when I write to you in the fall. May you be reliving fine summer musical adventures and new friendships then, also.

Of concern to us... I know of at least two Dulcimer Players News subscribers who work for the post office; be sure not to tell them that I'm going to discuss slow distribution of DPN issues. However, it concerns us that copies are taking so long to reach you sometimes four and five weeks after they are mailed. I spoke with the bulk mailing agents at the post office, who are kind and helpful. They are going to work with us on better bagging of copies so there will be fewer distribution centers. The answer, in the long run, is probably second-class rather than third-class postage. We are also considering pre-sort first-class, but that probably won't be a good option. In any event, whatever the upgrade, it will mean a subscription price increase. We're also planning to increase the journal page count to 48 before long.

~

NETWORKING Closing dates for the November-January, 1994 DPN (To be mailed to subscribers by October 10th) Information for News & Notes, Letters, Music Exchange, etc: November 5th Classified Ads: November 5th Display Ads: November 5th (space reservation), November 20th (camera-ready copy) For inquiries conceming interviews and articles, contact us for details and a style sheet. Unsolicited manuscripts are welcome. For retums of manuscripts, photos, or artwork, please enclose a stamped envelope; otherwise DPN is not responsible for their eventual fate. The DPN reserves the right to edit all manuscripts for length and clarity. The opinions expressed therein are not necessarily those of the Dulcimer Players News. Ad Prices Classified Ads: 40¢ per word. 4 issues paid in advance without copy changes: 20% discount.

Display Ads: 1/12 page $25 1/6 page $50 1/4 page $75 1/3 page $100 1/2 page $150 Full page $300 Inside back cover $400 Outside back cover (~ page) $400

Contact us conceming multiple insertion discounts. Advertisers: Please be sure to mention which kind of dulcimer is featured on recordings. Technical Dulcimer questions Sam Rizzetta PO Box 510 Inwood, WV 25428

News and Notes, Letters, Events Dulcimer Players News PO Box 2164 Winchester, VA 22604

Clubs Column Judy Ireton 6865 Scarff Road New Carlisle, OH 45344

What's New and Reviews Carrie Crompton 11 Center Street Andover, cr 06232

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Letters to Us

Music

Exchange

illt Does anyone know the words to "Red-Haired Boy?"

Paul Bostick 806 E. Maple Stillwater, OK 74074

DULCIMER STATIONERY .,,~ from folknotesr M <.' \ designed & drawn by Vikki Appleton

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printed on recycled paper • hammered dulcimer • mt. dulcimer • fiddle

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., or write: follmotes: Dept. DPN2 17325 Cambridge, Sfld., MI 48076

DearDP" Fellow dulcimer players. Have you looked around at festivals and club meetings? Why, those people are as old as I am, and not enough younger people seem to be coming on board to replace us when we die. Someday Maddie won't have anybody to subscribe to this great magazine if we don't do more to get the young people interested in the mountain dulcimer. Besides, we owe it to them to show them how easy it is to make music. Well, the local Girl Scouts thought it sounded like music. This idea is not original with me. The following project is good for scouts, summer camps, grade school classes, or an individual child who wants to play your dulcimer. The boards can be cut and pilot holes drilled. The kids can nail in the staples and nails so it will be

something they made. Give them some tab for "Mary Had a Little Lamb" and watch them light up when they play something for the first time. You need 14 staples, 1 tack, one larger nail, one string, and a board. Make it easy on yourself and draw off the fret spacing from your dulcimer. (Leave off the 6 1/2 and 13 1/2 frets. They are only used on the "Concert Model".) If you are going to put it together, just drive in all the nails and staples (Frets). If a child is going to assemble it, pre-drill smaller pilot holes for the bridge, frets, string anchor, and tuner nail. Staples have been known to fly, so get some safety shields to protect the eyes. Start the bridge staple and use your tuner nail as a stop. The bridge height can be fine adjusted with a claw hammer. The "Concert" Version needs 2 more strings and (optional) 28 more staples. By the way, the board can be glued on a suitable small cardboard box with a sound hole cut in it to increase volume.

DPN CUSTOMER SUPPORT BBS

NOW IN TWO LOCATIONS! Enjoy Demonstrations & Workshops Hammered & Mountain Dulcimers Harmonicas & Other Folk Instruments

In the Heart of Northern Indiana Amish Country:

---Simple Sounds--Upstairs in the Davis Mercantile P.O. Box 837, Shipshewana, IN 46565-0837 (219) 768-7776 In Historic Montgomery, Texas, Just North of Houston:

--Simple Sounds Again-Davis Cottage 308 Liberty, Montgomery, TX 77356 (409) 597-6900 Open Year 'Round + Phone And Mail Orders Welcome Write To Indiana Address For Free Catalog + Ask About Workshops

A bulletin board service is provided for our clients to support 24 hour a day, highspeed data modem file transfers to DulcimerPlayers News. This system supports up t028,800 bps V.FC and all Y.32bis and Y.32modems and is managed for us by the ASTEC Company, which provides Macintosh consulting and system integration services in Purcellville, Virginia.

To send your file(s) to us.••

o Call 703/338-6025

"you are calling with a PC, Mini or Mainframe computer:

o o

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Enter the Name: DPN Enter the Password: dulcimer Type U to "Upload Files" and follow the prompts.

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Summer 1994 â&#x20AC;˘ 3

It sounds pretty good, but Blue Lion does not have to worry about the competition. Get some boards and be a "Dulcimer Disciple." Bill Buffington Hoschton, GA 30548

DearDPN, After I wrote my letter to DPN last summer, a friend in our dulcimer group told me about SongWright, and I went out and bought a copy right away. I have heard that other programs in its price class might have a noticeably better output, but such is life. So far, at least, we are quite satisfied with SW. We have an 8088 PC clone hooked up to a 24 pin Panasonic KXPl124 dot matrix printer. I teach English Composition and am not really into number crunching. The limiting factor for me is my own typing speed, and a newer, faster computer is not going to change that. We don't have a MIDI interface (yet, says my son, Robert!), and I only use SW to print out sheet music for the family and friends. I found the manual sprinkled with humor, making installing and learning the program almost fun. But I noticed that the manual took a lot of basic DOS knowledge for granted, so if program purchasers are really computer novices, they might want a knowledgeable friend to sit in with them as they install and run -the program at first. I also purchased the extra symbol package just for fun because I thought I'd get some use out of the chord construction feature. In addition, I found the ability to make shape notes and neumes (as in Gregorian Chant notation) intriguing. The instructions for the symbol set were both more humorous and more cryptic than the program manual, so I found learning to use them, as we say in the education business, a real learning experience. We do have a mouse, so entering the music into the computer is really pretty easy. As an example, Robert, my twelveyear-old, entered the melody line to "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" the other night. Because he also plays bassoon, he had the program automatically transpose the music onto the bass clef. So now he has the sheet music for a new

piece. I can see that we will find the transposing feature very useful. I find the lack of a three-line staff for dulcimer tablature a bit of a problem. Since our group only plays instrumental music, we have been entering our tab numbers in the space for lyrics. We start one line with T, the next with A, and the third with B. We then put the fret numbers on the T line for the bass string, the A line for the middle string, and the B line for the melody string. I think I will use the same system to make tab notation for hammered dulcimer music. I can use SongWright as above and use the T line for bass course numbers, the A line for the right side treble course numbers, and the B line for the left side treble course numbers. That way I won't have to have two separate tab systems for the different kinds of dulcimer. I am enclosing a sample to show how the printed copy appears. (See illustration below). Still, those three tab lines would be nice to have. Also, if the program would let me use four lines, I could print out more correct Gregorian chant notation if I wanted to. We can hope that a future release will incorporate such features. But, all in all, for $119.95 we are satisfied with SongWright and and if we add a soundboard and/or MIDI interface, I'm sure we'll continue to find the program useful on the old 8088. To get SongWright, check your local music dealer or contact SongWright, 7 Loudoun St. SE, Leesburg, VA 22075 (phone 703n77-7232).

Clayton E Samuels Barberton,OH

DearDPN, DPN readers who have access to the America Online (AOL) network service

might be interested to know that a dulcimer message board was created and is being used. Once a user is in AOL, it can be found by using the keyword "Exchange," then going to the Arts & Entertainment Message Boards. Messages include tuning, books, strings, building, and several other topics.

Stu Janis St. Paul, MN HDulc@aol.com

DearDPM, Within the past recent months, I have had the privilege of visiting many schools in several counties of Central Florida to present dulcimer programs for elementary as well as some high school classes. Thanks to Friends of the Florida Folk, I have met so many wonderful young people on these visits. Occasionally, they have offered to help load and unload my instruments and equipment and have even helped with the presentation. I especially want to relate this incident in particular. At this one school, two boys were asked to watch over my equipment-and this was during their lunch hour. They were extremely conscientious in doing this for me. They did not move away from the equipment or mess around. When I was on tight schedule, sometimes the students brought my lunch to me and many have become interested in music after my visits. I have received numerous letters from grade school students commenting on how much they enjoyed the presentation and would like to learn to playa musical instrument. One high school girl started to play the dulcimer and due to her interest and perseverance in playing the instrument, she and I have been able to perform

A7

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B

4 3

2

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2 10


4 â&#x20AC;˘ Dulcimer Players News

together at various shows and festivals. Also, in one school a young boy had to undergo chemotherapy. He expected to lose his hair so he decided to have his head shaved. Well ... 13 other boys in his class had their heads shaved as well, so that he would not look out of place. Talk about good kids! What hearts of gold they have! Stories about the good kids don't make front page news very often, do they? I have had so many satisfying times at these schools with the youth I have met that I felt this would be of interest to you, and that's the reason for my writing.

Bill Wiseman Eustis, FL

DearDPN, The CompuServe Information Service will offer a month-long focus on making musical instruments this . September and we invite anyone who is interested in music to join us. Exchange messages with instrument builders from around the world, participate in realtime conferences, download files from the library, and view images of musical instruments built by other participants. CompuServe is a telecommunications service (computer bulletin board system) that you access with your computer and modem. The September activities will be held in the Focus section (13) of the CRAFfS forum (GO CRAFfS) but be sure to drop into the woodworking section (11) to say hello and join the fun. We would also like to solicit any articles of a general nature you might wish to contribute to the Crafts Forum library for this focus. Other publications that have helped build up our library include

American Woodworker, American Lutherie, Guitarmaker, and Experimental MusicalInstrnments. Our guest authors include Dick Boak and Scott Landis, among many others. Please note that uploading a file to our library legally constitutes publishing, so if you do not hold the copyright to the material we cannot use it. Articles must be submitted on diskette, in ASCII or WordPerfect format, any size or density diskette.

We can include all subscription information with the article(s), which you must also supply. Please note that we cannot include the subscription price. Thank you very much. If you have any questions, please contact either of us by letter, phone, or E-mail.

Debbie Suran phone: (207)348-6884 e-mail:71501.675@compuserve.com

Nicholas Von Robison phone:(714 )842-6212 e-mail:71604.526@compuserve.com

increase concentration and overcome self-consciousness, doubt, and fear. In addition to performance, Inner Game skills can be applied to learning, teaching, improvisation, creativity and being a listener, a music parent or an ensemble player. The end goal, which can be applied in any area of human endeavor, is to help us discover our own youthful potential and experience the joy of music to the fullest. A DPN reader's mention of this book prompted my response.

Kay Kingsley DearDPN, I belong to two dulcimer clubs. One club has been established for a long time. The other club is relatively new. One thing both clubs have in common is that so few people do all the work. Using some suggestions from the Knoxville Area Dulcimer Club I compiled a questionnaire that enables a club to be more democratically ruled. It also keeps from overworking a few people if used correctly. The questionnaire helps big, established clubs survey their members' talents and willingness to work. For smaller, newer clubs the questionnaire gives even shy folks a chance to say, "Yes, I might like to sing with the club." So many times a handful of members steer the club because the quieter members won't speak out or don't know what needs to be done. I will send a copy to anyone interested. Just send me a SASE.

Indianapolis, IN (Reprinted from Sing Out!) I am a musician of a free, new European country - Lithuania. I have a big practice and long life on stage. I am a member of International Bluegrass Music Association. But folk music is my bread. I am looking for contacts with musicians, producers, managers. I am a producer too. I hope to visit folk venues in America and to book live musicians for my projects too. Can you help me? Or do you know some international organizations of folk music who can help me? Sorry for my English. My mistakes are only on paper. In heart they are not.

Virgis Stakenas Dainu 42-27 5406 Siauliai Lithuania Phone: 01-214-58703

Maureen Sellers

DearDPN,

4716 State Road 64 New Albany, IN 47150

I received the May-June D PN issue today and realized what a small dulcimer world it is! My teacher, Dallas Cline, was on the cover. Another featured player, Sue Carpenter, taught an inspiring workshops I attended at the Autumn Hills festival in 1992. I am one of those people who Dallas has brought music out of, and, while I am still a beginner, I have never been happier singing wonderful songs and playing my own accompaniment. I had attempted and failed at many different instruments, but Dallas has brought me quite a ways on the mountain dulcimer. She's an excellent teacher. Your magazine is a delight to read,

DearDPN, After his success in the mid-seventies with The Inner Game of Tennis followed by Inner Skiing, author Tim Gallwey engaged musician Barry Green to apply the Inner Game principles of "natural learning" to music. The book is a practical guide for improving the quality of music at all levels. He encourages us to let go of some old rules and apply specific techniques that do not inhibit musical expression. Using three basic skills of awareness, trust, and will, he presents simple techniques that provide ways to

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especially the performer profiles. I look forward to many more.

Rowena Fenstermacher Mille rton, NY

THE ULTIMATE ™ HAMMERED DULCIMER STAND • Fully HEIGHT ADJUSTABLE

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Congratulations on DPN's 20th anniversary. It has been interesting to watch it grow into the polished publication it now is. It is the result of a lot of time and dedication. It is my [dulcimer building] 25th anniversary - 1969-1994. I didn't even realize it until some company tried to sell me stickers celebrating the fact. Time goes by.

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BOOKS and TAPES WALNUT - CHERRY - CEDAR SITKA SPRUCE SA TISFACTION OR MONEY BACK FREE BROCHURE - PICTURES SEND S.A.S .E. JOE SANGUINETTE

301 Cliff Drive

Branson, Missouri 65616 - 14171 334· 53BB

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Alilnetrumental featuring hammered dulcimer. with guitar backup and banjo. Side One: (;oldcn Slippc.flI. II(lme S ",'~I I h..1C, ( "in:h: Be "nhrt)kcn'OId JncO:Uk.T hc Meeting I louse. S"ldidsJoY. Ode To Joy. . S ide Two: Missouri. UI:ad:b<.:IT)' UJos."Om. /,lop-Ean:d :-' Iulc. ('mlntr), D.lncc1l't:tih: V:lI~ . U~n ytScl1'Cca S'lu un: l>.loco:..

order send S I 0.00 plus $ 1.50 Shipping To: M lisle Folk Inc .. 8015 Big Bend Blvd .. St. LOlltS. MO 63 11 9 or call 3 14-9q 1-2838 Rick ls avaiIabIe

Electric Dulcimer • Solid body ofselected hardwood • Tone and volume control • Select pickup by EMG The Goose Lake Luthier • Grover Sta- Tite tuners 1162 South H. Street Lakeview, OR 97630 • Brochure and cassette tape $2.00 (503) 947-4982

ro. <:<>neerls

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- - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The Heart Is The Only Nation. Ruth

Musical Reviews edited by Carrie Crompton

~I

t's summer fes tiva l time! Conce rI S, wo rkshops, jam sessio ns and ve ndo r tables crammed wi th CD's, tapes and dulcimer boo ks. These tables are always alluri ng to me; even though, as a reviewe r, I ge t to see a lot of what's published in the dulcimer world, I always fi nd new stu ff th at interests me. Here arc some of the new items yo u may see o n the tables this season: The KIng's Favorite by Ironweed is a whimsical E nglish music hall-style

recording, with instrumentals and vocal pieces in about equal meas ure. The members o f this Washington, D .C. area trio - Jody Mars hall (hammered dulcime r), D on Stallo ne (squ eezeboxes), and C raig Williams (citte rn, guit ar and mandolin) - have the rare combination o f well-matched vocal quality and instrume ntal talent. (Mos t gro ups have one o r t he othe r, but not bo th.) They've got the lilt and e nergy to do justice to Mo rris dance tunes like "The Nutting G irl " and "The Winster Processional" (with Morris dancers' bells jingling in the backgrou nd ) and the traditi onal Co rnish Maying song "H al-a n-Tow." I enjoy th e to ngue-in-cheek qu ality o f their singing in the comic "I1kley Moo r B'aht" and "Five Foot Flirt" and the bounce in th eir playing o f "Congress Reel." Most of all, I e njoy Ironweed 's balanced arrange me nt: each instrument is played with styl e, and they all serve to express the spirit of th e music.

(CD 0;

Barrett and Cyntia Smith P.O B 1608, Topanga, CA 90290' cassette) an

I met Ruth Barrett and Cyntia Smith ove r ten yea rs ago at the Solstice Festiva l in Los Angeles. They we re singing songs in celebratio n of the mystery at the heart of life and womanhood, stru mming t hei r mount ain du lcimers as if in time with the basic life -pulse. I was impressed by th e strength o f their vo ic-

es and their vision, which was consistently woman-centered in a spiritual, not political, sense. Listening to a review copy of their seventh record ing, The Heart is The Only Nation, I can say th at the spirit whi ch info rmed their perfo rmance a decade ago has deepened and matured. Ru th and Cyntia are writing most of their own music now, and th eir theme is still the power and love at th e hea rI o f li fe. "Come with reverence to He r mazelYou who'd meet he r holy gaze/ An d take from this a sense o f

awe/From tiny seed to raven's claw."Thc poetry alo ne, offered in a 12-page CD boo kl et, is bea utiful, and when set to

modal tunes with clarinet, tamburica bass, and cello in additi o n to d ulcimers, is at times quite moving. So me o f the individual pieces are stronger than others, but the 66-minute recording, taken as a whole, is a soul ful explo rati on of Ruth and Cyntia's creed, set forth in the title song. The Electric Snowshoes features humorous so ngs for kids of all ages by Rick Scott, who plays the mo untain dulcime r in eclectic (a nd electric) stylesReggae, rock, Arlo Guthrie-style talking blues. Rick's singing voice reminds me of Taj Mahal. A ll but o ne o f the songs on th is album are o riginal, b ut they all

DENNIS DOROGI DULCIMERS PLUCKED & HAMMERED, PSALTERIES

The ICIng's Favorite. Ironweed, 2716 OccIdental Dr., Vienna, VA 221 80 (CD , cassette) The Electric SnOWShoe. G rand PooBah M usic, Rick Scott, 2736 West 13th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6K 2T4 (cassette)

The Kitchen MUsician's #12: Class/cal Dulcimer Duets. Sara Lee Jo hnson 449 Hidden Valley Lane, Cincinna'ti, OH 45215 (book with tape) HalllliCied Dulcimer Classics. C I K . ~ aroe

oe mg, 3 S. Fuller Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90036 (book with tape) feel classic. I especially like "Simo n Sez." 'Simo n say to look out/Simo n say never give up/Simo n say keep a good thing until you've had enough.' I thin k if enough people hea r "You're He re," " Oo hlahey," and "My Friend H as The Biggest E ars In the Wo rld" they'll beco me standards in the elementary school setting. This is th e o nly dulcimer recording my 6-year-old really loves. As fo r dulcimer boo ks, th e th ree new ones on my shelf are all fo r players of the hammer dulcimer who want to dip into Renaissance, Baroque and Class ical music. First, th ere's Classical Dulcimer Duets, #1 2 in the Kitche n Musician's series by Sara Lee Johnso n, with arrangements fo r two dulcimers (o r really, any two instruments th at play in the same range.) These are almost all keyboard pieces with the right a nd left hand parIs ass igned to separate playersMinuets by J.S. Bach, W. A. Mozart, and Beethove n, so natinas by Clemente and

t

Yes. I've moved!!!

Greetings from SCOTT ODENA!

Traditiona l & U niq ue D esig ns

JUit

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RD. BROCTON, N.Y.

I

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SEE YA DOWN TilE ROAD!!

/


Summer 1994 • 7

Haydn. Many have a sort of music-box quality when played on the dulcimer. Sara has made a tape for stud ents to play along with, with first one part playing alone, then the other. The book assumes that you read standard musical notation, and can figure ou t your own best hammering patterns. The computer-generated notation is big and easy to read on the music stand. If you've ever wanted to play classical music but didn 't know where to start, this book is the answer. For an introduction to Renaissance dances, I'd recommend Carole Koenig's llammered Dulcimer Classics. This book contains sixteen Renaissance dances (mostly from Praetorius) and three Baroque pieces (including the Mouret Rondeau of Masterpiece Theater fame.) Carole gives two versio ns of each piece: first a simple melody line and then an expanded arrangement with drones or chords. The latter ve rsions are identical ·to the ones she has recorded in her tapes Past TImes Present, Season's Greet-

ings and Encore! which are reproduced on the instructional tape, along with simplified, slowed-down versio ns to help the student hear what is act ually happening. The book does not assume that one reads standard no tat ion, but I, for one, would be daunted by a tablature system which numbers the bridges from \-35. It's easier to read music, and fortunately, this is provided. I ca n't review the third book, because I wrote it (see What's New). I mention it here on ly to point out a remarkable coincidence. The cover image of Carole Koenig's HaJIIlIered Dulcimer Classics and of my Hammer Dulcimer Solos vol. 2 is essen tially the same: a dulcimer-playing lady seated on a bench consisting of two life-like swans. (Carole's cover is a reproduction of a 16th- centu ry French painting; mine is a contemporary adaptation of the same painting.) We didn't discover this fact until both books were in press. It is wonderful that as geograph ically isolated as we dulcimer players sometimes are, we become kindred

spirits as we pursue o ur love of music. I hope all of the above will be at a festival near you this summer - if not in perso n, then at the vendo rs' tables. Check 'em all ou t' Send books, albums and tapes for review, to Carri e Crompton, 11 Cente r Street, Andover, CT 06232. ~

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Dulcimer Clubs edited by Judy Ireton

M

i

ost of the Club newsletters have stories about and from various .. â&#x20AC;˘ festivals. One thing is certain, few festivals ever get complaints other than they ended too soon! Sharon Skaryd sends news ofThe Saginaw Subterranean Strings club in Saginaw, Michigan. It is a hammered dulcimer gro up and acoustic instrument gathering. They meet at 7:00 PM on the 3rd Thursday of the month at the Holy Cross Lutheran church, 600 Court St., September through April. May through August they host a series of jams in Gazebo Park at the corner of Michigan and Court Streets fro m 6:30 until dark. For furthe r info rmatio n, call 517/7810849. Steve Schneider sends news that The Hudson River Hammered Dulcimer Circle is meeting the first Sunday of the month at Emanuel Lutheran Church in Pleasantville, New York [rom 1:00-4:30. He says the location is easily accessible by horseless carriage and Me tro North from New York City and other places. That should cover just about everybody's mode of transportation. The Dlde Tyme Music Shoppe Mountain Dulcimer Club is a new club meeting the 2nd Sunday of the month at the Shoppe. If you need more info) contact Vance Young at 2191767-2877. Misery Bay Dulcimer Club has hosted several performe rs this spring as well as several beginner classes. They are fortunate to have a local coffee house that showcases folk music as well as local college radio stations that carry our "brand" of music. The Greater Plains Dulcimer Society always gets my attention with the number of jams they hold. You don 't have jams in your area and you don't know how to arrange one? lust find an empty room that is available for 2-3 hours and the rest will happen on its own. Mike and Marsha Bowman used to go to a nearby Interstate reststop on summer holidays and play for anyone who cared to stop and listen awhile. They felt it hel ped relax the tourists a bit before they hit the road aga in. The

Knoxville Dulcimer Club included some helpful hints for their members in the newsletter. We have all known the stiff backs and shoulders you can get from playing for long periods without a good chair o r being in a cramped position. They gave pointers and simple exercises and "squiggles" to loosen up and/or prevent injuries. I was pleased also to sec some helpful hints in their column taken from the Dayton Dulcimer Club Newsletter on caring for one's instruments. I also enjoyed Toni's definition of a volunteer and found a special place in my heart for her (his?) article that stated " Everybody needs somebuddy." The article points out how impo rt ant it is to make newcomers welcome. I have heard people say many times that they had go ne to a meeting (not necessarily dulcimer) and felt "frozen o ut." I think we forget that everyone is not an extrovert and when we get to meetings we forget everything other than the fun we have with these people just once a month. We settle

ters is discussion about E-mail and music bulletin boards. If any of you wish, drop me a line and let me know where you are playing on line. This has possibilities of an article in DPN. Many readers want to know more about BBS's that deal with music and computer programs that work well with tablature. I have umpteen programs, but none really do what I want the m to do quickly or effortlessly. Drop me a note and maybe a sample of what you are doing with software and send me BBS telephone numbers you a re calling. We will share this information with everyone. ~ Judy Ire ton Dulcimer Clubs Column 6865 Scarff Road New Carlisle, OH 45344

Club Updates Arkansas Crowley's Ridge Dulcimer Society in Jonesboro is no longer active.

down with those we know and arc com-

fortable with and start playing, forgetting the new ones around us. I li ke Toni's suggestion to "stop, say hello, find out the ir name and ask a question." The Silver Strings Dulcimer Club also had an article o n this subject. The question was asked how many times a club member had taken time to show a beginner the chords or to teach them a new song? We do not ignore people intentio nally. We just need to be reminded occasionally! I have been pleased to read in several newsle tte rs state ments that they are looking for tablature in the public domain. Guy Bankes made such a request, pointing out that many contemporary tunes sound traditional, but are copyrighted and cannot be used without permission. I frequently see blatant violatio ns of this in club newsletters. Maybe "Mary Sue" did the dulcimer arrangement with he r own little pen in hand but that docs no t make it legal to publish a copyrighted song. Changing just one note or phrase does not make it legal. Nor does ignorance hold up in court either. If yo u are publishing tunes, make sure they are done with permission or held in the public dom ain. One item common to many news let-

Northeast Arkansas Dulcimer Players Sally Papich 713 Locust Dr. Jonesboro, AR 72401 501/935-5974 1st Mondays California Bay Area H ammered Dulcimer Society Gale Leach PO Box 280632 San Francisco, CA 94128 2nd Wednesdays Indiana aide Tyme Music Shoppe Mt. Dulc. Club Vance W. Young, Jr. 606 Water St. Union Mills, IN 46382 2191767-2877 2nd Sundays Michigan Saginaw Subterranean Strings Sharon Skaryd 11239 Lake Circle Dr. North Saginaw, MI 48609 3rd Thursdays

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Summer 1994 â&#x20AC;˘ 9

Technical Dulcimer by Sam Rizzetta

ver the years I have enJoyed your Technical Dulcimer columns In DPN and your article In American Luther/B. Have you considered collecting and publishing them in book fonn? he found them very helpful and thought provoking. rm wondering about your current thinkIng on the use of plywood vs. solid wood for the backs of hammered dulcimers. Aesthetically, solid wood appeals to me nmre, but is H structurally equal to laminated wood of the same weight? What dRference Is there acoustically? Does solid wood need to be quarter sawn If It Is stable (walnut, mahogany)? I understand the need for quarter sawn wood In guitars and violins, but does the dulcimer need that kind of Integrity when Hdoesn't need a ,back for sound productfon? Another question I have is, where can I find a source for laminated pin block material? It is good to know that this column has been helpful, and publishing the collected columns in book form sounds like a great idea. I don't personally have the time to do it, but perhaps someone would be willing to take the task on someday. Structurally, plywoods and solid woods have different attributes and shortcomings. Plywood panels are more resistant to cracking and dimensional instabilities due to humidity. Certain shocks and stresses are readily absorbed by plywood without breaking. On the negative side, plywood may be prone to failure due to delamination and internal weaknesses due to voids (holes in the internal laminations ). Higher-quality plywoods made for aircraft and marine construction can be somewhat safer. Plywoods are less stiff, and therefore, more easily warped. And although plywood panels may be convenient, they are likely to be more expensive than solid woods of comparable structural quality. Solid woods of similar weight are likely to be much stiffer than plywoods, and

offer greater compression strength. It is more important with solid woods to dry and cure the woods adequately and work in a climate-controlled shop. The primary concern is to have the solid woods adequately dry so that the dulcimer top and back do not dry and shrink after assembly. Shrinkage is a primary cause of cracking. If an instrument may have to endure a climate with dry seasons, warm or hot conditions, or heated indoor air during cool or cold winters, then drying, shrinkage, and cracking are very real concerns. It is nearly impossible for an instrument to go through life without enduring some combination of these conditions, so you must allow for them. If you cannot control your dulcimerbuilding environment, then plywood might be a safer choice. One way to build your instruments under dryer conditions is to limit your work to winter months when the outside temperatures are cold, and your central heating is running. Cut all your wooden parts roughly to shape a few weeks before assembly, and let them adjust to the heated, indoor environment. Complete all your dulcimer's assembly, gluing, and varnishing/finishing during the cooler months, while your heat is running. Humidity gauges are often inaccurate, but if you have a good one, use it. I build all of my instruments at a humidity of 35% or less. Hammer dulcimers are not as fussy about humidity as are some other instruments, and you may not need to be quite as particular about shop climate as I am to get acceptable results. There is no reason to consider plywoods necessarily less desirable aesthetically. They are just another natural but processed material, as is solid wood once it is res awn and assembled into dulcimer parts. Beautiful plywoods of mahogany and other woods are available for marine, aircraft, and architectural applications. Decorative veneers are often used over a plywood base in fine furniture, and this has worked very well for hammer dulcimer backs. If you use solid wood for the back of the hammer dulcimer, quarter sawn wood is a very good idea. A quarter sawn back will be more stiff, less liable Continued on page 10

In my column in the May-July 1994 DPN on water base finishes I recommended Stewart-MacDonald's Guitar Shop¡ Supply as a source for Hydrocote water base lacquer. However, Hydrocote was dropped from their Spring 1994 catalog and replaced with Crystalac water base spraying lacquer. I have not tested this finish, yet. Most water base finishes seem to work somewhat similarly, so the techniques given in my column should still be a useful basis for trying a variety of water base finishes like Crystalac. By. this time you will find more water base finishes appearing in your local hardware stores, and you may be tempted to try them on dulcimers. The versions that dry to a harder finish, such as extra hard water base polyurethanes, may work better for floors and bar tops than for furniture and dulcimers. A somewhat softer finish that sands and buffs more easily is more appropriate for instrument work and furniture. Also, many of the water base finishes do not dry quite as clear and transparent as the traditional lacquers and varnishes I¡ have used in the past The water base finishes from luthier suppliers, like Stewart-MacDonald, are more likely to be products meeting acceptance with other instrument makers. Of the locally available water base products I've tested, I particularly like Carver Tripp Safe & Simple Sanding Sealer and Carver Tripp Safe & Simple Satin Super Poly. Although advertised as a "hard polyurethane': the Satin finish version is not too hard and sands nicely. It can be rubbed to a bit of a shine, but so far I've been happiest using it (and Hydrocote) on .projects where I wanted satin rather than glossy results. Minwax also now makes some water base polyurethanes, but I've had happier results with the Carver Tripp, As this technology advances I am certain products will evolve and more new finishes will find their way onto dulcimers. Expect to go through a leaming curve with these new finishes. They will work differently and require different techniques than you may have used in the past It should be worth the effort for their greater safety to the dulcimer builder and the environment.

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10 • Dulcimer Players News

Continued from page 9 to warp and less likely to crack o r split. The relatively wide expanse of a poorly cut or dried dulcime r back might shrink enough to crack. I p ut a great deal of time, effort and emo tion in to each instrume nt, and I want to give each one the best chance of a trouble- free life. You may believe th at a dulcimer back is not necessary fo r sound production, but it may indeed be necessary for the best sound produ cti o n. It is possible to build ham mer dulcimers without any back at all, and I've made a number of th em th at way. But the very best sounding dulcime rs that I have hea rd and that I have built have all had backs. In a good dulcimer, the back is pa rt of the stru ctural and acoustic suppo rt system fo r the sou ndboard. T he back helps tie the pin blocks and frame togeth er into a stro ng and lightweight box. The back p rovides an im port ant vibrating surface and encloses an intern a l vo lume of air which also vibrates. A nd while it is possible to design dulcime rs that accomplish these tasks in o th er ways, the back as a design element allows us to build good dulcimers in a n efficient way with a minimum of weight and complexity. The simplest way is almost always the bes t way to achieve a des ign goal. D ulcimers that have a plywood sound board have a characteristic sound color th at is different from that of solid wood. In fact, each wood has its own character, with woods th at are similar in specific gravity and sti ffness often having a similar sound . T he differences between dulcimers with different backs arc less prono un ced th an with dulcimers

how good the rest o f the dulcimer is. It is possible to b uild both good and bad dulcimers with eithe r back, and other design elements ca n ove rwhelm any influence the back may have on to ne. Use of different wood species, whether solid or ply, can yie ld sound differences from the mahogany in the above example. Which is best fo r yo ur dulcimer back, plywoo d or solid wood ? Plywood is a good selection if: • you have access to hi gh-qu ality plywoods. • your dulcime r may live pa rt of its life in a climate th at is dry or hot, o r has cycles o f d rying, o r has cold winte rs. • your shop lacks humidi ty controls, and your wood supply is of uncertain mo isture content and mo isture stability. • your dulcimer must e ndure rough hand ling without cracking. • you wish to tre nd towa rd extremely limited sustain. If solid woods arc we ll selected, well dried and well used , the dulcimer might have a to ne that develops and matures better with time . It should produce a slightly stro nger, lo ud er and more visceral, more ve rsatile tone than a dulcimer th at has a very good plywood back and is otherwise absolu tely identical. Today I make most of my du lcimers with solid wood backs. But I make backs of aircraft laminates fo r very light we ight dul cimers that will suffe r rough use on the road (o r in th e air! ) with touring professio nal musicians, an d when a musician needs a pa rti cula rly sho rt sustaining dulcimer. A lso, a dul cimer design th at has a slight ly harsh tone in solid wood often ca n be "sweetened" by

with di ffe re nt soundboa rds. But the to ne colors characteristic o f the di ffe rences between va rio us woods and plywoods are still evide nt. One may mix va ri ous so undboard woods in combinatio n with va rio us du lcimer back woo ds to custo mi ze the to ne . It is difficult to understand and compare such to ne differences witho ut building many dulcimers under co ntrolled experimental co nditions, which is exactly what I've spent much of the past thirty years doing. An d it is almost eq ually difficult to talk abo ut tone and sound in wo rds, rather th an liste ning to examples. Bu t let us try. Assume we have two identical hammer du lcimers, except that one has a back made of solid mahoga ny a nd o ne a back of ma hogany plywood. To make the comparison as close as possible, we will say the plywood back is slightly thinner but slightly heavier. An advantage of plywood is its resistance to cracking or brea kin g in thin secti ons; an advantage o f the solid wood is that it does not carry th e weight of plywood's laminating glue. So, this makt:s a fair compa rison. T he plywood-backed dulcimer will usually have less sustain, less volu me (loud ness), fewe r overtones (some of which arc agreeable and some of which may be ugly), and, on a very good d ulcimer, a wa rm bass range. The solid-backed d ulcimer will usually have a slightly brighter tone with a lo nger ring and a bass range that may be a bit more rich and stro ng, but more harsh. Note th at there arc not necessatily va lue judgments we might attach to all these tone characteristics. It depends o n the music, the player, and especially,

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Summer 1994 • 11

switching to a plywood back. I am glad that you are interested in laminated pin blocks. This is the strongest, safest, most durable type of pin block, and they are required in good pianos. You can, of course, make your own. Piano supply compan ies are a good source. Supply company catalogs are expensive and suppliers may require large minimum orders. If you are only building one dulcimer or a few, ask a

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to order one for you. Determine the dimensions you require. The laminated pin block material comes in pieces ready-cutfor piano pin blocks and in larger panels in a variety of thicknesses. One source to the piano trade is John Schadler & Sons, Inc. and American Piano Supply Co., Box 1068, Clifton, NJ 07014; phone (201)-777-3600. You can also check with plywood and veneer companies in your area , or

advertisers in woodworking magazines. The material is sold as "maple dieboard. " This is a very expensive material, but I have used it in almost all my hammer dulcimers of the past 15 or 20 years. Laminated pin blocks hold the tuning pins more securely, which enhances tuning stability. Also, cracking or splitting of the pin block and distortion of the pin holes are far less likely than with solid wood. I've never seen one fail in any way, in fact. Laminated pin blocks allow me to engineer design options that would be unwise or impossible with solid wood. If you are already building dulcimers with solid wood pin blocks, you may have to experiment with different hole sizes for putting pins into dieboard. Experiment in scraps to determine the correct hole size to drill. The hole may have to be just slightly larger than for the same pin in solid wood. It is possible for the tuning pins to be held too tightly. Not only can the pin stick and take too much force to turn, but you might get the pin in successfully, only to break it off when trying to string or tune! All in all, laminated woods and plywoods are useful forms of wood that may give us some helpful choices in designing and building musical instruments. mlI

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Festival Profiles O'Carolan Harp Festival The O'Carolan Harp and Traditional Music Festival is held in Keadue, County Roscommon, Rep. of Ireland, every Bank Holiday August weekend. This year the festival runs from July 29th through August! st. The Festival was started in Keadue in 1978. To the uninitiated, Keadue might not have seemed an obvious choice for such a festival. A small village of 150 people located in the Parish of Kilronan, it is set at the foot of the Arigna Mountains. Located East of Keadue is the renowned Lough Allen lake and on the West is Lough Meelagh. However, on closer examination it can be seen that it was no accident or whim that the O'Carolan Harp Festival commenced in Keadue. Turlough O'Carolan's (1670-1738) remains are interred in what is known as the O'Duignan Abbey, just a half mile outside Keadue opposite Lough Meelagh . Some two miles further on is the location of Alderford House, the home of the McDermott-Roe family under whose tutelage and care O 'Carolan first came to learn the harp. It was from Alderford House that he set forth on his travels as a harper and composer at the age of 21 in Roscommon and adjoining Counties. In the 1950's there was a special celebration of O'Carolan and his music in Keadue and the well known Irish Harpist, Kathleen Watkins attended at same. Since that time Sean O'Riada, and more recently the Chieftains, amongst others, as exponents of O'Caralan's music have been instrumental in creating an awareness and appreciation of O 'Carolan amongst a large and more diverse audience. In the mid 1970's a Committee was formed in Keadue with a view to promotion of the harp and in particular O 'Carolan, his music and works. To this end it was felt that a first step should be the hosting of an annual Harp Festival. In 1978 the first Festival was held with approximately three harpers in attendance. Since that time the Festival has grown in strength and stature, leading the way for other Harp

Festivals that have emerged in the intervening years. Eight years ago a Harp School was established in Keadue and a new generation of local harpers has come forth who perform and play both locally and nationally. The Festival weekend usually includes a one day harp school, harp recital, harp workshops and onc of the main features of the weekend, on Monday, the harp competitions. The Festival in 1994, July 29thAugust 7th, should be an enjoyable and memorable one. This year Keadue was awarded the Irish Tourist Organization's National Award for the tidiest village/town in Ireland . Keadue was adjudged out of 650 entrants to be the best kept village in the country and won the overall national award, the first time ever such an award was granted to a village or a town in the West of Ireland. Accordingly, in celebration of such an historic achievement, there will be many special events taking place in Keadue throughout the year. For further information, and a brochure concerning the harp competitions and Festival, contact Brid McMorrow, Harp Secretary, Keadue, Boyle, County Roscommon, Rep. Of Ireland Tel. No: 078-47221.

Old -Time Country Music Festival When the pioneer settlers, who came west in covered wagons, dropped anchor in the vast agricultural area known as Iowa, they did not have symphony orchestras in the back seat of their wagons. As a matter of fact, the only musical entertainment they had, is what they could stick in at the last minute. Those great foot pedal organs didn 't come along until much later, and certainly pianos, or any other heavy kind of musical instrument was much further down

the line. The fiddle seemed to predominate, but it was used primarily for the Saturday night hoe-downs, or barn raising parties, or eventually barn dances. For the more sophisticated listener, or the romantic, or those that appreciated something softer, more mellow, easier

to listen to, the dulcimer seemed to fit the bill.

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Summer 1994 • 13

It's probably true, that the dulcimer as such, was a late entry into Iowa farm life, but studies by the National Traditional Country Music Association, have found that a number of settlers had dulcimers with them when they came to Iowa. It was a popular instrument in the east, especially through the Appalachian Mountain Chain, was light and portable, and was certainly beautiful. The NTCMA also discovered that the most popular of the two kinds of dulcimers, lap or mountain dulcimer, and hammered dulcimer, depended on where you settled. In the Harlan, Iowa area, a large contingency of German settlers decided to plant roots, and they brought with them the instrument from Germany that is the forerunner to our own hammered dulcimers. Further south, near the Red Oak area, the lap dulcimer was popular: In the Pioneer Music Instrument Museum that the NTCMA established, and currently runs, there is a lap dulcimer made in a square box-like shape, dated 1861, along with the maker's name. According to Sheila Everhart, who takes care of the museum,"This lap dulcimer was given to us by Laurier and Leora Birginal, originally from Canada, who collected old music and instruments. They bought this lap dulcimer at an auction in Lewis, Iowa, some thirty years ago. It had been left behind at the Hitchcock House, a station on the underground railroad, by an escaping slave using that route. Remarkably, there are some shape-note markings on the neck, which leads us to believe that this particular slave may have been exposed to shape-note singing, or at least enough to warrant that kind of marking on the instrument so he would know where to bar for the right chordings." Also in the NTCMA Museum, located at the 1899 restored opera house in Walnut, Iowa, is a hammered dulcimer that came west into Iowa in a covered wagon. "It was made from the mop boards taken from a Pennsylvania farm house, and strung with incredibly thick wire, but it must have been a lovely instrument to those who had no other music," Mrs. Everhart explains. The NTCMA has been very active

since 1976 in attempting to sort, classify, file, and preserve music and music instruments from the past, especially the pioneer time period. They have been doing this since 1976, the bicentennial year, which is when they started their festival of old-time acoustic music. According to Everhart, "We still conduct our annual festival of old -time music, and a featured attraction of that seven-day event are contests for both lap dulcimer and hammered dulcimer. We have lots of workshops, and a quite large participation by players of both instruments. We keep the festival limited to non-electric instruments. This makes it possible for players to sit down under nearly any beautiful elm tree and play without being disturbed. We utilize seven stages to conduct all the acoustic music we present, and we have large grandstand programs on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights." The NTCMA invites all music players and listeners of acoustic music, especially from the world of the dulcimer to be with them. This year's dates are August 30 through September 5. NTCMA, P.O. Box 438, Walnut, Iowa 51577 Bob Everhart

1994 £\fENTS FOR FOLK ARTISTS Texas Gulf Coast Area August 27

Tuns Duah for autoharp, dulcimers, folk harps, flutes, & more •

September 6&7

Mitzi CoUins , hammered dulcimer, in concert and workshop

November 5

tarot falrt, I B1usltal fta$t

a preview of new Christmas music for autoharp,dulcimers, folk harps, flutes, guitars, mandolins & more. Learn new arrangements of favorite tunes with Peggy Cartar, hammered dulcimer; Nancy Price, mountain dulcimer; Gene Hatten, autoharp; Mary Radspinner, folk harp; Heidi Straube, flute; Steve Heiser; guitar & mandolin.

• SEPl'EMBER

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JAMES'S GATE • NONESUCH NATIONAL MOUNTAIN DULCIMER CHAMPIONSHIP SEPTEMBER 16TH NATIONAL HAMMERED DULCIMER CHAMPIONSIUP SEPTEMBER 17TH

PRIzE INSTRUMENTS BY LUTIIIERS ROUND FAMILY

DULCIMER Co. LYNN MCSPADDEN

RUS8ELCOOK TACK &: SoN DULCIMER Co.

R.L.

.Sponsored by the Houston Area Acoustic Music Society (HAAMS). For more information on this and other Folk Artist Events, call or write HMMS 21626 Gentry Rd, Houston, TX 77040. 713-955-6052

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WRITE FOR MORB INPoRATION


March 3rd. 4th and 5th. 1995 SPONSORED ST, THE BAYOU DULCIMER CLUB Wbcn: MaDdC9Wc/eo.iII.Ct0o, 1&- O... t IIOrth oUf_ Orleane)

YOUR CALENDARS. DON'T MISS THIS GOOD FOOD, GOOO VtlSle. AND,. GOOD 11.JoI!!1II

Guest Performers and Instructors: Larldn Bryant. Tul1 Gluencr, Lone Star Strlnt Band, Left Handed Dulelmer Band. Ben Wade. Robin "[0' and others to be announced.

The San FrClnclsco Area's source for -HClmmereci Clnd MountClln Dulcimers - Bowed PsCllterys - TClpes & COs -Accessories - Books Clnd Instruction-

A 5'O((OWlnG WinD

,ountain and Hammered Dulcimer Works:boF'.' CAJUN cmSINE OFFEREDI ANNUAL CORONA'I10N COSrnME BAIL/CONCERT. ~ POll;

BUT co.rtJIIB PO. TBD EVI2ITI

trabitionol music fr om Celtic shor es Glenn Mot'g'cut'" hot hantmc,.i.ng in l..wJh a,..,.al1.gcmcn.t:) with fiddle, celLo, oboe, guitar. ,.ecol"dc I". lt1.eLodeon, pennywhi.:>tLc cutd mo,.c! A compeUing tK&dkaL Jou.,.n.e y Uutt :)houLdn.'t be mb:x!d!

CAMPING - DORMS AND SITES AVAILABLE. FOR MORE INFO. CALL : PAUL ANDRY- 604-845-3494DENISE GUILLORY - 504-394-9891 BOB VAUGHN - 5()4..824-5610

6th Annual Memphis Dulcimer Festival ThursdllY Evening, September 22 All DIIY FrldllY lind SlIturdllY, September 23 lind 24 Featuring Concerts and Workshops for Fretted and Hammered Dulcimer, Autoharp, Guitar, Fiddle, Harp, Whistle, Banjo, Songs, Dance, Storytelling, and more . . . . . Some of our many performers and workshop leaders are:

Neal Hellman, Susan Trump. Larkin Kelley Bryant, Janlta Baker. Mike Casey. Tull Glazener. Bill Spence" Fennlng's All Star String Band. Helicon, Esther Kreek, Rick Thum. Princess Harris. Ed Hale, David Peterson, Karen Mueller, Tom Schroeder, Michael King, Andy Cohen, Mose Vinson, The Billy's, Nell Kelley, and more, and more, and more..... . Write or call for our Festival Flier listing workshops, hotels, and other information, Larkin Kelley Bryant 95-A No. Evergreen St. Memphis. TN 381 04 901 725-6976 Vendor Inquiries Welcome

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EVENTS CALENDAR DEADLINES

Events

August 1-4 • Mt. View, AR Summer Hanwnered Dulcimer Workshop at the Ozark Folk Center. Intensive sessions, beginning and intermediate levels. Info: Ozark Folk Center, PO Box 500, Mountain View, AR 72560. 501/269-3851. August 2-8 • Brasstown, NC Hammered Dulcimer Workshop for intermediate to advanced players. Info: John C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC 28902. Telephone 800.FOLK.SCH. August 12-14· Cle Elum, WA Kindred Gathering #20. A gathering for friends of modes and dulcimerie. Held at Camp Koinonia, nestled in the high pine forests just over Snoqualmie Summit (60 milcs cast of Seattle). Workshops, concert. Info: Robert and Janette Force, 1228 Blaine St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. 206/385-5289. August 12- 14. Brasstown, NC Mountain Dulcimer Weekend Workshop for beginning players. Info: John C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC 28902. Telephone 800. FOLK.SCH. August 12-14· West Dover, VT Dulcimer Daze. Open stage, workshops and concerts. Info: Folk Craft Music, PO Box 1572, Wilmington, VT 05363. 802/464-7450. August 13- 14· Salem, WV Dulcbner Weekend at Fort New Salem, (a nineteenth century West Virginia settlement), features workshops (hammered and mountain), concert, and jamming. Info: Carol Schweiker, Fort New Salem, Salem-Teikyo University, Salem, WV

August 20 • Sand Springs, OK 8th Ever Dulcimer Day. Workshops for mountain and hammered dulcimer plus afternoon and evening concerts. Info: Indian Territory Dulcimer Celebration, PO Box 471532, Tulsa, OK 74 147. 918/744-8928.

Febtuary-Aprillssue: Events from early F~bruary to early May Deadhne • November 1st May-July Issue: Events from e.arly May to early September 11us IS Our .Iargest yearly calendar August 26-28 • Midland, MI Deadline· February 1st Old Car and Folk Music Gathering. J amAugust-llctober issue: ming, workshops, co ncerts and dance. Events from Camping available. Info: Bill Kuhlman, early August to early November 2769 S. Homer Rd., Midland, MI 48640. Deadline· May 1st 517/835-5085. Novernber-January issue: Events from Aug 3O-Sept 5 • Avoca, IA early November to early February Old-Time Country Music Contest and FestiDeadline· August 1st val. Contests and workshops for ham- -~-~-...~~';:'-~~_J mered and mountain dulcimers among September 11- 17. Brasstown, NC many other instruments at the Pottawat- Hammered Dulcimer Workshop for beginners. Info: John C. Campbell Folk lamie Cou nty Fairgrounds. Camping available. Info: PO Box 438, Walnut, IA School, Brasstown, NC 28902. Tele51577. 712/784-3001. phone 800/FOLK-SCH. Sept 2-4 • La Crosse, WI Great River Traditional Music and CraHs Festival. Music and dance workshops, craft demonstrations and sales, ethnic food and children's area. Info: Great River Festival of Arts, 119 King St. La Crosse, WI 54601. 608/785. 1434. September 9-10 • Jackson, MS Central Mississippi Dulcimer Festival features workshops for mt. and hammered dulcimers, wo rkshops, open stage,

hayride, jamming and cook-out. Camping available. Info: Robert Box, PO Box 275, Flora, MS 39071. 601/879-8374. September 9-11 • Shepherdstown,WV Upper Potomac Dulcimer Festival. Annual hammered dulcimer festival , featuring classes at all levels, open mike and a concert. In fo: Joanie Blanton, Box 1474, Shepherdstown, WV 25443. 304/2632531.

26426. 3041782-5245.

August 15-20· Brasstown, NC Hammered Dulcimer Workshop for beginners. Info: John C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC 28902. Telephone 800/FOLK-SCH .

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September 10-11 • Cooksburg, PA Sawmill Great Dulcimer Round-Up. Classes for all levels of mountain and hammered

September 15-18. Winfield, KS Walnut Valley Festival. Features national contests o n hammered and mountain

dulcimer, finger-pick and fl at-pick guitar, mandolin, fiddle, banjo and autoharp, plus workshops, concerts, all-night jams, and arts & crafts fair. Info: Bob Redford, PO Box 245, Winfield, KS 67156.316/221-3250. September 17 • Mannington, WV WV Mountaineer Dulcimer Club Fall Meeting featuring jamming, pot luck lunch and open stage at the Mannington Middle School. Public invited at no charge. Info: Patty Looman, 228 Maple Ave., Mannington, WV 26582. 304/986-24 11 . Sept 17 -18 • Coshocton, OH Old Time Music Festival. Celebration of 19th-century music and musical instruments. Info: Roscoe Village Foundation, 440 North Whitewoman St., Coshocton, OH 43812. 614/622-931 0. September 18 • Huntsville, Al Mountain Dulcimer Festival. Perfor-

dulcimers, concert, sales, open stage,

mances, jam sessio ns, sales booths at

jamming, food, and demonstrations. Info : Cook Forest Sawmill Art Center , PO Box 180, Cooksburg, PA 16217. Phone 814/927-6655 after May 1st.

Burritt Museum and Park. Handicapped accessible; camping available nearby. Info: Damon Nolin, PO Box 1823, Huntsville, AL 35807.205/881 -5352.

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1& • Dulcimer Players News

Nebraska 1st Galaxy of Stars

September 23-24 • Memphis, TN Memphis Dulcimer Festival, featuring performances and workshops on hammered and mountain dulcimers, autoharp, etc. Info: Memphis Dulcimer Festival, 95 N. Evergreen St., Memphis, TN 38104. 901n25-6976.

November 4-6 • Mobile, AL Deep South Dulcimer Assn. Festival. Jamming, workshops beginners & advanced, open stage. Held at Chickasabogue Park. Camping available. Info: Nell Hoyt, 8730 Dutchman Woods Dr., Mobile, AL 36695. Phone 205/633-7739.

September 23-24 • Pineville, KY Great American Dulcimer Convention fea-

November 4-6 • East noy, WI Strlngalong Weekend. Concerts, work-

turing workshops on mountain and hammered dulcimers plus concerts. Info: Pine Mountain State Resort Park, 1050 State Park Rd., Pineville, KY 40977. 800/325-1712.

shops, singing and dancing at Edwards conference Center. Dulcimer activities. Bring or rent an instrument. Info: UMW Folk Center, Ann Schmid, PO Box 413, MIlwaukee, WI 53201. Phone 800/636-3655.

Sept 3O-0ct 1 • CharloUe, NC Heritage Day, sponsored by the Charlotte Folk Music Society. Traditional music, jamming, camping available. Info: 803/548-5671.

October 8-9. St. Petersburg, FL Sunshine State Acoustic Music Camp features classes for players of Appalachian dulcimer, hammered dulcimer, guitar, mandolin, autoharp and other acoustic instruments. Limited enrollment. Some single day rates. Info: Charley Groth, PO Box 668, Crystal Beach, FL 34681. 813n84-1771 (before 10 p.m.).

Nov 18-20 • Helen, GA Fcothllls Dulcimer Festival. Concert Friday night, Saturday workshops for mountain dulcimer. Open stage and concert Saturday evening, Sunday events. Held at Unicoi State Park. Info: Pat Corley, 16160 Freemanville Rd., Alpharetta, GA 30201. Phone 404/475- 4283.

Festival

Cass County Fairgrounds Weeping Water, Nebraska Contests for Singers, Pickers, Fiddlers, Dulcimer Players, and Songwriters line dancing instruction, Jam Sessions, Flea market and much, much morel

August 19-21, 1994 Info: Leora Maves 712-323-3581 or Florence Anderson 402-895-5939

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September 17 - 18, 1994 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

and piping workshops and concerts. Info: Mrs. Rebecca Edmondson, HCR 62, Box 267-A, Mount Desert, ME 04660.207/244-7193.

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October 14-15 • Tishomingo, MS Dulcimer Day. Two days of performances

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and jam sessions, as well as sales booths, sponsored by the Ala-sippi Dulcimer Association. Held at the Tishomingo State Park. Info: Hollis E. Long, Box 76, Golden, MS 38847.

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performers from the Alpine regions: Austria, Switzerland, Bavaria (Germany). Info: Jorg Baiter, Geltendorfer str. 6, D-82299 Turkenfeld, Germany. Phone: 0049-8193-5596.

Conntry Entertainment

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October 8-9· Bar Harbor, ME Scottish Performing Arts Weekend. Harp

October 28-30. Munich, Germany Alpine Hammered Dulcimer Festival with

1994

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A Celebration of 19th Century Music and Musical Instruments. A Variety of Stringed Instruments Will Be Played Acoustically on the Main Stage. Barbershop Quartets,Jam Sessions, Open Stage, Workshops, & Flattop Guitar Picking Contest (With cash prizes).

For More Information Call 1-800-877-1830 Roscoe Village, Coshocton, Ohio

Ros~oe

Village is a restored 19th Century living hlstory canal town, featuring living history buildings, 19 shops, 4 restaurants and a 51-room Inn. Lodgi ng Informati on 1-800-237-7397

Free Admission to the FestivaZ/ Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.


Summer 1994 â&#x20AC;˘ 17

by Gerry Milnes Elkins, West Virginia Old-time dulcimer player and maker, Walter Miller, of Tioga, West Virginia, went to a spring to get some wate r on a cold and icy day in February, 1994. WaIter fell that day in that rocky, icy place, and the ra Il caused severe head and neck injuries from which he never recov-

ered. He passed away on March 3rd, 1994, at the age of eighty, after weeks of constant atte ntion from his fami ly and while receiving the best of medical care. Walter began a lifelong association with music when he " traded up" an old dulcimer at the age of fourteen , in 1928. He immediately went to work on making them himself, an activity that, with few interruptions, lasted until his misfortune at the spring. His dulcimers were innovative, his playing was unique in many ways, and his humanness and generosity touched many. I sought Walter out at his Nicholas County home in 1987 after a chance visit with his neighbor, who to ld me of his dulcimer playing. Over the yea rs we

became friends, fellow musicians, and Walter cooperated with several musical documentation projects on which I've worked. An obituary in the Charles/on Gazelle announced Walter's passing as that of a master dulcimer player who taught at the Augusta Program at Davis and Elkins College. Many youn ger dulcimer players met Wal ter there, and some acquired replicas he made for students of a dulcimer he'd made in the 1930's. His playing is documented on a cassette tape, Th e West Virginia Hills, produced by the Augusta Heritage Center. I accompanied Walter at several contests held at the Vandalia Gathering, and I presented Walter at the Celebration of Traditional Music at Berea College in October, 1993. Walter was a bit confused by the attention he was given at the sunset of his li fe for some thing that was a perfectly normal expression for him- his love of and playing of old-time dulcimer music. He played old b~lI ads learned from his mother, fiddle tunes he'd heard at the square dances of his youth, hymns and spirituals from deep-felt fa ith, and even a blues tune learned from a black coworker in the mines fifty yea rs ago. Walter was an innovative player and maker who, in 1956, constructed wha t was probably the very first electric dulcimer ever made (t hey're now played regularly in Nashville). H e experimented with va rious woods, usually liking best the native hardwoods of his beloved Nicholas County hills. The shapes of his instruments, including their peg heads, sound holes, and tail pieces, all exhibited his stylistic touch . Walter had an impish grin that he would Hash, along with a wink and a nod, when he concurred with what you said. During our last visit, while he was in the intensive care unit at Charleston General Hospital, he had no feeling in his arms or legs and could not move his head because of the spinal injury. He was hooked to a breathing machine (he had developed pneumonia, and was having heart and lung problems) a nd his only contact with the world was what he could see and hear from his pillow. Lean ing over so as to be seen, I told him

I thought everything was goi ng to work out all right. That little half-wink and attempt at a nod assured me he had heard.

As many mountaineers arc wont to do, Walter liked to get drinking water from a clear cold mountain spring. These sources - crysta l fonts from which gush forth the purest of water, are believed to sustain body and soul. Falling as ra inwater and having been filtered through a mountain canopy of oak, as h, hickory and pine, the water is intermingled wit h the minerals deep within the limestone and sandstone of the mountain's secret interior, and surges from a rocky crevice

in a mountain laurel thicket, beckoning to the thirsty. I'd like to take one of your dulcimers, Walter, to that mountain spring where yo ur life met its e nd. I'd launch that little dulcimer-ark like a new life 's beginning. It'd cascade down th rough the rocky hills, through swirling blackwater pools of life, and through the eddies of time. It would survive, like yo u, to reach calmer waters and a peaceful river. It would Hoat on placid waters through qu iet valleys to the old salt sea. It would eventually sink, like you, to its final rest-

ing place. There are depths of space in that sea, Walter, that are deeper and darker than the coal mine shafts yo u descended with your pick and shovel. There are whales in those depths that are bigger than your workshop that sing eerie songs you would have liked to try and play. There arc creatures, tiny and delicate, that could make extraordinary designs for the sound holes on your instruments. In that briny deep, your little dulcimer can still be heard. It joins a symphony deep within the earth that fans mighty fires which make powerful steam to drive the wheels of the wo rld. This steam escapes at places to become dark clouds, driven by winds, to rain on mountains. It's purifi ed and mineralized and Haws again from clear bubbling springs. It quenches our thirsts and becomes the babbling brooks that inspire our music.

Gerry Milnes Photo by G. Milnes

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Hammered Dulcimer by Linda Lowe Thompson

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ne of my students wanted to learn "Ross's Reel," so I decided to learn it and teach it to him. Its being in the . key of F presented a few interesting hammering decisions and I decided not only to teach him the tune but to use it for discussing what he should think about when making hammering decisions. Upon my giving it to him, he said he'd make a tape of my playing it, go home and listen to it a bunch, then transpose it by ear and play it in G. Yes, I know I should have been delighted that he'd learned how to do that, but I objected to his plan. I told him this key was lots of fun and the dulcimer's too limited not to use all of it we've got. Besides, D minor is one of my favorite dulcimer sounds and it's right up there with F. He told me no, the key of F was like the F -word: he'd decided to make it a practice to avoid using both at all costs. Well, happily, he was more adamant about the F-word than he was abo ut they key of F. I coaxed him into trying it, just that one time, and we've both had a really good time with this tune.

I've also had several beginning stude nts, recently, and we've been working on playing scales and a few simple tunes all over the dulcimer. Since I find Ross's fairly difficult for true

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beginners, I've decided to include two tunes this month. However, let me assure the beginners that I, personally, have made it a habit to learn things that were above my ability physically and I don't think it's hurt me a bit to work on them-I just refrain from performing them until I can get a handle on them-it's been my contention that my brain's always at least a yea r ahead of my body in this dulcimer stuff. In fact, the first couple of years, it was probably three or four years ahead. Is the gap closing because my body's getting better or because my brain's getting worse?

learning a New Tune: 1. As with everything, it's best to hear it over and over before you attempt to play it. That way, your ear will help figure out when you've erred. If that's not possible, then just understand that it will take a bit longer to learn it. Start with the A part and learn the first section. 2. Decide what size chunks you choose to learn this tune in. Phil always does one measure at a time. Karen usually uses two measures at a time. So do I. I have a friend, Carl, who tends to learn in 4-measure bits. It doesn't matter what size you decide, so long as it's working fo r you. In Frere Jacques, I teach it in two-measure bits because that's also the way the parts go when it's sung as a round. In Ross's, I myself learned it in phrases: the first bit was the pickup measure + the first full measure +

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Summer 1994 â&#x20AC;˘ 19

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20 â&#x20AC;˘ Dulcimer Players News

the first three beats of the second full measure. The student learned it learned it in two-measure bits. Experiment until you decide what works best for you and, then, just make it a permanent decision that you'll learn tunes that way. 3. Learn the first section. When I first start learning a tune, the first order of business becomes seeing where it goes on the dulcimer. I often use just the right hand, for a while, until I know how it's going to sit on the instrument. Then, I start figuring out hammering patterns in that section. 4. Now, learn section two. As you may have suspected, the same thought processes apply to the second measure/couple of measures/phrase as it did to the first. 5. Next comes playing sections one and two together and reconsidering whether the hammering decisions made while just addressing one section will hold when a second is attached. Did you forget section one while learning section two? I often do and so do lots of people I know. Don't worry. Relearn it! It's not going to take nearly as long to learn it a second time and your memory of it will be much stronger after learning it multiple times. In fact, I even use that principle to force my brain to learn tunes more quickly: I often learn tunes in pairs, finding that learning a new tune makes me forget the one I learned just before that. By speeding up the forgetting processes, I also speed up the learning processes. I take it as a given that I'll have to relearn a tune at least five times. 6. What next? Section three. Big surprise. 7. Then, play sections 1,2, and 3 together before going on to 4. 8. Etc., etc., etc. 9. Only after learning the whole tune, do I think it's advisable to start thinking about "final" hammering patterns.

Figuring Out Hanuner Patterns: 1. Be wary of following "hammering rules" anyone's set down. There are a lot of things to take into consideration. My sons are jocks and I've learned from them that each body has a set of things that makes it singular. In order to set out rules for hammering, one would need to formulate rules for each specific dulcimist, taking into consideration height, length of arms, length of hammers, weight of hammers, which is the dominant hand, how much less dominant is the less-dominant hand (does that make it sub-dominant??), amount of skill, amount of coordination, configuration of that dulcimer, forearm development, upper arm development, finger development. Am I getting silly? Yeah, but I'll bet you see what I mean. So, you'll hear no rules from me. I'm just going to give suggestions of things you'll want to consider when making your own hammer patterns. 2. Is that note found in more than one place? Lots of them are. Lots of them aren't. If that one is, one of them will probably be more available to the right hand and one to the left, at any given time. So, if things aren't going just

swimmingly, consider seeing if you could play some of those notes in a different place, with a different hand. If that one note is found in only one place, that decides it. And, you'll have to base many of your decisions on being able to get to that note when it's needed. What makes these two tunes such fun for working on hammer patterns is that lots of the notes are found in only one place. So, it makes many of your decisions simpler, in a way. When I'm first learning a tune, I go through its scale several times and identify the notes that are duplicated. These are in the key of F. Both the F-naturals are found in only one place on my dulcimer. Likewise the C-naturals. Ditto the B-flats. On my instrument, the possibilities of duplication: O's, ~s, D's, and E's. 3. In my opinion, it's always better to play the first beat in each measure with the dominant hand. With both these tunes and my body, that's often not possible. So, it's up to me to make certain that first beat is emphasized, even though my left hand may be the one hitting it. 4. When going from bass bridge to the treble or from one side of the treble to the other, it's better to move first with the hand closest to the new side. For example, you're going from the left side of the treble bridge to the right side of the treble bridge: usually, it's best to play the first note on the right side of the treble with your right. However, this isn't always possible. Just make certain you keep the left hammer to the left of the right hammer. 5. Sometimes, when the hammering's just not working for me, I'll leave a note out. But, for the sake of thinking about hammering patterns in these specific tunes, try to put them all in. It'll be more of a challenge in hammering. Most all the dulcimers with which I'm familiar will have all but one of the notes in Ross's Reel and all the notes in Frere Jacques. The Rosss note that's missing on a fairly large number of dulcimers is that high B-flat, the one above the clef, in the B portion of the tune. If you don't have that note, I suggest you substitute the high C there on the left side of the treble bridge. 6. Be willing to re-think anything that's not working as you gain speed on that tune. I originally thought about doing lots of jumping over to the left side of the treble bridge with the right hammer on the B section of Ross's. It would have made it so that I could play it "right-handed." Yes, you're right, that meant my crossing the right over the left. If it had worked, I would have left it in, even though it "violated" one of the "suggestions." But, as I gained speed, I was whacking the bridge many of the times. So, I had to rethink the hammering or convince myself and, maybe later, an audience, that this was a planned percussive addition. (Occasionally, I do make an effort to add some bridge ... but it's quite a bit more rhythmic than that.) The way I now have the hammering in the B section, it makes a fine left - hand exercise. But, it feels like the right way for me to do it. 7. If you must put two of the same hammers together either right, right or left, left - do it as often as possible

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Maiden Creek Dulcimers

with your dominant hand. It's always preferable, in my

Your Source for Traditional Music

opinion, to alternate the hammers. For me, it's not always possible. Also, if you must put two of the same hammers together, it's easier to do it when you have more time in the rhythmic notation. If you're doing it on half notes, you have more time to maneuver than if you're doing it on sixteenths. On Frere Jacques in the key of F, I put rights fo llowing rights a few times.

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In Closing: I'm not including hammer patterns with these tunes because I want you to think about them yourself. This is not a contest and there can be no winners - except that anyone who learns to playa great tune smoothly is a winner. But, if you'll send me the hammer patterns you've chosen for e ither tune and a self-addressed, stamped envelope, I'll send you six great tunes I've never published anywhere else. They'll be in a variety of keys and will include tab charts, but not hammer patterns. I'd prefer it if you made a couple of comments on why you chose what you did, but that's not necessary. Also, tell me if you have any hamme ring suggestio ns to add to my list. Send these to Harvest Time Music 1114 Vine Street Denton TX 76201. m!

"Music, the greatest good that mortals know/And all of heaven we have below." Joseph Addison "I like most music unless it's wrong." Coleman Hawkins Linda Lowe Thompson is part of our DPN Texas Bureau. About a decade ago, she produced Tunes for Hammered Dulcimer, a beginning instruction set, and Sounds of Christmas Past. Sin ce retiring from her management position in domestic engineering, she has stepped up production at Harvest Time Music, where she holds several key position. Th is shift in focus resulted in the publication in 1993 of H ammered Dulcimer Notebook. In her wealth of spare time, she co-coordinates Winter Festival of Acoustic Music and is the den mother for the Lone Start State Dulcimer Society.

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l &

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22 • Dulcimer Players News

Ken K%dner is a hammered dulcimer

player muclz admired for his tasteful QITangemen/s and playing style. He per-

tonns wilh Chris Nonnan (flute, whistle, bagpipes) and Robin Bullock (guitar, cittem, fiddle) in a trio known as Helicon, named after Mount Helicon of mythology-the home of the nine muses, each of W/zOl1'l

inspired a discipline in the arts.

In spite of a "fairly brutal" towing sclzedule this past year (95 concerts in 34 stales and three countries), Ken found time to honor DPN's request for an intelview.

How did you take the leap from being a Ph.D. In Public Health to being a full-time musician? I started playing the fiddle just prior to entering the doctoral program at Johns Hopkins University in 1978. I didn't know a thing about music, nor did I have any idea how hard the fiddle is to learn. Ignorance is bliss sometimes. I quickly became hooked playing Southern fiddle tunes. Around 1980, I heard Walt Michael play the dulcimer. A year or so later, I purchased my first hammered dulcimer-an awful creature which I , of course, thought sounded great until I heard other dulcimers! Meanwhile, I was slogging through the doctoral program, still intending to do public health full-time, when I met Chris Norma n who had just dropped out of music school to play traditional music on the flute. In 1983 we started performing together at a cafe in Baltimore for dinner and tips and $10 apiece. Forks and hot wax from candles were routinely dropped on us from a balcony. Despite these haza rds, it was a great place to rehearse ! Chris and I

Interview with Helicon's Ken Kolodner· by Chris Norman and Robin Bullock· Baltimore, Maryland Helicon has just completed what seems to have been a grueling performance schedule. How do you like touring? Our two-week tour of Germany was a real experience, highlighted by a performance at the International Hackbrett

were in search of a guitarist when we

Festival where we met and shared music

me t Robin Bullock at a fiddler's convention. Robin was pulling in prizes on fiddle, mandolin, and guitar. He had told us how much he enjoyed our 1985 recording, Daybreak, so we joined forces and Helicon was formed.

with some fine players from fifteen countries. The Chinese and Ukrainian players were truly amazing! But our April tour was way too long: 26 concerts in 28 days

Do you still fInd tIme to play soccer? Every chance I get. I was once fairly serious about the game. I was all-State in high school and all-Midwest something or other, and one of the leading scorers in the U.S. when I was in college. I still try to playa few times a week, yearround, but in a more relaxed way.

in nine states. We've learned our limits. I

missed family and friends and day-to-day things, like playing pick-up soccer.

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Summer 1994 â&#x20AC;˘ 23

WIth all the touring, do you sUll stay active In public bealth? Yes, in between tours, as a consultant. I bring my laptop on tour and manage to get a fair bit of work done on the road - very 1}tpe A, isn't it! I still manage to publish a few articles a year in scientific journals.

from around the world have an instrument similar to the dulcimer - similar either in the way it is played, or in the sound (such as the kantele in Finland, the yang qin in China, or the charango in South America). I get ideas by listening to instruments that are similar but yet distinctly different from the dulcimer.

Back to music, bow bas the band's style developed over the years? We started out playing Celtic and Appalachian music, but our musical tastes were much broader, so we began performing material outside of these traditions. Our focus is now on traditional folk music from allover the world. Our repertoire includes music from as far away as South America, Eastern Europe, and the Far East. As Robin Bullock often says, we may be the only folk band able to give an audience jet lag at our concerts.

You do a fair amount of teaching. What do you try to communicate to your dulcimer students? I believe that while it is important to learn techniques and, of course, the notes in a tune (although that hasn't stopped me!), it is equally important to learn to play musically. I believe that the main reason hammer dulcimers are not so warmly received in jam sessions is the lack of attention many players pay to playing musically. Also, most players do not practice playing back-up, so when the time comes to play with people, they don't have a clue.

Where do you find your material? From other musicians, obscure and not so obscure recordings, sheet music occasionally - you name it! It sometimes takes a lot of searching and patience particularly when listening to some of the scratchy recordings which we encounter. We then transcribe the tunes we like. We do a lot of our homework while on tour. Touring also brings us into contact with all sorts of people willing to share music. And each of us also writes music. Do you try to sound authentic? We try to maintain the spirit of the music, but we definitely interpret it. When performing Peruvian music, we make no pretense about sounding just like it may have been played 200 years ago in Peru. While there is certainly a place for preserving an "authentic" sound, there is also a place for creating a new sound out of the old. Our view is that playing traditional music does not necessarily mean that you need to play as if you are preserving museum pieces. How do you go about adapting such diverse music to the dulcimer? Oftentimes, I am inspired by "relatives" to the dulcimer. Most traditions

What do you mean by "playing musically"? Unfortunately, I think many dulcimer players play too loud, or too fast, or arhythmically, with little use of dynamics or sense of phrasing. I think playing musically means paying attention to the way one plays every note. It means paying attention to the spacing between notes, to how one accents each note, to the use of dynamics, and to how one plays "invisible" or "ghost" notes. I try to communicate an understanding of the music both as a player and a teacher. Within Helicon, we always form a consensus as to the way a piece of music is to be played. This means agreeing on the chord progression, the phrasing, the harmony, the instrumentation, the texturing of the music, and in general, an attention to detail so that every second of the music is important.

which can dramatically change the texture. Robin Bullock will often reinforce this by damping the guitar or cittern. The resulting sound is very percussive.

What would you Uke to see change In the hammer dulclm.. world? I think we need to be much more self-critical. Because the sound which dulcimers make when struck is so pleasing, we are far too complacent and end up letting the dulcimer do too much of the work. I do not think that we hold ourselves up to the same musical standards that players of other instruments do. My hope is that we all become more critical and strive to pay attention to detail and play musically, and not just the notes! What new Is In store for Helicon? Another busy year of touring with a return trip to Germany and another recording due out in the summer of 1994. We also are debuting several arrangements of some of our longer sets of music with the Nova Scotia Symphony Orchestra. Our hope is that we will someday do some touring with these arrangements. It is very ambitious, but we'll see how it goes over! I! Helicon 3806 Fenchurch Road Baltimore, MD 21218 410/243-7254

HELICON DISCOGRAPHY

What do you mean by texturing? Many elements can produce variations in texture. How one layers the. instrumentation, what role each of these instruments plays in the piece, and how that role changes, how one varies the kinds of hammers one uses, perhaps also using plucking, tremolo, arpeggios, and so on. I also have a great time using my dampers

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24 • Dulcimer Players News

The Kalevala (Land of Heros)

Traditional Finnish arl Ken Kolodner 1992

Playing sequence ABAB CCDO

1 L. Hand -' 1\

··

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1

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on Horizons, Dorian Records, 1992. Used with permission Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.

~

··


Summer 1994 • 25

Lithuanian Piece an Ken Kolodner 1991

Title Unknown Bm

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1 Left

o

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Helicon: Robin Bullock, Chris Norman and Ken Kolodner

on Helicon's next release for Dorian Records. Used with permission Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.

,


26 â&#x20AC;˘ Dulcimer Players News

IRISH AIItE&

P~OFILE OF JOE HEALEY

"H

MA~GARET DAVIS

e made it look so easy!" That's what we said to each other after Nick Blanton brought a hammered dulcimer to the FO.A. M. (Friends of Appalachian Music) jam in Williamsburg. Effortlessly he tapped with lightening quick strokes. The sound was magical-we were hooked!! Some twelve years and eight dulcimers later it's hard to say what caused us to stick with it. The early years were certainly frustrating. Margaret drove an hour one way for monthly lessons at a music store in Norfolk while Joe pecked away note by note in the privacy of his dining room. But the trips to Elkins, West Virginia, to the Augusta Heritage Workshops sustained us along the way. There were fellow beginners and talented, caring teachers. We learned something else there that made it all come together. Sitting under the trees at night and listening to little groups play tunes by moonlight, watching an elderly fiddler entertain in the park, or enjoying Russell Fluharty talk about playing dulcimer in an Indian Medicine show, you got a sense of the people part of this music. We love to talk to people about the heritage of the tunes we play. It pleases us a lot when toddlers dance at a folk art show while we entertain. They understand and respond to the spirit of the music!

We've been truly blessed to be in the right place at the right time with teachers like Sam RizzeUa, R.P.Hale, Randy Marchany, Wes Chappell, Paul Van Arsdale and Sam Hermann . Festivals such as the Upper Potomac Dulcimer Fest bring us in contact with top performers like Walt Michael, Ken Kolodner, Karen Ashbrook and Steve Schneider. From Maddie MacNeil we learned that the instrume nt is not played with the wrists but rather with fluid movements that start in the body and move outward. The results are lovely, measured tones that showcase the dynamics and subtlety of this instrument. Now, we are sorry to report that Maddie hasn't made singers out of either of us! We've also been lucky in that Williamsburg, Virginia is a great place to perform. Our first job was at the Trellis restaurant in Colonial Williamsburg eight years ago and we still play there two or three times a month. We enjoy blending the sounds of keyboard, banjo, guitar, accordion and concertina with the dulcimer. People stop eating and look, however, when we blend in the bodhran or bowed psaltery! Our most unusual gig was a barbecue for judges from South America. They danced the Virginia Reel as it was translated into Spanish call by call. Meanwhile, the entire scene was guarded by forty state troope rs. Folk music is an emerging art. It has certainly changed our musical perspective. Two years ago we began inviting Ryan Kershner, an oboist, to perform with us. We had heard oboe with traditional music in the SwaliowtailfWild Asparagus sound and loved it. People have responded to our eclectic mix as well. Rya n plays on our second tape, Rose Bower, and our upcoming Winter Carols. Both of our tapes are a mix of dance medleys, slow airs, waltzes and original pieces. To show that there could never be too much of a good thing, we started our own Dulcimer Workshop three years ago. This is a very informal weekend of socializing, jamming, a dance, open mike, sharing, and a day-long workshop for beginners. We hold it at the site of our monthly dances, a Norwegian town hall built in 1907 in Norge, Virginia, near Williamsburg. Because food is also a central theme of this weekend, we call it the "Norge Gorge." We can be found there eating and hammering the first weekend in March. ~

Irish Aire Margaret Davis RI. 4, 101 Penn Drive Williamsburg, VA 23185

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Summer 1994 • 27

Ninety Three .J=140

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Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.

J II


28 • Dulcimer Players News

Christopher's

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Jean's Dulcimer Shop

~

P.O. BOX 18, IIIGIIWAY 32 COSBY, TENNESSEE 37722

~

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~

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ai

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~

~~~~~~~QjS Catalog $1.00 -- Refundable with first order ~~~~~~~QiS Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.


TOMBAEH~

I

'd been playing mountain dulcimer for about five yea rs when I heard about this dulcimer weekend in Binghamton, New York. There weren't that many dulcimer players where I lived in Vermont, so I figured I could learn something by going down to the Third and Hopefully Not Last Northeast Cranberry Hammered Dulcimer Gathering. It was 1979. What a wonderful weekend of revelations. Hearing the better players was exciting and inspiring. Equally encouraging were the compliments I got on my own playing, rudimentary as it was then; more importantly, the exposure pointed out how much room I had for further growth. The unreserved friendliness and support affected me profoundly. For the first time in my life I felt like I truly belonged. Over the years I've taught workshops at this and several other festivals, and was a featured performer at the Downeast Dulcimer Festival in Bar Harbor, Maine, in 1990. In 1981 I joined the staff of the Cranberry Dulcimer Gathering and became its coordinator in 1983. I've tried to pass on that same exhilarating sense of sharing and caring I first experienced as a novice in 1979. I'm blessed with a wonderfully dedicated and talented staff. Crafting new tunes for dulcimer most satisfies my creative side. It often starts with a phrase, or a fragment of one, that seems to leap from the strings. Sometimes nothing comes of

it; but occasionally one becomes a question that not only demands an answer but raises further questions to spur me on. Yet the overwhelming sensation is of revelation, not construction, for as I polish each tune it's like removing layers to reveal its musical essence. Fingerstyle guitar continues to be the strongest influence on my playing and composing. The intricate interplay of left and right hands, the nuance of intertwining melodies and harmony, the range of expression, the tactile intimacy all transfer well to dulcimer. I've strived to get beyond the mechanics of playing to draw out, as Stokowski said, the music behind the notes. That's what I try to convey when I perform: to pull the melody out of the chordal "soup;" to shape and contour each phrase, emphasizing some notes and backing off others so that the music speaks its own language. To get one note to flow into the next; to punctuate that flow with little windows of silence to delineate phrases and sub-phrases, to link phrases together to tell a musical story; these are ways to play musically. I try to identify these same qualities in others' playing and find them most often in solo performers on a variety of instruments, not just dulcimer. Although I enjoy listening to many dulcimer players, one stands out as an early influence in the direction I've gone on dulcimer. John Molineux's musicianly approach to fingerstyle playing completely floored me when I first heard him. Johann Wolfgang Goethe said, "The world is so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers and cities; but to know someone here and there who thinks and feels with us, and who, though distant, is close to us in spirit, this makes the earth for us an inhabited garden." Inhabited, indeed, by the many friends we make at dulcimer events over the years and miles; may it continue to be so. E! Tom Baehr is the auth or a/New Tunes/O ld Friends alld A Pleasant Addiction, alld has recorded a solo casselle, An Inhabited Garden. All are available from Hogfiddle Press, P. 0 Box 2721, Wobum, MA 01888-1421.

':4n Inhabited Garden" uses three basic chord positions. They are:

,,, m,, .,, ,,

"

"

I I

"

"

and their variations. 0

,, , i: ,, , ", , "

,,

~I

, pi, I

i.

_r l

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, m,

"

x', m', ,

-L '

, m' x' ,I _r l

t = thumb, i = index, m = middle, r = ring, p a = open string, x = string not played

Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.

,,

;,

,,

;,

= pinky,


30 â&#x20AC;˘ Dulcimer Players News

An Inhabited Garden

Tom Baehr

harmonics

Copyright 1989 by Tom Baehr Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.


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DULCIMER TUNING PEGS 6-11 8.05 B.05 8.50 8.50 8.35 8.35 10.55 10.55 24.00

l Z&up 7.25 7.25 7.65 7.65 7.SO 750 9.SO 950 2160

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DULCIMER STRING ANCHDR PINS (Coppel plated) (use With ball end slrrngs)

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DULCIMER SIDE SETS Dimensroos 2")[ 32".1110' (2 pes) 601 Cherry .. 602 Walnul . 603 Hond, Mahogany .. 604 Birdseye Maple .. 60S Cur~ Maple ... 606 E. Indian Rosewood ..

365 3.90 3.80 5.55 5.55 liAS

FINGERBDARDS Dimensions 314' x 32')[ I 112" 6SO Cherry . 651 Walnut .. 652 Hond. Mahogany 653 . Cleat Maple ............................. 654 Bdseye Maple 655 Cu,~ Maple 656 E. Indian Rosewood

850 8.95 8.BO 7.55 10.55 10.55 21.75

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1000

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Bulk Packed (Combine SizeS lor Besl Discount) Plain Sizes 009 - .013 Wound Sizes .020· .026 Plain Size, Wo und Sizes 1·12Stllngs . .SOea 1.25 ea 13·48 S1frngs .. 35 ea t.15 ea. 49·144 Slrmgs .. .30 ea. 90 ea. 145·288 Strings .. ,25 ea. .71) ea, 289 & Up Strrn gs .. .18 ea. .50 ea. - SPECIFY BAllOR LOOP END-

Abalone DOIS (6 MMJ Mother 01 Pearl DOls (6 MM)

_so "

40 ea.

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DULCIMER TAIL BLDCKS Dimensions 2"."12".3' 850 Cherry ... 851 Wa lnul 852 Hond. Mahogany . 853 Clear Maple 854 BIrdseye Maple 855 Cur~ Maple ....... 856 E. IfMlian Rosewood ..

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1.90

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5th GEAR PRODUCTIONS NEWEST RELEASE

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The .i'1agic f'orest

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-.7.~ -,-,

Mountain Dulcimer Tales & Traditions by Ralph Lee Smith

---------:~-----------Two More Dulcimers-In-Boxes are Found! In my column in the July-September 1993 issue of DPN, I described and illustrated three specimens of a type of instrument that I called a "dulcimer-ina-box." DPN readers have sent me descriptions and pictures of two more!

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Dulcimer-in-a-box owned by Mary Kick, Mount Pleasant, s.c. and Rella King, Johns Island, S.C.

Dulcimer-in-a-box made by ÂŁ Beckwith, owned by Lee Vaccaro, Rochester, N. Y.

Instruments Known In 1993 These are the three that I described in my 1993 column: 1. Maker, owner, and cu rrent whereabouts all unknown. Illustrated in the Queries Column of Antiques, January 1932. Six strings, of which two pass over fifteen frets. The photo and text from Antiques are reproduced in L. Allen Smith's,A Catalogue of Pre-Revival Appalachian Dulcimers, University of Missouri Press 1983, page 32. 2. Maker: E. Beckwith. Owner, Don Koerber, Warren, Michigan. Two photos appear in my book, The Story of the Dulcimer, Crying Creek Publishers 1986, pp.45-46, and a third one appears in my 1993 column. Six strings, of which two pass over fifteen frets. 3 Maker unknown. Owner, Randolph Case, Atlanta, Georgia. Seven strings, of which two pass over fifteen frets. Three photos appear in my article. These instruments are all well made, and are decorated with beautiful stcnciling. When the hinged lid is open, one sees a raised portion shaped like a long right triangle with head and tuning pins at the truncated apex, set into the rectangular top surface of the box.

Back of Marys and Rella's dulcimer-in-a-box, showing the stenciled name "BENNETT"

"ÂŁ Beckwith, Maker; stenciled on the side of the

"triangte," above the lid latch, on Lees instrument.

Lee's instrument, likc Don Koerbcr's, was made by E. Beckwith. Here is her description: "Mine is labeled in gold, as you described Don Koerber's: ' E. Beckwith Maker' along the front panel of the right triangle, with lovely gold stenciling of red Howers in a pot, and lyres with wings inside the lid, and a wheat stalk down one soundhole, and a stylized daisy a nd leaves across the other." As with Don's instrument, six strings pass over fifteen frets. Comparison of the photo shown here and several more that Lee sent me, with the two photos of Don's instrument in my book, shows that the beautiful box, the shape of the sound holes, and the stenciling around the upper soundhole, are basically the same in both instruments. However, the stenciling aro und the lower soundhole and on the inside of the lid are notably different.

ASecond Beckwith Shortly after the appearance of my column, Lee Vaccaro of Rochester, New York wrote to me as follows: HI received my DPN las t mid-week, and I was tickled to see your article on the dulcimersin-a-box, or scheitholts. I've had one around for a year or so, that I bought at a Hea market."

News From North Carolina In February 1994, Mary Kick of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, called me in a state of great excitement, and on

March 6th she followed up her call with a leuer which read in part as follows: " Rella King and I play in a dulcimer group in the area, Also, we receive the

Dulcimer Players News and read every word you write, A week and a half ago, I loaned her my notebook with all the class handouts and my notes from my week at the Dulcimer Workshop at Appalachian State, "The next day, Rella's ne ighbor told her of a strange instrument at a local shop. Rella called me, and we met on Monday to sce the unusual instrument. As I told you, I think we both were a little disappointed to find the instrument quite so primitive, but we were thrilled at the same time. "

After Mary's and my phone conversation, she and Rella teamed together to buy the instrument, and Mary sent the photos that appear above, The soundholes closely resemble those of the Beckwith instruments. The top of the "triangle" is made of beautiful tiger maple, A notable difference of th is instrument from the other four that are known, is the simple decoration, which is confined to handsome, and in fact stylish, stripes that are painted on the top, The name " Bennett" is stenciled on the bottom of the box, and the initials "TLB" are scratched in script in the center of the bottom. There is no way to know whether this person was the maker or an owner.

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New from Neal Hellman! More Instruments? In a subsequent letter, Mary informed me that a neighbor had seen two such instruments within the past yea r. One was auctioned in Ashville, North Carolina. Mary, who has become an instant antique dulcimer buff, got onto the trail of this one and found that the auctioneer's records show where the auctioneer got it and who bought it. "You may hear of another dulcimer in a box," she writes. Musical Features Of the five known specimens, all except Randolph Case's instrument are fretted in such a fashion as to play the Ionian scale from the open fret. Such fretting is created by reversing the whole tone and half tone that ordinarily appea r at the sixth and seventh fre ts of traditional dulcimers. This feature is found occasionally on American scheitholts -see, for example, the scheitholts shown in Figures 14 and 16 of my book. This fretting makes it possible to stencil letters in the intervals between the frets, that indicate notes of the scale of C Major - C, which is the open string and therefore does not have a stenciled letter, followed by the stenciled letters D,E,F,G,A,B,C. This procedure was followed by" E. Beckwith"- see Figure 79A in my book. Randolph Case's instrument presents a charming anomaly. Lettering for the C Major scale, beginning with D, is stenciled along the fretboard as described above. However, the instrument is fretted in the same fas hion as a traditional dulcimer, so that the Ionian scale begins at the third fret. The seventh note of the scale from the open fret is therefore really B fiat, not B as is stenciled on the fretboard. One wonders what the owners of these instruments thought when they reached the seventh note of the scale! Let us continue to share information. I will report every scrap of evidence that turns up, in this column. This is high adventure on a forgotten fro ntier of American folk art. Illl

AUTUMN IN THE VALLEY A companion album to Oktober County: folk and classical treasures (both earl y and new) - an irresistable collecti on of Appalachian, Celtic and classical arrangements plus a new crop of Hellman originals, featuring lots of Neal's friends: Joe Weed, Barry Phillips, Robin Petrie, and many more ...

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Eurotunes by David r Moore

The Star Spangled Banner The words that accompany this issue's EuroTune require no commentary-they are familiar to all of us who claim citizenship in the United States of America. Francis Scott Key's moving poem to the flag flying at dawn over Baltimore Harbor's Fort McHenry stirs our patriotic sentiments; many of our public events begin with a singing of it. We tend to assume that the melody to which the poem was set is also American; it is not. Rather, it is the work of an Englishman, John Stafford Smith. In this issue we shall focus briefly on his life and work. John Stafford Smith was born in Gloucester around 1750 and died in London, in 1836. The son of an organist, he sang in English boy-choirs in Gloucester and London, and eventually became an organist himself. He is credited with a number of anthems, hymns and chants. Smith's most important contribution is his role as a pioneer musical antiquarian and musicologist. While most of his collection was lost in a mid-19th century auction, it was extensive and included-among other works-J. S. Bach's own copy of the Ulm Gesangbuch. Smith published one of the earliest scholarly music collections in 1799: A Collection of English

Songs ... Composed about the year 1500. Taken from MSS of the same age. 1 His studies of early music were summarized and published in 1812 in Musica Antiqua; this chronological collection of music contained a broad range of early English music as well as historical notes and comments on each piece. It was a work that was used by scholars for decades. 2 Smith was also known as a "glee" composer. A "glee" was an 18th-century English musical composition for" ... three or more voices (one voice to each part) set to words of any character, grave or gay .... ") Glees were often sung by the patrons of pubs and taverns as they entertained themselves in games and music. His glees won awards in 1773 and he published a number of collections of them.4 In 1777, he composed the drinking song, "To Anacreon in Heaven." It was published in 1799, in his fifth collection of glees. Francis Scott Key's patriotic poem evoked his feelings at seeing the American flag fly over Fort McHenry after a night of intense naval bombardment. Key's poem had three verses of which today only the first is well known. It was first published in a handbill and later was published in a Baltimore newspaper. The poem soon became a popular song, set to Smith's "To Anacreon in Heaven." However, it was not approved by an act of Congress as the national anthem of the United States until March, 1931. The original flag about which Key wrote survived and is displayed in the Smithsonian Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. I have arranged Smith's melody for a three-stringed Appalachian dulcimer with a sixth-and-a-half fret. To play the tune as written, tune your instrument to a D-A-dd (1-5-8) tuning. I have added some a"ccompaniment to the basic melody

and readers should feel free to add additional accompaniment. There is also a long tradition of writing and playing variations to this tune (culminating in Dudley Buck's variations for pipe organ and Jimi Hendrix's version for electric guitar). Finally I have included all three verses to Key's evocative poem. I hope you enjoy this fine EuroTune and its American lyrics. We'll meet again in November. 1 Nicholas Temperley, The New Grove Dictionary of Music, Volume 18, Stanley Sadie, ed., Macmillan Publishing, Ltd., London, 1980, p. 416.

2 ibid ) The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary,

Volume I, Oxford University Press, 1971, p. 1154. 4 Nicholas Temperley, op. cit.

The Star Spangled Banner o say can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming, Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming? And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there. o say does that star-spangled banner yet wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses? Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, In full glory reflected now shines on the stream; 'Tis the Star-Spangled Banner, 0 long may it wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

o thus be it ever, when free men shall stand Between their loved homes and the war's desolation! Blest with victory and peace, may the heaven-rescued land Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation! Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, And this be our motto, "In God is our trust." And the Star Spangled banner in triumph shall wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

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The Star Spangled Banner Tuning: Mixolydian of D (D-A-dd) Words: Francis Scott Key, 1814 Music: To Anacreon in Heaven, alt., John Stafford Smith 1777 Arrangement and Tablature: David r Moore, 1994 AI

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Arrangement and Tablature © Copyright 1994, David r Moore ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Please do not reprint or redistribute without permission. Contact dpn@dpnews.com.


'

"TOM BAEHR certainly has a vision of the potllntial 01 the (Irllned) dulcimer," -

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Mountain Dulcimer Instrumentals By

Steven K. Smith

with Jerry Rockwell, Chris Wagner, & Rochelle Volen-Smith

7le

Original compositons and Traditional Tunes Played with something "extra" All Instrumental, Baroque to the Blues A Brand New Day & Tunesmich.- two cassettes of Original & Traditional Mus ic performed on the Mountain Dulcimer. Dandelions and Tulips -- a CD Comp ilation of music selected from the tapes.

C rO, - Dolby B Digitally Mastered

Tapes $10.00 CDs $15.00 "Really Great ... Highly Recommended" ··Doug Dickson, host of the Toss the Feathers radio show To O rder, send $10.00 per rape and $ 15.00 per C D, plus $1.00 shipp ing & handling per order to:

Steven K. Smith 429 Park Ave. N ewark,OH 43055

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~ & ~"tia s",id

Ruth Barrett and Cyntie Smith, internationally known fretted dulcimer artists and vocalists, are happy to announce the release of their long-awaited fifth album. The Heart Is The Only Nation is a collection of original songs and instrumentals celebrating our connection to the natural world, the passion of life, and the healing of the human heart. For copies please send $15 for CD, $10 for cassette, plus $1.50 for postage/handling for each album. (Calif. residents must add B.25% sales tax to their order.) Check or money orders payable to Aeolus Music, P.O. Box 160B, Topanga, CA 90290. Write us for other releases too!

O hio residents please add 6%

sales tax.

rna. gie's rnasic a

WIZMAK PRODUCTIONS is pleased to announce the release of

Pushing the boundaries of celtic music into our own time W histlcSlops reS) Dulcimer:;

NEW ARTIST· NEW RELEASE

1\'"

rrto~""'I\I\ ...."1\\11101.1'11"."1'"

KAREN ASHBROOK

Kill en Ashbrooll

':::-:_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _...1

From the premier exponent of the lr1sh harrunered duldmer style &. author of "Playing the Harrunered Duldmer In the lr1sh Tradlt10n (OAK PUB) comes this sw eeping collect1on of tradlttonal tunes performed on hammered duldmer. lr1sh Rute &. whistle with lush dasslcal--style plano accompaniment. Indudes 8.1nk of Red Rases , Reaping the Rye. Connaughtnlans Rambles.hornplpes. airs &. The Osprey . a haun t1ng rune by Scottish musldan Dougle MacLean.

Tbe HUls of ERin fRff. CATALOG: MAGGIE'S MUSIC. PO BOX 4144-DKA. ANNAPOLIS. MD 21403. Mention this ad . send in your check (call to charge) and receive sale price for HDls of Erin - $B/tape, $12/CD PPD.

with KEVIN BURKE onjiddle, DAN COMPTON on guitar, ROBIN BANKS MC REVEY on accordion & IwrmDny uocals and GAYLE JEWEL- Iuzrmony vocals

CASSETTES $10.98 PPD • CD's $16.98 PPD VISA I MASTERCARD ACCEPTED CALL US TOLL FREE AT 1-800-538-5675 for a free catalog write PO BOX 477 • WINGDALE, NY 12594

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WIZMAK PRODUCTIONS

cloUd Cover by

ROB BRERETON "Someone To Watch Over Me" (W579·14)

RICHBALA "Hudson Valley Traditions" (W579-4) "Home For The Harvest" (W579-2 I)

Tabby Finch

GEORGE HAGGER1Y "Just Friends" (W579-7) "Just Frlends ... Again " (W579-13) 'The Best Of Just Friends" (W579- 7 / 13)

playing Hammered Dulcimer and Celtic Harp with d Za nas • Joe DeZarn. Fiddle and Mandolin mpo · Quena an Carlos A trlen, S h Austen Guitar Ralph Gordon, Cello and Bass· e,t I · h Bouzouki and PercuSS\on esse W If\C, . DC J . ther som< of (/oe WashmgtOn,

Tablry's debut

album bnngs rwge f

aditionol music from [reland,

area's ~ne.st mttSlCWT\S In ~~t 0 ~ Engiand, France , and So menca· SELECTIONS

produced by Seth Austen and Engineered by Bill McElroy a~ award.winning BIAS Recording

Srudio. Available on chrome cassette for

$10.00 plus $1.50 posmge. Order from: FINCH MUSIC PO Box336

THOMASINA "Let's Pretend" (W579- 15) LANCE FRODSHAM II< SYLVIA HACKATHORN "Whistle Stops & Dulcimers" (W579-25) JERRY ROCKWELL "The Blackbird & The Beggarman" (W579-24) COMING THIS FALL 11

THE PLAID FAMILY· "The Flying Book" produced by Pete Sutherland THOMASINA· "A Peaceful Storm" CASSETTES $10.98 PPD • CD's $16.98 PPD VISA / MASTERCARD ACCEPTED CALL US TOLL FREE AT 1-800-538-5675 for a free catalog PO BOX 477 • WINGDALE, NY 12594

Round Hill, Virginia 22141

Waltzing with the Mountain Dulcimer

Bear Meadow

by TuU Glazener

Appalachian Dulcimers

By

Wallztng with the Mountain Dulctmer Tablature book containing arrangements for 18 waltzes for mountain dulcimer in DAD tuning. Melody line is written in standard music notation with dulcimer tab below. Back-up chords with suggested fingerings also included. Includes "My Own Home," "Brahm's LuUaby," "Skater's Waltz." "Black Velvet Waltz," and 2 Bach Minuets Order #BOOI . . . . .$9.00

Waltzing wtth tbe Mountain Dulc1mer Tull Glazener & Jim Sperry 45 minute cassette featuring aU 18 tunes from the tab book. Featuring the mountain dulcimer along with guitar. autoharp. hammered dulcimer and bunon accordion. Digitally mastered. Order #Coo2 . .... $10.00 Du1ctfled - Tull Glazener & Jim Sperry 50 minute instrumental cassette featuring both mountain and hammered dulcimers along with guitar. aUlDharp and button accordion. Selections include "Sunny Side of the Street," "Paganini Melody," "Misty," and "Ashokan Farewell." Digitally mastered ...Order #COOl. .. .SIO.oo

Dwain Wilder

• Fine hand aaftsmanship, sweet voice, smooth action, superb projection • Premier instruments for Perlormezs, Artists, and ardent Students • Custom design and tonewood voicing to complement your voice, musical style, and repertoire. I play Dwain'. d..umnen in remrding. JWrlonning.. and fer the 5heer pltuurc oflt. -~ u.. HUf1f'IOfId

Fur II brochwtt, CIUlom

TnU Glazener

I go. It's llpidly ~

('116)442-0127 Also ANilable from Bolton ~r-I'-"""""'ClIoookllr>ol Muoic: E........ um

(LoIIdnP'll

-1." 1tild<M

dlsir. 2nd ordc'Dlg in~iurI, turiU Dr call

8carMeadow 3 Arlington Street Rochester, New York 14607

Add $1.50 shipping per order. Send check or money order to:

6936 W 71st Street Indianapolis. IN 46278-1609

Dw&in. I uk.e)"OW' dllltimtr ~ .. er

ina'- f..vtrite with ill who hur It.

North CaolirIa Sa.d,Mwi::5lIop ~

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A Quantum Leap for Dulcimer Players Two unique new instruments expand your musical horizons •

Never need tuning

No strings to break

Durable, rugged -

good travellers

Dulci-Chime™ The sparkling sliver Duld-Chlme sounds like heavenly chimes

Great for kids

Not affected by dlmate and weather

Add variety to live performances and recordings

Play immediately - layout of notes and keys same as traditional hammer dulcimer Write or Call Today for Free Brochure Dulclfuslon Sampler cassette now avaUable $5_00 (Deductible from first order) Please send check or money order to:

Dulci-Marimba™ The Duld-Marlmba has the warm wood resonance of a marimba

DUlCIFUSIONTM by Ron Konzak. Architect. Harpmaker and Dulci-Maniac t 2580 Vista Drive NE • Bainbridge Island. WA 98 t tOil (206) 842-49 t 6

Profile: Dorothy Robson pianist, music teacher, composer, arranger and music director for the White River Valley Players. Most recent show directed My Fair Lady. Favorite use of the dulcimer playing music for small groups of children. Owns a Steinway Grand piano. Bought in 1981. Reason: Wanted more sound and pla¥ing pleasure. Owns a Jeremy Seeger dulcimer. Bought in 1977. Reason: Wanted more sound and playing pleasure. For a free brochure and more information on high quality dulcimers with a lifetime warranty, write or call: Jeremy Seeger Dulcimers PO Box 117 Hancock, VT 05748 Tel: 802-767-3790

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42-. Dulcimer Players News

Beauty In Tears

Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738)

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Key of I) Scale DEF#O AB C# D In measure 16, the tune modulates to the Key of A. lbe V chord in the key of A is E, so that's how you get there. Dy the end of mcmmre 17. you're on the way back to the key of D. Since the key of D is so established by this time, you don't need to go through the V chord to get back. I altered the last note in measure 16 for those who don't have a chromatic dulcimer. If you have a high 0#, play it instend of the D.

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D


What's New edited by Carrie Crompton

Homecoming· Jerry Read Smith an d Lisa Maria Smith, Song of the Wood Music, 203 West State Street, Black Mountain, NC 29711 (CD, cassette). This is the third recording of Jerry's Strayaway Child Trilogy, featu ring himself o n hammered dulcimer and Lisa o n flute. Selections include "Childgrove," "Christ Child Lullaby," "Amazing Grace," "Be Thou My Vision," "St. Basil's Hymn." Dandelions And Tulips· Steven K. Smith, 429 Park Ave., Newark, OH 43055 (CD) Twenty-six mo unt ain dulcimer instrumentals: originals and traditionals such as "Tum Balalaika," U Childgrove," " Scarborough Fair. " Jerry Rockwell produced the reco rd ing and plays on a number of tracks. (I ncludes selections fro m Ttmesmith and A Brand New Day, Steven's cassett e rele ases.) The Heart Is The Only Nation. Ruth Barrett and Cyntia Smith, P.O. Box 1608, Topa nga, CA 90290 (CD and cassette). See review this issue. The King's Favorite. Ironweed, c/o J ody Marshall, 27 16 Occidental Dr., Vienna, VA 22180 (CD, cassette). See review this issue. The Electric Snowshoe. Rick Scott, Grand PooBah Music, 2736 West 13th Ave., Vancouve r, BC V6K 2T4 (cassette). See review this issue. My Favorite Things· Greg Latt a, The Latta Sound Works, 134 Frost Ave., Frostburg, MD 21532 (cassette). Solos o n regular and soprano hammered dulcimer. Selections include " M~neo Da Ulla" (Galician), a Finnish Polka, George Harrison's " Here Comes the Sun," and the "Hymne" by Vangel is. The Magic Forest. Tom and Carole Norul ak, 754 Franklin Ave., Pittsb urgh, PA 15221 (cassette). Toe-tapping dan ce music with a " polka band" flavor. Tom Norulak o n accordian, Cawle on ham-

mered dulcime r, Dennis Kepthorne on bass and guit ar and John Whitacre on fiddle and mandolin. Selections include "Ragtime Annie," "St. Anne's Ree l," "Blackberry Blossom," as well as "Aj Lujcka Lujcka" and "Katushka."

All eclectic collectioll of

~

..'" "". "" , ,"., , . I

Victoria II/ Civil War period music R witll a ulliqlle, fresll SOU lid. ~

Gala: Classics From A Romantic Era. Carole Koenig, 433 S. Fuller Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90036 (cassette). A collection of Victorian songs performed instrumentally with hamme red dulcimer, piano, violin and viola. Includes "Peg 0 ' My Heart," ''Aura Lee," "After the Bail," "The Sidewalks of New York." Hammered Dulcimer Solos, Volume 2 • Carrie Crompton, Barolk Folk Music, 11 Center St., Andover, cr 06232 (book with tape). Arrangements of Medieval, Renaissa nce, Baroque and traditional tunes for ham mered dulcimer with emphas is o n self-accompan ime nt and va ri at io ns. Incl ud es Bach " Prelude No. 1," Beethoven "Sonat ina," Handel "Gavotte,"" Douce Dame Jo iie," a nd 10 Christmas carols. For inte rm ediate to advanced players. Remembered Ways· Trapezoid, Azure Records, PO Box 38, WaShingto n, VA 22747 (CD, cassette). This recording is a collection of so ngs and instrum entals composed by Paul Reisler, reflecting th e beauty of the land and th e strength of the people who live close to nature. Paul plays acoustic, electric and slide guitars as well as hammered dulcimer. Martha Sandefer sings and plays rhythm guitar. Guests include Cecil Hooker, Bob Read, Howard Levy, Y saye Barnwell, an d Lorrai ne Duisit. fl'!l

A COPYIST SERVICE FOR DULCIMER PLAYERS

"T~~""""'I->­

~~...otu:t.. ~ f"ff'''

$12.00 ppc!. Ros(ll1lOlId Campbell 1037 Central Avc. Wilmette, IL 60091

~~~, ==~=::.::.:....:.....:===-~

Over 25 years of hammer dulcimer design innovation. Instruments of versatility, beauty, and expanded tone and range. Also, the recordings of Sam Rizzetta, on compact disc and cassette! Write for free price list.

Rizzetta Music Dept. D

COMPUTER LYRICS AND TUNES 8885 Trinity Avenue 8aton Rouge, Louisiana 70806·7935 TEL (504) 926·8581 .... FAX (504) 756-4632

p.o. Box 510 Inwood, WV 25428

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Classifieds Dulc1-duster! The best clean-up for your dulcimer! These feathers get right under strings. $8.50 ppd. Fishbite Recordings, Box 280632, San Francisco, CA 94128-0632. Classified ads are 40e per word, payable in advance. There is a 20% discount for pre-paid (4 issues) classified ads running unchanged in 4 or more consecutive issues.

Hanunered Dulcimer For Sale: Dusty Strings D-300 with black legs. One year old. navels easily, sounds beautiful, and stays in tune. Includes: case, tuning wrench, hammers. $1,300. 703/869-2589.

Finely Designed Hand-Crafted Folk Toys. Limber Jack, Dog, Pony, Bear, Frog, Rooster, Lamb, Unicorn and Dinosaur. $12.95 each includes shipping. Jean's Dulcimer Shop, P.O. Box 8, Cosby, TN 37722.

Great Place for WIlrkshops! WeekIy group specials May 14December 15. Also willing to barter hammer dulcimer lessons for guest house space-anytime. New Dawn Caribbean Retreat, Box 1512, Vieques, Puerto Rico 00765 or 809n41-0495. Ask for Gail.

Note-Ably Yours: Mail order for books, records, cassettes, videos, musical gifts, jewelry, stationery, folk instruments. Vast Celtic and folk harp music inventory. Call for free catalog. 513/845-8232. Note-Ably Yours, 6865 Scarff Road, New Carlisle, OH 45344.

For Sale: Cloud Nine ChromatIc Hanunered Dulcimer by M. Allen. Model 17/16/8, 1991. Like new. Cherry case, black top, rosettes, Paduak bridges, accessories. $945 less 10% discount or best offer, plus shipping. Call Elizabeth Fox at 518/989-6417. Subscribe Now to our monthly used and vintage instrument list with hundreds of quality instruments at down-to-earth prices. $5.00/year ($10.00 overseas). Current issue free on request. Elderly Instruments, 1100 N. Washington, POB 1421O-DJ27, Lansing, MI 48901. 51713727890.

Wlldwuod Music has discount prices on dulcimers, hundreds of hand-crafted guitars and other beautiful stringed instruments! Historic Roscoe Village, Coshocton, Ohio 43812. 614/622-4224.

SlIt1J Out! The Folk SoIt1J Magazine: Sharing Songs Since 1950. Sing Out! provides a diverse and entertaining selection of traditional and contemporary folk music. Quarterly issues contain 20 songs, over 100 pages, feature articles, interviews, record and book reviews, instrumental "teach-ins," Plus columns by Pete Seeger and Ian Robb. $18 (1 yr.) $32.50 (2 yrs.) $45 (3 yrs.) Sustaining Membership: $30, $50 or $100/yr. Sing Oul! Box 5253-0, Bethlehem, PA 18015.

Clmbaloms: Chromatic hammered dulcimer with damper pedal. Alex Udvary, 2115 W. Warner, Chicago, Illinois 60618.

For Sale: Soprano Hammered Dulclmer. Rizzetta, Feb. 1982.21/2 octaves chromatic. Extremely sweet bell-like tone. Mostly Phillipine mahogany. Case included. $450 or best offer. Call Cam at 515/472-8623.

Dulcimers, Autoharps, Harmonicas, Concertinas, Bagpipe Chanters, Bodhrans, Bones, Tinwhisties, more. Free discount catalog. Elderly Instruments, 1100 N. Washington, POB 1421O-DJ27, Lansing, MI 48901. 517/3727890.

For Sale: Bass Dulcimer, Blue Lion. Cherry/spruce. $350. 716/896-6462, evenings, weekends.

Texas' Oldest Bulclmer Shoppe: Since 1951. Fine 4-string dulcimers, beautiful tone. What can you afford to pay? Send 75(/,. Write to Trinity Cross Dulcimers, 1010 South 14th St., Slaton, Texas 79364.

Tbe Bowed Psaltery Instruction And Song Book, by Jean Schilling. Beginners' playing instructions, care of the psaltery and bow, tuning, string replacement, and seventy-six songs, with chords-American, English,Scottish, and Irish favorites, hymns, carols, and O'Carolan tunes. $11.95 postpaid from Crying Creek Publishers, P.O. Box 8, Cosby, TN 37722.

Autoharp Qum1er1y: the only magazine bringing you everything about the autoharp world. 44 pages of articles, lessons, events,

music, and more. Subscribers enjoy 10% discount on merchandise offered in the AQ Market Place. Four issues/firstclass mail, $18 in U.S.; Canada $20(US}. Send check to Autoharp Quarterly, PO Box A, Newport, PA 17074.

BeautHuI vacation apartment for rent in Blue Ridge Mountains. Owners are dulcimer builder/players. Bring instrument and jam! Mrs. Mac's Hideaway, PO Box 286, Morganton, GA 30560. 7061374-2519.

Instructional Books, Videos, Cas-

sattes, and much more. Free discount catalogs. Elderly Instruments, 1100 N. Washington, POB 1421O-DJ27, Lansing, MI 48901. 517/372-7890.

Instnunent Builders: Our respected quarterly journal American Lutherie is entirely devoted to building and repairing dulcimers, guitars, mandolins, lutes, violins, and other string instruments. We also have instrument klans including a hammer du cimer. Write for complete info, or send $36 for membership. GAL, 8222 S. Park, Tacoma, WA 98408.

For Sale: Blue Lion custom Braz. rosewood dulcimer with gold keys, Baggs pickup, koa binding, and rose inlay. Like new. $950. Ron Ewing 6-string, cherry with spruce top. $450. Will Sears 16string Hungarian citera. Birdseye and curly maple with rosewood and spruce top. $450. Two Oscar Schmidtt 15-chord Centurion Autoharps (U.S.A) with h.s. cases. $300 each. Call 712/246-5734 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., CST.

Electronic Tuners: Zenon Chromatina, hears seven octaves, shows note, how sharp or flat (meter needle), very sensitive. $65 (list $95). Korg ATI, $55 (list $75). Shipping $4. Catalog (2 stamps): Dulcimers, harps, psalteries, bagpipers, bodhrans, kits, concertinas. Song of the Sea, 47 West Street, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609. 2071288-5653. Autoh... Players: Need information on workshops, recordings, publications, or have an autoharp-related question? Call the '~utoharpoholic~ Hotline": 8001782-4277 (M-F, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Pacific Time).

Pre-Loved Fiddles, Mandolins, Banjos, GuHars. Mostly pre-1940, some 1900. Carefully restored for good playing. Inexpensive.

Also buying. Maiden Creek Dulcimers, Box 666, Wooster, OH 44691. 2161345-7825.

Dulcimer-Friendly Worship, Vol. I. The season of Advent The Coming of the Lord, by Steve Eulberg. 24 settings of 16 Advent hymns arranged for fretted dulcimer-solos, duets, trios, playing with others. Ecumenical & multi-cultural. Ancient & contemporary. Thorough research on sources of hymns and tunes. Preface by Esther Kreek. Each arrangement includes: Melody lines, full lyrics, chords & readable tablature by FinaleÂŽ. For players with basic playing experience.47 + xi pp. OMM BK9301. $9.95 + $1.50 S&H. Owl Mountain Music, PO Box 4485DPN, Kansas City, MO 641270485.816/231-1995.

Folk Harps â&#x20AC;˘ New and Used. All sizes. Mountain Dulcimers. Info: 1-800/398-4277.

Dulcimer Clubs: Want new material to play? All 5 Norma Davis'

Dulcimer Delights have 2 or more parts. Mixolydian. Book 1, $10.00; Books 2-5, $7.00 each. All five bound together, $30.00. $1.50 postage. Club discount. Norma Davis, 205 Engel Rd., Loudon, TN 37774.615/4585493.

lWo New Courses: Easy course to learn About Building Chords for any musician. Teaches what notes are in any chord. $21.50 postpaid. The Dulcimer NOle Book teaches playing by music and transposing on Mountain Dulcimer. $11.50 postpaid. Norma Davis, 205 Engel Rd., Loudon, TN 37774.

oCome Sing (Songs for the Seasons of Ufe~ Cassette album by Clare Wettemann featuring psaltery (Robert Beers type). Includes Dumbarton's Drums, Copper Kettle, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and ten other contemporary and traditional songs. Three are original. RR 1, Box 83, Jordanville, NY 13361-9611. $10.95 includes postage.

Compact Discs, Cassettes, LPs, Videos! New free discount catalog. Elderly Instruments, 1100 N. Washington, POB 14210D127, Lansing, MI 48901. 517/372-7890.

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1'iomJXin A{(~ Xusic f OWL t MOONTAIN t MUSIC t

Dulcimer-Friendl y Worship, Vol. I

Presents:

Tiompdn : the I r ish hamm ered & plucked dul ci mer. by David James , A /I·lreland Cbampion . 60 minutes of Irish reels . jigs . unique a irs ; with

the season of ADVENT The Coming of Ihe Lord Hymntunes Arranged for Fretted Dulcimer

fiddle s, keyboHd , bouzouki, bo dhdn. One wild Bulgarian tune with clarinet. kaval & drum. Cassett~ ($11 ppd) and Compact Disc ($16 ppd).

by Steven B. Eulberg Foreword by Esther Kreek ISBN 0-9639663-0·8 47pp + xi $9.95 + $1.50 S & H (MO l'esidefllS alk/64(. sales uu) Order from:

Owl Mountain Music PO Box 4485·DPNA Kansas City, MO 64127·0485 For information call

"Workshops a Specialty" Hammered Dulcimer, Tin Whisde, Bodhran, Irish -Session. - etc.

(816)231·1995

IDealer Inquiries lnvfled I

Join David James, Kim Hoffmann and Rick Willey,

" The lise of 'he dulcimer in lVorship services takes liS back to a simpler, unhurried time. The sweet song of the dulcimer tells us to relax, take a deep breath and listen for ,hat still, small voice. " -Esther Kreek

"The NeIR Potatoesat Winfield, Kansas Walnut Valley Festival, Sept, 15-18. See you therel

nompa" Alley Music 916 Emerson Avenue, South Bend, IN, 46615 Telephone (219) 288·4326

SOUNDINGS Hooray!! ! A REPERTOIRE BOOK

for the Fretted Dulcimer Revised, Second Edition

Over 80 Arrangements by Anno Barry 15 New Arrangements Most with Melody and Harmony Parts Am erican Populo! Old English. and Early Americ an Tunes; Christmas and Easter Carols; Traditiona l Tunes in Non· Traditional Tunlngs; Songs for Singing: Marches for Mountain Dulcimer; Ensembles for DulCimers. Record ers. Flute. Guitar Chords. ' The Sound

~

the Gold In the Ore." Robert Frost

Order From: SOUNDINGS PO Box 1974 ' Boone NC 28607 Singles Copies: $18.75 Postpaid In the U.S. NC reside nls please odd 6% Soles Tox

~.

Finally , , .. Larkin's Dulcimer Book has come home to Larkin! Riverlark Music (Larkin's Company) now publishes Larkin's Dulcimer Book So!: Companion Cassette a friendly . Lap Dulcimer instruction book and teaching tape for new players through intermediate level players Book and Tape Set $17.95 Book 9.95 Shipping 2.00

O

Order From: Larkin Kelley Bryant

Riverlark Music P.O. Box 40081 Memphis,1N 38174 1-800-366-5275 Dealer Inquiries Welcome

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o


Butk Rate U.S. Postage PAID Winchester, VA Permit No. 107

Mail to: Subscription copies mailed on or before July 10.

Subscribers: If your mailing label is dated 8/1/1994, that means your subscription ends with this issue. Time to renew! To keep your DPNs coming without interruption, send us your renewal before October 1,1994. Labels dated 11/1/1994 mean you have one issue after this one. Renewing early is just line!

PO. Box 2164 • Winchester, VA 22604 Address Correction Requested Return Postage Guaranteed

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Precise Construction

Playable Mountain Dulcimer Pleasing Design

%CSpaaaen %usica[ Instruments po. Box 1230 {Dept. DPNI Mounta in View, AR 72560

Highway 9 North {SO i l 269·4313

Senti $1.50 fo r our fu[[ color cataIog.

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1994-03, Dulcimer Players News Vol. 20 No. 3