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DUKE U N I V E R S I T Y

P R E S S

BOOKS & JOURNALS F A L L

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W I N T E R

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contents GENERAL INTEREST Aunties, Sablin 1 Haydée Santamaría, Cuban Revolutionary, Randall 2 Light in the Dark / Luz en lo Oscuro, Anzaldúa 3 Earth Beings, de la Cadena 4 Ontopower, Massumi 5 Strip Cultures, The Project on Vegas 6 How Would You Like to Pay?, Maurer 7 Mounting Frustration, Cahan 8 Edgar Heap of Birds, Anthes 9 Zhang Hongtu, Lee & Silbergeld 10 Performance, Taylor 10 Microgroove, Corbett 11 Muslim Fashion, Lewis 12 Asians Wear Clothes on the Internet, Pham 12 The Rio de Janeiro Reader, Williams, Chazkel & Knauss 13 The Feminism of Uncertainty, Snitow 14 Saved for a Purpose, Joseph 15 Normal Life, Spade 16 Exile and Pride, Clare 16 Conquest, Smith 17 Incognegro, Wilderson III 17 Reel World, Pandian 18 addicted.pregnant.poor, Knight 18 After War, Wool 19 Cosmopolitan Conceptions, Inhorn 19

Cachita’s Streets, Schmidt 29 Gesture and Power, Covington-Ward 29 C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S Islam and Secularity, Göle 30 Indian Given, Saldaña-Portillo 30 Balibar on Althusser and Ideology’s Dramaturgy, Weed & Rooney 31 1970s Feminism, Disch 31 Virtual Memory, King 32 The Transparent Traveler, Hall 32 AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES Dark Matters, Browne 33 The Repeating Body, Brown 33 Territories of the Soul, Ellis 34 Shapeshifters, Cox 34 Race Becomes Tomorrow, Sider 35 I N D I G E N O U S / N AT I V E A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S Dilemmas of Difference, Radcliffe 35 G AY & L E S B I A N S T U D I E S / S E X U A L I T Y Sexing Empire, Cowan, Guidotti-Hernández & Ruiz 36 Metroimperial Intimacies, Mendoza 36 ASIAN STUDIES Queer Marxism in Two Chinas, Liu 37 Youth, Labor and Politics in East Asia, Lukács 37

ANTHROPOLOGY Who Counts?, Nelson 20 The Need to Help, Malkki 20 A Nervous State, Hunt 21 Emergent Ecologies, Kirksey 21 Alchemy in the Rain Forest, Jacka 22 Making Freedom, Makhulu 22

SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES Speaking of the Self, Malhotra & Lambert-Hurley 38 Pipe Politics, Contested Waters, Björkman 38 The Spectral Wound, Mookherjee 39 POLITICAL THEORY Janus’s Gaze, Galli 39 Henri Bergson, Jankélévitch 40

MUSIC / SOUND STUDIES Sensing Sound, Eidsheim 23 Sound, Chion 23 Remixing Reggaetón, Rivera-Rideau 24 Negro Soy Yo, Perry 24 Audible Empire, Radano & Olaniyan 25 Real Men Don’t Sing, McCracken 25

CARIBBEAN STUDIES Troubling Freedom, Lightfoot 40 HISTORY Food and France, Peters & Gordon 41

FILM STUDIES

LITERARY CRITICISM

Birth of an Industry, Sammond 26

Modernist Ethics and Posthumanism, Ryan & West 41

SCIENCE STUDIES

HISTORY OF ECONOMICS

Rendering Life Molecular, Myers 26

Market Failure in Context, Marciano & Medema 42

GENDER STUDIES

M AT H E M AT I C S / N E W J O U R N A L S

Gut Feminism, Wilson 27 Economies of Violence, Suchland 27

Annals of Functional Analysis, Moslehian 42

Banach Journal of Mathematical Analysis, Moslehian 42

journals

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

43

selected backlist & bestsellers

Poetics of the Flesh, Rivera 28 Religious Affects, Schaefer 28

46

sales information & index Inside Back Cover

You

Tube

www.dukeupress.edu COVER: The last strawberries, Alekhovshchina, Leningrad Oblast, Russia, 2009. Photograph by Nadia Sablin. From Aunties: The Seven Summers of Alevtina and Ludmila, page one.


general interest

Aunties

WINNER

The Seven Summers of Alevtina and Ludmila

The Center for Documentary Studies/ Honickman First Book Prize in Photography

photographs by nadia sablin With a foreword by Sandra S. Phillips

Nadia Sablin, a freelance photographer based in Brooklyn, New York, earned a B.F.A. from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2002 and an M.F.A. from Arizona State University in 2011. Her work has been featured in such publications as the New York Times, the Guardian, the Moscow Times, Photo by Nadia Sablin. Slate, American Photo, the Calvert Journal, and WPO ’s The Magazine. Sablin, who has received the Firecracker Photographic Grant, a New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship, and a Puffin Foundation Grant, was named one of the Magenta Foundation’s Emerging Photographers in 2011 and was Sean O’Hagan’s Juror’s Pick for the Daylight Photo Awards in 2013. Sablin’s photographs of her Russian aunts were chosen from 200 entries to win the seventh biennial CDS /Honickman First Book Prize in Photography. Sandra S. Phillips is the senior curator of photography at In northwest Russia, in a small village called Alekhovshchina, Nadia Sablin’s aunts spend the warmer months together in the family home and live as the family has always lived—chopping wood to heat the house, bringing water from the well, planting potatoes, and making their own clothes. Sablin’s remarkably lyrical and evocative photographs, taken over seven summers, capture the small details and daily rituals of her aunts’ surprisingly colorful and dreamlike days, taking us not only to another country but to another time. Alevtina and Ludmila, now in their seventies, seem both old and young, as if time itself was as seamless and cyclical as their routines—working on puzzles, sewing curtains, tatting lace, picking berries, repairing fences—and as full of the same subtle mysteries. Sablin collaborated with her aunts to re-create scenes she remem-

the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Among the most recent exhibitions that she has curated for SFMOMA are South Africa in Apartheid and After: David Goldblatt, Ernest Cole, Billy Monk; Rineke Dijkstra: A Retrospective; and Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera Since 1870. Over her career, she has curated major exhibitions, including Crossing the Frontier: Photographs of the Developing West; William Klein New York 1954–1955; Police Pictures: The Photograph as Evidence; Diane Arbus: Revelations; Larry Sultan: The Valley; and Robert Adams: Turning Back. Phillips has authored or coauthored numerous catalogs, and her articles and essays have appeared in such journals as Art in America, DoubleTake, and History of Photography.

bered from her childhood and to make new images of the patterns of their days. In these photographs, Sablin combines observation and invention, biography and autobiography, to tell the stories of her aunts’ life together, and in the pro-

The Center for Documentary Studies/

cess, quilts together a thoughtful meditation on memory, aging, and belonging.

Honickman First Book Prize in Photography is open to North American photographers who use

A CDS BOOK

their cameras for creative exploration, whether it

Published by Duke University Press and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University

or social world; of beauty at large or the lack of it;

see centerfold insert

be of places, people, or communities; of the natural of objective or subjective realities. For more information about this important book series, Nadia Sablin’s Aunties, and the previous prizewinning books, visit firstbookprizephoto.com.

PHOTOGRAPHY

November 88 pages, 11” x 8.25” trim size, 54 color photographs cloth, 978–0–8223–6047–6, $45.00tr/£31.00

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general interest

Haydée Santamaría, Cuban Revolutionary She Led by Transgression margaret randall Margaret Randall is the author of dozens of books of poetry and prose, including Che on My Mind, and the translator of When Rains Became Floods: A Child Soldier’s Story, both also published by Duke University Press.

Taking part in the Cuban Revolution’s first

HAYDÉE SANTAMARÍA  CUBAN REVOLUTIONARY SHE LED BY TRANSGRESSION

armed action in 1953, enduring the torture and killings of her brother and fiancé, assuming a leadership role in the underground movement, and smuggling weapons into Cuba, Haydée Santamaría was the only woman to participate in every phase of the revolution. Virtually unknown outside of Cuba, Santamaría was a trusted member of

Courtesy Albuquerque The Magazine.

Fidel Castro’s inner circle and friend of Che

“Haydée Santamaría, Cuban Revolutionary is essential

Guevara. Following the revolution’s victory

reading for all involved in the struggles for social justice,

Santamaría founded and ran the cultural

and for those devoted to literature, the arts, and imagination as a core ingredient in realizing another world. In Margaret Randall’s literary hands, Haydée is a study of an ordinary, yet remarkable woman redefining herself through commitment to revolutionary change and to the people she loved. It is also a magnificent and sorrowful

Margaret Randall

and arts institution Casa de las Americas, which attracted cutting-edge artists, exposed

Cubans to some of the world’s greatest creative minds, and protected queer, black, and feminist artists from state repression. Santamaría’s suicide in 1980 caused confusion and discomfort throughout Cuba; despite her commitment

meditation on revolution, loss, gender, and art. A major

to the revolution, communist orthodoxy’s disapproval of suicide prevented

and outstanding book.”—BERNARDINE DOHRN , activist,

the Cuban leadership from mourning and celebrating her in the Plaza of the

academic, and clinical law professor, retired

Revolution. In this impressionistic portrait of her friend Haydée Santamaría, Margaret Randall shows how one woman can help change the course of history.

“In her personal and passionate book, Margaret Randall dares to speak out about the pained silence surrounding Haydée Santamaría, perhaps the most important female figure of the Cuban Revolution. Drawing on archives, interviews, memories, and imagination,

also by Margaret Randall

Randall brings this complex woman to life, both to honor her quiet idealism and to mourn her death by suicide, which made it impossible for her to be seen as a proper national hero. This book opens the door to much-needed scholarship about the trauma suffered by women who sought to bring about social transformations on the island.”—RUTH BEHAR, author of Traveling Heavy: A Memoir in between Journeys

Che on My Mind paper, $19.95tr/£13.99 978–0–8223–5592–2 / 2013

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CUBA/BIOGRAPHY

August 248 pages, 62 illustrations paper, 978–0–8223–5962–3, $23.95tr/£16.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5942–5, $84.95/£59.00


general interest

Light in the Dark / Luz en lo Oscuro Rewriting Identity, Spirituality, Reality gloria e . anzaldúa Edited by AnaLouise Keating

Written during the last decade of her life, Light in the Dark represents the culmination of Gloria E. Anzaldúa’s mature thought and the most comprehensive presentation of her philosophy. Throughout Anzaldúa L IGH T I N T H E DA R K LUZ E N LO OSC U RO r e w r i t i ng i den t i t y, sp i r i t ua l i t y, r e a l i t y

GLOR I A E . A NZ A L DÚA e di t e d b y

a na l ou ise k e at i ng

weaves personal narratives into deeply engaged theoretical readings to comment on numerous contemporary issues—including the September 11 attacks, neocolonial practices in the art world, and coalitional politics. She valorizes subaltern forms and methods of knowing, being, and creating that have been marginalized by Western thought, and theorizes her writing process

as a fully embodied artistic and political practice. Resituating Anzaldúa’s work within Continental philosophy and new materialism, Light in the Dark takes Anzaldúan scholarship in new directions. “Gloria E. Anzaldúa is one of the most generative and generous thinkers and story tellers in our times. In these rich auto-ethnographies she continues to search for what she calls the ‘positive shadows’ of personal and collective experience, spirit, and world. Anzaldúa has the courage to write inside recesses and crevices to encounter what one does not necessarily want to know, but needs nonetheless to inhabit, tuned to change and possibility. In her unique speaking in entwined tongues, in Spanish and English, she

Gloria E. Anzaldúa (1942– 2004) was a visionary writer whose work was recognized with many honors, including the Before Columbus Foundation American Book Award, a Lambda literary award, the National Endowment for the Arts Fiction Award, and Photo by Margaret Randall. the Bode-Pearson Prize for Outstanding Contributions to American Studies. Her book Borderlands / La frontera was selected as one of the 100 Best Books of the Century by the Hungry Mind Review and the Utne Reader. AnaLouise Keating, Professor of Women’s Studies at Texas Woman’s University, is the author of Women Reading, Women Writing: Self-Invention in Paula Gunn Allen, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Audre Lorde; Teaching Transformation; and Transformation Now! Toward a Post-Oppositional Politics of Change. She is the editor of Anzaldúa’s Interviews/ Entrevistas; The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader; and EntreMundos/ AmongWorlds: New Perspectives on Gloria Anzaldúa; and coeditor, with Anzaldúa, of this bridge we call home: radical visions for transformation. LATIN AMERIC A OTHERWISE A Series Edited by Walter D. Mignolo, Irene Silverblatt, and Sonia Saldívar-Hull

is a multimodal guide in our hard times to ‘active imagining’ for worlds that may yet be. It is such a pleasure to see this book at last; it makes her legacy vivid when it is most needed.”—DONNA HARAWAY, author of When Species Meet “Ready to move beyond identity politics? Beyond contemporary theories of globalization,

also by Gloria E. Anzaldúa

de-coloniality, feminism, Marxism? Then take this U.S. Third Space/Fourth World Feminist Liberationist ride on Anzaldúan rivers of thought. They carry away outmoded debris. Tributary streams nourish decolonial visions. Shimmering re-cognitions arrive. Perceptual light shifts, wreaking havoc, unleashing floods of liberation philosophy. Dizzy? Take the book’s medicine. It transforms refugees into citizen-chamanas, political co-creators of how we will be known. Anzaldúa wonders: Do you have the yearning, the energizing power of life, the courage to join us?”—CHELA SANDOVAL , author of Methodology of the Oppressed

The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader paper, $24.95tr/£16.99 978–0–8223–4564–0 / 2009

W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E S/C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S/C H I C A N A S T U D I E S

October 240 pages, 10 illustrations paper, 978–0–8223–6009–4, $23.95tr/£16.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5977–7, $84.95/£59.00

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general interest

Earth Beings Ecologies of Practice across Andean Worlds marisol de la cadena Marisol de la Cadena is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Davis, and the author of Indigenous Mestizos: The Politics of Race and Culture in Cuzco, Peru, 1919–1991, also published by Duke University Press.

Earth Beings is the fruit of Marisol de la Cadena’s decade-long conversations with Mariano and Nazario Turpo, father and son, runakuna or Quechua people. Concerned

MARISOL DE L A CADENA

with the mutual entanglements of indigenous and nonindigenous worlds, and the

E A RTH BEINGS

partial connections between them, de la

EC O LOG I E S O F PR AC T IC E AC RO S S A N D E A N WO R L D S

Cadena presents how the Turpos’ indigenous ways of knowing and being include and exceed modern and nonmodern practices. Her discussion of indigenous political strategies—a realm that need not abide by binary logics—reconfigures how to think about and question modern politics,

while pushing her readers to think beyond “hybridity,” and toward translation, communication that accepts incommensurability, and mutual difference as conditions for ethnography to work. THE LEWIS HENRY MORGAN LECTURES A Series Edited by Robert Foster

“In response to its own subject, this is an extraordinary intervention in ethnography. Marisol de la Cadena writes not across genres, different perspectives on one entity, but in a way that allows different entities to emerge—and they’re not ‘genres’ at all. Diverse narratives, conversations, recollections can be read simultaneously as scholarly tools and as making present realities they can hardly contain. A highly courageous and in personal terms deeply moving book.”—MARILYN STRATHERN , Cambridge University

also by Marisol de la Cadena

“Earth Beings is one of those books that emerge into the scholarly domain once in a decade that crystallizes that decade’s debates and rearticulates them in ways that open paths into new worlds.”—ARTURO ESCOBAR, author of Territories of Difference: Place, Movements, Life, Redes

Indigenous Mestizos: The Politics of Race and Culture in Cuzco, Peru, 1919–1991 paper, $27.95/£18.99 978–0–8223–2420–1 / 2000

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A N T H R O P O L O GY/ I N D I G E N O U S S T U D I E S/ E C O L O GY

October 352 pages, 51 illustrations paper, 978–0–8223–5963–0, $26.95/£18.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5944–9, $94.95/£66.00


general interest

Ontopower War, Powers, and the State of Perception brian massumi

Ontopower War, Powers, and the State of Perception

Color coded terror alerts; invasion; drone

Brian Massumi is Professor of Communication at the

war; rampant surveillance: all manifesta-

University of Montreal. He is the author of The Power at the End of the Economy, What Animals Teach Us about Politics, and Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation, all also published by Duke University Press.

tions of the type of new power Brian Massumi theorizes in Ontopower. Through an in-depth examination of the War on Terror and the culture of crisis, Massumi identifies the emergence of preemption,

“Ontopower is a powerfully written, tightly argued, and

which he characterizes as the operative

persuasive accounting of the operative logic of preemp-

logic of our time. Security threats, regard-

tion. Brian Massumi demonstrates how the military now

less of the existence of credible intelligence, are now felt into reality. Whereas nations

Brian Massumi

once waited for a clear and present danger

drives war into the very nature of human perception. Captivating and quintessential Massumi.”—ELIZABETH

POVINELLI , author of Economies of Abandonment: Social Belonging and Endurance in Late Liberalism

to emerge before using force, a threat’s felt reality now demands launching

a preemptive strike. Power refocuses on what may emerge, as that potential presents itself to feeling. This affective logic of potential washes back from the war front to become the dominant mode of power on the home front as well. This is ontopower—the mode of power embodying the logic of preemption across the full spectrum of force, from the hardest (military intervention) to the “soft” (surveillance). With Ontopower, Massumi provides an original theory of power that explains not only current practices of war but the culture of insecurity permeating our contemporary neoliberal condition.

also by Brian Massumi

The Power at the End of the Economy

What Animals Teach Us about Politics

paper, $21.95/£14.99

paper, $21.95/£14.99

Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation

978–0–8223–5838–1 / 2015

978–0–8223–5800–8 / 2014

paper, $24.95/£16.99 978–0–8223–2897–1 / 2002

P O L I T I C A L T H E O R Y/ P H I L O S O P H Y

September 304 pages

paper, 978–0–8223–5995–1, $24.95/£16.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5952–4, $89.95/£62.00

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general interest

Strip Cultures Finding America in Las Vegas the project on vegas The members of The Project on Vegas are Stacy M. Jameson, Instructor of Film Media at the University of Rhode Island; Karen Klugman, photographer and Chair of the Art Department at the Hopkins School in New Haven, Connecticut; Jane Kuenz , Associate Professor of English at the University of Southern Maine; and Susan Willis, Associate Professor of Literature at Duke University.

On the Las Vegas Strip, blockbuster casinos “Rabelais does Las Vegas” — Mike Davis

burst out of the desert, billboards promise “hot babes,” actual hot babes proffer complimentary drinks, and a million happy

STRIP CULTURES Finding America in Las Vegas

slot machines ring day and night. It’s loud and excessive, but, as The Project on Vegas demonstrate, the Strip is not a world apart. Combining written critique and more than 100 photographs by Karen Klugman, Strip Cultures examines the politics of food and water, art and spectacle, entertainment and branding, body and sensory experience.

by The Project on Vegas

In confronting the ordinary on America’s most famous four-mile stretch of pavement,

the authors reveal how the Strip concentrates and magnifies the basic truths and practices of American culture where consumerism is the stuff of life, digital surveillance annuls the right to privacy, and nature—all but destroyed— is refashioned as an element of decor. “Bringing fresh perspectives to our understanding of the Las Vegas Strip, the authors offer a compelling set of observations that speak not only to the over-the-top world of the Strip, but to larger trends in American culture. They allow readers to catch a brief glimpse of another Vegas, the one occupied by those who keep the city’s economic wheels of gaming and tourism turning.”—LYNN COMELLA , University of Nevada, Las Vegas “Rabelais does Las Vegas.”—MIKE DAVIS , author of City of Quartz: Excavating the

also of interest

Future in Los Angeles

Inside the Mouse: Work and Play at Disney World The Project on Disney paper, $23.95 978–0–8223–1624–4 / 1995 Rights: World, except United Kingdom and Europe

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C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S/A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

October 384 pages, 101 photographs paper, 978–0–8223–5967–8, $27.95tr/£18.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5948–7, $99.95/£69.00


general interest

How Would You Like to Pay? How Technology Is Changing the Future of Money bill maurer Bill Maurer is Dean of the School of Social Sciences; Professor of Anthropology, Law and Criminology, Law and Society; and the Director of the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of Pious Property: Islamic Mortgages in the United States.

From Bitcoin to ApplePay, big changes seem to be afoot in the world of money. How Would You Like to Pay? How Technology is Changing the Future of Money Bill Maurer

Yet the use of coins and paper bills has persisted for 3,000 years. In How Would You Like to Pay?, leading anthropologist Bill Maurer narrates money’s history, considers its role in everyday life, and discusses the implications of how new technologies are changing how we pay. These changes are especially important in the developing world, where people who lack access to banks are using cell phones in creative ways to send and save money. To truly understand money,

“A lucid and entertaining work which shines a light on many of the complexities of money and payments. Bill Maurer makes us realize—and remember—that money is not just economics and process, but also an integral part of human life, and that the psychology and behavioral dynamics

Maurer explains, is to understand and appreciate the complex infrastructures

around money are just as important to understand as the

and social relationships it relies on. Engaging and straightforward, How Would

business aspects. A must-read!”—CAROL COYE BENSON ,

You Like to Pay? rethinks something so familiar and fundamental in new and

Glenbrook Partners

exciting ways. Ultimately, considering how we would like to pay gives insights into determining how we would like to live.

F RO M C H A P T E R T WO What is money? The answer is changing as electronic and mobile communications devices become a new interface for storing, spending, paying and keeping track of money, and as some in the tech world imagine an era of digital, non-state currencies. Many people involved in economic development are pinning their hopes for economic growth on adaptations of these new non-cash systems, particularly with mobile phones. Others imagine libertarian utopias free from governments and insulated from inflation and economic shocks thanks to peerto-peer cryptocurrencies. But can a new mode of payment or even a new currency bring about such substantial changes? To answer this question, we need to re-ask our earlier one: What is money?

B U S I N E S S A N D M O N E Y/A N T H R O P O L O GY

November 144 pages, 51 color illustrations paper, 978–0–8223–5999–9, $19.95tr/£13.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5956–2, $69.95/£49.00

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general interest

Mounting Frustration The Art Museum in the Age of Black Power susan e . cahan Susan E. Cahan is Associate Dean and Dean of the Arts in Yale College, the editor of I Remember Heaven: Jim Hodges and Andy Warhol, and the coeditor of Contemporary Art and Multicultural Education. She has directed programs at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Peter Norton Family Foundation.

MOUNTING FRUSTRATION THE ART MUSEUM IN THE AGE OF BLACK POWER

Prior to 1967 fewer than a dozen museum exhibitions had featured the work of African American artists. By the time the civil rights movement reached the American art museum, it had already crested: the first public demonstrations to integrate museums occurred in late 1968, twenty years after the desegregation of the military and fourteen years after the Brown v. Board of Education decision. In Mounting Frustration Susan E. Cahan investigates the strategies

“In this outstanding and nuanced book, Susan E. Cahan

African American artists and museum pro-

illuminates a discourse over inclusion that took place all over the country, and not just in visual art, but even in

SUSAN E. CAHAN

opera and ballet where the very presence of the black

fessionals employed as they wrangled over access to and the direction of New York

body became an issue. Her analysis reveals the muse-

City’s elite museums. Drawing on numerous interviews with artists and analyses

ums’ duplicity, confusion, and attempts to serve only

of internal museum documents, Cahan gives a detailed and at times surprising

their own interests, and the names of excluded artists repeated in this book are shocking, as are the indications that curators claimed to have not known of people like Jacob Lawrence. Mounting Frustration is a most welcome means of cracking the silence and complacency around the retrenchment since activists opened the discourse on who owns culture.”—THULANI DAVIS , author of My Confederate Kinfolk: A Twenty-First Century Freedwoman Discovers Her Roots

picture of the institutional and social forces that both drove and inhibited racial justice in New York’s museums. Cahan focuses on high-profile and wildly contested exhibitions that attempted to integrate African American culture and art into museums, each of which ignited debate, dissension, and protest. The Metropolitan Museum’s 1969 exhibition Harlem on My Mind was supposed to represent the neighborhood, but it failed to include the work of the black artists living and working there. While the Whitney’s 1971 exhibition Contemporary Black Artists in America featured black artists, it was heavily criticized for being haphazard and not representative. The Whitney show revealed the consequences of museums’ failure to hire African American curators, or even white curators who possessed knowledge of black art. Cahan also recounts the long history of the Museum of Modern Art’s institutional ambivalence toward contemporary artists of color, which reached its zenith in its 1984 exhibition “Primitivism” in Twentieth Century Art. Representing modern art as a white European and American creation that was influenced by the “primitive” art of people of color, the show only served to further devalue and cordon off African American art. In addressing the racial politics of New York’s art world, Cahan shows how aesthetic ideas reflected the underlying structural racism and inequalities that African American artists continue to face. The ongoing process of integrating museums, Cahan demonstrates, is far broader than overcoming past exclusions.

ART HISTORY PUBLIC ATION INITIATIVE www.arthistorypi.org

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A R T H I S T O R Y/A F R I C A N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

February 400 pages, 113 illustrations (including 20 in color) cloth, 978–0–8223–5897–8, $34.95tr/£23.99


general interest

Edgar Heap of Birds bill anthes For over three decades, contemporary Native American artist Hock-E-Aye-Vi Edgar Heap of Birds has pursued a disciplined practice in multiple media, having

Bill Anthes is a Professor in the Art Field Group at Pitzer College and the author of Native Moderns: American Indian Painting, 1940–1960, also published by Duke University Press.

shown his paintings, drawings, prints, BILL ANTHES

EDGAR HEAP OF BIRDS

and text-based conceptual art through-

“So often we fail to look carefully at or describe the works

out numerous national and international

of Native American artists in depth, but tend instead to look

galleries and public spaces. In this first

through them to some plane of political meaning to which

book-length study of this important artist,

they presumably grant passage. Bill Anthes, by contrast,

Bill Anthes analyzes Heap of Birds’s art and politics in relation to the international contemporary art scene, Native American history, and settler colonial-

lingers on and deeply engages with Edgar Heap of Birds’s work, filling a gaping hole in contemporary art scholarship. Compelling, thought provoking, and urgently needed.” —JANE BLOCKER , author of Where Is Ana Mendieta? Identity, Performativity, and Exile

ism. Foregrounding how Heap of Birds roots his practice in Cheyenne spirituality and an indigenous way of seeing and being in the world, Anthes describes how Heap of Birds likens his art to weapons, delivering trenchant critiques of the loss of land, life, and autonomy endured by Native Americans. Whether appearing as interventions in public spaces or in a gallery, Heap of Birds’s carefully honed artworks— “sharp rocks”—pose questions about time, modernity, identity, power, and the meaning and value of contemporary art in a global culture.

“The art of Edgar Heap of Birds as it comes to life in these pages guides us into the dense interplay between seemingly familiar contemporary forms that in fact derive from a lifetime of contemplation on the Cheyenne and Arapaho world the artist belongs to and the art-making that grows therefrom. Bill Anthes impressively appreciates the technical virtuosity Heap of Birds revels in even as he finds a path toward understanding growing spiritual and intellectual wisdom—and perhaps more than anything the great joy, humor, and hope—that have long fueled the art Edgar Heap of Birds makes.”—ROBERT WARRIOR , editor of The World of Indigenous North America

also by Bill Anthes

Native Moderns: American Indian Painting, 1940–1960 paper, $24.95tr/£16.99 978–0–8223–3866–6 / 2006

A R T/ N AT I V E A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

September 256 pages, 95 illustrations (including 78 in color) paper, 978–0–8223–5994–4, $24.95tr/£16.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5981–4, $89.95/£62.00

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general interest

Zhang Hongtu

Performance

Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World luchia meihua lee &

diana taylor

jerome silbergeld , editors

“Diana Taylor concludes with a strong claim that ‘Performance is a powerful weapon. We need to understand it.’ In that light she is clearly a warrior

In this book, leading art

and an exemplary scholar. But she is also, as evidenced in the pages of this

experts, art historians, and

book, a profoundly insightful, compassionate, hope-filled lover of perform-

critics review the life, career,

ers and performance. I’ve rarely come across such a trustworthy witness

and artistic development of New York–based Chinese artist Zhang Hongtu. A pioneer in contemporary

to the potential of art and activism. For that last ounce of courage, I think I’ll just have to carry this inspiring chronicle of performance studies, performance art and, from my read, artists of all sorts—and have it with me in every type of backstage dressing room I might occupy.”—ANNA

DEAVERE SMITH

Chinese art, Zhang’s oeuvre is as diverse, intellectually “Performance” has

complex, and engaging Zhang Hongtu. Little Monkey, 2014. Ink, oil on rice paper, mounted on panel; 48.5 x 46 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

as it is entertaining. From

multiple and often

painting and sculpture to

overlapping meanings that signify a wide

computer-generated works

variety of social behav-

and multimedia projects, Zhang’s art is equally rich in terms of China’s history and its current events, containing profound

iors. In this invitation

reflections on China’s oldest cultural habits and contemporary

to reflect on the power of performance,

preoccupations. His art is designed to make Asian and Western audiences look more closely at each other and at themselves to recognize their beliefs and unexamined values. From his early work during China’s Cultural Revolution to his decades as an artist in New York, Zhang reflects the complex attitudes of a scholar-artist toward modernity, as well as toward Asian and Western societies and himself. Placing Zhang in the context of his cultural milieu both in China and in the Chinese immigrant artist community in America, this volume’s contributors examine his adaptations of classic art to reflect a contemporary sensibility, his relation to Cubism and Social Realism, his collaboration with fashion designer Vivienne Tam, and his visual critique of China’s current environmental crisis. Zhang’s work will be on display at the Queens Museum in New York City from October 17, 2015 to March 6, 2016.

Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver (Split Britches) in their performance Retro Perspective / It’s a small house and we’ve lived in it always, performed at the 2007 Encuentro in Buenos Aires. Photo by Julio Pantoja.

iterations: artistic,

performance of everyday life; and the gendered, sexed, and racialized performance of bodies. This book performs its argument. Images and texts interact to show how performance is at once a creative act, a means to comprehend power, a method of transmitting memory and identity, and a way of understanding the world.

Diana Taylor is University Professor of Performance Studies and Spanish at New York University. She is the author and editor of several books, including The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas, and Disappearing Acts: Spectacles of Gender and Nationalism in Argentina’s “Dirty War,” both also published by Duke University Press.

Julia F. Andrews, Alexandra Chang, Tom Finkelpearl, Michael Fitzgerald, Luchia Meihua Lee, Morgan Perkins, Kui Yi Shen, Jerome Silbergeld, Eugenie Tsai, Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, Lilly Wei, Wu Hung

Luchia Meihua Lee is Guest Curator at the Queens Museum in New York City and the Executive Director of the Taiwanese American Arts Council. Jerome Silbergeld is P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History at Princeton University. COPUBLISHED BY THE QUEENS MUSEUM AND DUKE UNIVERSIT Y PRESS

XAXRXT/A X XS/IXAXNXSXTXU S DTI EUSD I E S

X X FXOXR /M XX PX ER AX NX CX E STUDIES S/A R T

xxxx xxx pages December 300 pages, 120 color illustrations

xxxx February xxx pages 296 pages, 74 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5114–6, 978–0–8223–6042–1, $22.95/£14.99 $40.00tr/£27.99 paper,

978–0–8223–5997–5, $24.95/£16.99 paper, 978–0–8223–5114–6, $22.95/£14.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5954–8, $89.95/£62.00 978–0–8223–5100–9, $79.95/£54.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5100–9, 978–0–8223–6025–4, $79.95/£54.00 $60.00/£42.00 cloth,

many of its uses and

economic, sexual, political, and technological performance; the

Contributors

10 10

Diana Taylor explores


general interest

Microgroove Forays into Other Music john corbett

MI O

CR GR O O VE

John Corbett is a music critic, record producer, and curator. He is the author of Extended Play: Sounding Off from John Cage to Dr. Funkenstein, also published by Duke University Press. His writing has appeared in Downbeat, The Wire, the Chicago Reader, and numerous other publications. He is the co-owner of Corbett vs. Dempsey, an art gallery in Chicago.

Microgroove continues John Corbett’s exploration of diverse musics, with essays, interviews, and musician profiles that focus on jazz, improvised music, contemporary classical, rock, folk, blues, post-punk, and cartoon music. Corbett’s approach to writing is as polymorphous as the music, ranging from oral history and journalistic portraiture to deeply engaged cultural cri-

forays into other music

john corbett

tique. Corbett advocates for the relevance

Photo by W. Patrick Hinely (WorkPlay).

of “little” music, which despite its smaller audience, is of enormous cultural significance. He writes on musicians as varied as Sun Ra, PJ Harvey, Koko Taylor, Steve

“Microgroove is a brilliant contribution to the tradition of Nat Hentoff, Lester Bangs, Robert Christgau, John Rockwell, and Robert Palmer. John Corbett loves improvisation, and can

Lacy, and Helmut Lachenmann. Among other topics, he discusses recording

write about unusual and nonpopular music in popular ways,

formats; investigates the relationship between music and visual art, dance,

taking readers behind the curtain to help them understand

and poetry; and with Terri Kapsalis analyzes the role of female orgasm sounds

what creativity means and the conditions under which it

in contemporary popular music. Above all, Corbett privileges the importance

comes to be. Corbett plays against the ultra-narrowcasting

of improvisation; he insists on the need to pay close attention to “other” music and celebrates its ability to open up pathways to new ideas, fresh modes of expression, and unforeseen ways of knowing.

concept that dominates media now, and seeks audiences willing to chance an encounter with the unexpected. The genre-busting of Microgroove is highly laudable and sorely needed.”—GEORGE E. LEWIS, author of A Power Stronger than Itself: the AACM and American Experimental Music

“John Corbett likes, I’m sorry—LOVES—all kinds of music. But who doesn’t? Well most people really just dig one kind of genre or other but there are those who are into it ALL and continue to seek and follow the wild threads from African American jazz, blues, R&B and hip hop to the indie rock heart beat of college kid psychosis to the luscious worlds of Braziliana to European free improvisation to Japanese noise and pop paroxysm. One may suspect this erudite fellow as a chin scratching academic but I’ve been in the pas-

also by John Corbett

senger seat next to this dude while he’s blasting Chicago blues cassettes and he’s hammering the steering wheel and fully turned on by the dripping music moment of creation and emotion. To share and express the impression of expression in discussion to the intellect and to the cosmic fire, this is where the righteously engaged Corbett comes into play. The respect, consideration, and wonder is genuine. As music defines his aesthetic perspective so he playfully identifies our sentience with the promise of music, the power of foreverness.”—THURSTON MOORE

Extended Play: Sounding Off from John Cage to Dr. Funkenstein paper, $25.95/£17.99 978–0–8223–1473–8 / 1994

M U S I C/A R T

October 504 pages, 60 illustrations paper, 978–0–8223–5870–1, $28.95tr/£19.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5900–5, $99.95/£69.00

11 11


general interest

Muslim Fashion Contemporary Style Cultures reina lewis

Asians Wear Clothes on the Internet Race, Gender, and the Work of Personal Style Blogging

“Gracefully interweaving hijab and veiling into historical, political, legal, and

minh - ha t. pham

cultural contexts, Reina Lewis delves deeply into the everyday style, fashion, and dress of young Muslim women. Lewis captures a dynamic moment in time—transnationally and comparatively—and offers keen insights into the variations and intersectionalities of religion, ethnicity, class, gender, generation, and nation. Muslim Fashion is an extraordinary book and an exemplary model of a feminist cultural studies approach to fashion.” —SUSAN B. KAISER , author of Fashion and Cultural Studies

“Asians Wear Clothes on the Internet is a fiercely imaginative and inspiring book. Minh-Ha T. Pham’s discussion of the garment industry’s racialization and the details she provides about bloggers’ lives and the conditions of their labor is impressive. She acknowledges and debunks the writing on overly utopian and breathless views of digital media as ‘participatory culture’ while giving full credit and agency to the bloggers she writes about.

In the shops of London’s Oxford Street, girls wear

Stunning!”—LISA NAKAMURA , author of Digitizing Race: Visual Cultures of the Internet

patterned scarves over their

MUSLIM FA S H I ON C O N T E M P O R A R Y S T Y L E C U LT U R E S

REINA LEWIS

hair as they cluster around

In the first ever book devoted to a critical

makeup counters. Alongside

investigation of the personal style blogo-

them, hip twenty-somethings

sphere, Minh-Ha T. Pham examines the

style their head-wraps in

phenomenal rise of elite Asian bloggers

high black topknots to match

who have made a career of posting pho-

their black boot-cut trousers.

tographs of themselves wearing clothes

Participating in the world of

on the Internet. Pham understands their

popular mainstream fashion—

online activities as “taste work” practices

often thought to be the domain

that generate myriad forms of capital

of the West—these young

forms of modest clothing as fashion, Reina Lewis counters the overuse of images of veiled women as “evidence” in the prevalent

the status and meaning of “Asian taste” in the early twenty-first

suggestion that Muslims and Islam are incompatible with Western

century, the kinds of cultural and economic work Asian tastes do,

modernity. Muslim Fashion contextualizes modest wardrobe styling

and the fashion public and industry’s appetite for certain kinds of

within Islamic and global consumer cultures, interviewing key

racialized eliteness. Situating blogging within the historical context

players including designers, bloggers, shoppers, store clerks,

of gendered and racialized fashion work while being attentive to

and shop owners. Focusing on Britain, North America, and Turkey,

the broader cultural, technological, and economic shifts in global

Lewis provides insights into the ways young Muslim women

consumer capitalism, Asians Wear Clothes on the Internet has pro-

use multiple fashion systems to negotiate religion, identity, and

found implications for understanding the changing and enduring

ethnicity.

dynamics of race, gender, and class in shaping some of the most

Reina Lewis is Professor of Cultural Studies at the London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London, and the author of Rethinking Orientalism: Women, Travel and the Ottoman Harem.

economy.

youth subculture of modest fashion. In treating hijab and other

12

for superbloggers and the brands they

Photograph by Girls in Hunter Boots and more. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic. https://flic.kr/p/ pvmpMJ

Muslim women are part of an emergent cross-faith transnational

feature. A multifaceted and detailed analysis, Asians Wear Clothes on the Internet addresses questions concerning

popular work practices and spaces of the digital fashion media

Minh-Ha T. Pham is Assistant Professor in the Graduate Media Studies Program at the Pratt Institute. Her research has been featured in the New York Times, the Guardian, the Atlantic, the San Francisco Chronicle, CNN , NPR , Jezebel, and the Huffington Post.

FA S H I O N/C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S

FA S H I O N/A S I A N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S/ M E D I A S T U D I E S

September 416 pages, 87 photographs (including 17 in color)

November 280 pages, 38 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5934–0, $28.95/£19.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6030–8, $24.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5914–2, $99.95/£69.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–6015–5, $89.95/£62.00


general interest

The Rio de Janeiro Reader History, Culture, Politics daryle williams , amy chazkel & paulo knauss , editors Spanning a period of over 450 years, The Rio de Janeiro Reader traces the history,

THE RIO DE JANEIRO READER

culture, and politics of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil through the voices, images, and experiences of those who have made the city’s

H i story, Cu lture, Pol it ics

history. It outlines Rio’s transformation from a hardscrabble colonial outpost and strategic port into an economic, cultural, and entertainment capital of the modern world. The volume contains a wealth of

Daryle Williams is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland and the author of Culture Wars in Brazil: The First Vargas Regime, 1930–1945, also published by Duke University Press. Amy Chazkel is Associate Professor of History at the City University of New York, Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center, and the author of Laws of Chance: Brazil’s Clandestine Lottery and the Making of Urban Public Life, also published by Duke University Press. Paulo Knauss is Professor of History at Universidade Federal Fluminense (Niterói, Brazil) and the author of Rio de Janeiro da pacificação: franceses e portugueses na disputa colonial.

primary sources, many of which appear here in English for the first time. A mix of government documents, lyrics, journalism, Daryle Williams, Amy Chazkel, and Paulo Knauss, editors

speeches, ephemera, poems, maps, engrav-

ings, photographs, and other sources capture everything from the fantastical impressions of the first European arrivals to the complaints about roving capoeira gangs, and from sobering eyewitness accounts of slavery’s brutality

“A great city deserves a great reader, and this one rises to the occasion. From the colonial outpost to the modern megalopolis, from emperors to the humblest of residents, this reader offers snapshots of Rio from every angle. Chico Buarque described cariocas as ‘completely crazy citizens, with truckloads of reason.’ This book captures the craziness

to the glitz of Copacabana. The definitive English language resource on the city,

and the reason.”—BRYAN M C CANN , author of Hard Times

The Rio de Janeiro Reader presents the “Marvelous City” in all its complexity,

in the Marvelous City: From Dictatorship to Democracy in the

importance, and intrigue.

Favelas of Rio de Janeiro

THE LATIN AMERIC A READERS A Series Edited by Robin Kirk and Orin Starn

The Latin America Readers

The Dominican Republic Reader: History, Culture, Politics

see page 46 for additional titles

The Chile Reader: History, Culture, Politics

The Paraguay Reader: History, Culture, Politics

The Guatemala Reader: History, Culture, Politics

Eric Paul Roorda, Lauren Derby & Raymundo González, editors

Elizabeth Quay Hutchison, Thomas Miller Klubock, Nara B. Milanich & Peter Winn, editors

Peter Lambert & Andrew Nickson, editors

Greg Grandin, Deborah T. Levenson & Elizabeth Oglesby, editors

paper, $27.95tr/£18.99

paper, $29.95tr/£20.99

paper, $27.95tr/£18.99

paper, $29.95tr/£18.99

978–0–8223–5268–6 / 2013

978–0–8223–5107–8 / 2011

978–0–8223–5700–1 / 2014

978–0–8223–5360–7 / 2013

T R AV E L / B R A Z I L

January 464 pages, 72 illustrations (including 11 in color) paper, 978–0–8223–6006–3, $25.95tr/£17.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5974–6, $94.95/£66.00

13


general interest

The Feminism of Uncertainty A Gender Diary ann snitow Ann Snitow is Associate Professor of Literature and Gender Studies at Lang College, The New School, in New York City. A longtime activist, Snitow has cofounded The Network of East-West Women, No More Nice Girls, and New York Radical Feminists. She has written for the Village Voice, the Nation, the Women’s Review of Books, Dissent, and many other publications, and is coeditor of Powers of Desire: The Politics of Sexuality and The Feminist Memoir Project: Voices from Women’s Liberation.

The Feminism of Uncertainty

The Feminism of Uncertainty brings together Ann Snitow’s passionate, provocative dispatches from forty years on the front lines of feminist activism and thought. In such celebrated pieces as “A Gender Diary”—which confronts feminism’s need to embrace, while dismantling, the category of “woman”— Snitow is a virtuoso of paradox. Freely mixing genres in vibrant prose, she considers Angela Carter, Doris Lessing, and Dorothy Dinnerstein and offers selfreflexive accounts of her own organizing,

“Ann Snitow’s writing brims with brilliance, subtlety, and fresh insight on every page. Mixing personal essay with complex theoretical thinking, these essays stimulate and enlighten. One of those rare activists who tries to understand rather than demolish her

A Gender Diary

ANN SNITOW

writing, and teaching. Her pieces on international activism, sexuality, motherhood,

and the waywardness of political memory all engage feminism’s impossible contradictions—and its utopian hopes.

political adversaries, Snitow manages here to be at once deeply committed and open-minded, presenting each side as sympathetically as her own. For anyone confused by the controversies within feminism, reading Ann Snitow is guaranteed to bring clarity.” —ALIX KATES SHULMAN “In this rich and varied collection drawn from a lifetime of engagement with feminist politics, Ann Snitow combines and recombines theory and activism to make

F RO M C H A P T E R T H R E E From my first burst of intense activism, say 1969 to 1979, what I mainly recall is a prevailing feeling shared across all sorts of different feminist groups, a mixture of outrage and hope hard to recapture now. Sexism, racism, capitalism were all under attack on many fronts; we expected everything was going to change. I remember sitting on the train home after hours of talking to women, truly at ease

something living, fresh, and dare one say it, hopeful

in a public place for the first time in my entire life, breathing deeply, taking as much

out of what have proved to be surprisingly resistant

space as I wanted. Have we written enough about how erotic these new freedoms

circumstances. I found thought-provoking insights

sometimes felt? Most of us were young of course, but that can’t fully explain the

on every page, and so will you.”—KATHA POLLITT

general atmosphere of passion set free, the literal embodiment of the name

“Ann Snitow is one of the irreplaceable voices of the

the movement had then: “Women’s Liberation.”

feminist movement, as sharp, funny, precise, passionate, and insightful today as she was in the founding moments of women’s liberation. This collection of pieces from her long career as an activist and intellectual is as luminous and indispensable as she is.”—GAYLE RUBIN

14

WOMEN’S STUDIES

September 384 pages, 24 illustrations paper, 978–0–8223–5874–9, $26.95tr/£18.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–5860–2, $94.95/£66.00


general interest

Saved for a Purpose A Journey from Private Virtues to Public Values james a . joseph The son of a minister, James A. Joseph grew up in Louisiana’s Cajun country, where his parents taught him the value of education and the importance of serving others. These lessons inspired him to follow a career path that came to include working in senior executive or advisory positions for four U.S. presidents and with the legendary Nelson Mandela to build a new democracy

S AV E D F O R A PUR POSE A Journey from Private Virtues to Public Values

j a m e s a. j o s e p h

in South Africa. Saved for a Purpose is Joseph’s ethical autobiography, in which he shares his moral philosophy and his insights on leadership.

James A. Joseph is Professor Emeritus of the Practice of Public Policy at Duke University. Joseph served as the U.S. ambassador to South Africa from 1996 to 2000, and as the Under Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior from 1977 to 1981. He was the President and CEO of the Council on Foundations, Vice President of the Cummins Engine Company, and served as Chaplain of the Claremont Colleges. He is the recipient of numerous honorary degrees and awards, including the Order of Good Hope, South Africa’s highest award to a citizen of a foreign country. Joseph is also the author of Leadership as a Way of Being; Remaking America: How the Benevolent Traditions of Many Cultures Are Transforming Our National Life; and The Charitable Impulse: Wealth and Social Conscience in Communities and Cultures Outside the United States.

In an engaging and personal style, Joseph shows how his commitment to applying moral and ethical principles to large groups and institutions played out in his work in the civil rights move-

“I am so grateful that James A. Joseph has chosen to

ment in Alabama and as a college chaplain in California in the turbulent 1960s.

share lessons learned from a lifetime of service in this

His time later as vice president of the Cummins Engine Company provided

fine book.”—MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN , President,

an opportunity to promote corporate ethics, and his tenure as Under Secretary

Children’s Defense Fund

of the Interior in the Carter administration underscored the difficulty and weight of making the right decisions while balancing good policy analysis with transcendent moral principles. In 1996 President Bill Clinton selected Joseph to become the U.S. ambassador to South Africa. His recollections of working with Nelson Mandela, whom he describes as a noble and practical politician, and his observations about what

“James A. Joseph has had a remarkable career. I have enjoyed working with him and watching him implement the values and ideals of Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela. He has written a book that I hope will be widely read.”—ANDREW YOUNG , former Congressman, United Nations ambassador, and Mayor of Atlanta

he learned from Desmond Tutu and others about reconciliation contain some of the book’s most poignant passages. Saved for a Purpose is unique, as Joseph combines his insights from working to integrate values into America’s public and private sectors with his long engagement with ethics as an

“Ambassador James A. Joseph brings a new approach to the question of why ethics matters by offering a compelling case for ethical decision making drawn from his wide and distinguished service in the real worlds

academic discipline and as a practical guide for social behavior. Ultimately,

of church, business, charitable foundations, politics,

it reflects Joseph’s passionate search for values that go beyond the personal

diplomacy, and higher education. The moral reasoning

to include the ethical imperatives that should be applied to the communal.

in Saved for a Purpose is incredibly clear, and it is written from an ethical perspective that is at once deeply rooted in religious conviction and informed by careful

All royalties from this book will be donated to the Association of Black Foundation

attention to the moral dimensions of decisions about

Executives (ABFE) and the Community Foundation of Sarasota County, Florida.

major social, economic, and political issues.”—JOSEPH

C. HOUGH JR. , President Emeritus of Union Theological Seminary in New York and author of Black Power and White Protestants

M E M O I R /A F R I C A N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

September 336 pages, 27 illustrations cloth, 978–0–8223–5896–1, $29.95tr/£20.99

15


general interest NOW AVAIL A BLE FROM DUKE

NOW AVA IL A BLE FROM DUKE

Normal Life

Exile and Pride

Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics, and the Limits of Law

Disability, Queerness, and Liberation

dean spade

With a new foreword by Aurora Levins Morales and an afterword by Dean Spade

Revised and Expanded Edition

“Should be read by everyone who is interested in challenging capitalism, colonialism, racism, and patriarchy.”—ANGELA Y. DAVIS

“Should be read by everyone who is interested in challenging capitalism, colonialism, racism, and patriarchy.”

—Angela

Y. Davis

“Eli Clare writes with the spirit of a poet and the toughness of a construction worker. The passion and skill of [his] writing will draw you inside a complex life and more deeply inside yourself.”—JEWELLE GOMEZ

Wait—what’s wrong with rights? It

First published in 1999, the

is usually assumed that trans and gender nonconforming people should follow the civil rights and “equality” strategies of lesbian

NORMAL LIFE

eli clare

and gay rights organizations by agitating for legal reforms that would ostensibly guarantee nondiscrimination and equal protection under the law. This

EXILE AND PRIDE di s a bi l i t y, qu eer n e ss, a n d l i ber at ion

ELI CLARE with a New Foreword by

ADMINISTRATIVE VIOLENCE, CRITICAL TRANS POLITICS, & THE LIMITS OF LAW DEAN SPADE

approach assumes that the best

au ror a l e v i ns mor a l e s

way to address the poverty and

de a n spa de

and an Afterword by

institutions. But is this strategy effective?

Clare’s revelatory writing about his experiences as a white disabled genderqueer activist/writer established him as one of the leading writers on the intersections of queerness and disability and permanently changed the and queer liberation. With a

poet’s devotion to truth and an activist’s demand for justice, Clare deftly unspools the multiple histories from which our ever-evolving

In Normal Life Dean Spade presents revelatory critiques of the

sense of self unfolds. His essays weave together memoir, history,

legal equality framework for social change and points to examples

and political thinking to explore meanings and experiences of

of transformative grassroots trans activism that is raising demands

home: home as place, community, bodies, identity, and activism.

that go beyond traditional civil rights reforms. Spade explodes

Here readers will find an intersectional framework for understand-

assumptions about what legal rights can do for marginalized

ing how we actually live with the daily hydraulics of oppression,

populations, and describes transformative resistance processes

power, and resistance. At the root of Clare’s exploration of envi-

and formations that address the root causes of harm and violence.

ronmental destruction and capitalism, sexuality and institutional

In the new afterword to this revised and expanded edition, Spade

violence, gender and the body politic, is a call for social justice

notes the rapid mainstreaming of trans politics and finds that

movements that are truly accessible to everyone. With heart and

his predictions that gaining legal recognition will fail to benefit

hammer, Exile and Pride pries open a window onto a world where

trans populations are coming to fruition. In the context of recent

our whole selves, in all their complexity, can be realized, loved,

increased mainstream visibility of trans people and trans politics,

and embraced.

Spade continues to advocate for the dismantling of systems of

Eli Clare is a poet, essayist, activist, and the author of The Marrow’s Telling: Words in Motion. He speaks regularly at universities and conferences throughout the United States about disability, queer identities, and social justice, and his writing has appeared in numerous periodicals and anthologies. Aurora Levins Morales is the author of Kindling: Writings on the Body. Dean Spade is the author of Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics, and the Limits of Law.

state violence that shorten the lives of trans people. Now more than ever, Normal Life is an urgent call for justice and trans liberation, and the radical transformations it will require.

Dean Spade is Assistant Professor at the Seattle University School of Law and founder of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. 16

is essential to the history and future of disability politics. Eli

landscape of disability politics

criminalization that plague trans populations is to gain legal recognition and inclusion in the state’s

groundbreaking Exile and Pride

Q U E E R S T U D I E S/ T R A N S S T U D I E S/ L AW

D I S A B I L I T Y S T U D I E S/Q U E E R S T U D I E S

August 264 pages

August 208 pages

paper, 978–0–8223–6040–7, $23.95tr/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6031–5, $22.95tr/£15.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5989–0, $84.95/£59.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–6016–2, $79.95/£55.00


general interest NOW AVAIL A BLE FROM DUKE

NOW AVA IL A BLE FROM DUKE

Conquest

Incognegro

Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide

A Memoir of Exile and Apartheid frank b . wilderson III

andrea smith Foreword by Winona LaDuke “Wilderson [will] become a major American writer. Mark my word.” —ISHMAEL REED “A must-read for everyone concerned about Native people and our Native world.”—HAUNANI-KAY TRASK , author of From a Native Daughter:

In 1995, a South African journal-

Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawai’i

ist informed Frank Wilderson, one of only two American mem-

In this revolutionary text, promi-

bers of the African National

nent Native American studies

Congress (ANC), that President

scholar and activist Andrea Smith

Nelson Mandela considered

reveals the connections between

him “a threat to national secu-

different forms of violence—

rity.” Wilderson was asked to

perpetrated by the state and by

comment. Incognegro is that

society at large—and documents their impact on Native women. Beginning with the effects of

“comment.” It is also his response

INCOGNEGRO A MEMOIR OF EXILE AND APARTHEID FRANK B. WILDERSON III

later in a California university classroom: “How come you came

the abuses inflicted on Native American children at state-sanc-

to a question posed five years

back?” Although Wilderson recollects his turbulent life as an expa-

tioned boarding schools from the

triate during the furious last gasps of apartheid, Incognegro is

1880s to the 1980s, Smith adroitly

at heart a quintessentially American story. During South Africa’s

expands our conception of violence to include the widespread

transition, Wilderson taught at universities in Johannesburg and

appropriation of Indian cultural practices by whites and other non-

Soweto by day. By night, he helped the ANC coordinate clandes-

Natives, environmental racism, and population control. Smith deftly

tine propaganda, launch psychological warfare, and more. In this

connects these and other examples of historical and contemporary

mesmerizing political memoir, Wilderson’s lyrical prose flows from

colonialism to the high rates of violence against Native American

unspeakable dilemmas in the red dust and ruin of South Africa

women—the most likely to suffer from poverty-related illness and

to his return to political battles raging quietly on U.S. campuses

to survive rape and partner abuse. Smith also outlines radical and

and in his intimate life. Readers will find themselves suddenly

innovative strategies for eliminating gendered violence.

overtaken by the subtle but resolute force of Wilderson’s biting wit,

Andrea Smith is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Media

rare vulnerability, and insistence on bearing witness to history no

and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is the author of Native Americans and the Christian Right: The Gendered Politics of Unlikely Alliances and coeditor of Theorizing Native Studies, both also published by Duke University Press.

matter the cost.

Frank B. Wilderson III is Professor of African American Studies and Drama at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of Red, White, and Black: Cinema and the Structure of U.S. Antagonisms, also published by Duke University Press.

N AT I V E A M E R I C A N & I N D I G E N O U S S T U D I E S/ W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E S

M E M O I R /A F R I C A N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

Available 264 pages

August 512 pages

paper, 978–0–8223–6038–4, $23.95tr/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5993–7, $24.95tr/£16.99

17


general interest

Reel World

addicted.pregnant.poor

An Anthropology of Creation

kelly ray knight

anand pandian With a foreword by Walter Murch

“Kelly Ray Knight has the courage to expose eloquently and ethnographically one of the most painful public secrets of addiction and urban poverty (and

“Reel World thinks in and through the media of cinema and experience as things of the world. They are like fireflies whose paths flash and cut out. A chance encounter, a glance, or a gesture activates experiments in rhythm and voice, light and sound, a feeling of movement. Streets, migrants,

gentrification) that medicine, public health, science, and society cannot solve. What this book documents ethnographically and explores theoretically must be confronted in all its impossible complexity and violence.”—PHILIPPE

BOURGOIS , coauthor of Righteous Dopefiend

flowers, bullets, children’s textbooks and bottlefuls of pills form ecologies of incipience. Ontological curiosity laps like an infinity wave in the craving for wonders now.”—KATHLEEN STEWART, author of Ordinary Affects

Reel World explores what happens to life when everything begins to look and feel like cinema. Drawing on years of fieldwork with Tamil filmmakers, artists, musicians, and craftsmen in the south Indian movie studios of “Kollywood,” Anand Pandian examines how ordinary moments become

Photo by the author.

K E L LY R AY K N I G H T

For the addicted, pregnant, and poor women living in daily-rent hotels in San Francisco’s Mission district, life is marked by battles against drug cravings, housing debt, and potential violence. In this stunning ethnography Kelly Ray Knight presents these women in all their complex humanity and asks what kinds of futures are possible for them given their seemingly hopeless situation. During her four years of fieldwork Knight docu-

elements of a cinematic world.

mented women’s struggles as they traveled from the street to the

With inventive, experimental, and

clinic, jail, and family court, and back to the hotels. She approaches

sometimes comical zeal, Pandian

addicted pregnancy as an everyday phenomenon in these women’s

pursues the sensory richness

lives, and describes how they must navigate the tension between

of cinematic experience and the

pregnancy’s demands to stay clean and the pull of addiction and

adventure of a writing true to these sensations. Thinking with the

poverty toward drug use and sex work. By creating the space for

visceral power of sound and image, his stories also broach deeply

addicted women’s own narratives and examining addicted pregnancy

philosophical themes such as desire, time, wonder, and imagination.

from medical, policy, and social science perspectives, Knight forces

In a spirit devoted to the turbulence and uncertainty of genesis,

us to confront and reconsider the ways we think about addiction,

Reel World brings into focus an ecology of creative process:

trauma, health, criminality, and responsibility.

the many forces, feelings, beings, and things that infuse human

Kelly Ray Knight is Assistant Professor of Anthropology, History and Social Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

endeavors with transformative potential.

Anand Pandian teaches anthropology at Johns Hopkins University. His books include Crooked Stalks: Cultivating Virtue in South India, also published by Duke University Press. Walter Murch is a sound designer, film editor, and the winner of three Academy Awards.

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ F I L M/S O U T H A S I A N S T U D I E S

18

addic .poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor addicted.pregnant.poor

CRITIC AL GLOBAL HEALTH: EVIDENCE, EFFIC ACY, ETHNOGRAPHY A Series Edited by Vincanne Adams and João Biehl

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ U R B A N S T U D I E S/S O C I A L M E D I C I N E

November 360 pages, 51 illustrations (including 2 in color)

October 296 pages, 34 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6000–1, $26.95/£18.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5996–8, $25.95/£17.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5957–9, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5953–1, $94.95/£66.00

Rights: World except South Asia


general interest

After War

Cosmopolitan Conceptions

The Weight of Life at Walter Reed

IVF Sojourns in Global Dubai

zoë h . wool

marcia c . inhorn

“This brilliant and absorbing ethnography reveals how the violence of war

“Cosmopolitan Conceptions is a groundbreaking contribution to ongoing

is rendered simultaneously enduring and ephemeral for wounded American

discussions of globalized medicine, travel for reproductive care, and

soldiers. Zoë H. Wool accounts for the frankness of embodiment and the

the multiple and complex modernities of the contemporary Middle East.

unstable yet ceaseless processes through which the ordinary work of living

Marcia C. Inhorn writes with great sympathy, valorizing the first-person

is accomplished in the aftermath of serious injury. After War is a work

rationalities, suffering, and aspirations of the people she interviewed.

of tremendous clarity and depth opening new sightlines in disability and

A very valuable book.”—RAYNA RAPP, author of Testing Women, Testing

the critical politics of the human body.”—JULIE LIVINGSTON , author of

the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America

Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic

ns

onceptio

RCIA A

nC

al Dubai

it a

M

Cosmo

po l

Army Medical Center from grievous injuries like lost limbs and

. INHO

RN

to build some kind of ordinary life while recovering at Walter Reed

C

lob

most severely injured in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars struggle

I

G

In After War Zoë H. Wool explores how the American soldiers

In their desperate quest for conception, thousands of infertile

Sojourns in VF

couples from around the world travel to the global in vitro fertilization (IVF) hub of Dubai. In Cosmopolitan Conceptions Marcia

traumatic brain injury. Between 2007 and 2008, Wool spent time

C. Inhorn highlights the stories

with many of these mostly male soldiers and their families and

of 220 “reprotravelers” from fifty

loved ones in an effort to understand what it’s like to be blown

countries who sought treatment at

up and then pulled toward an ideal and ordinary civilian life in

a “cosmopolitan” IVF clinic in Dubai.

a place where the possibilities of such a life are called into ques-

These couples cannot find safe,

tion. Contextualizing these soldiers within a broader political and

affordable, legal, and effective IVF

moral framework, Wool considers the soldier body as a historically,

services in their home countries, and their stories offer a window

politically, and morally laden national icon of normative masculinity.

into the world of infertility—a world that is replete with pain, fear,

She shows how injury, disability, and the reality of soldiers’ experi-

danger, frustration, and financial burden. These hardships dispel

ences and lives unsettle this icon and disrupt the all-too-common

any notion that traveling for IVF treatment is reproductive tourism.

narrative of the heroic wounded veteran as the embodiment of

The magnitude of reprotravel to Dubai, Inhorn contends, reflects

patriotic self-sacrifice. For these soldiers, the uncanny ordinariness

the failure of countries to meet their citizens’ reproductive needs,

of seemingly extraordinary everyday circumstances and practices

which suggests the necessity of creating new forms of activism

at Walter Reed create a reality that will never be normal.

that advocate for developing alternate pathways to parenthood,

Zoë H. Wool is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Writing and Theory in the

reducing preventable forms of infertility, supporting the infertile,

Department of Anthropology at Columbia University.

and making safe and low-cost IVF available worldwide.

CRITIC AL GLOBAL HEALTH: EVIDENCE, EFFIC ACY, ETHNOGRAPHY A Series Edited by Vincanne Adams and João Biehl

Marcia C. Inhorn is William K. Lanman Jr. Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs in the Department of Anthropology and The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University. She is the coeditor of Medical Anthropology at the Intersections: Histories, Activisms, and Futures, also published by Duke University Press.

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ D I S A B I L I T Y S T U D I E S/A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

M E D I CA L A N T H R O P O L O GY/ M I D D L E E A S T S T U D I E S/ WO M E N ’S S T U D I E S

November 280 pages, 17 illustrations

August 416 pages, 25 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6003–2, $24.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5933–3, $27.95/£18.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5971–5, $89.95/£62.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5913–5, $99.95/£69.00

19


anthropolog y

Who Counts?

The Need to Help

The Mathematics of Death and Life After Genocide

The Domestic Arts of International Humanitarianism

diane m . nelson

liisa h . malkki

“‘Life is painting a picture not doing a sum,’ Oliver Wendell Holmes once

“Many have noted that heroic humanitarianism, if often inadvertently,

said; the diversity of human experience and the complexities of culture

tends to presume a passive, suffering other. In this work, Liisa H. Malkki

can’t be explained by formula (no matter what our social scientists say).

shatters that one-way mirror. With uncommon imagination and insight,

Holmes’s observation is wonderfully brought to life by Diane M. Nelson in

she turns her gaze back on the neediness of the benefactor: on the ways

her compelling new ethnography, Who Counts? Building on her previous

in which distant care-giving might offer an escape—a sense of passion

pathbreaking scholarship on Guatemala, Nelson creatively and empatheti-

and purpose—to those alienated in prison-houses of relative affluence.”

cally documents the many ways in which a postgenocidal society struggles against the stifling cunning of neoliberal regimentation—against, in

—JEAN COMAROFF, coeditor of Millennial Capitalism and the Culture of Neoliberalism

other words, extinction by other means.”—GREG GRANDIN , author of Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World

In The Need to Help Liisa H. Malkki shifts the focus of the study of

In Who Counts? Diane

humanitarian intervention from

M. Nelson explores

aid recipients to aid workers

the social life of numbers, teasing out the myriad roles math plays in Guatemalan state violence, economic exploitation and disPhoto by James Rodríguez, used with kind permission.

enfranchisement, as

The Need to Help THE DOMESTIC ARTS OF INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIANISM

Liisa H. Malkki

motivations and desires of these professionals and how they imagine themselves in the world “out there” led Malkki to spend more than a decade interviewing mem-

well as in Mayan revi-

bers of the international Finnish

talization and grassroots environmental struggles. In the aftermath of

Red Cross, as well as observing

thirty-six years of civil war, to count—both numerically and in the sense

Finns who volunteered from their

of having value—is a contested and qualitative practice of complex

homes through gifts of handiwork.

calculations encompassing war losses, migration, debt, and competing

The need to help, she shows, can come from a profound neediness—

understandings of progress. Nelson makes broad connections among

the need for aid workers and volunteers to be part of the lively world

seemingly divergent phenomena, such as debates over reparations

and something greater than themselves, and, in the case of the elderly

for genocide victims, Ponzi schemes, and anti-mining movements.

who knit “trauma teddies” and “aid bunnies” for “needy children,” the

Challenging the presumed objectivity of Western mathematics, Nelson

need to fight loneliness and loss of personhood. In seriously examining

shows how it flattens social complexity and becomes a raced, classed,

aspects of humanitarian aid often dismissed as sentimental, or trivial,

and gendered skill that colonial powers considered beyond the grasp

Malkki complicates notions of what constitutes real political work.

of indigenous peoples. Yet the Classic Maya are famous for the preci-

She traces how the international is always entangled in the domestic,

sion of their mathematics, including conceptualizing zero long before

whether in the shape of the need to leave home or handmade gifts that

Europeans. Nelson shows how Guatemala’s indigenous population is

are an aid to sociality and to the imagination of the world.

increasingly returning to Mayan numeracy to critique systemic inequali-

Liisa H. Malkki is Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University. She

ties with the goal of being counted—in every sense of the word.

Diane M. Nelson is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University and a coeditor of War by Other Means: Aftermath in Post-Genocide Guatemala and author of Reckoning: The Ends of War in Guatemala, both also published by Duke University Press; and A Finger in the Wound: Body Politics in Quincentennial Guatemala.

20

themselves. The anthropological commitment to understand the

is the author of Purity and Exile: Violence, Memory, and National Cosmology among Hutu Refugees in Tanzania, and the coauthor of Improvising Theory: Process and Temporality in Ethnographic Fieldwork.

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ L AT I N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ H U M A N I TA R I A N I S M

November 328 pages, 35 illustrations

September 296 pages, 6 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6005–6, $25.95/£17.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5932–6, $24.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5973–9, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5912–8, $89.95/£62.00


anthropolog y

A Nervous State

Emergent Ecologies

Violence, Remedies, and Reverie in Colonial Congo

eben kirksey

nancy rose hunt “A praisesong for the possibilities of bricolage, Emergent Ecologies is a “With stunning insight, Nancy Rose Hunt makes a distinguished contribution to African history that goes a long way toward generating a critical

postmodern natural history in which displaced ants, macaques, frogs, and flies tumble with philosophy, performance art, science, and adventure story.

understanding of colonial projects, their alignment with forms of early

Eben Kirksey takes us on a wild ride through a funhouse of risky and ironic

capitalism, and the brutal practices of extraction industries. By braiding

entanglements.”—ANNA LOWENHAUPT TSING , coeditor of Words in

these issues with the emergence of new healing cults, Hunt helps us better

Motion: Toward a Global Lexicon

understand the complex social process of colonialism. A Nervous State will greatly impact African studies, colonial history, and the anthropology of

In an era of global warming, natural

medicine and violence.”—VEENA DAS , coeditor of The Ground Between:

disasters, endangered species,

Anthropologists Engage Philosophy

and devastating pollution, contemporary writing on the environment largely focuses on doomsday scenarios. Eben Kirksey suggests we reject such apocalyptic thinking and instead find possibilities in the wreckage of ongoing disasters, as symbiotic associations of opportunistic plants, animals, and microbes are flourishing in unexPhoto by the author.

pected places. Emergent Ecologies uses artwork and contemporary

philosophy to illustrate hopeful opportunities and reframe key problems in conservation biology such as invasive species, extinction, Photo courtesy of Disciples of Christ Historical Society.

environmental management, and reforestation. Following the flight of

In A Nervous State, Nancy Rose Hunt considers the afterlives of

capital and nomadic forms of life—through fragmented landscapes

violence and harm in King Leopold’s Congo Free State. Discarding catas-

of Panama, Costa Rica, and the United States—Kirksey explores how

trophe as narrative form, she instead brings alive a history of colonial

chance encounters, historical accidents, and parasitic invasions have

nervousness. This mood suffused medical investigations, security

shaped present and future multispecies communities. New generations

operations, and vernacular healing movements. With a heuristic of two

of thinkers and tinkerers are learning how to care for emergent ecologi-

colonial states—one “nervous,” one biopolitical—the analysis alternates

cal assemblages—involving frogs, fungal pathogens, ants, monkeys,

between medical research into birthrates, gonorrhea, and childlessness

people, and plants—by seeding them, nurturing them, protecting them,

and the securitization of subaltern “therapeutic insurgencies.” By the

and ultimately letting go.

time of Belgian Congo’s famed postwar developmentalist schemes,

Eben Kirksey is a permanent faculty member in Environmental Humanities at UNSW Australia and a Visiting Research Scholar at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is the editor of The Multispecies Salon, and the author of Freedom in Entangled Worlds: West Papua and the Architecture of Global Power, both also published by Duke University Press.

a shining infertility clinic stood near a bleak penal colony, both sited where a notorious Leopoldian rubber company once enabled rape and mutilation. Hunt’s history bursts with layers of perceptibility and song, conveying everyday surfaces and daydreams of subalterns and colonials alike. Congolese endured and evaded forced labor and medical and security screening. Quick-witted, they stirred unease through healing, wonder, memory, and dance. This capacious medical history sheds light on Congolese sexual and musical economies, on practices of distraction, urbanity, and hedonism. Drawing on theoretical concepts from Georges Canguilhem, Georges Balandier, and Gaston Bachelard, Hunt provides a bold new framework for teasing out the complexities of colonial history.

Nancy Rose Hunt is Professor of History at the University of Michigan, and the author of the prizewinning A Colonial Lexicon: Of Birth Ritual, Medicalization, and Mobility in the Congo, also published by Duke University Press. A F R I C A N S T U D I E S/ H I S T O R Y/A N T H R O P O L O GY

A N T H R O P O L O GY/S C I E N C E S T U D I E S/ E N V I R O N M E N TA L S T U D I E S

January 376 pages, 41 illustrations

November 336 pages, 72 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5965–4, $26.95/£18.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6035–3, $25.95/£17.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5946–3, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–6017–9, $94.95/£66.00

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anthropolog y

Alchemy in the Rain Forest

Making Freedom

Politics, Ecology, and Resilience in a New Guinea Mining Area

Apartheid, Squatter Politics, and the Struggle for Home

jerry k . jack a

anne- maria makhulu

“In this field-changing analysis, Jerry K. Jacka shows us a world that is com-

“We tend to think of South Africa in terms of its heroic struggles. Anne-

plex and changing, and he takes topics readers think they know and treats

Maria Makhulu shows us just how much we can learn by appreciating

them in new and stimulating ways. Alchemy in the Rain Forest is a brilliant

its quieter and less dramatic subaltern moments. In doing so, she places

examination of ontological adaptation and change over the course of the

the expansion of shack settlements in post-apartheid Cape Town within

history of Papua New Guinea’s highlands.”—PAIGE WEST, author of From

the larger transformations of a global context.”—DONALD L. DONHAM ,

Modern Production to Imagined Primitive: The Social World of Coffee from

author of Violence in a Time of Liberation: Murder and Ethnicity at a South

Papua New Guinea

African Gold Mine, 1994

In Alchemy in the Rain Forest

Photo by the author.

Makhulu examines practices

the indigenous population of

of squatting and illegal settle-

Papua New Guinea’s Porgeran

ment on the outskirts of Cape

highlands struggle to create

Town during and immediately

meaningful lives in the midst

following the end of apartheid.

of extreme social conflict

Apartheid’s paradoxical policies

and environmental degradation. Drawing on theories of

political ecology, place, and ontology, and using ethnographic, environ-

Photo courtesy of Josette Cole.

of prohibiting migrant Africans who worked in Cape Town from

living permanently within the city led some black families to seek safe

mental, and historical data, Jacka presents a multilayered examination

haven on the city’s perimeters. Beginning in the 1970s families set up

of the impacts large-scale commercial gold mining in the region has had

makeshift tents and shacks and built whole communities, defying the

on ecology and social relations. Despite the deadly interclan violence

state through what Makhulu calls a “politics of presence.” In the simple

and widespread pollution brought on by mining, the uneven distribu-

act of building homes, squatters, who Makhulu characterizes as urban

tion of its financial benefits has led many Porgerans to call for further

militants, actively engaged a politics of “the right to the city” that

development. This desire for increased mining, Jacka points out, coun-

became vital in the broader struggles for liberation. Despite apartheid’s

ters popular portrayals of indigenous people as innate conservationists

end in 1994, Cape Town’s settlements have expanded, as new forms

who defend the environment from international neoliberal development.

of dispossession associated with South African neoliberalism perpetu-

Jacka’s examination of the ways Porgerans search for common ground

ate relations of spatial exclusion, poverty, and racism. As Makhulu

between capitalist and indigenous ways of knowing and being points to

demonstrates, the efforts of black Capetonians to establish claims to

the complexity and interconnectedness of land, indigenous knowledge,

a place in the city not only decisively reshaped Cape Town’s geography

and the global economy in Porgera and beyond.

but changed the course of history.

Jerry K. Jacka is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Anne-Maria Makhulu is Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies at Duke University. She is a coeditor of Hard Work, Hard Times: Global Volatility and African Subjectivities.

NEW ECOLOGIES FOR THE TWENT Y-FIRST CENTURY A Series Edited by Arturo Escobar and Dianne Rocheleau

22

In Making Freedom Anne-Maria

Jerry K. Jacka explores how

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ P O L I T I C A L E C O L O GY

A N T H R O P O L O GY/A F R I C A N S T U D I E S/G E O G R A P H Y

November 320 pages, 39 illustrations

October 256 pages, 16 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6011–7, $25.95/£17.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5966–1, $23.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5979–1, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5947–0, $84.95/£59.00


music / sound studies

Sensing Sound

Sound

Singing and Listening as Vibrational Practice

An Acoulogical Treatise

nina sun eidsheim

michel chion Translated and with an introduction by James A. Steintrager

“Sensing Sound offers a singular and original perspective on the status of the voice and the theory of music. Nina Sun Eidsheim teaches readers to

“Michel Chion is one of the leading—and most prolific—writers on sound,

think about voice as a multisensory phenomenon, and in so doing, turns

but only a few of his many books are available in English. This impeccable

the tools of sound studies and critical musicology against themselves,

translation of Sound will make Chion’s outstanding work available to a

demonstrating conclusively that an understanding of sound is not enough

broader audience.”—VEIT ERLMANN , author of Reason and Resonance:

for understanding voice, singing, or music.”—JONATHAN STERNE , author of MP3: The Meaning of a Format

A History of Modern Aurality

First published in French in 1998, revised in 2010, and appearing

Songs of Ascensions performed inside the sculptural tower created by Anne Hamilton. Photo by Maria Mikheyenko.

In Sensing Sound Nina Sun

here in English for the first time, Michel Chion’s Sound addresses the

Eidsheim offers a vibrational

philosophical, interpretive, and practical questions that inform our

theory of music that radically

encounters with sound. Chion considers how cultural institutions privi-

re-envisions how we think

lege some sounds above others and how spurious distinctions between

about sound, music, and

noise and sound guide the ways we hear and value certain sounds.

listening. Eidsheim shows

He critiques the tenacious tendency to understand sounds in relation

how—rather than being fixed,

to their sources and advocates “acousmatic” listening—listening with-

knowable, and constant—

out visual access to a sound’s cause—to disentangle ourselves from

sound, music, and listening

auditory habits and prejudices. Yet sound can no more be reduced

are dynamic and contextually

to mere perceptual phenomena than encapsulated in the sciences of

dependent. She uses twenty-

acoustics and physiology. As Chion reminds us and explores in depth,

first-century operas by Juliana

a wide range of linguistic, sensory, cultural, institutional, and media-

Snapper, Meredith Monk,

and technologically specific factors interact with and shape sonic

Christopher Cerrone, and Alba

experiences. Interrogating these interactions, Chion stimulates us to

Triana as case studies to chal-

think about how we might open our ears to new sounds, become more

lenge common assumptions

nuanced and informed listeners, and more fully understand the links

about sound—such as air being

between how we hear and what we do.

the default medium through which it travels—and to demonstrate the importance a performance’s location and reception play in its contingency. By theorizing the voice as an object of knowledge and rejecting the notion of an a priori definition of sound, Eidsheim releases the voice from a constraining set of fixed concepts and meanings. In Eidsheim’s theory, music consists of aural, tactile, spatial, physical,

Michel Chion is a composer, filmmaker, teacher, researcher, and the author of several books, including Film, A Sound Art; The Voice in Cinema; and Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen. James A. Steintrager is Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and European Languages and Studies at the University of California, Irvine; he is the author, most recently, of The Autonomy of Pleasure: Libertines, License, and Sexual Revolution.

material, and vibrational sensations. This expanded definition of music as manifested through material and personal relations suggests that we are all connected to each other in and through sound. Sensing Sound will appeal to readers interested in sound studies, new musicology, contemporary opera, and performance studies.

Nina Sun Eidsheim is Assistant Professor of Musicology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

SIGN, STORAGE, TRANSMISSION A Series Edited by Jonathan Sterne and Lisa Gitelman

S O U N D S T U D I E S/ M U S I C

S O U N D S T U D I E S/C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S

December 304 pages, 26 illustrations

January 320 pages, 25 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6061–2, $25.95/£17.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6039–1, $25.95/£17.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–6046–9, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–6022–3, $94.95/£66.00

23


music / sound studies

Remixing Reggaetón

Negro Soy Yo

The Cultural Politics of Race in Puerto Rico

Hip Hop and Raced Citizenship in Neoliberal Cuba

petr a r . rivera - rideau

marc d . perry

“Petra R. Rivera-Rideau does an outstanding job explaining the contradic-

“Offering a wealth of ethnographic detail, Negro Soy Yo is a welcome addi-

tory power dynamics behind the representations of blackness in Puerto

tion to the study of international hip hop, contemporary Cuban culture and

Rico. In exploring the ways in which racial identities get restructured,

society, and the Black Atlantic. Marc D. Perry’s foregrounding of the role of

reorganized, and even elided through the music industry, Rivera-Rideau

race in the history of Cuban hip hop, and in the transnational engagements

provides a significant contribution and a brilliant intervention into stud-

of Afro-Cuban culture more broadly, is a crucial contribution.”—WAYNE

ies on race, blackness, and popular music in Puerto Rico.”—FRANCES

MARSHALL , coeditor of Reggaetón

APARICIO , author of Listening to Salsa: Gender, Latin Popular Music, and Puerto Rican Cultures

In Negro Soy Yo Marc D. Perry explores Cuba’s hip hop movement as a window Puerto Rico is often depicted as a

into the racial complexities of the

emixing RRemixing RegReggaetón gaeton

“racial democracy” in which a history

The Cultural Politics of Race in Puerto Rico Petra R. Rivera-Rideau

island’s ongoing transition from revo-

of race mixture has produced a racially

lutionary socialism toward free-market

harmonious society. In Remixing

capitalism. Centering on the music and

Reggaetón, Petra R. Rivera-Rideau

lives of black-identified raperos (rap-

shows how reggaetón musicians

pers), Perry examines the ways these

critique racial democracy’s privileg-

young artists craft notions of black

ing of whiteness and concealment of racism by expressing identities that

Cuban identity and racial citizenship, Photo by the author.

along with calls for racial justice, at the

center blackness and African diasporic

fraught confluence of growing Afro-Cuban marginalization and long-held

belonging. Stars such as Tego Calderón

perceptions of Cuba as a nonracial nation. Situating hip hop within

criticize the Puerto Rican mainstream’s

a long history of Cuban racial politics, Perry discusses the artistic and

tendency to praise black culture while

cultural exchanges between raperos and North American rappers

neglecting and marginalizing the island’s black population, while Ivy

and activists, and their relationships with older Afro-Cuban intellectuals

Queen, the genre’s most visible woman, disrupts the associations

and African American political exiles. He also examines critiques

between whiteness and respectability that support official discourses

of Cuban patriarchy by female raperos, the competing rise of reggaetón,

of racial democracy. From censorship campaigns on the island that

as well as state efforts to incorporate hip hop into its cultural institu-

sought to devalue reggaetón, to its subsequent mass marketing to

tions. At this pivotal moment of Cuban–U.S. relations, Perry’s analysis

U.S. Latino listeners, Rivera-Rideau traces reggaetón’s origins and its

illuminates the evolving dynamics of race, agency, and neoliberal trans-

transformation from the music of San Juan’s slums into a global pop

formation amid a Cuba in historic flux.

phenomenon. Reggaetón, she demonstrates, provides a language

Marc D. Perry is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and African and African Diaspora Studies at Tulane University.

to speak about the black presence in Puerto Rico and a way to build links between the island and the African diaspora.

Petra R. Rivera-Rideau is Assistant Professor of Africana Studies at Virginia Tech.

24

L AT I N O A N D L AT I N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S/ M U S I C/ B L AC K D I A S P O R A

REFIGURING AMERIC AN MUSIC A Series Edited by Ronald Radano and Josh Kun

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ R A C E /C U B A N M U S I C

October 280 pages, 11 illustrations

January 288 pages, 14 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5964–7, $24.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5885–5, $24.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5945–6, $89.95/£62.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5985–2, $89.95/£62.00


music / sound studies

Audible Empire

Real Men Don’t Sing

Music, Global Politics, Critique

Crooning in American Culture

ronald radano & tejumola olaniyan ,

editors

“Audible Empire is an important, substantive, and significant volume containing essays that display a theoretical sophistication about an important

allison m c cracken

“Allison McCracken explores the blurred genders of the croon through intimate historical detail, impeccable research, and a sense of the ever-shifting

range of musical, social, and political issues. In addressing the ways in

mores of sexual identity. She understands how technology influences

which the production, distribution, and consumption of public music can

artistry; and how the core of musical seduction remains constant, a voice

illuminate the history of empire and other transnational practices, struc-

whispering in the ear, a man singing to a woman in her own lingual.”

tures, and institutions, Audible Empire introduces new ways of thinking

—LENNY KAYE , author of You Call It Madness: The Sensuous Song of

about music as a social force.”—GEORGE LIPSITZ , coauthor of The Fierce

the Croon

Urgency of Now: Improvisation, Rights, and the Ethics of Co-Creation

Crooner Rudy Vallée’s soft, intimate, Audible Empire rethinks the processes and mechanisms of empire and shows how musical practice has been crucial to its spread around the globe. Music is a means of comprehending empire as an audible formation, and the contributors highlight how it has been circulated, consumed, and understood through imperial logics. These fifteen

RE

AL

DON

and sensual vocal delivery simultaneM

EN

’T S I NG

ously captivated millions of adoring fans and drew harsh criticism from those threatened by his sensitive masculinity. Although Vallée and

interdisciplinary essays cover large swaths of genre, time, politics,

other crooners reflected the gender

and geography, and include topics such as the affective relationship

fluidity of late 1920s popular culture,

between jazz and cigarettes in interwar China; the sonic landscape

their challenge to the Depression

of the U.S.–Mexico border; the critiques of post-9/11 U.S. empire by desi

era’s more conservative masculine

rappers; and the role of tonality in the colonization of Africa. Whether focusing on Argentine tango, theorizing anticolonialist sound, or examining the music industry of postapartheid South Africa, the contributors

norms led cultural authorities to crooning in american culture

Allison McCracken

show how the audible has been a central component in the creation

stigmatize them as gender and sexual deviants. In Real Men Don’t Sing Allison McCracken outlines crooning’s

of imperialist notions of reason, modernity, and culture. In doing so,

history from its origins in minstrelsy through its development

they allow us to hear how empire is both made and challenged.

as the microphone sound most associated with white recording artists,

Contributors Kofi Agawu, Philip V. Bohlman, Michael Denning, Brent Hayes Edwards, Nan Enstad,

band singers, and radio stars. She charts early crooners’ rise and fall between 1925 and 1934, contrasting Rudy Vallée with Bing Crosby

Andrew Jones, Josh Kun, Morgan Luker, Jairo Moreno, Tejumola Olaniyan, Marc Perry,

to demonstrate how attempts to contain crooners created and dictated

Ronald Radano, Nitasha Sharma, Micol Siegel, Gavin Steingo, Penny Von Eschen,

standards of white masculinity for male singers. Unlike Vallée, Crosby

Amanda Weidman

survived the crooner backlash by adapting his voice and persona to

Ronald Radano is Professor of Music at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the author of Lying Up a Nation: Race and Black Music. Tejumola Olaniyan is Louise Durham Mead Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the author of Arrest the Music! Fela and His Rebel Art and Politics. REFIGURING AMERIC AN MUSIC A Series Edited by Ronald Radano and Josh Kun

adhere to white middle-class masculine norms. The effects of these norms are felt to this day, as critics continue to question the masculinity of youthful, romantic white male singers. Crooners, McCracken shows, were not only the first pop stars, but their short-lived yet massive popularity fundamentally changed American culture.

Allison McCracken is Associate Professor of American Studies at DePaul University. REFIGURING AMERIC AN MUSIC A Series Edited by Ronald Radano and Josh Kun

M U S I C/C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S

A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S/ M U S I C/G E N D E R S T U D I E S

January 432 pages, 21 illustrations

September 448 pages, 80 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6012–4, $28.95/£19.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5936–4, $28.95/£19.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5986–9, $99.95/£69.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5917–3, $99.95/£69.00

25


science studies

film studies

Birth of an Industry

Rendering Life Molecular

Blackface Minstrelsy and the Rise of American Animation

Models, Modelers, and Excitable Matter natasha myers

nicholas sammond “With a lively and engaging style, a commitment to a feminist and phenom“Welcome to an X-ray of Toontown, its Bones showing. Minstrelsy has some-

enological analysis, and an extraordinary attention to the specificity of

times seemed the skeleton in the closet of American animation, its racist

scientists’ embodied, material, and affective engagement in the creation

tar coons hiding inside our most beloved cartoons—Felix, Mickey, Bugs,

of knowledge, Natasha Myers takes the study of the biosciences in a new

Daffy, and a host of others both before and after them. With sweeping eru-

direction. Rendering Life Molecular expands the laboratory studies canon,

dition and definitive archival and theoretical diagnoses, Nicholas Sammond

as it reanimates our sense of the dynamic contingencies and relationalities

shows just how pervasively blackface figurations have formed the back-

of all biological entities.”—LUCY SUCHMAN , author of Human-Machine

bone of our animated fantasy lives. Modern cartoons don’t merely nod to

Reconfigurations: Plans and Situated Actions

nineteenth-century blackface performance, Sammond establishes, they constitute its afterlife.”—ERIC LOTT, author of Love and Theft: Blackface

What are living bodies made of?

Minstrelsy and the American Working Class

Protein modelers tell us that our cells are composed of millions of

In Birth of an Industry Nicholas Sammond describes how popular early

proteins, intricately folded molecular

American cartoon characters were derived from blackface minstrelsy. He

structures on the scale of nanopar-

charts the industrialization of animation in the early twentieth century,

ticles. Proteins twist and wriggle

its representation in the cartoons themselves, and how important black-

as they carry out the activities that

face minstrels were to that performance, standing in for the frustrations

keep cells alive. Figuring out how to

of animation workers. Cherished cartoon characters, such as Mickey

make these unruly substances visible,

Mouse and Felix the Cat, were conceived and developed using blackface

RENDERING

L I FE

MOLECUL AR

lenging task, one that is not readily

minstrelsy’s visual and performative conventions: these characters are not like minstrels; they are minstrels. They play out the social, cultural, political, and racial anxieties and desires that link race to the laboring body, just as live minstrel show performers did. Carefully examin-

tangible, and workable is a chal-

Models, Modelers, and Excitable Matter

N ATA S H A M Y E R S

automated, even by the fastest computers. Natasha Myers explores what protein modelers must do to render

ing how early animation helped naturalize virulent racial formations,

three-dimensional, atomic-resolution models of these lively materi-

Sammond explores how cartoons used laughter and sentimentality

als. Rendering Life Molecular shows that protein models are not just

to make those stereotypes seem not only less cruel but actually plea-

informed by scientific data: model building entangles a modeler’s

surable. Although the visible links between cartoon characters and the

entire sensorium, and modelers must learn to feel their way through

minstrel stage faded long ago, Sammond shows how important those

the data to interpret molecular forms. Myers takes us into protein

links are to thinking about animation then and now, and about how

modeling laboratories and classrooms, tracking how gesture, affect,

cartoons continue to help illuminate the central place of race in American cultural and social life.

Nicholas Sammond is Associate Professor of Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Babes in Tomorrowland: Walt Disney and the Making of the American Child, 1930–60, and the editor of Steel Chair to the Head: Essays on Professional Wrestling, both also published by Duke University Press.

imagination, and intuition shape practices of objectivity. Asking, “What is life becoming in modelers hands?,” she tunes into the ways they animate molecules through their moving bodies and other media. In the process she amplifies an otherwise muted liveliness inflecting mechanistic accounts of the stuff of life.

Natasha Myers is Associate Professor of Anthropology at York University.

EXPERIMENTAL FUTURES A Series Edited by Michael M. J. Fischer and Joseph Dumit

26

F I L M S T U D I E S/A N I M AT I O N/A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

S C I E N C E S T U D I E S/A N T H R O P O L O GY

September 400 pages, 134 illustrations

August 336 pages, 55 illustrations (including 19 in color)

paper, 978–0–8223–5852–7, $26.95/£18.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5878–7, $26.95/£18.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5840–4, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5866–4, $94.95/£66.00


gender studies

Gut Feminism

Economies of Violence

elizabeth a . wilson

Transnational Feminism, Postsocialism, and the Politics of Sex Trafficking

“‘There is still something about biology that remains troublesome for femi-

jennifer suchland

nist theory,’ writes Elizabeth Wilson, in Gut Feminism. This vigorous, rigorous, and riveting book not only asks what biology might do for feminist understandings of affect, illness, mood, and agency; it makes a searingly powerful case for an unashamed embrace of feminist aggression. A wonderful pedagogical experience.”—LAUREN BERLANT, author of Cruel Optimism

“Economies of Violence is a refreshing intervention into the global antitrafficking discourse. Smart, timely, politically relevant, and convincingly argued, it will appeal to audiences both inside and outside of academia. Jennifer Suchland’s book is a clarion call to academics, activists, and policy makers to radically rethink the way we talk about trafficking.”—KRISTEN

GHODSEE , author of The Left Side of History: World War II and the

In Gut Feminism Elizabeth A. Wilson

Unfulfilled Promise of Communism in Eastern Europe

urges feminists to rethink their resistance to biological and pharma-

Recent human rights campaigns

ON

ION PO AL F LIT EM ICS INI OF SM, PO SE STSO X T CI R A ALI FF SM ICK , A ING ND TH

EC

to the gut and depression, she asks what conceptual and methodological

OM

innovations become possible when

IE S

feminist theory isn’t so instinctively antibiological. She examines research

OF

on antidepressants, placebos, trans-

V IO

ference, phantasy, eating disorders,

E

AT SN AN TR

NC

data can be useful for feminist theory, and to address the necessary role of aggression in feminist politics.

LE

and suicidality with two goals in mind: to show how pharmaceutical

E

ceutical data. Turning her attention

J EN N I F ER SU C H L A N D

Gut Feminism’s provocative challenge to feminist theory is that it would be more powerful if it could attend to biological data and tolerate its own capacity for harm.

Elizabeth A. Wilson is Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Emory University and the author of Psychosomatic: Feminism and the Neurological Body, also published by Duke University Press. NEXT WAVE: NEW DIRECTIONS IN WOMEN’S STUDIES A Series Edited by Inderpal Grewal, Caren Kaplan, and Robyn Wiegman

against sex trafficking have focused on individual victims, treating trafficking as a criminal aberration in an otherwise just economic order. In Economies of Violence Jennifer Suchland directly critiques these explanations and approaches, as they obscure the reality that trafficking is symptomatic of complex economic and social dynamics and the economies of violence that sustain them. Examining United Nations proceedings on women’s

rights issues, government and NGO antitrafficking policies, and campaigns by feminist activists, Suchland contends that trafficking must be understood not solely as a criminal, gendered, and sexualized phenomenon but as operating within global systems of precarious labor, neoliberalism, and the transition from socialist to capitalist economies in the former Soviet Union and Eastern bloc. In shifting the focus away from individual victims, and by underscoring trafficking’s economic and social causes, Suchland provides a foundation for building more robust methods for combating human trafficking.

Jennifer Suchland is Associate Professor of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Ohio State University.

F E M I N I S T T H E O R Y/S C I E N C E S T U D I E S

W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E S/ H U M A N R I G H T S

September 248 pages

August 272 pages, 5 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5970–8, $23.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5961–6, $24.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5951–7, $84.95/£59.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5941–8, $89.95/£62.00

27


religious studies

Poetics of the Flesh

Religious Affects

mayra rivera

Animality, Evolution, and Power donovan o . schaefer

“Mayra Rivera’s Poetics of the Flesh is an elegant exploration of the sensual, political, and theological fashioning of our materiality. Moving from ancient

“Blending seamlessly the most fecund insights of affect theory, evolutionary

Christian texts to the most up to date material feminisms and postcolonial

biology, and critical animal studies, as well as feminist, queer, and post-

discourses, this book insistently returns us to the unsettled and elusive

colonial theories of materiality and embodiment, this bold and trenchant

vitality of flesh even in the most unpromising theoretical contexts, and

challenge to the ideology of human exceptionalism and its accompanying

opens up the promise and possibility that our flesh, formed by those

linguistic fallacy—the refusal to analyze religion and power outside

contexts, might through its practices change them in turn.”—KARMEN

of language and texts—offers a revolutionary and more capacious

M AC KENDRICK , author of Divine Enticement: Theological Seductions

approach to religion that recovers its visceral intensity and animal generativity.”—MANUEL A. VÁSQUEZ , author of More Than Belief:

In Poetics of the Flesh Mayra Rivera POET ICS OF THE

F L E SH

M AY R A R I V E R A

A Materialist Theory of Religion

offers poetic reflections on how we understand our carnal relationship to

In Religious Affects Donovan O. Schaefer challenges the notion that reli-

the world, at once spiritual, organic,

gion is inextricably linked to language and belief, proposing instead that

and social. She connects conversa-

it is primarily driven by affects. Drawing on affect theory, evolutionary

tions about corporeality in theology,

biology, and poststructuralist theory, Schaefer builds on the recent

political theory, and continental

materialist shift in religious studies to relocate religious practices in the

philosophy to show the relationship

affective realm—an insight that helps us better understand how religion

between the ways ancient Christian

is lived in conjunction with systems of power. To demonstrate religion’s

thinkers and modern Western

animality and how it works affectively, Schaefer turns to a series of

philosophers conceive of the “body”

case studies, including the documentary Jesus Camp and contemporary

and “flesh.” Her readings of the bibli-

American Islamophobia. Placing affect theory in conversation with post-

cal writings of John and Paul as well

Darwinian evolutionary theory, Schaefer explores the extent to which

as the work of Tertullian illustrate

nonhuman animals have the capacity to practice religion, linking human

how Christian ideas of flesh influenced the works of Maurice Merleau-

forms of religion and power through a new analysis of the chimpanzee

Ponty and Michel Foucault, and inform her readings of Judith Butler,

waterfall dance as observed by Jane Goodall. In this compelling case

Frantz Fanon, and others. Rivera also furthers developments in new

for the use of affect theory in religious studies, Schaefer provides

materialism by exploring the intersections between bodies, material

a new model for mapping relations between religion, politics, species,

elements, social arrangements, and discourses through body and flesh.

globalization, secularlism, race, and ethics.

By painting a complex picture of bodies, and by developing an account of how the social materializes in flesh, Rivera provides a new way to understand gender and race.

Donovan O. Schaefer is Departmental Lecturer in Science and Religion at the University of Oxford.

Mayra Rivera is Associate Professor of Theology and Latina/o Studies at Harvard University and the author of The Touch of Transcendence: A Postcolonial Theology of God.

28

R E L I G I O N/ P H I L O S O P H Y

R E L I G I O N/A F F E C T T H E O R Y

October 208 pages

November 288 pages, 3 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6013–1, $22.95/£15.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5990–6, $24.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5987–6, $79.95/£55.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5982–1, $89.95/£62.00


religious studies

Cachita’s Streets

Gesture and Power

The Virgin of Charity, Race, and Revolution in Cuba

Religion, Nationalism, and Everyday Performance in Congo

jalane d . schmidt

yolanda covington - ward

The Virgin of Charity, Race, & Revolution in Cuba

Jalane D. Schmidt

CACHITA’S STREETS

Cuba’s patron saint, the Virgin of

In Gesture and Power

Charity of El Cobre, also called

Yolanda Covington-Ward

Cachita, is a potent symbol of Cuban

examines the everyday

national identity. Jalane D. Schmidt

embodied practices

shows how groups as diverse as

and performances of

Indians and African slaves, Spanish

the BisiKongo people

colonial officials, Cuban indepen-

of the lower Congo to

dence soldiers, Catholic authorities

show how their gestures,

and laypeople, intellectuals,

dances, and spirituality

journalists and artists, practitioners of spiritism and Santería, activists, politicians, and revolutionaries each

Photo by the author.

are critical in mobilizing social and political action.

Conceiving of the body as the center of analysis, a catalyst for social action,

have constructed and disputed the

and a conduit for the social construction of reality, Covington-Ward focuses

meanings of the Virgin. Schmidt

on specific flashpoints in the last ninety years of Congo’s troubled history,

examines the occasions from 1936 to 2012 when the Virgin’s beloved,

when embodied performance was used to stake political claims, foster dis-

original brown-skinned effigy was removed from her national shrine

sent, and enforce power. In the 1920s Simon Kimbangu started a Christian

in the majority black and mixed-race mountaintop village of El Cobre

prophetic movement based on spirit-induced trembling, which swept

and brought into Cuba’s cities. There, devotees venerated and

through the lower Congo, subverting Belgian colonial authority. Following

followed Cachita’s image through urban streets, amassing at large-

independence, dictator Mobutu Sese Seko required citizens to dance and

scale public ceremonies in her honor that promoted competing claims

sing nationalist songs daily as a means of maintaining political control.

about Cuban religion, race, and political ideology. Schmidt compares

More recently, embodied performance has again stoked reform, as national-

these religious rituals to other contemporaneous Cuban street events,

ist groups such as Bundu dia Kongo advocate for a return to pre-colonial

including Carnival, protests, and revolutionary rallies, where organiz-

religious practices and non-Western gestures such as traditional greetings.

ers stage performances of contested definitions of Cubanness. Schmidt

In exploring these embodied expressions of Congolese agency, Covington-

provides a comprehensive treatment of Cuban religions, history, and

Ward provides a framework for understanding how embodied practices

culture, interpreted through the prism of Cachita.

transmit social values, identities, and cultural history throughout Africa

Jalane D. Schmidt is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the

and the diaspora.

University of Virginia.

Yolanda Covington-Ward is Assistant Professor of Africana Studies at the

RELIGIOUS CULTURES OF AFRIC AN AND AFRIC AN DIASPORA PEOPLE A Series Edited by Jacob K. Olupona, Dianne M. Stewart, and Terrence L. Johnson

Announcing a new series The Religious Cultures of African and African Diaspora People EDITED BY JACOB K. OLUPONA , DIANNE M . STE WART & TERRENCE L. JOHNSON

University of Pittsburgh. RELIGIOUS CULTURES OF AFRICAN AND AFRICAN DIASPORA PEOPLE A Series Edited by Jacob K. Olupona, Dianne M. Stewart, and Terrence L. Johnson

The Religious Cultures of African and African Diaspora People series examines the religious, cultural, and political expressions of African, African American, and African Caribbean traditions. Through transnational, cross-cultural, and multidisciplinary approaches to the study of religion, the series investigates the epistemic boundaries of continental and diasporic religious practices and thought and explores the diverse and distinct ways African-derived religions inform culture and politics. The series aims to establish a forum for imagining the centrality of Black religions in the formation of the “New World.”

R E L I G I O N/C U B A / B L A C K S T U D I E S

R E L I G I O N/A F R I C A N S T U D I E S/A N T H R O P O L O GY

August 376 pages, 27 illustrations

January 312 pages, 17 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5937–1, $26.95/£18.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6036–0, $25.95/£17.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5918–0, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–6020–9, $94.95/£66.00

29


cultural studies

Islam and Secularity

Indian Given

The Future of Europe’s Public Sphere

Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States

nilüfer göle

“Nilüfer Göle’s insistence on the ‘interpenetration’ of Muslim and European experience is a major contribution, offering incisive theoretical formulations. In explicating the mutual interactions and transformations that arise from the conflicts and anxieties that accompany the proximity of Islam within Europe, she comments in new and insightful ways about Muslim/European relations. Göle is a major thinker who deserves more prominence.”—JOAN

W. SCOTT, Institute for Advanced Study

maría josefina saldaña - portillo

“Indian Given is an important interrogation of racial and knowledge production in the Americas and offers important analyses of how racial geographies figure in the U.S./Mexico borderlands. With Indian Given, María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo gives us the most comprehensive study of indigenous Mexican and Mexican American identity formations to date.”—SONIA SALDÍVAR-HULL , author of Feminism on the Border: Chicana Gender Politics and Literature

In Islam and Secularity Nilüfer Göle takes on two pressing issues: the

In Indian Given María

transforming relationship between Islam and Western secular modernity

Josefina Saldaña-

and the impact of the Muslim presence in Europe. Göle shows how the

Portillo addresses

visibility of Islamic practice in the European public sphere unsettles

current racialized vio-

narratives of Western secularism. As mutually constitutive, Islam

lence and resistance in

and secularism permeate each other, the effects of which play out in

Mexico and the United

embodied and aesthetic practices and are accompanied by fear, anxiety,

States with a geneal-

and violence. In this timely book, Göle illuminates the recent rethinking

ogy that reaches back

of secularism and religion, of modernity and resistance to it, of the public significance of sexuality, and of the shifting terrain of identity in contemporary Europe.

Nilüfer Göle is Professor of Sociology at the Centre d’Etudes Sociologiques et Politiques Raymond Aron, and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris). She is the author of Islam in Europe: The Lure of Fundamentalism and the Allure of Cosmopolitanism and editor of Islam and Public Controversy in Europe.

to the sixteenth cenPhoto by Manuel Larios.

tury. Saldaña-Portillo

formulates the central place of indigenous peoples in the construction of national spaces and racialized notions of citizenship, showing, for instance, how Chicanos/as in the U.S./Mexico borderlands might affirm or reject their indigenous background based on their location. In this and other ways, she shows how the legacies of colonial Spain’s and Britain’s differing approaches to encountering indigenous peoples

PUBLIC PLANET BOOKS A Series Edited by Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar, Jane Kramer, Benjamin Lee, and Michael Werner

continue to shape perceptions of the natural, racial, and cultural landscapes of the U.S. and Mexico. Drawing on a mix of archival, historical, literary, and legal texts, Saldaña-Portillo shows how los indios/Indians provided the condition of possibility for the emergence of Mexico and the United States.

María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo is Associate Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University and the author of The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development, also published by Duke University Press. LATIN AMERIC A OTHERWISE A Series Edited by Walter D. Mignolo, Irene Silverblatt, and Sonia Saldívar-Hull

30

SOCIAL THEORY

I N D I G E N O U S S T U D I E S/ L AT I N A M E R I C A N A N D L AT I N O S T U D I E S

October 264 pages

January 368 pages, 15 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5998–2, $23.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6014–8, $26.95/£18.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5955–5, $84.95/£59.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5988–3, $94.95/£66.00


cultural studies

Balibar on Althusser and Ideology’s Dramaturgy elizabeth weed & ellen rooney, special issue editors

1970s Feminism lisa disch ,

special issue editor

a special issue of SOUTH ATL ANTIC QUARTERLY

a special issue of

For more than a decade, feminist historians and

DIFFERENCES: A JOURNAL OF FEMINIST CULTURAL STUDIES

historiographers have engaged in challenging the “third wave” portrait of 1970s feminism as essentialist, white, middle-class, uninterested

Most readers of Louis

in racism, and theoretically naive. This task

Althusser first enter his work

has involved setting the record straight about

through his writings on ide-

women’s liberation by interrogating how that

ology. In an important new essay Étienne Balibar, friend and colleague of Althusser, offers an original reading of Althusser’s idea of ideology, drawing on both recently published posthumous writing and Althusser’s work on the Piccolo Teatro di Milano. Balibar’s essay uncovers the intricate workings of interpellation through Althusser’s essays on the theater. If debates

image took hold in the public imagination and among academic feminists. This issue invites feminist theorists to return to women’s liberation—to the texts, genres, and cultural productions to which the movement gave rise—for a more nuanced look at its conceptual and political consequences. The essays in this issue explore such topics as the ambivalent legacies of women’s liberation; the production of feminist subjectivity in mass culture and abortion documentaries; the political effects of archiving Chicana feminism; and conceptual and generic innovations in the work of Gayle Rubin, Christine Delphy, and Shulamith Firestone.

Contributors

on dialectical materialism belong to a distant history, Balibar suggests,

Maria Cotera, Lisa Disch, Nancy Fraser, Victoria Hesford, Shatema Threadcraft,

the question of ideology remains crucial for thinking the present. The

Shilyh Warren, Kathi Weeks

issue includes commentaries on Balibar’s essay from five influential scholars who engage critically with Althusser’s philosophy: Judith Butler, Banu Bargu, Adi Ophir, Warren Montag, and Bruce Robbins. This issue

Lisa Disch is Professor of Political Science and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. She is the author of The Tyranny of the Two-Party System and Hannah Arendt and the Limits of Philosophy.

reanimates Althusser’s concept of ideology as an analytic tool for contemporary cultural and political critique.

Contributors Étienne Balibar, Banu Bargu, Judith Butler, Warren Montag, Adi Ophir, Bruce Robbins, Ellen Rooney, Elizabeth Weed

Elizabeth Weed is Director Emeritus of the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women at Brown University. Ellen Rooney is Professor of Modern Culture and Media and Professor of English at Brown University.

C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S/ P H I L O S O P H Y

C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S/ W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E S

December 200 pages Vol. 26 no. 3

October 240 pages Vol. 114 no. 4

paper, 978–0–8223–6837–3, $14.00/£9.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6845–8, $16.00/£10.99

31


cultural studies

Virtual Memory

The Transparent Traveler

Time-Based Art and the Dream of Digitality

The Performance and Culture of Airport Security

homay king

rachel hall

“Homay King’s Virtual Memory is a fascinating and beautifully written book that explores the complex imbrication of the analog with the digital, both

“Rachel Hall’s study of the performance of surveillance, transparency, and screening at airports offers acute perceptions about the cultural impact of

technologically and conceptually, and makes the case that there is no

the TSA’s screening practices, and her notion of transparency has both imme-

experience of technology or art that can avoid engagement with the real-

diate political implications and lasting explanatory power. Current debates

ity of lived experience. Considering the breadth of its examples and topics,

over surveillance and demands for transparency make this book important

Virtual Memory should find readers not only in film and media studies, but

and incredibly prescient.”—DIANA TAYLOR , author of Performance

in art history and criticism, and science and technology studies as well. An outstanding book.”—D. N. RODOWICK , author of Philosophy’s Artful

At the airport we line up, remove

Conversation

our shoes, empty our pockets, and hold still for three seconds THE

in the body scanner. Deemed safe, we put ourselves back

T RAN SPA R E N T

together and are free to buy the beverage we were prohibited from taking through security. In The

TRAVELER

Transparent Traveler Rachel Hall explains how the familiar routines of airport security choreograph passenger behavior to create

THE PERFORMANCE

submissive and docile travel-

AND CULTURE OF AIRPORT

ers. The cultural performance of

SECURITY

RACHEL HALL

contemporary security practices mobilizes what Hall calls the

“aesthetics of transparency.” To appear transparent, a passenger must A publicity still for Ming Wong’s Persona Performa, 2011. Courtesy of the artist.

perform innocence and display a willingness to open their body to rou-

In Virtual Memory, Homay King traces the concept of the virtual through

tine inspection and analysis. Those who cannot—whether because of

the philosophical works of Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze, and Giorgio

race, immigration and citizenship status, disability, age, or religion—are

Agamben to offer a new framework for thinking about film, video, and

deemed opaque, presumed to be a threat, and subject to search and

time-based contemporary art. Detaching the virtual from its contem-

detention. Analyzing everything from airport architecture, photography,

porary associations with digitality, technology, simulation, and speed,

and computer-generated imagery to full-body scanners and TSA behav-

King shows that using its original meaning—which denotes a potential

ior detection techniques, Hall theorizes the transparent traveler as the

on the cusp of becoming—provides the means to reveal the “analog”

embodiment of a cultural ideal of submission to surveillance.

elements in contemporary digital art. Through a queer reading of the

Rachel Hall is Associate Professor of Communication Studies at Louisiana State University and the author of Wanted: The Outlaw in American Visual Culture.

life and work of mathematician Alan Turing, and analyses of artists who use digital technologies such as Christian Marclay, Agnès Varda, and Victor Burgin, King destabilizes the analog/digital binary. By treating the virtual as the expression of powers of potential and change and of historical contingency, King explains how these artists transcend distinctions between disembodiment and materiality, abstraction and tangibility, and the unworldly and the earth-bound. In so doing, she shows how their art speaks to durational and limit-bound experience more than contemporary understandings of the virtual and digital would suggest.

Homay King is Associate Professor of History of Art at Bryn Mawr College and the author of Lost in Translation: Orientalism, Cinema, and the Enigmatic Signifier, also published by Duke University Press.

32

F I L M T H E O R Y/ N E W M E D I A /A R T

C U LT U R A L S T U D IE S/S U RV E I L L A N CE S T U D IE S/PE R F O R M A N CE S T U D IE S

October 248 pages, 59 illustrations

September 256 pages, 37 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6002–5, $23.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5960–9, $23.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5959–3, $84.95/£59.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5939–5, $84.95/£59.00


african american studies

Dark Matters

The Repeating Body

On the Surveillance of Blackness

Slavery’s Visual Resonance in the Contemporary

simone browne

kimberly juanita brown

“Simone Browne paints a devastating portrait of the compounding work of

“In this moving study of slavery and its afterlife, Kimberly Juanita Brown

racial surveillance—a process in which profiling serves as both the justifi-

examines literature, photography, and contemporary art to retrieve black

cation for information gathering and a defense of the heightened, dispro-

women from the margins of slavery’s representation. The Repeating Body

portionate scrutiny this information is said to warrant. From the branding

is an invaluable contribution to the study of feminism, diaspora, and visual

of flesh as stigmata of captivity to biometric markers as gatekeepers, Dark

culture.”—SAIDIYA HARTMAN , author of Lose Your Mother: A Journey

Matters transports us across space and time, illuminating how the sort-

Along the Atlantic Slave Route

ing, counting, and surveilling of human beings was as central to the dawn of industrialization as it is to the information society. Browne’s incisive,

Haunted by representations of

wide-ranging, and multidisciplinary meditation shows us the scale and persistence of surveillance culture, and especially its urgent stakes for communities of color. Her deft history of the present moment reveals how data

black women that resist the THE REPEATING BODY

reality of the body’s vulnerability, Kimberly Juanita Brown

becomes us.”—ALONDRA NELSON , author of Body and Soul: The Black

traces slavery’s afterlife in black

Panther Party and the Fight against Medical Discrimination

women’s literary and visual cultural productions. Brown draws In Dark Matters Simone Browne locates the conditions of blackness

on black feminist theory, visual

as a key site through which surveillance is practiced, narrated, and

culture studies, literary criti-

resisted. She shows how contemporary surveillance technologies and

cism, and critical race theory to

practices are informed by the long history of racial formation and by

explore contemporary visual and

the methods of policing black life under slavery, such as branding, run-

literary representations of black

away slave notices, and lantern laws. Placing surveillance studies into

women’s bodies that embrace

conversation with the archive of transatlantic slavery and its afterlife, Browne draws from black feminist theory, sociology, and cultural studies to analyze texts as diverse as the methods of surveilling blackness

slavery’s visual resonance in the contemporary

kimberly juanita brown

and foreground the body’s vulnerability and slavery’s inherent violence. She shows how writers

she discusses: from the design of the eighteenth-century slave ship

such as Gayl Jones, Toni Morrison, Audre Lorde, and Jamaica Kincaid,

Brooks, Jeremy Bentham’s Panopticon, and The Book of Negroes, to

along with visual artists Carrie Mae Weems and María Magdalena

contemporary art, literature, biometrics, and post-9/11 airport security

Campos-Pons, highlight the scarred and broken bodies of black women

practices. Surveillance, Browne asserts, is both a discursive and mate-

by repeating, passing down, and making visible the residues of slav-

rial practice that reifies boundaries, borders, and bodies around racial

ery’s existence and cruelty. Their work not only provides a corrective

lines, so much so that the surveillance of blackness has long been,

to those who refuse to acknowledge that vulnerability, but empowers

and continues to be, a social and political norm.

black women to create their own subjectivities. In The Repeating Body,

Simone Browne is Assistant Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.

Brown returns black women to the center of discourses of slavery, thereby providing the means with which to more fully understand slavery’s history and its penetrating reach into modern American life.

Kimberly Juanita Brown is Visiting Scholar in Gender Studies at Brown University and Visiting Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Harvard University.

B L A C K S T U D I E S/S U R V E I L L A N C E S T U D I E S/C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S

B L AC K S T U D I E S/ W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E S/ V I S U A L C U LT U R E

October 232 pages, 20 illustrations

September 272 pages, 29 illustrations (including 9 in color)

paper, 978–0–8223–5938–8, $23.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5929–6, $24.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5919–7, $84.95/£59.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5909–8, $89.95/£62.00

33


african american studies

Territories of the Soul

Shapeshifters

Queered Belonging in the Black Diaspora

Black Girls and the Choreography of Citizenship

nadia ellis

aimee meredith cox

“Territories of the Soul is a work of such profligate complexity and counter-

“In this powerful and passionate book Aimee Meredith Cox communicates

intuitive imagination that it defies stable definition. It aims, above all, to

important messages about the integrity and humanity of Black girls, their

figure a queer aesthetic of diasporic sensibility that exceeds any simple

potential, and the ways this potential is variously thwarted, squeezed,

dialectic of belonging and displacement, sameness and difference. Through

bounced, and redirected. Rich in detail and at times hilarious, painful, and

its uncanny juxtapositions it challenges us to think against our norma-

revealing, Cox’s ethnography provides an account of the ways girls move

tive assumptions of the limits and satisfactions of black identification.

through the obstacle course of poverty, racism, and gender violence

Nadia Ellis has written a sensuously queer manifesto of diasporic loss and

to create and imagine lives for themselves.”—ELIZABETH CHIN, author

utopia.”—DAVID SCOTT, author of Omens of Adversity: Tragedy, Time,

of Purchasing Power: Black Kids and American Consumer Culture

Memory, Justice

In Shapeshifters Aimee Meredith Nadia Ellis attends to African diasporic belonging as it comes into

Cox explores how young Black

being through black expressive culture. Living in the diaspora, Ellis

women in a Detroit homeless shel-

asserts, means existing between claims to land and imaginative flights

ter contest stereotypes, critique

unmoored from the Earth—that is, to live within the territories of the

their status as partial citizens,

soul. Drawing on the work of Jose Muñoz, Ellis connects queerness’s uto-

and negotiate poverty, racism,

pian potential with diasporic aesthetics. Occupying the territory of the

and gender violence to create

soul, being neither here nor there, creates in diasporic subjects feelings

and imagine lives for themselves.

of loss and desire and a sensation of a pull from elsewhere. Ellis locates

Based on eight years of fieldwork

these phenomena in the works of C. L. R. James, the testy encounter

at a local shelter, Cox shows how

Black Girls and

between George Lamming and James Baldwin at the 1956 Congress of

the Choreography of Citizenship

Negro Artists and Writers in Paris, the elusiveness of the queer diasporic subject in Andrew Salkey’s novel Escape to an Autumn Pavement, and the trope of spirit possession in Nathaniel Mackey’s writing and Burning

SHAPESHIFTERS AIMEE MEREDITH COX

Spear’s reggae. Ellis’s use of queer and affect theory shows how geog-

the shelter’s residents—who range in age from fifteen to twenty-two— employ strategic methods she characterizes as choreography to disrupt the social hierarchies and

raphies claim diasporic subjects in ways that nationalist or masculinist

prescriptive narratives that work to marginalize them. Among these are

tropes can never fully capture. Diaspora, Ellis concludes, is best under-

dance and poetry, which residents learn in shelter workshops. These

stood as a mode of feeling and belonging, one fundamentally shaped

outlets for performance and self-expression, Cox shows, are key to the

by the experience of loss.

residents exercising their agency, while their creation of alternative

Nadia Ellis is Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley.

family structures demands a rethinking of notions of care, protection, and love. Cox also uses these young women’s experiences to tell larger stories: of Detroit’s history, the Great Migration, deindustrialization, the politics of respectability, and the construction of Black girls and women as social problems. With Shapeshifters Cox gives a voice to young Black women who find creative and non-normative solutions to the problems that come with being young, Black, and female in America.

Aimee Meredith Cox is Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies at Fordham University.

34

B L AC K S T U D I E S/C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S/Q U E E R S T U D I E S

A F R I C A N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S/ W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E S

August 272 pages, 5 illustrations

August 304 pages

paper, 978–0–8223–5928–9, $23.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5931–9, $25.95/£17.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5915–9, $84.95/£59.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5943–2, $94.95/£66.00


african american studies

i n d i g e n o u s /n a t i v e a m e r i c a n s t u d i e s

Race Becomes Tomorrow

Dilemmas of Difference

North Carolina and the Shadow of Civil Rights

Indigenous Women and the Limits of Postcolonial Development Policy

gerald m . sider

sarah a . radcliffe “Through storytelling Gerald M. Sider makes many incisive points about race, culture, power, and class. His stories are more than just stories—they provide entry points into a deeper understanding of how people live race and power. Highly stimulating, and at times humorous and poignant, Race Becomes Tomorrow will make a controversial and important contribution to contemporary debates about race, culture, and inequality.”—LESLEY

GILL , author of The School of the Americas: Military Training and Political Violence in the Americas

“Sarah A. Radcliffe’s wonderful new book shows how race, class, and gender continue to structure inequalities in the postcolonial present. Based on innovative collaborations with indigenous women’s organizations in Ecuador, this book is an important intervention into the politics of knowledge. She brings us the voices of indigenous women—the supposed beneficiaries of development—who bring their own situated knowledge to bear to critique both NGO development projects and the alternative model of vivir bien, creating new forms of citizenship in the process.”—NANCY

In Race Becomes Tomorrow Gerald M. Sider weaves together stories from his civil rights activism, his youth, and his experiences as an

GREY POSTERO, author of Now We Are Citizens: Indigenous Politics in Postmulticultural Bolivia

anthropologist to investigate the dynamic ways race has been constructed and lived in America since the 1960s. Tacking between past

In Dilemmas of Difference Sarah

and present, Sider describes how political power, economic control,

A. Radcliffe explores the relation-

and racism inject chaos into the lives of ordinary people, especially

ship of rural indigenous women

African Americans, with surprising consequences. In addition to

in Ecuador to the development

recounting his years working on voter registration in rural North

policies and actors that are osten-

Carolina, Sider makes connections between numerous issues, from

sibly there to help ameliorate

sharecropping and deindustrialization to the recessions of the 1970s

social and economic inequality.

and 2008, the rise of migrant farm labor, and contemporary living-wage campaigns. Sider’s stories—whether about the cockroach races in immigrant homes, degrading labor conditions, or the claims and failures of police violence—provide numerous entry points into gaining a deeper understanding of how race and power both are and cannot be lived. They demonstrate that race is produced and exists in unpredictability, and the transition from yesterday to tomorrow is anything but certain.

Radcliffe finds that development Photo by the author.

policy’s inability to recognize and

reckon with the legacies of colonialism reinforces long-standing social hierarchies, thereby reproducing the very poverty and disempowerment they are there to solve. This ineffectiveness results from failures to acknowledge the local population’s diversity and a lack of accounting for the complex intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and

Gerald M. Sider is Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the Graduate

geography. As a result, projects often fail to match beneficiaries’ needs,

Center and the College of Staten Island, City University of New York,

certain groups are made invisible, and indigenous women become

and the author of Skin for Skin: Death and Life for Inuit and Innu, also

excluded from positions of authority. Drawing from a mix of ethno-

published by Duke University Press.

graphic fieldwork and postcolonial and social theory, Radcliffe centers the perspectives of indigenous women to show how they craft practices and epistemologies that critique ineffective development methods, inform their political agendas, and shape their strategic interventions in public policy debates.

Sarah A. Radcliffe is Professor of Latin American Geography at the University of Cambridge and coauthor of Indigenous Development in the Andes: Culture, Power, and Transnationalism, also published by Duke University Press.

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ R A C E A N D R AC I S M

A N T H R O P O L O GY/ D E V E L O P M E N T/ L AT I N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S

November 264 pages, 13 illustrations

December 400 pages, 20 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6008–7, $24.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6010–0, $27.95/£18.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5976–0, $89.95/£62.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5978–4, $99.95/£69.00

35


gay & lesbian studies / sexuality

Sexing Empire

Metroimperial Intimacies

Bodies, Gender, and Desire in Colonial and Postcolonial Relations

Fantasy, Racial-Sexual Governance, and the Philippines in U.S. Imperialism, 1899–1913

ben cowan , nicole m . guidotti - hernández

victor román mendoza

& jason ruiz ,

special issue editors

a special issue of RADIC AL HISTORY REVIEW

“Metroimperial Intimacies is a magisterial work of cultural and historical scholarship, and one of the best books about Philippine cultural exigen-

From steamships to steam rooms and sweat lodges to sweatshops, processes of pleasures and desire have shaped the regulation and classification of bodies in a wide variety of colonial settings. On beaches and online, and in board-

cies in the early twentieth century to come out in recent years. Wielding an expert and elegant hand, Victor Román Mendoza deploys a queer of color perspective and relocates it outside of American shores into its colonial frontier. An exciting, intricately argued, and path-breaking book, Metroimperial Intimacies marks a major turn.”—MARTIN F.

MANALANSAN IV, author of Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora

rooms, temples, and taverns, sexual

Performers enacting a scalping at the Indian Pageant. Photo by Gil Larsen and used courtesy of the Bayfield Heritage Association.

practices have always influenced

In Metroimperial Intimacies Victor Román Mendoza combines histori-

imperial power relations. In the

cal, literary, and archival analysis with queer-of-color critique to show

many places and relationships

how U.S. imperial incursions into the Philippines enabled the growth of

where colonialism still affects eco-

unprecedented social and sexual intimacies between native Philippine

nomics, sex and sexuality remain

and U.S. subjects. The real and imagined intimacies—whether expressed

a driving—if sometimes hidden—

through friendship, love, or eroticism—threatened U.S. gender and

force. The contributors to this

sexuality norms. To codify U.S. heteronormative behavior, the colonial

provocative issue contemplate

government prohibited anything loosely defined as perverse, which

empire as a global process involving sexualized subjects and objects,

along with popular representations of Filipinos, regulated colonial sub-

with essays that consider the history of sex and (or in) empire across

jects and depicted them as sexually available, diseased, and degenerate.

several disciplines. Their topics include a “bewitched” nun in colonial

Mendoza analyzes laws, military records, the writing of Philippine stu-

Mexico, contemporary call-center workers in the Philippines, and

dents in the United States, and popular representations of Philippine

General Douglas MacArthur’s mixed-race Filipina mistress, among many

colonial subjects to show how their lives, bodies, and desires became

others.

the very battleground for the consolidation of repressive legal, eco-

Contributors

nomic, and political institutions and practices of the U.S. colonial state.

Laura Briggs, Keith Camacho, Ben Cowan, Emmanuel David, Vernadette Vicuña

By highlighting the importance of racial and gendered violence in main-

Gonzalez, Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández, Elizabeth Mesok, Rachel Sarah O’Toole,

taining control at home and abroad, Mendoza demonstrates that studies

Katrina Phillips, Jason Ruiz

of U.S. sexuality must take into account the reach and impact of U.S.

Ben Cowan is Assistant Professor of World History at George Mason University. Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández is Associate Professor of

36

imperialism.

Victor Román Mendoza is Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and

American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of Unspeakable Violence: Remapping U.S. and Mexican National Imaginaries, also published by Duke University Press. Jason Ruiz is Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University of Notre Dame and the author of Americans in the Treasure House: Travel to Porfirian Mexico and the Cultural Politics of Empire.

PERVERSE MODERNITIES A Series Edited by Jack Halberstam and Lisa Lowe

English at the University of Michigan.

H I S T O R Y/S E X A N D S E X U A L I T Y

A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S/ H I S T O R Y/Q U E E R T H E O R Y

October 228 pages, 4 illustrations Issue #123

December 320 pages, 18 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–6836–6, $14.00/£9.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6034–6, $25.95/£17.99 cloth, 978–0–8223–6019–3, $94.95/£66.00


asian studies

Queer Marxism in Two Chinas

Youth, Labor and Politics in East Asia

petrus liu

gabriella luk ács ,

special issue editor

a special issue of POSITIONS: ASIA CRITIQUE “In this quite stunning book, Petrus Liu offers a new intervention into gender and sexuality studies. He establishes queer perspectives as a way

The economic deregulation

of thinking about the doubleness of China, and tracks how sexuality has

that followed the East Asian

been produced as a new ethnic identity within an emerging pluralist frame-

financial crisis and reces-

work, and how queer Marxism contests this production. Liu argues for

sion in the 1990s blocked

a complex materialist social theory that takes into account the relationship

youth from the labor market.

between labor power, the reproduction of society, and the material status

This issue investigates

of sexuality. In the end, he refuses to identify materialism with economic

the resulting youth labor

reductionism, showing instead how the reproduction of society requires its

crisis and its predominant

cultural articulation, and how the effort to navigate two Chinas produces

manifestations—youth

a non–state-centered form of queer critique. For Liu, queer theorists are in

unemployment and underem-

a powerful position to call the theory of the state into question—a move

ployment. The contributors

that holds out serious consequences for a new geopolitical reading of Marxism through the powerful framework of sexuality.”—JUDITH BUTLER , Maxine Elliot Professor, University of California, Berkeley

examine these phenomena Han Bing, Youth Offered Up to Capital 1, 2007. Courtesy of the artist.

not as social anomalies but as the new faces of labor for

youth. They conceptualize this situation as emblematic of a global crisis In Queer Marxism in Two Chinas Petrus Liu rethinks the relationship between Marxism and queer cultures in mainland China and Taiwan. Whereas many scholars assume the emergence of queer cultures in China signals the end of Marxism and demonstrates China’s political and economic evolution, Liu finds the opposite to be true. He

in capitalism and study how the politics of youth unemployment and underemployment emerge interconnected in China, Japan, and South Korea. The essays highlight how political leaders in these countries gamble with the futures of their young people to secure their places in neoliberal globalization, disconnecting national futures from personal

challenges the persistence of Cold War formulations of Marxism that

ones.

position it as intellectually incompatible with queer theory, and shows

Contributors

how queer Marxism offers a nonliberal alternative to Western models

Cho Hae-joang, Jennifer Jihye Chun, Mark Driscoll, Michael Fisch, Ju Hui Judy Han,

of queer emancipation. The work of queer Chinese artists and intellec-

Anita Koo, Gabriella Lukács, Pun Ngai, Xia Zhang

tuals not only provides an alternative to liberal ideologies of inclusion and diversity, but demonstrates how different conceptions of and attitudes toward queerness in China and Taiwan stem from geopolitical tensions. With Queer Marxism in Two Chinas Liu offers a revision

Gabriella Lukács is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the author of Scripted Affects, Branded Selves: Television, Subjectivity, and Capitalism in 1990s Japan, also published by Duke University Press.

to current understandings of what queer theory is, does, and can be.

Petrus Liu is Associate Professor of Humanities at Yale-NUS College and the author of Stateless Subjects: Chinese Martial Arts Literature and Postcolonial History.

Q U E E R T H E O R Y/A S I A N S T U D I E S/ M A R X I S T T H E O R Y

ASIAN STUDIES

October 232 pages, 2 illustrations

August 232 pages Vol. 23 no. 3

paper, 978–0–8223–6004–9, $23.95/£16.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6832–8, $14.00/£9.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5972–2, $84.95/£59.00

37


south asian studies

Speaking of the Self

Pipe Politics, Contested Waters

Gender, Performance, and Autobiography in South Asia

Embedded Infrastructures of Millennial Mumbai

anshu malhotra & siobhan lambert- hurley,

editors

lisa björkman

“Pipe Politics, Contested Waters is a brilliant ethnography of water and Lisa Björkman is one helluva fieldworker: indefatigable, resilient, determined,

“In analyzing material from South Asia, across contexts and time periods, Speaking of the Self is a novel contribution to the flourishing field of autobiography studies. The contributors present material little-known to Anglophone audiences that will stimulate thinking by specialists who have heretofore been mostly focused on ‘Western’ texts and contexts.” —MARILYN BOOTH , author of Classes of Ladies of Cloistered Spaces: Writing Feminist History through Biography in Fin-de-siècle Egypt

and resourceful. Determined as she was to get to the bottom of things, what she finds is that she can’t. The more she tries to map the infrastructure or follow the water engineers and their workmen to the sites at which the ‘system’ needs to be fixed, the more the solutions, if there are any, seem out of reach. A path-breaking book, Pipe Politics, Contested Waters is destined to become a classic in the burgeoning literature on water and water sustainability.”—STEVEN CATON , author of Yemen Chronicle: An Anthropology of War and Mediation

Many consider the autobiography to

Despite Mumbai’s position as

be a Western genre that represents

India’s financial, economic, and

the self as fully autonomous.

cultural capital, water is chroni-

The contributors to Speaking of the Self challenge this presumption by

p i p e p o l i t i c s , c o n t e s t e d wat e r s

poor alike. Mumbai’s dry taps

examining a wide range of women’s

are puzzling, given that the city

autobiographical writing from South

does not lack for either water or

Asia. Expanding the definition of what

financial resources. In Pipe Politics,

kinds of writing can be considered

Contested Waters, Lisa Björkman

autobiographical, the contributors

shows how an elite dream to trans-

analyze everything from poetry, songs, mystical experiences, and diaries to prose, fiction, architecture,

form Mumbai into a “world-class” Embedded Infrastructures of Millennial Mumbai lisa Björkman

ethnographic detail, Pipe Politics,

they study are just as diverse: a Mughal princess, an eighteenthcentury courtesan from Hyderabad,

a nineteenth-century Muslim prostitute in Punjab, a housewife in colonial Bengal, a Muslim Gandhian devotee of Krishna, several female Indian and Pakistani novelists, and two male actors who worked as female impersonators. The contributors find that in these autobiographies the authors construct their gendered selves in relational terms. Throughout, they show how autobiographical writing—in whatever form it takes—provides the means toward more fully understanding the historical, social, and cultural milieu in which the author performs herself and creates her subjectivity.

Contributors Asiya Alam, Afshan Bokhari, Uma Chakravarti, Kathryn Hansen, Siobhan LambertHurley, Anshu Malhotra, Ritu Menon, Shubhra Ray, Shweta Sachdeva Jha, Sylvia Vatuk

Anshu Malhotra is Associate Professor of History at the University

business center has wreaked havoc on the city’s water pipes. In rich

and religious treatises. The authors Jahanara, attributed to Lalchand, c. 1631–3. © British Library Board. Add. Or.3129.f.25v. Used by permission.

cally unavailable for rich and

Contested Waters explores how the everyday work of getting water animates and inhabits a penumbra of infrastructural activity—of business, brokerage, secondary markets, and sociopolitical networks—whose workings are reconfiguring and rescaling political authority in the city. Mumbai’s increasingly illegible and volatile hydrologies, Björkman argues, are lending infrastructures increasing political salience just as actual control over pipes and flows becomes contingent on dispersed and intimate assemblages of knowledge, power, and material authority. These new arenas of contestation reveal the illusory and precarious nature of the project to remake Mumbai in the image Shanghai or Singapore, and gesture instead toward the highly contested futures and democratic possibilities of the actually existing city.

Lisa Björkman is Assistant Professor of Urban and Public Affairs at University of Louisville, and Research Scholar at CETREN (Transregional Research Network), University of Göttingen (Germany).

of Delhi and the author of Gender, Caste, and Religious Identities: Restructuring Class in Colonial Punjab. Siobhan Lambert-Hurley is Senior Lecturer in Modern History at Loughborough University and author of Muslim Women, Reform and Princely Patronage: Nawab Sultan Jahan Begam of Bhopal.

38

S O U T H A S I A N S T U D I E S/ W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E S

U R B A N S T U D I E S/A N T H R O P O L O GY/S O U T H A S I A N S T U D I E S

November 336 pages, 15 illustrations

October 320 pages, 18 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5991–3, $26.95/£18.99

paper, 978–0–8223–5969–2, $25.95/£17.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5983–8, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–5950–0, $94.95/£66.00


south asian studies

political theory

The Spectral Wound

Janus’s Gaze

Sexual Violence, Public Memories, and the Bangladesh War of 1971

Essays on Carl Schmitt

nayanik a mookherjee Foreword by Veena Das

“Nayanika Mookherjee has made visible a scene of gendered violence in

carlo galli Edited and with an introduction by Adam Sitze Translated by Amanda Minervini

“Carlo Galli is certainly the most important scholar of Carl Schmitt in Italy

the Bangladesh War of Liberation that travels beyond its specific context

and, to my knowledge, in the world. Among Galli’s virtues is how well he

to historical, theoretical, and lived realities that are global in range and

situates Schmitt’s concepts both in the context of Schmitt’s entire opus

scope.”—GAYATRI CHAKRAVORTY SPIVAK , author of An Aesthetic

and in the context of twentieth-century German politics and political theory.

Education in the Era of Globalization

Galli’s essays provide brilliant explications and explorations of Schmitt’s central concepts, and Adam Sitze’s introduction and Amanda Minervini’s translation are exemplary.”—MICHAEL HARDT, coauthor of Empire

First published in Italian in 2008 and appearing here in English for the first time, Janus’s Gaze is the culmination of Carlo Galli’s ongoing critique of the work of Carl Schmitt. Galli argues that Schmitt’s main accomplishment, as well as the thread that unifies his oeuvre, is his construction of a genealogy of the modern that explains how modernity’s compulsory drive to achieve order is both necessary and impossible. Galli addresses five key problems in Schmitt’s thought: his relation to the state, the significance of his concept of political theology, his readings of Machiavelli and Spinoza, his relation to Leo Strauss, and his relevance for contemporary political theory. Galli emphasizes the importance of passing through Schmitt’s thought—and, more important beyond Schmitt’s thought—if we are to achieve insight into Photo by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak.

the problems of the global age. Adam Sitze provides an illuminating

Following the 1971 Bangladesh War, the Bangladesh government

introduction to Schmitt and Galli’s reading of him.

publicly designated the thousands of women raped by the Pakistani

Carlo Galli is Professor of History of Political Theory at the University of Bologna and the author of many books, including Political Spaces and Global War. Adam Sitze is Associate Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought at Amherst College and the coeditor of Biopolitics: A Reader, also published by Duke University Press. Amanda Minervini is Visiting Assistant Professor of Italian at Colorado College and translator of Nymphs by Giorgio Agamben.

military and their local collaborators as birangonas, (“brave women”). Nayanika Mookherjee demonstrates that while this celebration of birangonas as heroes keeps them in the public memory, they exist in the public consciousness as what Mookherjee calls a spectral wound. Dominant representations of birangonas as dehumanized victims with disheveled hair, a vacant look, and rejected by their communities create this wound, the effects of which flatten the diversity of their experiences through which birangonas have lived with the violence of wartime rape. In critically examining the pervasiveness of the birangona construction, Mookherjee opens the possibility for a more politico-economic, ethical, and nuanced inquiry into the sexuality of war.

Nayanika Mookherjee is Reader in Socio-Cultural Anthropology at Durham University. Veena Das is Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University.

A N T H R O P O L O GY/S O U T H A S I A N S T U D I E S

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

October 352 pages, 42 illustrations

December 240 pages

paper, 978–0–8223–5968–5, $26.95/£18.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6032–2, $23.95/£16.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5949–4, $94.95/£66.00

cloth, 978–0–8223–6018–6, $84.95/£59.00

39


political theory

caribbean studies

Henri Bergson

Troubling Freedom

vladimir jankélévitch Translated by Nils F. Schott Edited by Alexandre Lefebvre and Nils F. Schott

Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation natasha lightfoot

“Troubling Freedom is a major contribution to the burgeoning literature “Vladimir Jankélévitch’s reading of Henri Bergson remains fresh and vital,

on the aftermath of emancipation. More than any other scholar, Natasha

it is written with tremendous erudition and diligence, and it provides

Lightfoot probes the daily lives of the former slaves, illuminating their family

a ‘Bergson regained’ for a whole new generation of readers of a truly great

relations, work lives, religious practices, and quotidian struggles. The end

philosopher. Jankélévitch gives us Bergson as a philosopher of life and also

of slavery emerges not as a revolutionary watershed but as a transition

a figure for whom philosophy should be a way of life.”—KEITH ANSELL-

from one regime of inequality to another.”—ERIC FONER, author of

PEARSON, author of Philosophy and the Adventure of the Virtual: Bergson

Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad

and the Time of Life

Appearing here in English for the

HENRI

BERGSON VLADIMIR JANKÉLÉVITCH A L E XA N DR E L EF E BVR E & N I L S F. SC HO T T, E DI TORS T R A N S L A T E D B Y N I L S F. S C H O T T

first time, Vladimir Jankélévitch’s Henri Bergson is one of the two great commentaries written on Henri Bergson. Gilles Deleuze’s Bergsonism renewed interest in the great French philosopher but failed to consider Bergson’s experiential and religious perspectives. Here Jankélévitch covers all aspects of Bergson’s thought, emphasizing the concepts of time and duration, memory, evolution, simplicity, love, and joy. A friend of Bergson’s, Jankélévitch first published

this book in 1931 and revised it in 1959 to treat Bergson’s later works.

Moravian Church Mission, St. John’s Street (ca. 1830). Aquatint by Johann Stobwasser. Courtesy of the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University.

This unabridged translation of the 1959 edition includes an editor’s introduction, which contextualizes and outlines Jankélévitch’s reading

In 1834 Antigua became the only British colony in the Caribbean to move

of Bergson, additional essays on Bergson by Jankélévitch, and

directly from slavery to full emancipation. Immediate freedom, however,

Bergson’s letters to Jankélévitch.

did not live up to its promise, as it did not guarantee any level of stabil-

Vladimir Jankélévitch (1903–1985) held the Chair in Moral Philosophy at the University of Paris-Sorbonne from 1951 to 1978, and wrote more than twenty books on philosophy and music. Alexandre Lefebvre is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Government and International Relations and the Department of Philosophy at the University of Sydney. He is the coeditor of Bergson, Politics, and Religion, also published by Duke University Press. Nils F. Schott is James M. Motley Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University and the translator of several books, including The Helmholtz Curves: Tracing Lost Time, by Henning Schmidgen.

ity and autonomy, and the implementation of new forms of coercion and control made it in many ways indistinguishable from slavery. In Troubling Freedom Natasha Lightfoot tells the story of how Antigua’s newly freed black working people struggled to realize freedom in their everyday lives, prior to and in the decades following emancipation. She presents freedpeople’s efforts to form an efficient workforce, acquire property, secure housing, worship, and build independent communities in response to elite prescriptions for acceptable behavior and oppression. Despite its continued efforts, Antigua’s black population failed to convince whites that its members were worthy of full economic and political inclusion. By highlighting the diverse ways freedpeople defined and created freedom through quotidian acts of survival and occasional uprisings, Lightfoot complicates conceptions of freedom and the general narrative that landlessness was the primary constraint for newly emancipated slaves in the Caribbean.

Natasha Lightfoot is Assistant Professor of History at Columbia University.

40

PHILOSOPHY

C A R I B B E A N H I S T O R Y/A F R I C A N D I A S P O R A

August 360 pages

December 328 pages, 10 illustrations

paper, 978–0–8223–5935–7, $25.95/£17.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6007–0, $25.95/£17.99

cloth, 978–0–8223–5916–6, $94.95/£66.00

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history

literary criticism

Food and France

Modernist Ethics and Posthumanism

What Food Studies Can Teach Us about History erica j . peters &

derek ryan & mark west,

bertram m . gordon ,

special issue editors

special issue editors

a special issue of TWENTIETH-CENTURY LITERATURE From snakes to sheep, from hyenas

a special issue of FRENCH HISTORIC AL STUDIES

to moths, from rural landscapes to childhood objects, this special issue

This special issue offers a broad range

examines the role of nonhuman alterity

of social and cultural insights into

in the ethics of modernism. Drawing

the history of French gastronomy.

on the posthumanist theory of Jacques

At a moment when French cuisine no

Derrida, Bruno Latour, Jane Bennett,

longer dominates the world of fine

and others, Modernist Ethics and

dining, the history of French food has

Posthumanism offers original close

drawn increasing attention in the aca-

readings of both canonical and more

demic world. The contributors address

marginalized modernist figures. The

topics spanning the seventeenth to the

contributors analyze unrecognizable

twentieth centuries, such as coffee’s relationship to slavery and exoticism;

creatures in D. H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf; indeterminate animals in E. M. Forster; networks of human and

the promotion of terroir to an aspiring

nonhuman agents in Rainer Maria Rilke and Woolf; pacifism among

middle class; the contrast between the

people, animals, and things in Samuel Beckett; responsibility and rural

romanticized images of Parisian shop girls and their efforts to survive

environments in Mary Butts; and objects, both lost and found, and

on street food in the early twentieth century; the “standard meal”

the threat of extinction in Elizabeth Bowen. What emerges from these

imagined by nineteenth-century nutritionists and the divergent reality

essays is an account of modernist ethics that is embedded in relations

of meager lunches for the working class; and the inequitable experience

between human and nonhuman and that gains its force through experi-

of wartime deprivation. The articles in this issue both model how the

ments in both content and form.

study of the culture of food can ground our understanding of France’s place in the world and illuminate questions of nationalism, global networks, gender, race, ethnicity, and class.

Contributors Martin Bruegel, Bertram M. Gordon, Julia Landweber, Philippe Meyzie, Kenneth Mouré, Erica J. Peters, Patricia A. Tilburg

Contributors Gabriel Hankins, Laci Mattison, Stephen Ross, Derek Ryan, Jeff Wallace, Mark West, Sam Wiseman

Derek Ryan is Lecturer in Modernist Literature at the University of Kent and the author of Animal Theory: A Critical Introduction. Mark West is a recent Ph.D. graduate of the University of Glasgow.

Erica J. Peters is the Director of Culinary Historians of Northern California and author of San Francisco: A Food Biography. Bertram M. Gordon is Professor of History at Mills College and the author of Collaborationism in France during the Second World War.

H I S T O R Y/ F O O D S T U D I E S

LITER ARY CRITICISM AND THEORY

Available 184 pages, 6 illustrations Vol. 38 no. 2

August 135 pages Vol. 61 no. 3

paper, 978–0–8223–6835–9, $14.00/£9.99

paper, 978–0–8223–6834–2, $12.00/£9.99

41


histor y of economics

mathematics / new journals

Market Failure in Context

Banach Journal of Mathematical Analysis

alain marciano & steven g . medema ,

mohammad sal moslehian , editor special issue editors

Annals of Functional Analysis

a special issue of HISTORY OF POLITIC AL ECONOMY

mohammad sal moslehian , editor

This volume explores the social, political, and intellectual contexts in which twentieth-century notions of market failure were developed.

On behalf of the Tusi Mathematical Research

Markets can fail to perform in ways that best promote the larger inter-

Group of Mashhad, Iran, Duke University Press

ests of society: this idea is as old as economics itself and is one of the

now publishes two mathematics journals in

most crucial issues with which economic thinkers have had to grapple.

the fields of matrix analysis, functional analysis,

However, while the history of the theory of market failure has received

operator theory, abstract harmonic analysis,

some critical examination, little attention has been paid to the larger

and related subjects.

contexts in which these theoretical analyses emerged. Contributors

The Banach Journal of Mathematical Analysis is a peer-reviewed journal

to this volume directly examine these contexts to gain a greater under-

publishing survey articles and original research papers that give major

standing of and appreciation for the influence of external ideas and

results with profound impact while developing new ideas.

events on the development of economic theories and to stimulate additional scholarship around this important facet of the history of economics. Subscribers to History of Political Economy will receive a copy of Market Failure in Context.

Contributors Nahid Aslanbeigui, Roger E. Backhouse, Bradley W. Bateman, Sebastian Berger, David Colander, J. Daniel Hammond, Marianne Johnson, Thomas C. Leonard, Alain Marciano, Steven G. Medema, Guy Oakes, Malcolm Rutherford, John D. Singleton

Alain Marciano is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Montpellier and coeditor of A Guide to Posner’s Economic Analysis of Law. Steven G. Medema is Distinguished Professor of Economics at the University of Colorado at Denver and the author of The Hesitant Hand: Taming Self-Interest in the History of Economic Ideas.

The Annals of Functional Analysis publishes short research papers which present new and deep results with interesting implications for the fields.

Mohammad Sal Moslehian is Professor of Mathematics at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.

Banach Journal of Mathematical Analysis Volume 9 | Four times per year

Annals of Functional Analysis Volume 6 | Four times per year Both journals are online-only publications and are available to libraries as part of the Euclid Prime mathematics and statistics collection. Individual subscriptions are not available at this time.

December 280 pages Vol. 47 no. 5 cloth, 978–0–8223–6833–5, $59.95/£42.00

ELEC T RONIC COLLEC TIONS

F ROM DU KE U NIV ER SIT Y PRE SS

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The Argentina Reader: History, Culture, Politics Gabriela Nouzeilles and Graciela Montaldo, editors 2002 978–0–8223–2914–5 paper, $27.95tr/£18.99

The Costa Rica Reader: History, Culture, Politics Steven Palmer and Iván Molina, editors 2004 978–0–8223–3372–2 paper, $26.95tr/£18.99

The Cuba Reader: History, Culture, Politics Aviva Chomsky, Barry Carr, and Pamela Maria Smorkaloff, editors 2004 978–0–8223–3197–1 paper, $29.95tr/£20.99

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The Czech Reader: History, Culture, Politics Jan Baz˘ant, Nina Baz˘antová, and Frances Starn, editors 2010 978–0–8223–4794–1 paper, $27.95tr/£18.99

SECOND EDITION

Orin Starn, Carlos Iván Degregori, and Robin Kirk, editors 2005 978–0–8223–3649–5 paper, $28.95tr/£19.99

The SouTh AfricA reAder

The Sri Lanka Reader is a sweeping introduction to the epic history of the island nation located just off the southern tip of India. The island’s recorded history of more than two and a half millennia encompasses waves of immigration from the South Asian subcontinent, the formation of Sinhala Buddhist and Tamil Hindu civilizations, the arrival of Arab Muslim traders, and European colonization by the Portuguese, then the Dutch, and finally the British. Selected texts depict perceptions of the country’s multiple linguistic and religious communities, as well as its political travails after independence in 1948, especially the ethnic violence that recurred from the 1950s until 2009, when the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam were defeated by the Sri Lankan government’s armed forces. This wide-ranging anthology covers the aboriginal Veddhas, the earliest known inhabitants of the island; the Kings of Kandy, Sri Lanka’s last indigenous dynasty; twenty-first-century women who leave the island to work as housemaids in the Middle East; the forty thousand Sri Lankans killed by the tsunami in December 2004; and, through cutting-edge journalism and heart-wrenching poetry, the protracted violence that has scarred the country’s contemporary political history. Along with fifty-four images of paintings, sculptures, and architecture, The Sri Lanka Reader includes more than ninety classic and contemporary texts written by Sri Lankans and foreigners.

H isto ry, C u lt u r e, P o l it iCs

Sri Lanka/Travel

the World readers A Series Edited by Robin Kirk and Orin Starn

The SRI Lanka ReadeR John Clifford Holt, editor

The SRI Lanka ReadeR hi story, Cu ltu r e, Pol i t i Cs

“The Sri Lanka Reader is unprecedented. Never before has there been a book so synoptic in its treatment of Sri Lankan history, politics, and culture. The overall organization, the selections chosen for inclusion, and the introductions to the individual pieces are all of the highest order. This book will be welcomed by specialists in Sri Lankan studies, as well as the more general, educated reader.”—roger r. JaCkson , John W. Nason Professor of Asian Studies and Religion, Carleton College “John Holt’s The Sri Lanka Reader gives many insights into contemporary Sri Lanka while providing an in-depth picture of its rich history. Holt effectively weaves together documents, analytical accounts, photographs, and poetic works to produce a balanced work that is consistent in quality and readability despite accommodating many viewpoints. It is a book that you will return to time and again. It will undoubtedly become the standard collection of documents on Sri Lanka and its history.”—Chandra r. de silva , author of Sri Lanka: A History

John Clifford holt is William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of the Humanities in Religion and Asian Studies at Bowdoin College.

duke university Press Box 90660, Durham, NC 27708-0660

Clifton Crais and Thomas V. McClendon, editors www.dukeupress.edu Cover photograph courtesy of Adele Barker

The Indonesia Reader: History, Culture, Politics Tineke Hellwig and Eric Tagliacozzo, editors 2009 978–0–8223–4424–7 paper, $27.95tr/£18.99 46

The Russia Reader: History, Culture, Politics Adele Marie Barker and Bruce Grant, editors 2010 978–0–8223–4648–7 paper, $29.95tr/£20.99

The South Africa Reader: History, Culture, Politics Clifton Crais and Thomas V. McClendon, editors 2013 978–0–8223–5529–8 paper, $29.95tr/£20.99

d u ke

John Clif f or d holt, ed itor

The Sri Lanka Reader: History, Culture, Politics John Clifford Holt, editor 2011 978–0–8223–4982–2 paper, $34.95tr/£23.99


selected backlist & bestsellers

SEX, OR THE UNBEARABLE LAUREN BERLANT AND LEE EDELMAN

Sex, or the Unbearable Lauren Berlant and Lee Edelman 2014 978–0–8223–5594–6 paper, $21.95/£14.99

Cruel Optimism Lauren Berlant 2011 978–0–8223–5111–5 paper, $24.95/£16.99

No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive Lee Edelman 2004 978–0–8223–3369–2 paper, $22.95/£15.99

Willful Subjects Sara Ahmed 2014 978–0–8223–5783–4 paper, $24.95/£16.99

Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution James Ferguson 2015 978–0–8223–5886–2 paper, $24.95/£16.99

Fear of Small Numbers: An Essay on the Geography of Anger Arjun Appadurai 2006 978–0–8223–3863–5 paper, $21.95tr/£14.99

The Intimacies of Four Continents Lisa Lowe 2015 978–0–8223–5875–6 paper, $24.95/£16.99

The Left Side of History: World War II and the Unfulfilled Promise of Communism in Eastern Europe Kristen Ghodsee 2015 978–0–8223–5835–0 paper, $23.95tr/£16.99

Architecture at the End of the Earth: Photographing the Russian North William Craft Brumfield 2015 978–0–8223–5906–7 cloth, $39.95tr/£27.99

Shine: The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice Krista Thompson 2015 978–0–8223–5807–7 paper, $26.95tr/£18.99

give a man a fish Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution

JAMES FERGUSON

The Queer Art of Failure Judith Halberstam 2011 978–0–8223–5045–3 paper, $22.95tr/£15.99

Denise Brennan

Life Interrupted

Duke

trafficking into forced labor in the united states

Life Interrupted: Trafficking into Forced Labor in the United States Denise Brennan 2014 978–0–8223–5633–2 paper, $23.95tr/£16.99

47


selected backlist & bestsellers

records ruin the landscape

david grubbs

48

John Cage, the Sixties, and Sound Recording

MP3: The Meaning of a Format Jonathan Sterne 2012 978–0–8223–5287–7 paper $24.95/£16.99

Lion Songs: Thomas Mapfumo and the Music That Made Zimbabwe Banning Eyre 2015 978–0–8223–5908–1 cloth, $34.95tr/£23.99

Records Ruin the Landscape: John Cage, the Sixties, and Sound Recording David Grubbs 2014 978–0–8223–5590–8 paper, $23.95tr/£16.99

Legions of Boom: Filipino American Mobile DJ Crews in the San Francisco Bay Area Oliver Wang 2015 978–0–8223–5890–9 paper, $23.95tr/£16.99

When Rains Became Floods: A Child Soldier’s Story Lurgio Gavilán Sánchez 2015 978–0–8223–5851–0 paper, $19.95tr/£13.99

Remnants: A Memoir of Spirit, Activism, and Mothering Rosemarie Freeney Harding with Rachel Elizabeth Harding 2015 978–0–8223–5879–4 paper, $24.95tr/£16.99

The Last Beach Orrin H. Pilkey and J. Andrew G. Cooper 2014 978–0–8223–5809–1 paper, $19.95tr/£13.99

Lunch With a Bigot: The Writer in the World Amitava Kumar 2015 978–0–8223–5930–2 paper, $23.95tr/£16.99

Reclaiming Travel Ilan Stavans and Joshua Ellison 2015 978–0–8223–5869–5 paper, $23.95tr/£16.99

Good Bread Is Back: A Contemporary History of French Bread, the Way It Is Made, and the People Who Make It Steven Laurence Kaplan 2006 978–0–8223–5924–1 paper, $24.95tr/£16.99

Ordinary Medicine: Extraordinary Treatments, Longer Lives, and Where to Draw the Line Sharon R. Kaufman 2015 978–0–8223–5888–6 paper, $26.95tr/£18.99

Rights: World, except South Asia

Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy Gary May 2014 978–0–8223–5927–2 paper, $23.95tr/£16.99


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IN DE X Adams, Michael 43 Aers, David 44 Ahmed, Sara 47 Anthes, Bill 9 Anzaldúa, Gloria E. 3 Appadurai, Arjun 47 Armitage, John 43 Armstrong, Nancy 45 Barker, Adele Marie 46 Barlow, Tani 45 Bathrick, David 45 Baz˘ant, Jan 46 Baz˘antová, Nina 46 Berlant, Lauren 47 Bishop, Ryan 43 Björkman, Lisa 38 Bové, Paul A. 43 Brennan, Denise 47 Brown, Kimberly Juanita 33 Brown, Marshall 45 Browne, Simone 33 Brumfield, William Craft 47 Cahan, Susan E. 8 Cai, Zong-Qi 44 Campbell, Ian M. 43 Carr, Barry 46 Chazkel, Amy 13 Chion, Michel 23 Chomsky, Aviva 46 Christianson, Aileen 43 Clare, Eli 16 cooke, miriam 44 Cooper, J. Andrew G. 48 Corbett, John 11 Cornett, Michael 44 Covington-Ward, Yolanda 29 Cowan, Ben 36 Cox, Aimee Meredith 34 Crais, Clifton 46 Currah, Paisley 45 Das, Veena, 39 de la Cadena, Marisol 4 de la Torre, Carlos 46 Degregori, Carlos Iván 46 Derby, Lauren 13 Detlefsen, Michael 45

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Inhorn, Marcia C. 19 Izumi, Masaki 44 Jacka, Jerry K. 22 Jankélévitch, Vladimir 40 Joseph, Gilbert M. 46 Joseph, James A. 15 Joyrich, Lynne 43 Kaplan, Steven Laurence 48 Kaufman, Sharon R. 48 Keating, AnaLouise 3 Kellner, Douglas 43 King, Homay 32, 43 Kinser, Brent E. 43 Kirk, Robin 46 Kirksey, Eben 21 Klinenberg, Eric 45 Klubock, Thomas Miller 13 Knauss, Paulo 13 Knight, Kelly Ray 18 Kumar, Amitava 48 Lambert, Peter 13 Lambert-Hurley, Siobhan 38 Lee, Luchia Meihua 10 Lefebvre, Alexandre 40 Lerner, Michael 45 Levenson, Deborah T. 13 Lewis, Reina 12 Lightfoot, Natasha 40 Liu, Petrus 37 Lowe, Lisa 47 Lukács, Gabriella 37 Makhulu, Anne-Maria 22 Malhotra, Anshu 38 Malkki, Liisa H. 20 Marciano, Alain 42 Massumi, Brian 5 Maurer, Bill 7 May, Gary 48 McClendon, Thomas V. 46 McCracken, Allison 25 McCreless, Patrick 44 Medema, Steven G. 42 Mendoza, Victor Román 36 Milanich, Nara B. 13 Minervini, Amanda 39 Mitchell, Timothy 43 Molina, Iván 46 Montaldo, Graciela 46

Mookherjee, Nayanika 39 Moslehian, Mohammad Sal 42, 43 Myers, Natasha 26 Namikawa, Yoshinori 44 Nelson, Diane M. 20 Nickson, Andrew 13 Nordloh, David J. 43 Nouzeilles, Gabriela 46 Nyong’o, Tavia 45 Ochoa, Marcia 44 Ogelsby, Elizabeth 13 Okeke-Agulu, Chika 45 Olaniyan, Tejumola 25 Olcott, Jocelyn 44 Pagedas, Constantine 44 Palmer, Steven 46 Pandian, Anand 18 Penley, Constance 43 Perl, Jeffrey M. 43 Perry, Marc D. 24 Peters, Erica J. 41 Pham, Minh-Ha T. 12 Phillips, Sandra S. 1 Pilkey, Orrin H. 48 Pillay, Anand 45 The Project on Disney, 6 The Project on Vegas, 6 Rabinbach, Anson 45 Radano, Ronald 25 Radcliffe, Sarah A. 35 Radical History Review editorial collective, 45 Randall, Margaret 2 Rao, Anupama 43 Restall, Matthew 44 Reverand, Cedric D. II 44 Rivera, Mayra 28 Rivera-Rideau, Petra R. 24 Roberts, Jane 43 Rooney, Ellen 31, 43 Roorda, Eric Paul 13 Rowe, George E. 43 Ruiz, Jason 36 Ryan, Derek 41 Sablin, Nadia 1 Saldaña-Portillo, María Josefina 30 Sammond, Nicholas 26 Schaefer, Donovan O. 28

Scharnhorst, Gary 43 Schmidt, Jalane D. 29 Schott, Nils F. 40 Scott, David 45 Sellar, Tom 45 Sider, Gerald M. 35 Sigal, Peter 44 Silbergeld, Jerome 10 Sitze, Adam 39 Smith, Andrea 17 Smorkaloff, Pamela Maria 46 Snitow, Ann 14 Sorenson, David R. 43 Spade, Dean 16 Starn, Frances 46 Starn, Orin 46 Stavans, Ilan 48 Sternberg, Meir 45 Sterne, Jonathan 48 Striffler, Steve 46 Stryker, Susan 45 Suchland, Jennifer 27 Sutherland, Liz 43 Tadiar, Neferti 45 Tagliacozzo, Eric 46 Takahashi, Tess 43 Taylor, Diana 10 Taylor, Marcy 45 Thompson, Krista 47 van Schendel, Willem 46 Wahl, Jonathan 43 Wald, Priscilla 43 Wang, Oliver 48 Watson, Janell 44 Weed, Elizabeth 31, 43 West, Mark 41 Wild, Jonathan 43 Wilderson, Frank B. III 17 Williams, Daryle 13 Willis, Sharon 43 Wilson, Elizabeth A. 27 Winn, Peter 13 Wool, Zoë H. 19 Wu, Chia-Ling 43 Yuan, Xingpei 44 Zimmerman, Lee 45


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